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Alphabetical    [«  »]
abstention 2
abstinence 113
abstinences 2
abstract 120
abstracted 123
abstractedly 5
abstracting 10
Frequency    [«  »]
121 infinity
121 loving
121 stars
120 abstract
120 diminished
120 holiness
120 mysteries
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

abstract

    Part, Question
1 1, 3 | are composite; and we use ~abstract nouns to signify His simplicity. 2 1, 7 | there is no lie ~in things abstract," as the Philosopher says ( 3 1, 12 | is capable of receiving abstract ~intelligible things. Hence 4 1, 12 | intelligible light, enabling us to abstract from ~them intelligible 5 1, 13 | Further, every name is either abstract or concrete. But concrete ~ 6 1, 13 | since He is simple, nor do abstract names ~belong to Him, forasmuch 7 1, 13 | subsisting, we ~attribute to Him abstract names to signify His simplicity, 8 1, 18 | signifies this, though in the abstract, just as the word "running" ~ 9 1, 18 | denotes "to run" in the abstract.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[18] A[ 10 1, 31 | concrete is predicated ~of the abstract; for Deity is God and paternity 11 1, 32 | require to presuppose any abstract notions as ~principles of 12 1, 32 | mentioned, he propounded the abstract for the concrete. For as 13 1, 32 | the use of concrete and abstract ~names in God is not in 14 1, 32 | In ~these things we use abstract terms to signify simple 15 1, 32 | things, as above stated, by abstract names, to express their ~ 16 1, 32 | names be signified in the abstract and in ~the concrete, as 17 1, 32 | there must also be some abstract ~terms whereby we may answer 18 1, 32 | notions signified by an abstract term, as paternity ~and 19 1, 32 | separately signified in the abstract; and these are what we mean 20 1, 32 | idea of notions, as the ~abstract is contained in the concrete.~ 21 1, 39 | essential names taken in the ~abstract?~(6) Whether the names of 22 1, 39 | Thes. Para. 1/1 ~Whether abstract essential names can stand 23 1, 39 | OBJ 1: It would seem that abstract essential names can stand 24 1, 39 | signifies the essence as an abstract form. ~Consequently, what 25 1, 39 | them: thus, for instance, abstract ~names should be explained 26 1, 39 | Nevertheless, as regards these ~abstract names a certain order should 27 1, 39 | attributes expressed in the abstract ~signify by mode of form. 28 1, 39 | especially when expressed in ~the abstract, are not to be appropriated 29 1, 40 | These are designated by abstract terms, ~being forms, as 30 1, 40 | follows that in God the ~abstract is the same as the concrete, 31 1, 40 | the persons ~because the abstract and the concrete are the 32 1, 40 | Son, because in God the ~abstract and the concrete do not 33 1, 40 | as, for instance, if we abstract the form of a circle from 34 1, 40 | it would be necessary to abstract the rationality from ~the 35 1, 44 | mentally, whereas it is not abstract in ~reality. Now, it is 36 1, 44 | our understanding. For we ~abstract universal ideas by force 37 1, 54 | can be but one; just as an abstract thing that subsists. ~Consequently 38 1, 54 | signifies the act in the abstract, and ~the other in the concrete. 39 1, 55 | the ~angelic mind can also abstract species from sensible things. 40 1, 55 | Even granted that he could abstract ~intelligible species from 41 1, 59 | tending towards good in the abstract, which appetite belongs 42 1, 76 | or ~power cannot be more abstract or more simple than the 43 1, 39 | essential names taken in the ~abstract?~(6) Whether the names of 44 1, 39 | Thes. Para. 1/1 ~Whether abstract essential names can stand 45 1, 39 | OBJ 1: It would seem that abstract essential names can stand 46 1, 39 | signifies the essence as an abstract form. ~Consequently, what 47 1, 39 | them: thus, for instance, abstract ~names should be explained 48 1, 39 | Nevertheless, as regards these ~abstract names a certain order should 49 1, 39 | attributes expressed in the abstract ~signify by mode of form. 50 1, 39 | especially when expressed in ~the abstract, are not to be appropriated 51 1, 40 | These are designated by abstract terms, ~being forms, as 52 1, 40 | follows that in God the ~abstract is the same as the concrete, 53 1, 40 | the persons ~because the abstract and the concrete are the 54 1, 40 | Son, because in God the ~abstract and the concrete do not 55 1, 40 | as, for instance, if we abstract the form of a circle from 56 1, 40 | it would be necessary to abstract the rationality from ~the 57 1, 45 | mentally, whereas it is not abstract in ~reality. Now, it is 58 1, 45 | our understanding. For we ~abstract universal ideas by force 59 1, 55 | can be but one; just as an abstract thing that subsists. ~Consequently 60 1, 55 | signifies the act in the abstract, and ~the other in the concrete. 61 1, 56 | the ~angelic mind can also abstract species from sensible things. 62 1, 56 | Even granted that he could abstract ~intelligible species from 63 1, 60 | tending towards good in the abstract, which appetite belongs 64 1, 75 | or ~power cannot be more abstract or more simple than the 65 1, 78 | since we perceive that we abstract universal ~forms from their 66 1, 81 | more simple and the more abstract a thing is, the ~nobler 67 1, 84 | the passive intellect to abstract ~the intelligible species 68 1, 84 | color; since ~light does not abstract anything from color, but 69 1, 84 | existing in such matter, is to abstract the ~form from individual 70 1, 84 | by participating things abstract, as stated above (Q[84]~, 71 1, 84 | Thus for the intellect to abstract one ~from another things 72 1, 84 | things which are not really abstract from one another, does, ~ 73 1, 84 | abstraction, for the intellect to abstract things which are not ~really 74 1, 84 | things which are not ~really abstract from one another, does not 75 1, 84 | qualities; and this is to abstract them from sensible matter; 76 1, 84 | quantity; for that would be to abstract them from common ~intelligible 77 1, 84 | substance; for that is to abstract them from individual intelligible ~ 78 1, 84 | abstracted by the intellect, are abstract in reality.~Aquin.: SMT 79 1, 84 | In like manner the words "abstract universal" imply two ~things, 80 1, 85 | immaterially and in the abstract, which is to know the universal.~ 81 1, 86 | immaterial, but only the abstract likenesses thereof. ~Hence 82 1, 87 | we unable to understand abstract substances, ~"because it 83 1, 87 | nature of our intellect is to abstract the quiddity of material ~ 84 1, 87 | however much our ~intellect abstract the quiddity of material 85 2, 35 | likeness is more immaterial and abstract. Consequently inward pain 86 2, 53 | take an ~accident in the abstract, it implies relation to 87 2, 53 | defining an ~accident in the abstract, we do not put the subject 88 2, 53 | that ~accident, not in the abstract, but in the concrete. Such 89 2, 94 | the natural law, in the abstract, can nowise be ~blotted 90 2, 95 | because lawgivers judge in the abstract and of future events; whereas ~ 91 2, 99 | could not go astray in the abstract, as to the universal ~principles 92 2, 99 | of these belongs in the ~abstract to the dictates of the natural 93 2, 102 | a reason for them in the abstract, but not in regard to ~particular 94 2, 102 | figurative cause; whereas in the ~abstract they have a literal cause.~ 95 2, 80 | subtle considerations about ~abstract matters are often a hindrance 96 3, 2 | considered in itself, i.e. in the abstract, is viewed as assumed; and 97 3, 3 | It would seem that if we abstract the Personality by our mind, ~ 98 3, 3 | 2]). Now if we mentally ~abstract these, there still remains 99 3, 3 | Personalities. And ~hence if we abstract Personality by our intellect, 100 3, 3 | attributed to God in the abstract is ~considered in itself, 101 3, 3 | Reply OBJ 3: If we mentally abstract the Personality, it is said 102 3, 12 | species from phantasms, could abstract ~others, and others again.~ 103 3, 16 | one of the other, in the abstract. For the ~Divine Nature 104 3, 16 | flesh" are taken in the abstract, even as ~Godhead and manhood; 105 3, 16 | Hence in both cases ~the abstract is not predicated of the 106 3, 16 | is not predicated of the abstract, but only the concrete of ~ 107 3, 16 | if they are ~taken in the abstract. Now concrete words stand 108 3, 16 | signifying human nature in the abstract, it might be taken in this 109 3, 16 | predicated not only of ~abstract, but also of concrete things; 110 3, 17 | itself, as it is used in the ~abstract, cannot truly be predicated 111 3, 17 | predicated of Him both in the abstract and in the concrete, for 112 3, 17 | predicated of Christ in ~the abstract, but only in the concrete, 113 3, 17 | natures were predicated in the abstract of ~Christ, it would follow 114 3, 17 | predicated even in the ~abstract of the Father and Son. But 115 3, 17 | nature as ~it is in the abstract, but as it is in the concrete; 116 3, 17 | predicated, even in the abstract of the three Persons; hence 117 3, 17 | are not predicated in the abstract of Christ; ~hence it cannot 118 3, 77 | OBJ 4: Further, quantity abstract from matter seems to be 119 Suppl, 89| has a natural aptitude to abstract the quiddity from all ~intelligible 120 Suppl, 89| has a natural aptitude to abstract this quiddity, and consequently


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