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preyed 1
preying 1
priapus 2
price 125
priced 2
pricked 1
pricks 1
Frequency    [«  »]
125 execution
125 existed
125 kept
125 price
125 promised
125 sloth
124 cognitive
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

price

    Part, Question
1 2, 26 | is ~held to be of great price, as the word itself implies [* 2 2, 102 | hire of a strumpet or the price of a dog in the house of . . . 3 2, 102 | in the Old Law, since the price had ~not yet been paid. 4 2, 105 | owner received a certain price for the ~use of the animals; 5 2, 105 | they in ~such need of their price in order to gain a livelihood: 6 2, 114 | return for work or toil, as a price for it. ~Hence, as it is 7 2, 114 | of justice to give a just price for anything ~received from 8 2, 114 | with God, Who set such a price on ~another's faith, as 9 2, 10 | freedom, without paying any ~price, if he should be a "vernaculus," 10 2, 31 | by fraud kept back the price of the land," ~without beforehand 11 2, 53 | young, it is learnt at a price by children." Now the above 12 2, 53 | fraud kept ~back part of the price of the land." Now it pertains 13 2, 53 | that the Apostles kept the price of the land, which had been ~ 14 2, 60 | he must not retain the ~price, but must use it for some 15 2, 64 | bury in the earth is the price of the poor man's ransom 16 2, 75 | unjust sales as regards the price; namely, whether it is lawful ~ 17 2, 75 | sell a thing at a higher price ~than was paid for it?~Aquin.: 18 2, 75 | thing for more than its just price, because this is to ~deceive 19 2, 75 | human use is measured by the price given for it, ~for which 20 2, 75 | Therefore ~if either the price exceed the quantity of the 21 2, 75 | conversely, the thing exceed the price, there is no longer the 22 2, 75 | In such a case the just ~price will depend not only on 23 2, 75 | worth in itself, though the price paid be not more than ~it 24 2, 75 | ought not to raise ~the price, because the advantage accruing 25 2, 75 | half the amount of the just price of a thing [*Cod. ~IV, xliv, 26 2, 75 | condition, because the just price of things is not fixed with ~ 27 2, 75 | a man who gave the just price for a book to a man who ~ 28 2, 75 | through ignorance asked a low price for it. Hence it is evident 29 2, 75 | De Civ. Dei xi, 16) the price of things ~salable does 30 2, 75 | horse ~fetches a higher price than a slave; but it depends 31 2, 75 | be in order to lower the price. Now sometimes ~the price 32 2, 75 | price. Now sometimes ~the price would be lowered for some 33 2, 75 | where ~wheat fetches a high price, knowing that many will 34 2, 75 | they would give a lower ~price. But apparently the seller 35 2, 75 | he takes nothing off the price on that ~account - danger, 36 2, 75 | much as he ought from the ~price, he is not bound to state 37 2, 75 | sells his goods at the price actually offered him, does 38 2, 75 | so, or if he lowered his price, it would be ~exceedingly 39 2, 75 | sell a thing at a higher price than ~what was paid for 40 2, 75 | sell a thing ~for a higher price than we paid for it. For 41 2, 75 | but buying at a ~cheap price with the purpose of retailing 42 2, 75 | of retailing at a higher price?" and he ~adds: "Such were 43 2, 75 | sell goods at a higher ~price than their worth, or to 44 2, 75 | sell a thing for a higher price than you ~paid for it, you 45 2, 75 | trading, to buy at a low price and to sell at a higher 46 2, 75 | and to sell at a higher price.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[77] A[ 47 2, 75 | perjures himself over the price of his wares. But ~these 48 2, 75 | sells ~something at a higher price without its undergoing any 49 2, 75 | if he ~sells at a higher price something that has changed 50 2, 75 | everyone that sells at a higher price than he bought is ~a tradesman, 51 2, 76 | a sin to take money as a price for money lent, which ~is 52 2, 76 | itself sinful to accept a ~price for doing what one is not 53 2, 76 | him sometimes to accept a price for lending it.~Aquin.: 54 2, 76 | it is lawful to accept a price for the ~loan of a silver 55 2, 76 | also lawful to accept a price ~for the loan of a silver 56 2, 76 | measure, the other, the price of the use, which is called 57 2, 76 | its substance, he exacts a price of something ~non-existent: 58 2, 76 | pledge he might sell for a price: as when a man mortgages 59 2, 76 | happens that a man raises the price of his ~goods under guise 60 2, 76 | low figure; or ~raises his price through delay in being paid, 61 2, 76 | being paid, and lowers his price that ~he may be paid the 62 2, 76 | receive anything whose price can be measured by money. 63 2, 76 | that can be valued at a price, the lender must allow for 64 2, 76 | sell his goods at a higher price than that ~which is just, 65 2, 76 | for the payment of the ~price has the character of a loan, 66 2, 76 | demands beyond the ~just price in consideration of this 67 2, 76 | of this delay, is like a price for a loan, ~which pertains 68 2, 76 | to buy goods at ~a lower price than what is just, for the 69 2, 76 | character of a loan, the price ~of which is the rebate 70 2, 76 | is the rebate on the just price of the goods sold. On the 71 2, 76 | allow a rebate on the just price in order that he ~may have 72 2, 76 | usury must be sold, and the ~price repaid to the persons from 73 2, 76 | property be sold, and the price be restored, of course according 74 2, 84 | forbidden to offer "the price ~of a dog" in the house 75 2, 84 | possesses ~lawfully the price of a dog he has lawfully 76 2, 84 | were redeemed and their price could be offered, ~according 77 2, 86 | written (Ecclus. 26:20): "No price is worthy of a ~continent 78 2, 86 | itself for which no worthy price can be found, as is stated 79 2, 98 | appraised at any earthly price, even as it is ~said concerning 80 2, 98 | spiritual grace, on which no ~price can be set, and which is 81 2, 98 | it is received not as a price of goods, but as a payment ~ 82 2, 98 | must by no ~means pay a price for Baptism, and should 83 2, 98 | receives money, not as the price for ~consecrating the Eucharist, 84 2, 98 | person absolved is not the price ~of his absolution (for 85 2, 98 | demanding anything as the price of a spiritual thing, with ~ 86 2, 98 | whether by demanding a price or by ~seeking any kind 87 2, 98 | not lawful to charge ~a price or return for them.~Aquin.: 88 2, 98 | livelihood, but ~not as a price for the exercise of their 89 2, 98 | for his support, not as a price ~of the words he preaches. 90 2, 98 | thing for a ~contemptible price." In like manner temporal 91 2, 98 | for the dead, not as a price but as a means of livelihood; 92 2, 98 | visits his subjects, not as a price for correcting them, but 93 2, 98 | can lawfully receive a price for his learning or advice, 94 2, 98 | exact or receive anything as price for ~entering a monastery: 95 2, 98 | Ephron intended to accept the price as payment for a burial ~ 96 2, 98 | human favor, which has its price, or a request whereby man' 97 2, 151 | are bought with a great price: glorify and bear God in 98 2, 152 | estimate, and shall pay the price of her purity ~[*Cf. Dt. 99 2, 153 | written (Ecclus. 26:20): "No price is worthy of a continent 100 2, 153 | and thus it means that "no price is worthy of a ~continent 101 2, 153 | and thus it means that "no price is ~worthy of a continent 102 2, 184 | Ecclus. 26:20) that "no price is worthy ~of a continent 103 2, 184 | Douay ~version renders 'price.']. Or again continence 104 2, 186 | took their origin kept the price of the ~lands, and distributed 105 2, 187 | of the pit shall pay the price of ~the beasts." Now through 106 3, 46 | are bought with a great price: ~glorify and bear God in 107 3, 48 | redeems an object pays the price to the ~holder. But it was 108 3, 48 | Christ ~paid His blood as the price of our redemption. Therefore 109 3, 48 | human race, it was as a price ~at the cost of which we 110 3, 48 | or another is called the price, ~by which he ransoms himself 111 3, 48 | bestowing what was of greatest price - Himself - for us. And 112 3, 48 | regard to the devil, the price had to be ~paid not to the 113 3, 48 | is said to have ~paid the price of our redemption - His 114 3, 48 | said to redeem who pays the price of redemption. ~But God 115 3, 48 | the act of paying and the price paid. For if in redeeming 116 3, 48 | something a man ~pays a price which is not his own, but 117 3, 48 | rather the other is, whose price it is. Now ~Christ's blood 118 3, 48 | is in the blood," is the price ~of our redemption (Lev. 119 3, 48 | The Man-Christ paid the price of our redemption ~immediately, 120 3, 49 | from our ~sins, as by the price of His Passion: in the same 121 3, 52 | excluded from glory, since the price of man's redemption was ~ 122 3, 83 | Or again, to signify the price for which He was ~sold, 123 Suppl, 21| death for ~keeping back the price of their piece of land ( 124 Suppl, 43| appended, not as asking a price for the consent of marriage, ~ 125 Suppl, 52| obtain anywhere a ~just price for his slave.~Aquin.: SMT


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