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Alphabetical    [«  »]
concluding 1
conclusi 1
conclusion 174
conclusions 136
conclusive 3
concomitance 23
concomitant 10
Frequency    [«  »]
137 gravity
137 mixed
136 107
136 conclusions
136 correction
136 derive
136 lover
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

conclusions

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | self-evident, or reducible to the conclusions of a higher science; and ~ 2 1, 1 | OBJ 2: Further, whatever conclusions are reached in any science 3 1, 1 | But in Holy Writ we reach ~conclusions not only concerning God, 4 1, 1 | Reply OBJ 2: Whatever other conclusions are reached in this sacred ~ 5 1, 12 | gather the knowledge of many conclusions; but this ~is beyond one 6 1, 14 | since science is about conclusions, it is a kind of ~knowledge 7 1, 14 | as regards knowledge of conclusions; he has "wisdom," according 8 1, 14 | arrive at the knowledge of conclusions. The first kind of discursion ~ 9 1, 14 | proceeds from principles to conclusions ~does not consider both 10 1, 16 | our intellect. ~From this, conclusions result that are inadmissible, 11 1, 44 | the causes of ~necessary conclusions. And therefore Aristotle 12 1, 58 | known ~all its consequent conclusions, then there would be no 13 1, 58 | perceives principles and conclusions ~through those principles, 14 1, 60 | acquire the ~knowledge of conclusions. Hence they are disposed 15 1, 60 | man comes the knowledge of conclusions, which are known by ~him 16 1, 62 | as the intellect is to conclusions. Now it is evident that 17 1, 62 | to proceed to different ~conclusions, according to given principles; 18 1, 45 | the causes of ~necessary conclusions. And therefore Aristotle 19 1, 59 | known ~all its consequent conclusions, then there would be no 20 1, 59 | perceives principles and conclusions ~through those principles, 21 1, 61 | acquire the ~knowledge of conclusions. Hence they are disposed 22 1, 61 | man comes the knowledge of conclusions, which are known by ~him 23 1, 63 | as the intellect is to conclusions. Now it is evident that 24 1, 63 | to proceed to different ~conclusions, according to given principles; 25 1, 78 | from first ~principles, conclusions. From this point of view 26 1, 78 | the intellect; whereas the conclusions which we draw from them ~ 27 1, 80 | syllogistic matters particular conclusions are drawn from universal ~ 28 1, 80 | because to draw particular conclusions ~from universal principles 29 1, 81 | principles: such as ~demonstrable conclusions, a denial of which involves 30 1, 81 | necessary connection of these conclusions with ~the principles; but 31 1, 82 | speaking, ~we reason about conclusions, which are known from the 32 1, 83 | universal principles to ~conclusions by questioning or by asserting; 33 1, 84 | certitude of scientific conclusions.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[85] A[ 34 1, 86 | principles are more known than conclusions. ~But habit as such does 35 1, 87 | instance, we ~understand conclusions by principles understood; 36 1, 112 | are regulated as regards conclusions, ~about which we may have 37 1, 116 | order of ~principles to conclusions, by reason of his not having 38 1, 116 | power to be able to draw the conclusions from the principles. ~Hence 39 2, 8 | understands them in the conclusions, ~inasmuch as he assents 40 2, 8 | inasmuch as he assents to the conclusions on account of the principles.~ 41 2, 8 | intellect arrives at the conclusions through ~the principles 42 2, 9 | to its knowledge of the conclusions; and thus it ~moves itself. 43 2, 10 | necessarily assent to the conclusions, without ~which the principles 44 2, 13 | declared in Ethic. vii, 8. But ~conclusions follow of necessity from 45 2, 13 | us. In such matters the ~conclusions do not follow of necessity 46 2, 14 | thus in us science is of ~conclusions derived by reasoning from 47 2, 15 | Just as the knowledge of conclusions through the principles ~ 48 2, 17 | in the knowledge of the ~conclusions.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[17] A[ 49 2, 17 | derived knowledge of the conclusions; and from volition of the 50 2, 51 | according as ~it reasons about conclusions, has, as it were, an active 51 2, 51 | principle than the science of conclusions.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[51] A[ 52 2, 52 | when anyone ~learns several conclusions of geometry, the same specific 53 2, 52 | in considering the same conclusions.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[52] A[ 54 2, 53 | reason, to wit, the habit of conclusions, which is called ~science, 55 2, 54 | scientific knowledge. But many conclusions belong to but one science, ~ 56 2, 54 | increased in extent; because the conclusions and demonstrations of ~one 57 2, 57 | distinct from the knowledge of conclusions.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[57] A[ 58 2, 57 | sciences; viz. to demonstrate conclusions from ~principles. But since 59 2, 57 | all, not only as to their ~conclusions, but also as to their first 60 2, 57 | considered together with the conclusions, since the ~conclusions 61 2, 57 | conclusions, since the ~conclusions can be deduced from them. 62 2, 57 | science, which considers the ~conclusions also: while to consider 63 2, 57 | by ~judging both of the conclusions of science, and of the principles 64 2, 63 | excellent than the ~science of conclusions, and the natural rectitude 65 2, 65 | principles, do not depend on the conclusions, ~which are the objects 66 2, 66 | excellent than knowledge ~of conclusions. But wisdom draws conclusions 67 2, 66 | conclusions. But wisdom draws conclusions from indemonstrable ~principles 68 2, 66 | understanding, not only by drawing conclusions from ~them, as other sciences 69 2, 67 | one man can know the same conclusions ~through a probable and 70 2, 77 | consideration of ~geometrical conclusions, which he is ready to consider 71 2, 88 | even as an error about conclusions can ~be repaired through 72 2, 89 | proceed from ~principles to conclusions, so as to understand both 73 2, 89 | while the means are like conclusions. ~Wherefore, an angel's 74 2, 90 | proposition holds in regard to ~conclusions. Such like universal propositions 75 2, 91 | proceeds from principles to conclusions, as stated above (De Lib. 76 2, 91 | principles, we draw the conclusions of the ~various sciences, 77 2, 91 | belongs to the demonstrated conclusions of ~sciences. Nor is it 78 2, 94 | than they are, its ~proper conclusions, like the universal principles, 79 2, 94 | to principles and as to conclusions: although the truth is ~ 80 2, 94 | known to all as regards the conclusions, but only as regards the ~ 81 2, 94 | by all. As to the proper conclusions of the ~speculative reason, 82 2, 94 | all. ~But as to the proper conclusions of the practical reason, 83 2, 94 | matters of detail, which are conclusions, as it were, of those ~general 84 2, 94 | general principles, but as conclusions ~drawn from them, having 85 2, 94 | certain detailed proximate conclusions ~drawn from the first principles, 86 2, 94 | which are, as it ~were, conclusions following closely from first 87 2, 94 | in respect of necessary conclusions; or ~by vicious customs 88 2, 95 | those ~things which flow as conclusions from the general principles 89 2, 95 | in sciences, demonstrated conclusions are drawn from the ~principles: 90 2, 95 | natural law, by way of conclusions; e.g. that "one must not 91 2, 95 | the natural law, by way of conclusions.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[95] A[ 92 2, 95 | from the law ~of nature, as conclusions from premises, e.g. just 93 2, 97 | however, ~which are as conclusions of the general precepts, 94 2, 99 | precepts, which are like conclusions drawn from ~the universal 95 2, 99 | persuaded to assent to ~the conclusions by means of syllogistic 96 2, 100 | consider the particular conclusions of sciences, but only for ~ 97 2, 100 | principles in their proximate conclusions; while those which are known ~ 98 2, 100 | contained, conversely, as conclusions in their ~principles.~Aquin.: 99 2, 100 | are ~referred to these, as conclusions to general principles.~Aquin.: 100 2, 111 | teacher to know the ~principal conclusions of the science, and hence 101 2, 112 | concerning demonstrative conclusions. Now no one can know he 102 2, 1 | science of geometry, the conclusions ~are what is known materially, 103 2, 1 | demonstration, through which the conclusions are known.~Aquin.: SMT SS 104 2, 1 | known (as in ~the case of conclusions which are held by the habit 105 2, 4 | certitude of the knowledge of conclusions arises from ~the certitude 106 2, 5 | geometry, contain many conclusions. Now a man may possess ~ 107 2, 5 | geometry as to some geometrical conclusions, and yet be ~ignorant of 108 2, 5 | yet be ~ignorant of other conclusions. Therefore a man can believe 109 2, 5 | Reply OBJ 2: The various conclusions of a science have their 110 2, 5 | so ~that we may know some conclusions of a science without knowing 111 2, 9 | those sciences which draw conclusions ~about physical matter from 112 2, 9 | matters of faith, and of ~conclusions drawn therefrom.~Aquin.: 113 2, 21 | principles, unless the conclusions also are given which follow 114 2, 42 | for in these latter, the ~conclusions are virtually contained 115 2, 42 | has no ~need to have the conclusions put separately before him. 116 2, 42 | their sake, that scientific ~conclusions should be traced to their 117 2, 45 | particular cases: hence the ~conclusions of syllogisms are not only 118 2, 45 | knowledge through them, viz. conclusions, about which is ~"science," 119 2, 45 | practical reason by way of conclusions, and ~such are the means 120 2, 45 | principles to the particular ~conclusions of practical matters. Consequently 121 2, 45 | happens with regard to the conclusions of ~speculative sciences. 122 2, 47 | proportionate ~to their conclusions, and "like must be concluded 123 2, 94 | such as are all scientific conclusions. The demons may, ~however, 124 2, 174 | science, for instance the conclusions of ~arithmetic and geometry.~ 125 3, 11 | understanding, the knowledge of all ~conclusions to knowledge [scientia], 126 3, 12 | greater ~and more subtle conclusions. Now in this second way 127 Suppl, 65| derived from the first even as conclusions in speculative ~matters 128 Suppl, 65| those which are drawn like conclusions ~from these custom enforces, 129 Suppl, 65| secondary precepts, which like conclusions are drawn ~from its first 130 Suppl, 65| circumstances, the aforesaid conclusions do not proceed from the 131 Suppl, 80| contradiction - or contrary to the conclusions of geometry which are ~infallible 132 Suppl, 80| principles, both to the conclusions of geometry and to the ~ 133 Suppl, 80| of a line, or against any conclusions of geometry. For, as ~stated 134 Suppl, 89| intelligence sees more conclusions than one who is slow of 135 Suppl, 95| consider any intelligible conclusions, through being ~distracted 136 Appen2, 1| I answer that, From the conclusions we have drawn above (TP,


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