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tenable 1
tenacious 2
tenant 1
tend 169
tended 1
tendencies 3
tendency 70
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169 agree
169 eight
169 maintained
169 tend
169 tithes
169 tully
169 ye
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

tend

    Part, Question
1 1, 5 | but also towards which tend even those things which 2 1, 20 | every appetitive faculty tend ~towards good and evil, 3 1, 27 | an action which does not tend to anything external, but ~ 4 1, 50 | xvi), "all things would ~tend towards nothing, unless 5 1, 59 | and to another faculty to ~tend to what is outside it. Consequently 6 1, 60 | but does not of ~necessity tend towards something else; 7 1, 60 | self-centered were it to tend towards anything ~else more 8 1, 63 | since for the appetite to tend to the desire of something 9 1, 63 | particular good, it can ~tend naturally to some evil; 10 1, 68 | nature, and heavy things tend naturally downwards, not ~ 11 1, 71 | the fact that their bodies tend naturally to the earth and 12 1, 51 | xvi), "all things would ~tend towards nothing, unless 13 1, 60 | and to another faculty to ~tend to what is outside it. Consequently 14 1, 61 | but does not of ~necessity tend towards something else; 15 1, 61 | self-centered were it to tend towards anything ~else more 16 1, 64 | since for the appetite to tend to the desire of something 17 1, 64 | particular good, it can ~tend naturally to some evil; 18 1, 69 | nature, and heavy things tend naturally downwards, not ~ 19 1, 71 | the fact that their bodies tend naturally to the earth and 20 1, 81 | Reply OBJ 1: The will can tend to nothing except under 21 1, 102 | similarity of which all things tend. Consequently the ~effect 22 1, 102 | higher being, they would tend to nothing definite, ~especially 23 1, 103 | Therefore no ~creature can tend to not-being, except through 24 1, 103 | Therefore such creatures cannot tend to not-being, even if God 25 1, 103 | cannot cause a thing to tend ~to non-existence, whereas 26 1, 103 | Therefore all things must tend to this end, that there 27 1, 107 | is no longer necessary to tend ~towards the end. This is 28 2, 1 | things that lack reason tend to an end, by natural ~inclination, 29 2, 1 | to the rational nature to tend to ~an end, as directing [ 30 2, 1 | the irrational nature to tend to an end, as directed or 31 2, 1 | for the ~appetite so to tend to two things, as though 32 2, 1 | would be the case were it to tend to ~several diverse objects 33 2, 3 | naturally. But man's will should tend to nothing else as an end, 34 2, 5 | and thus the will does not tend thereto of necessity.~Aquin.: 35 2, 8 | in order that the will tend to anything, it is ~requisite, 36 2, 10 | point of view, it will not tend to it of necessity. ~And 37 2, 10 | approved by the will, which can tend to one and the same thing 38 2, 10 | which also remains, does not tend of ~necessity to that whereto 39 2, 12 | denotes, signifies, "to tend ~to something." Now both 40 2, 12 | movement of thing ~moved, tend to something. But that the 41 2, 12 | the eye whither we should tend with our bodies.~Aquin.: 42 2, 12 | is nothing else than to tend to something. But irrational ~ 43 2, 12 | A[1]), to intend is to tend to ~something; and this 44 2, 13 | Consequently no one would tend to the end, save for the ~ 45 2, 13 | reason. For the will can tend to ~whatever the reason 46 2, 15 | to which it belongs to tend to the thing itself, is 47 2, 16 | and the voluntary appetite tend to have the end in reality; 48 2, 17 | cause. For the will can tend freely towards ~various 49 2, 19 | appetite: since the will can tend to the universal ~good, 50 2, 19 | yet the will does not ~tend to this good except in so 51 2, 19 | salvation: but the will does not tend thereto, except inasmuch 52 2, 19 | Hence, ~whether the will tend to what is evil in itself, 53 2, 19 | will to be good, it must tend to the ~good under the species 54 2, 19 | man to be upright and to ~tend to God," as Augustine expounds 55 2, 23 | inclination or aptitude to tend to the mover: thus a light ~ 56 2, 24 | themselves good, if ~they tend to that which is truly good, 57 2, 25 | last of those passions that tend ~towards something as future. 58 2, 26 | sensitive appetite, cannot tend to wisdom, which is not ~ 59 2, 26 | it is possible for man to tend to God by love, ~being as 60 2, 27 | Hence the affections of one tend to the other, as being one ~ 61 2, 28 | loved, by his longing, to tend towards it with ~the love 62 2, 29 | apprehension and of appetite, ~can tend to something universally. 63 2, 35 | and especially those which tend to some ~defect. Consequently 64 2, 37 | natural for each thing to tend wholly ~to repel whatever 65 2, 40 | implying that desire seems to tend chiefly to ~the arduous 66 2, 40 | that a stone is ~certain to tend downwards. This is owing 67 2, 45 | But it ~belongs to hope to tend to that which is good and 68 2, 46 | the appetitive power can tend to both good and evil: by 69 2, 46 | desire those things which tend to preserve ~in him the 70 2, 50 | its nature, is ordained to tend to the good which reason ~ 71 2, 56 | Anima iii, text. ~42), to tend to that which is good, according 72 2, 62 | movement of the appetite cannot tend to ~anything, either by 73 2, 64 | Now some moral virtues tend ~to a maximum: for instance, 74 2, 64 | mean: since these virtues tend to this maximum in accordance 75 2, 64 | deficiency if one fails to tend thereto "where" ~one ought, 76 2, 73 | rather is it directed to tend to some appetible good whence 77 2, 74 | because the will does ~not tend to it under the aspect of 78 2, 77 | that the will would never tend to evil, unless there were 79 2, 77 | impels the will makes ~it tend with greater intensity to 80 2, 78 | of its ~own accord, may tend to an evil, through the 81 2, 85 | man finds it difficult to tend to the good. "Error" and ~" 82 2, 88 | if the angry ~movement tend to a hurt which is a mortal 83 2, 109 | above ~all things is to tend above oneself. Therefore 84 2, 3 | 3: Further, whatever may tend to scandalize and disturb 85 2, 4 | intellect should infallibly tend to its ~object, which is 86 2, 4 | the intellect should ~ever tend to the true, since nothing 87 2, 4 | which hope and ~charity tend towards Him.~Aquin.: SMT 88 2, 4 | possible, since ~hope does not tend to the impossible, as stated 89 2, 4 | because the will cannot tend to God with perfect love, 90 2, 8 | the right will needs to tend.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[8] A[4] 91 2, 10 | were silent, this would tend to ~strengthen error. Hence 92 2, 16 | which is a moral virtue, to tend to the arduous. ~Therefore 93 2, 16 | Reply OBJ 3: Hope makes us tend to God, as to a good to 94 2, 16 | properly ~speaking, makes us tend to God, by uniting our affections 95 2, 23 | onslaught less, they begin to tend to perfection with greater 96 2, 27 | remain to which he may tend, although by reaching that 97 2, 28 | of one man may happen to tend to diverse ~things, and 98 2, 28 | Further, the appetite does not tend to opposite things at the ~ 99 2, 28 | just as the ~appetite may tend to what is good simply, 100 2, 28 | so that all his desires tend to one ~object - the second, 101 2, 32 | in as much as they are, tend to be ~like God, Who is 102 2, 36 | answer that, To contend is to tend against some one. Wherefore 103 2, 41 | their property, this would tend to the detriment of the 104 2, 42 | charity, since it ~does not tend to a contrary object, but 105 2, 45 | off, in so far as ~they tend to be a help or a hindrance 106 2, 45 | the end, but because they tend to the end which is appointed 107 2, 56 | operations in ~so far as they tend towards external things, 108 2, 81 | towards Whom our affections tend in two ~ways: first, by 109 2, 86 | 3: Further, things that tend to be harmful to the person, 110 2, 86 | immoderate vigils or fasts which tend to ~injure the person: and 111 2, 96 | especially when it does not tend to another ~person's injury: 112 2, 99 | due mode that man should tend to worship his ~father rather 113 2, 102 | one's own ~will seems to tend principally, not to the 114 2, 102 | the will of him that obeys tend no less devotedly [*Cf. 115 2, 104 | gratitude for a favor does not tend to something yet greater.~ 116 2, 109 | indicates that one does not tend to different things, by ~ 117 2, 111 | well-disposed mind that a man tend to ~perfect righteousness, 118 2, 115 | to a virtue as such ~to tend to what is more perfect, 119 2, 121 | ways. ~First, because they tend to that which is difficult 120 2, 121 | essential to virtue ever to tend to good; ~wherefore it is 121 2, 127 | virtue, magnanimity makes him tend ~to perfect works of virtue; 122 2, 127 | although they ~seem to tend in contrary directions, 123 2, 127 | commended in those virtues that tend to ~something difficult, 124 2, 128 | presumption that one should tend to what is above oneself. ~ 125 2, 128 | ability: for it does not tend to ~anything greater than 126 2, 128 | like magnanimity, seems to tend to something ~great. For 127 2, 130 | and to this end a man may tend in two ways. In one way ~ 128 2, 131 | his power, by refusing to tend to ~that which is commensurate 129 2, 132 | belongs to magnanimity to tend to something ~great, as 130 2, 132 | magnanimity not only to tend to something ~great, but 131 2, 132 | strict sense, but also to tend ~with the mind to the doing 132 2, 134 | consequently the human will can tend ~thereto without the help 133 2, 134 | supernatural, wherefore man cannot tend thereto by a natural ~virtue. 134 2, 134 | magnanimity a man has a mind to tend to great ~things, so by 135 2, 134 | longanimity a man has a mind to tend to something a long ~way 136 2, 139 | sensitive appetite fails to tend towards them in accord with 137 2, 139 | with ~those passions that tend towards sensible goods, 138 2, 139 | the concupiscible which tend towards good, as a consequence, 139 2, 154 | degree. Yet he does not ~tend thereto perfectly, because 140 2, 156 | sensitive appetite can tend, in so far as it is moved 141 2, 159 | restrain the mind, lest it tend to high things ~immoderately; 142 2, 160 | every man's will should tend to that which ~is proportionate 143 2, 160 | sensitive appetite might tend, ~pride would have to be 144 2, 164 | of the appetite, lest it tend ~excessively to that which 145 2, 168 | contains those precepts which tend more directly to the love 146 2, 171 | cannot, at the same time, tend in ~opposite directions. 147 2, 171 | cannot at the same ~time tend to sensible objects. Therefore 148 2, 173 | It is natural to man to tend to divine things through 149 2, 173 | it makes man's ~appetite tend to the object loved. Hence 150 2, 182 | but it suffices for him to tend to ~all in common and collectively, 151 2, 182 | profess to ~be perfect, but to tend to perfection. Hence the 152 2, 183 | is ~not presumptuous to tend to perfection. Secondly, 153 2, 184 | he ~should by some means tend thereto. Hence he who enters 154 2, 184 | charity, but he is bound to tend to ~this, and use his endeavors 155 2, 184 | only if he despises to ~tend to perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 156 2, 184 | Therefore since ~religious tend to the perfection of virtue 157 2, 184 | bound to be perfect, but to tend to perfection, to which ~ 158 2, 184 | according to the rule, i.e. to tend to form one's conduct in 159 3, 3 | be a Son; for ~this would tend to the confusion of the 160 3, 11 | when it does not actually tend to all; provided it actually 161 3, 15 | these passions very often tend towards what is unlawful, 162 3, 15 | sensitive ~appetite that tend to unlawful things; and 163 3, 15 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, to tend to beatitude, or to obtain 164 3, 15 | do nothing ~by which they tend to beatitude, as Christ 165 3, 87 | instance, a man's affections so tend to God and Divine things, 166 Suppl, 42| the ~concupiscence lest it tend to something outside the 167 Suppl, 77| nor does the natural heat tend to destroy the natural humor, 168 Suppl, 90| which all light objects tend, whereas each one reaches 169 Suppl, 94| parts of the earth naturally tend to the center. Therefore ~


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