Table of Contents | Words: Alphabetical - Frequency - Inverse - Length - Statistics | Help | IntraText Library
Alphabetical    [«  »]
schooling 1
schools 5
science 504
sciences 139
scientia 6
scientiam 1
scientific 35
Frequency    [«  »]
139 murder
139 reach
139 restored
139 sciences
139 threefold
139 wont
138 confirmed
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

sciences

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | it is compared with other sciences?~(6) Whether it is the same 2 1, 1 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Sciences are differentiated according 3 1, 1 | there are two kinds of sciences. There are some which proceed 4 1, 1 | our lives (as in moral ~sciences) and in order to establish 5 1, 1 | separate philosophical ~sciences. Therefore sacred doctrine 6 1, 1 | different philosophical sciences can yet be treated of ~by 7 1, 1 | different philosophical sciences because it considers in 8 1, 1 | among the philosophical sciences one ~is speculative and 9 1, 1 | doctrine is nobler than other sciences?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[5] 10 1, 1 | is not nobler than other sciences; ~for the nobility of a 11 1, 1 | establishes. ~But other sciences, the principles of which 12 1, 1 | doubted. Therefore other sciences seem to be nobler.~Aquin.: 13 1, 1 | depend upon philosophical sciences; for Jerome observes, in 14 1, 1 | doctrine is inferior to other sciences.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[5] 15 1, 1 | 1~On the contrary, Other sciences are called the handmaidens 16 1, 1 | surpasses other ~speculative sciences; in point of greater certitude, 17 1, 1 | certitude, because other ~sciences derive their certitude from 18 1, 1 | human reason; while other sciences ~consider only those things 19 1, 1 | grasp. Of the ~practical sciences, that one is nobler which 20 1, 1 | it is nobler than other ~sciences.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[5] 21 1, 1 | upon the philosophical ~sciences, not as though it stood 22 1, 1 | principles not from other ~sciences, but immediately from God, 23 1, 1 | does not ~depend upon other sciences as upon the higher, but 24 1, 1 | handmaidens: even so the master sciences make use ~of the sciences 25 1, 1 | sciences make use ~of the sciences that supply their materials, 26 1, 1 | which proceed ~the other sciences) to that which is above 27 1, 1 | the principles of other ~sciences. Hence it is called the 28 1, 1 | it is called the chief of sciences, as is clear in Ethic. ~ 29 1, 1 | the principles of other sciences. ~Therefore it is not the 30 1, 1 | The principles of other sciences either are evident and ~ 31 1, 1 | the principles of other sciences, but only to judge of them. ~ 32 1, 1 | Whatsoever is found in other sciences contrary to any truth of 33 1, 1 | as in some philosophical ~sciences we demonstrate something 34 1, 1 | I answer that, As other sciences do not argue in proof of 35 1, 1 | demonstrate other truths ~in these sciences: so this doctrine does not 36 1, 1 | regard to the philosophical sciences, that the ~inferior sciences 37 1, 1 | sciences, that the ~inferior sciences neither prove their principles 38 1, 1 | poetry, the least of all the sciences. Therefore it is not fitting 39 1, 36 | immediate in the ~demonstrative sciences. Therefore, so far as the 40 1, 44 | false in the demonstrative sciences, where necessary principles 41 1, 44 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, sciences and definitions are concerned 42 1, 58 | Anima iii, text. 38), ~"The sciences are divided just as things 43 1, 76 | otherwise, the objects of sciences ~would not be things, but 44 1, 45 | false in the ~demonstrative sciences, where necessary principles 45 1, 45 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, sciences and definitions are concerned 46 1, 59 | Anima iii, text. 38), ~"The sciences are divided just as things 47 1, 75 | otherwise, the objects of sciences ~would not be things, but 48 1, 83 | Wherefore he said that ~sciences and definitions, and whatever 49 1, 83 | above (A[1]), he referred ~sciences and definitions to those 50 1, 85 | the intellect. But some sciences ~are of the contingent things, 51 1, 85 | contingent things, as the moral sciences, the objects of which ~are 52 1, 85 | and again, the natural sciences ~in as far as they relate 53 1, 85 | things themselves, thus some ~sciences are of necessary things, 54 1, 87 | the chief of speculative sciences. Hence Aristotle clearly ~ 55 1, 87 | intellect. But there are sciences ~and definitions of immaterial 56 1, 116 | universal principles of ~all the sciences are naturally understood 57 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences?~(7) Whether it consists 58 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] A[6] 59 2, 3 | consideration ~of speculative sciences. For the Philosopher says ( 60 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences. Therefore man's final ~ 61 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] A[6] 62 2, 3 | consideration of speculative ~sciences; because, as stated in Metaph. 63 2, 3 | stated that speculative ~sciences are sought for their own 64 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] A[6] 65 2, 3 | consideration of speculative ~sciences. Therefore it seems that 66 2, 3 | the consideration of these sciences, ~man's final happiness 67 2, 3 | reference to speculative sciences. ~Therefore man's final 68 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences. To prove this, we must 69 2, 3 | principles of ~speculative sciences are received through the 70 2, 3 | consideration ~of speculative sciences cannot extend farther than 71 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences. However, just as in sensible 72 2, 3 | consideration ~of speculative sciences is a certain participation 73 2, 3 | consideration of speculative sciences, but not to its final and 74 2, 14 | speak; thus in demonstrative sciences one science ~postulates 75 2, 27 | known, for instance, the sciences; for since "to have them 76 2, 27 | evident in regard to the sciences, which ~some love through 77 2, 49 | unchangeable causes, e.g. sciences ~and virtues. And in this 78 2, 50 | the habits of the soul are sciences and virtues: and ~just as 79 2, 50 | sensitive powers there are no ~sciences: since science is of universals, 80 2, 54 | are ~the habits of various sciences.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[54] A[ 81 2, 54 | OBJ 2: Further, different sciences are different habits. But 82 2, 54 | truth belongs to different sciences: thus both the physicist ~ 83 2, 56 | case is the same with other sciences and arts. Secondly, a habit 84 2, 57 | which ~is common to all the sciences; viz. to demonstrate conclusions 85 2, 57 | itself above the other ~sciences, inasmuch as it judges of 86 2, 57 | On the other hand, ~those sciences which are not ordained to 87 2, 57 | such like work, are called ~sciences simply, and not arts. Nor, 88 2, 57 | whereas demonstrative ~sciences, which pronounce judgment, 89 2, 60 | especially in the case of ~sciences. But the passions all concur 90 2, 63 | like manner with regard to sciences and virtues, some held that 91 2, 63 | so that all virtues and sciences would pre-exist ~in the 92 2, 63 | maintained. Others said that sciences and virtues are within us 93 2, 65 | the case with the various sciences ~and arts. Hence we do not 94 2, 66 | more lasting even than the sciences" ~(Ethic. i) which are intellectual 95 2, 66 | that the objects of the sciences, which ~are necessary and 96 2, 66 | Ethic. vi, 8), "orders that ~sciences should be cultivated in 97 2, 66 | then, ~wisdom is one of the sciences, it seems that prudence 98 2, 66 | understanding, even as ~other sciences do. Therefore understanding 99 2, 66 | conclusions from ~them, as other sciences do, but also by passing 100 2, 91 | conclusions of the ~various sciences, the knowledge of which 101 2, 91 | demonstrated conclusions of ~sciences. Nor is it necessary for 102 2, 92 | just as, ~in demonstrative sciences, the reason leads us from 103 2, 95 | like to that by ~which, in sciences, demonstrated conclusions 104 2, 97 | perfect. Hence, in speculative sciences, we see that ~the teaching 105 2, 99 | than human law. Now, in ~sciences, we notice that the loftier 106 2, 99 | that, As in speculative sciences men are persuaded to assent 107 2, 99 | observed that, in speculative sciences, the ~means of persuasion 108 2, 99 | the process of argument in sciences should be ordered becomingly, 109 2, 100 | particular conclusions of sciences, but only for ~those who 110 2, 109 | that "the most certain ~sciences are like things lit up by 111 2, 1 | relation ~to others: even as in sciences certain propositions are 112 2, 1 | development has taken place, in sciences devised by man, ~on account 113 2, 1 | progress that takes place in ~sciences devised by man. Secondly, 114 2, 2 | presupposes many other ~sciences: so that it would not by 115 2, 9 | account, it follows that those sciences which draw conclusions ~ 116 2, 9 | among the mathematical sciences, though, as to their matter 117 2, 9 | in common with physical sciences: and for this reason it 118 2, 21 | just as, in ~demonstrative sciences, it is not enough to lay 119 2, 23 | thus again, in ~speculative sciences, the false opinions that 120 2, 42 | propositions are to speculative sciences, for in these latter, the ~ 121 2, 45 | person, are all ~distinct sciences. Therefore in like manner 122 2, 45 | conclusions of ~speculative sciences. Since then prudence is 123 2, 46 | logic, rhetoric, physics are sciences. Therefore ~they are not 124 2, 46 | methods of prudence in the sciences. The first of these is the 125 2, 46 | comprise all demonstrative sciences). The second method is ~ 126 2, 46 | are not to be taken as ~sciences, but as kinds of prudence. 127 2, 49 | Further, in speculative sciences, research and decision belong 128 2, 78 | that 'all the virtues are sciences') ~[*Aristotle, Ethic. vi, 129 2, 93 | there are no true arts or sciences for the knowledge of ~other 130 2, 93 | species, even in demonstrative sciences.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[95] A[ 131 2, 94 | scientific truths: because sciences are about things necessary 132 2, 94 | certain teachings ~of the sciences, but this is not what is 133 2, 122 | OBJ 2: The truth of other sciences has no connection with the ~ 134 2, 165 | about the philosophical ~sciences. But, seemingly, there is 135 2, 165 | curiosity about ~intellective sciences may be sinful.~Aquin.: SMT 136 2, 186 | as ~professors of certain sciences. Therefore the study of 137 3, 11 | whatever pertains to human sciences; secondly, by this knowledge 138 Suppl, 38| lays down the law to lower sciences, namely what ~science each 139 Suppl, 89| the habits of ~speculative sciences and the likeness of other


Best viewed with any browser at 800x600 or 768x1024 on Tablet PC
IntraText® (V89) - Some rights reserved by Èulogos SpA - 1996-2007. Content in this page is licensed under a Creative Commons License