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Alphabetical    [«  »]
collocatio 1
colloquy 4
collusion 14
color 195
colored 45
colors 58
colossians 2
Frequency    [«  »]
196 phantasms
196 prevent
196 unfitting
195 color
195 excommunication
195 hast
195 incorruptible
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

color

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | formality of being ~colored; and color is the formal object of 2 1, 12 | transparent, and susceptible of color.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[12] A[ 3 1, 12 | eye by the similitude of color. ~Therefore if the intellect 4 1, 17 | blackness is a species of color. Falsity ~asserts something, 5 1, 19 | for instance the sight to ~color, since it tends to it by 6 1, 35 | different ~colors. Hence if the color of anything is depicted 7 1, 39 | which is appropriated. Thus color is ~posterior to body considered 8 1, 39 | beautiful which have ~a bright color.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[39] A[ 9 1, 45 | first visible thing is color," although, strictly speaking, 10 1, 51 | air ~is without shape or color. Therefore the angels do 11 1, 51 | rarefaction has ~neither shape nor color, yet when condensed it can 12 1, 56 | colored with some particular ~color, it could not see every 13 1, 56 | it could not see every color. But as the human intellect 14 1, 56 | existence. As the ~form of color on the wall has a natural 15 1, 59 | power of sight perceives color ~and whiteness. But the 16 1, 59 | of the power of sight be color as such, then ~there are 17 1, 66 | different acts, as sight is by color, hearing ~by sound. Therefore 18 1, 67 | natural being such as the color on a wall has, but only 19 1, 67 | being, as a similitude of color in the air. But this cannot 20 1, 67 | becomes actually luminous. But color does not do this, for we ~ 21 1, 75 | but only potentially; thus color ~is not actually in the 22 1, 75 | when a certain ~determinate color is not only in the pupil 23 1, 75 | seems to be of that same color.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[75] A[ 24 1, 75 | is to the intellect what color is to the sight. Neither 25 1, 75 | affected by a reflection of color: and so with the other senses. 26 1, 76 | for several see the same color, according to different 27 1, 76 | surface is presupposed to color; so ~that if we say that 28 1, 77 | soul as in a subject as color ~or shape, or any other 29 1, 77 | one power; as sound and color belong ~to sight and hearing, 30 1, 77 | principle and moving cause: for color is the principle of ~vision, 31 1, 77 | changed by a difference of color, but by a difference ~in 32 1, 77 | of itself is divided into color, sound, and the ~like, and 33 1, 77 | sensitive power with regard to color, ~namely, the sight, and 34 1, 77 | regard ~white as such, but as color. This is because of two 35 1, 77 | various and ~dissimilar, as color and sound. Therefore there 36 1, 77 | naturally from another, as color from light.~Aquin.: SMT 37 1, 77 | another; as surface is of color, inasmuch as substance receives 38 1, 39 | which is appropriated. Thus color is ~posterior to body considered 39 1, 39 | beautiful which have ~a bright color.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[39] A[ 40 1, 46 | first visible thing is color," although, strictly speaking, 41 1, 52 | air ~is without shape or color. Therefore the angels do 42 1, 52 | rarefaction has ~neither shape nor color, yet when condensed it can 43 1, 57 | colored with some particular ~color, it could not see every 44 1, 57 | it could not see every color. But as the human intellect 45 1, 57 | existence. As the ~form of color on the wall has a natural 46 1, 60 | power of sight perceives color ~and whiteness. But the 47 1, 60 | of the power of sight be color as such, then ~there are 48 1, 67 | different acts, as sight is by color, hearing ~by sound. Therefore 49 1, 68 | natural being such as the color on a wall has, but only 50 1, 68 | being, as a similitude of color in the air. But this cannot 51 1, 68 | becomes actually luminous. But color does not do this, for we ~ 52 1, 74 | but only potentially; thus color ~is not actually in the 53 1, 74 | when a certain ~determinate color is not only in the pupil 54 1, 74 | seems to be of that same color.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[75] A[ 55 1, 74 | is to the intellect what color is to the sight. Neither 56 1, 74 | affected by a reflection of color: and so with the other senses. 57 1, 75 | for several see the same color, according to different 58 1, 75 | surface is presupposed to color; so ~that if we say that 59 1, 76 | soul as in a subject as color ~or shape, or any other 60 1, 76 | one power; as sound and color belong ~to sight and hearing, 61 1, 76 | principle and moving cause: for color is the principle of ~vision, 62 1, 76 | changed by a difference of color, but by a difference ~in 63 1, 76 | of itself is divided into color, sound, and the ~like, and 64 1, 76 | sensitive power with regard to color, ~namely, the sight, and 65 1, 76 | regard ~white as such, but as color. This is because of two 66 1, 76 | various and ~dissimilar, as color and sound. Therefore there 67 1, 76 | naturally from another, as color from light.~Aquin.: SMT 68 1, 76 | another; as surface is of color, inasmuch as substance receives 69 1, 77 | and shape are further from color than sound is, it ~seems 70 1, 77 | than for that which grasps color or sound.~Aquin.: SMT FP 71 1, 77 | immuted, as the form of color is received ~into the pupil 72 1, 77 | alteration, as surface is of color. Therefore ~the common sensibles 73 1, 77 | the surface by reason ~of color. Yet they are not accidental 74 1, 77 | nearer to it, ~than the color; and in like manner with 75 1, 77 | not on ~account of its color or shape, but as a natural 76 1, 78 | be actually luminous; for color of its ~own nature moves 77 1, 78 | under the common ratio of color, is ~not differentiated 78 1, 81 | something in which there is color, though color is ~nobler 79 1, 81 | which there is color, though color is ~nobler and simpler than 80 1, 81 | directed to the perception of color, and the ~intellect to the 81 1, 81 | the ~different kinds of color: but if there were a power 82 1, 83 | receiving matter, such ~as the color of gold without receiving 83 1, 83 | its being informed with color. That ~this is the sense, 84 1, 84 | the intellectual soul what color is to the sight. But seeing 85 1, 84 | abstraction of species from color, but by color impressing ~ 86 1, 84 | species from color, but by color impressing ~itself on the 87 1, 84 | phantasm, as light is to color; since ~light does not abstract 88 1, 84 | not abstract anything from color, but rather streams on to 89 1, 84 | understood or said that ~color is not in a colored body, 90 1, 84 | assertion. But if we consider color and ~its properties, without 91 1, 84 | apple is not essential to color, and ~therefore color can 92 1, 84 | to color, and ~therefore color can be understood independently 93 1, 84 | For the sight sees the ~color of the apple apart from 94 1, 84 | it be asked where ~is the color which is seen apart from 95 1, 84 | is quite clear that ~the color which is seen is only in 96 1, 84 | receives the likeness of color and not of smell. In like ~ 97 1, 84 | subject, as, for instance, ~color and smell are in the apple. 98 1, 84 | as ~sight in regard to color; has accidentally through 99 1, 84 | honey by ~reason of the color being the same. The reason 100 1, 84 | perceive ~hearing rather than color.~ 101 1, 86 | accidentally ~knowable, as color is visible of itself, whereas 102 1, 90 | pupil of the eye is without color, so as to be in ~potentiality 103 1, 110 | born blind cannot imagine color. ~Sometimes, however, the 104 1, 110 | a man born blind imagine color), but by local ~movement 105 2, 1 | as the object of sight is color: wherefore just as the ~ 106 2, 5 | thus the "intention" of color which is in the pupil, ~ 107 2, 7 | instance, a body receives color ~by means of its surface. 108 2, 7 | another; for we speak of color as being in the surface.~ 109 2, 8 | for instance, sound and color are different ~genera of 110 2, 8 | of ~sight perceives both color and light by which color 111 2, 8 | color and light by which color is seen.~Aquin.: SMT FS 112 2, 8 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: Whenever color is seen, by the same act 113 2, 8 | can be seen without the color being seen. In like manner ~ 114 2, 10 | sight, under ~the aspect of color actually visible. Wherefore 115 2, 10 | actually visible. Wherefore if color be offered to ~the sight, 116 2, 12 | of sight that perceives color and light, as stated above ~( 117 2, 18 | as man does from shape, color, and the like; and ~if any 118 2, 18 | to another. Thus to know color and to know sound, differ ~ 119 2, 18 | the same fruit, as ~to its color, is contained under one 120 2, 18 | regard to its species of color. In like manner that which 121 2, 20 | considered as to the genus of color, if ~it be partly white, 122 2, 22 | receiving an intention of ~color. But the organs are receptive 123 2, 29 | animal, or ~two species of color. Sometimes they are simultaneous 124 2, 29 | the object of sight ~is color considered generically; 125 2, 29 | cognizant of ~universal color, but because the fact that 126 2, 29 | but because the fact that color is cognizant by the ~sight, 127 2, 29 | sight, is attributed to color, not as being this particular 128 2, 29 | as being this particular color, but ~simply because it 129 2, 29 | but ~simply because it is color. Accordingly hatred in the 130 2, 35 | are contrary species of color, ~so pleasure and sorrow 131 2, 37 | the ~air and do not give color to bodies. Therefore sorrow 132 2, 49 | dispositions: for shape and color, according ~to their suitability 133 2, 50 | superficies is the subject of color, in which sense power is ~ 134 2, 52 | even as the ~species of color is changed when a thing 135 2, 56 | by means of another, as color to the body by means ~of 136 2, 56 | said to be the subject of color. In ~this way a power of 137 2, 57 | power of sight to see both color, and light, which is the ~ 138 2, 57 | formal aspect under which color is seen, and is seen at 139 2, 57 | at the same time as ~the color. On the other hand, the 140 2, 67 | whiteness, the substance of color does not remain ~identically 141 2, 67 | as though the identical color were at one time ~whiteness, 142 2, 102 | air, because it ~has the color of the air; and scarlet 143 2, 102 | does not easily lose its color, and hyssop retains its ~ 144 2, 102 | the female sex; while ~the color of the cow designated the 145 2, 102 | scarlet, which has a ~vivid color, was offered up against 146 2, 102 | up against the repulsive color of leprosy. The ~living 147 2, 102 | placed a ~stone which changed color according to the various 148 2, 102 | tunic denoted the air by its color: ~its little bells betoken 149 2, 102 | snakes. The swan is bright in color, and by the aid of ~its 150 2, 1 | aspect of the object: thus color cannot be seen ~except by 151 2, 24 | and whereby we see the color under the aspect ~of light.~ 152 2, 109 | disguised ~face, by changing the color of their complexion, so 153 2, 143 | with a certain clarity of color. In like manner spiritual 154 3, 3 | is visible by reason of color, without color cannot be 155 3, 3 | reason of color, without color cannot be seen. Hence ~if 156 3, 6 | the superficies be removed color would ~leave the body, since 157 3, 11 | to know what is without color. ~Therefore it does not 158 3, 11 | sight knows nothing without color; ~nevertheless in a certain 159 3, 18 | surface which is ~visible by color is one visible thing with 160 3, 18 | one visible thing with the color. So, too, because ~the sensuality 161 3, 45 | the clarity, just as the color, of a non-transparent ~body 162 3, 54 | aspect of light, but not of color. Therefore, since Christ' 163 3, 54 | beheld under the aspect of color, as it had been hitherto, 164 3, 54 | after the ~manner of natural color in the human body; just 165 3, 54 | according to the mode ~of the color. But as it lies within the 166 3, 54 | Accordingly it can be seen in ~its color without its brightness. 167 3, 74 | destroyed, and the taste, color, and other accidents are 168 3, 76 | accidents, such as shape, color, and the rest, so that flesh, 169 3, 77 | something having ~quantity and color and affected by other accidents 170 3, 77 | as the first subject of color is said to be ~the surface, 171 3, 77 | said to be the subject of color. Hence when God makes an 172 3, 77 | alteration, for ~instance, if the color or the savor of the bread 173 3, 77 | as for instance, when the color ~or the savor of the bread 174 3, 77 | the qualities, as when the color, savor, and other ~qualities 175 3, 77 | black cause a difference of color; ~and because the liquid 176 3, 87 | for beauty, e.g. the right color ~or the due proportion of 177 Suppl, 70| soul in the same way as ~color is in a body, hold that 178 Suppl, 79| air is ~not receptive of color, according to its natural 179 Suppl, 79| reception of the image of color, so long as the pupil retains 180 Suppl, 80| is seen by reason of its color, so is it ~measured by reason 181 Suppl, 80| seen ~is by reason of its color. Consequently the comparison 182 Suppl, 82| OBJ 3: Further, light and color require a contrary disposition 183 Suppl, 82| an ~indeterminate body; color, in a determinate body" ( 184 Suppl, 82| glorified bodies will have color, for as Augustine says ( 185 Suppl, 82| with a certain ~charm of color": and it will be impossible 186 Suppl, 82| a crystal is ~known the color of a body contained in a 187 Suppl, 82| the body will retain the color due to it by reason ~of 188 Suppl, 82| we see bodies which ~have color by their nature aglow with 189 Suppl, 82| 1~Reply OBJ 2: A body's color does not prevent its being 190 Suppl, 82| both ~perfectly. But the color of the glorified body will 191 Suppl, 89| matter: ~thus light and color are received into a transparent 192 Suppl, 89| object, light being ~to color as form to matter. When 193 Suppl, 89| sensible, for instance ~color in relation to the sight, 194 Suppl, 89| as such a sense perceives color, it is impossible for the 195 Suppl, 89| perceive that which is neither color nor magnitude, unless we


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