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Alphabetical    [«  »]
philokindynos 1
philosop 1
philosopher 2038
philosophers 146
philosophical 22
philosophy 22
philotimia 5
Frequency    [«  »]
146 moving
146 often
146 paid
146 philosophers
146 position
146 soon
146 temptation
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

philosophers

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | ideas and phrases of the philosophers, that thou knowest not what ~ 2 1, 1 | through creatures just as philosophers knew ~Him - "That which 3 1, 1 | also of the authority of philosophers in those ~questions in which 4 1, 4 | Metaph. xii), some ancient ~philosophers, namely, the Pythagoreans 5 1, 4 | reason was that the ~ancient philosophers considered only a material 6 1, 7 | answer that, All the ancient philosophers attribute infinitude to 7 1, 9 | or accidental being; for philosophers treated of such ~movement.~ 8 1, 10 | heavens according to some philosophers, then God would ~still reign 9 1, 11 | Hence also the ~ancient philosophers, constrained as it were 10 1, 12 | Cor. 2:10), ~namely, the philosophers, as the gloss expounds.~ 11 1, 13 | Such a view is against the philosophers, who proved many ~things 12 1, 16 | the error of the ancient philosophers, who ~said that whatever 13 1, 16 | Reply OBJ 2: The ancient philosophers held that the species of 14 1, 19 | says (De Trin. iii, ~2): "Philosophers in their vanity have thought 15 1, 22 | demons, whom the Platonic philosophers ~placed between us and the 16 1, 32 | by natural reason. For philosophers came to the knowledge of 17 1, 32 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: The philosophers did not know the mystery 18 1, 32 | of the world" - i.e. the ~philosophers - "knew" (1 Cor. 2:6). Nevertheless, 19 1, 44 | answer that, The ancient philosophers gradually, and as it were 20 1, 45 | i, text 34), the ancient philosophers ~considered it as a commonly 21 1, 45 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Ancient philosophers, as is said above (Q[44], 22 1, 46 | asserted by ~the more approved philosophers. Therefore it can be demonstratively ~ 23 1, 46 | xi, 4), the opinion of ~philosophers who asserted the eternity 24 1, 47 | all the ancient natural ~philosophers, who admitted no cause but 25 1, 48 | probable in the opinion of some philosophers. Or, it may ~be said that, 26 1, 51 | opinions of the ~ancient philosophers. Bernard's expression can 27 1, 52 | east. Secondly, because philosophers do ~not hold that one separate 28 1, 63 | the heavenly bodies. But ~philosophers say that there cannot be 29 1, 66 | of the ancient ~natural philosophers, who maintained that primary 30 1, 66 | of the ancient ~natural philosophers maintained confusion devoid 31 1, 66 | question the opinions of philosophers have ~differed. Plato and 32 1, 66 | Thus the ancient natural philosophers taught that the substratum 33 1, 68 | the different opinions of philosophers. Some of ~these believed 34 1, 68 | same, in fact, that the ~philosophers speak of, calling it the 35 1, 68 | to that held by certain philosophers ~of antiquity, who taught 36 1, 68 | all other bodies. ~These philosophers also taught that not all 37 1, 68 | for there have even been philosophers who ~said that air is nothing, 38 1, 69 | portion of the earth. Some philosophers attribute this uncovering 39 1, 70 | Para. 1/3~I answer that, Philosophers have differed on this question. 40 1, 75 | knowledge and movement. The philosophers of ~old, not being able 41 1, 75 | the ~body. And because the philosophers of old believed that nothing 42 1, 75 | likeness. But the ancient philosophers omitted to distinguish between 43 1, 75 | answer that, The ancient philosophers made no distinction between ~ 44 1, 76 | reason, the ~old natural philosophers, who held that primary matter 45 1, 45 | answer that, The ancient philosophers gradually, and as it were 46 1, 46 | i, text 34), the ancient philosophers ~considered it as a commonly 47 1, 46 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Ancient philosophers, as is said above (Q[44], 48 1, 47 | asserted by ~the more approved philosophers. Therefore it can be demonstratively ~ 49 1, 47 | xi, 4), the opinion of ~philosophers who asserted the eternity 50 1, 48 | all the ancient natural ~philosophers, who admitted no cause but 51 1, 49 | probable in the opinion of some philosophers. Or, it may ~be said that, 52 1, 52 | opinions of the ~ancient philosophers. Bernard's expression can 53 1, 53 | east. Secondly, because philosophers do ~not hold that one separate 54 1, 64 | the heavenly bodies. But ~philosophers say that there cannot be 55 1, 67 | of the ancient ~natural philosophers, who maintained that primary 56 1, 67 | of the ancient ~natural philosophers maintained confusion devoid 57 1, 67 | question the opinions of philosophers have ~differed. Plato and 58 1, 67 | Thus the ancient natural philosophers taught that the substratum 59 1, 69 | the different opinions of philosophers. Some of ~these believed 60 1, 69 | same, in fact, that the ~philosophers speak of, calling it the 61 1, 69 | to that held by certain philosophers ~of antiquity, who taught 62 1, 69 | all other bodies. ~These philosophers also taught that not all 63 1, 69 | for there have even been philosophers who ~said that air is nothing, 64 1, 70 | portion of the earth. Some philosophers attribute this uncovering 65 1, 71 | Para. 1/3~I answer that, Philosophers have differed on this question. 66 1, 74 | knowledge and movement. The philosophers of ~old, not being able 67 1, 74 | the ~body. And because the philosophers of old believed that nothing 68 1, 74 | likeness. But the ancient philosophers omitted to distinguish between 69 1, 74 | answer that, The ancient philosophers made no distinction between ~ 70 1, 75 | reason, the ~old natural philosophers, who held that primary matter 71 1, 78 | recognized even by the ~philosophers. For sometimes they assign 72 1, 83 | question, ~that the early philosophers, who inquired into the natures 73 1, 83 | answer that, The ancient philosophers held that the soul knows 74 1, 83 | While the earlier natural philosophers, observing that things known 75 1, 83 | immaterially; thus the early philosophers held that ~the essence of 76 1, 83 | things, as did the earlier philosophers; he said that the soul is ~ 77 1, 83 | If those ~who are called philosophers said by chance anything 78 1, 83 | iv, 16): "Although the ~philosophers prove by convincing arguments 79 1, 83 | that, On this point the philosophers held three opinions. For ~ 80 1, 83 | Democritus and the other ~early philosophers did not distinguish between 81 1, 84 | the opinion of the ancient philosophers, who said that "like is ~ 82 1, 87 | itself. This is ~so true that philosophers also say that the knowledge 83 1, 88 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, some philosophers said that the ultimate happiness 84 1, 102 | answer that, Certain ancient philosophers denied the government of ~ 85 1, 109 | doctors, but also by all philosophers who admit the existence 86 1, 109 | 3 Para. 1/2~Reply OBJ 3: Philosophers have held different opinions 87 1, 109 | regards place. Hence also the philosophers asserted ~that the supreme 88 1, 114 | which the ~early natural philosophers held to be the "rare" and 89 1, 116 | degree: thus ~according to philosophers the mover of the lower heaven 90 2, 17 | perceptions of good. Hence philosophers define the free-will as 91 2, 34 | other respects, the ancient philosophers did not ~discriminate between 92 2, 41 | Para. 1/1 ~OBJ 5: Further, Philosophers have been led by amazement 93 2, 52 | were four opinions among philosophers ~concerning intensity and 94 2, 61 | both holy doctors, as also philosophers, speak about these virtues ~ 95 2, 68 | hence, according to the philosophers, not every one that had 96 2, 81 | evident that in the opinion of philosophers, the active ~principle of 97 2, 97 | the teaching of the early philosophers was imperfect, and that 98 2, 110 | virtue given by saints and philosophers fit grace, since ~"it makes 99 2, 1 | been demonstrated by the philosophers, such as the ~Existence 100 2, 1 | text. 52) and many other ~philosophers demonstrated the same truth. 101 2, 1 | truths about God, which the ~philosophers were unable to discover 102 2, 2 | incorporeal: which things philosophers prove by natural reason.~ 103 2, 2 | A ~sign of this is that philosophers in their researches, by 104 2, 2 | reasons brought ~forward by philosophers or heretics in opposition 105 2, 4 | definition, just as the philosophers touch on the principles 106 2, 18 | and in ~another way by philosophers. For, seeing that our life 107 2, 18 | God, as it is with the ~philosophers, but also as directing human 108 2, 22 | kind ~of friendship. Now philosophers do not reckon friendship 109 2, 92 | natural theology" which ~the philosophers gathered from their study 110 2, 92 | seek religion from the philosophers, who accepted the same things 111 2, 159 | what it was called by the philosophers, know ~that humility which 112 2, 165 | Christ. ii, 40) that "if the philosophers made any true ~statements, 113 2, 165 | Relig. ~4): "Maybe, the philosophers were debarred from the faith 114 2, 165 | account of the truth which the philosophers acquired ~through God revealing 115 2, 165 | Since, however, ~certain philosophers misuse the truth in order 116 2, 165 | ad Polycarp.) of certain ~philosophers that "they make an unholy 117 2, 184 | of wisdom. Even certain ~philosophers are said to have done this; 118 2, 186 | thought arose among the ~philosophers. Hence Jerome (Super Epist. 119 2, 186 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The philosophers professed the study of letters 120 2, 186 | commentary, "He reproves those philosophers who are ~commonly called 121 2, 186 | Hence it ~is that certain philosophers declined to make use of 122 3, 66 | For this reason certain philosophers held that water is the ~ 123 Suppl, 41| precept even ~according to the philosophers. Hence Theophrastus proves 124 Suppl, 67| offspring, because, according to philosophers, a certain man cannot ~beget 125 Suppl, 69| substances: wherefore also the philosophers held that the order of ~ 126 Suppl, 74| this reason, too, certain ~philosophers, who held that the movement 127 Suppl, 76| that, on this point the philosophers erred and certain modern ~ 128 Suppl, 76| heretics err. For some of the philosophers allowed that souls separated ~ 129 Suppl, 76| aforesaid opinions of the philosophers: while others held ~that 130 Suppl, 76| the error of the ~ancient philosophers refuted by the Philosopher ( 131 Suppl, 79| known to the peripatetic philosophers as the quintessence, of 132 Suppl, 79| mortal is ~included in the philosophers' definition of man, because 133 Suppl, 83| explained ~above. But the philosophers were ignorant of a cessation 134 Suppl, 88| question. The ~first is of the philosophers who assert that the movement 135 Suppl, 88| movement, according to philosophers, accompanies that movement, 136 Suppl, 89| life ~is to see God, so the philosophers maintained that man's ultimate ~ 137 Suppl, 89| this question we find that philosophers and ~theologians encounter 138 Suppl, 89| difference of ~opinion. For some philosophers held that our passive intellect 139 Suppl, 89| and also according to ~the philosophers who maintain that our souls 140 Suppl, 89| essence, and ~according to the philosophers, that it will attain to 141 Suppl, 89| way, which also certain philosophers ~held, namely Alexander 142 Suppl, 89| issue, for in this other philosophers also disagree with him. ~ 143 Suppl, 94| fire of hell. For ~some philosophers, as Avicenna, disbelieving 144 Suppl, 94| the opinion of ~certain philosophers of old, who maintained that 145 Suppl, 94| sphere according to the philosophers: and in ~like manner in 146 Suppl, 94| the earth." However, ~some philosophers have maintained that hell


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