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Alphabetical    [«  »]
limping 4
lina 1
lincoln 1
line 114
lineally 1
linear 1
linen 32
Frequency    [«  »]
115 writ
114 became
114 indulgences
114 line
114 per
114 remitted
114 revealed
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

line

    Part, Question
1 1, 4 | Dionysius implies ~the same line of argument by saying of 2 1, 4 | is wanting to God. This line of argument, too, ~is implied 3 1, 6 | greater or less ~than a line. Therefore, since God is 4 1, 7 | demonstrations says, "Let this line be infinite." Therefore 5 1, 7 | both to surface and to ~a line. Therefore nothing is infinite 6 1, 7 | does not need to assume a line actually ~infinite, but 7 1, 7 | takes some actually finite line, from which he subtracts ~ 8 1, 7 | he finds necessary; which line he calls infinite.~Aquin.: 9 1, 11 | or "the beginning of a line." ~"Multitude" also, in 10 1, 33 | point is the principle of a line; or also when we say that 11 1, 33 | that the ~first part of a line is the principle of a line.~ 12 1, 33 | line is the principle of a line.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[33] A[ 13 1, 36 | origin; as when we say that a line proceeds from a ~point, 14 1, 42 | mode is like the issue of a line from a point; ~wherein is 15 1, 53 | as is clear, because the line is not in the ~point. Therefore 16 1, 62 | simultaneous acts, as the ~same line cannot, at the same end, 17 1, 67 | circle as in a straight line. ~Hence it appears that 18 1, 76 | of quantity, as a whole line, or a whole ~body. There 19 1, 42 | mode is like the issue of a line from a point; ~wherein is 20 1, 54 | as is clear, because the line is not in the ~point. Therefore 21 1, 63 | simultaneous acts, as the ~same line cannot, at the same end, 22 1, 68 | circle as in a straight line. ~Hence it appears that 23 1, 75 | of quantity, as a whole line, or a whole ~body. There 24 1, 84 | into the definition of a line; for as ~Euclid says, "a 25 1, 84 | for as ~Euclid says, "a line is length without breadth, 26 1, 84 | included in the definition of a line in ~general: for it is manifest 27 1, 84 | it is manifest that in a line of indefinite length, and 28 1, 84 | length, and in a ~circular line, there is no point, save 29 1, 84 | defines a ~finite straight line: and therefore he mentions 30 1, 101 | paradise was on the equinoctial line are ~of opinion that such 31 2, 4 | being, just as a ~part of a line has another being from that 32 2, 4 | being from that of the whole line. But the ~human soul retains 33 2, 18 | objection proceeds along this line. ~But no action can be specifically 34 2, 55 | reducible to the genus of line. Therefore virtue is reducible 35 2, 68 | it swerves from the right line, may ~become distorted; 36 2, 73 | the same as to pass over a line. But passing over a ~line 37 2, 73 | line. But passing over a ~line occurs equally and in the 38 2, 100 | vice, ~because "the crooked line is known by the straight" ( 39 2, 105 | be granted to the female line in ~order to comfort the 40 2, 113 | in time, nor points in a line, as is proved in Physic. 41 2, 9 | evil: for "the straight line rules both itself and the ~ 42 2, 9 | itself and the ~crooked line" (De Anima i, 5). Therefore 43 2, 12 | said to them, "Fall into line for the ~defense of the 44 2, 23 | 6) that if we divide a line into an indefinite number 45 2, 23 | indefinitely to another ~line, we shall never arrive at 46 2, 23 | kinds: thus ~however much a line may increase it does not 47 2, 147 | brought back the end into line with the beginning." Therefore 48 2, 178 | movement takes ~a straight line when he proceeds to the 49 3, 1 | Horace, Ars. Poet., line 1]. But God and flesh are 50 3, 10 | if we take one infinite ~line, there is nothing greater 51 3, 10 | necessity in this particular line there is nothing ~greater 52 3, 10 | yet in another or a third line ~there will be more infinite 53 3, 26 | faith of his time. Hence his line of argument coincides with, ~ 54 3, 28 | wont to trace the ~female line in genealogies": secondly, " 55 3, 29 | traced through the male line. Thus Ambrose says on Lk. 56 3, 31 | but through ~some other line of private individuals.~ 57 3, 75 | particular movements, as a line and point are of a ~body, 58 3, 77 | from one another: thus a line is not made of whiteness. 59 3, 90 | time and equally, just as a line is made up of its parts. 60 3, 90 | continuation, as the ~parts of a line; while some are related, 61 Suppl, 23| contained in the ~following line: "Utility, law, lowliness, 62 Suppl, 29| potentially several - as a line. ~Thirdly, as something 63 Suppl, 40| the crozier). Hence the line:~"Gather, uphold, spur on~ 64 Suppl, 54| degrees and lines. For a line of consanguinity is described 65 Suppl, 54| such persons. Therefore a line of consanguinity is the 66 Suppl, 54| Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, a line is defined as being between 67 Suppl, 54| one degree. Therefore one line has but one degree, and ~ 68 Suppl, 54| movement of a point makes a line, and since a ~father by 69 Suppl, 54| namely the "descending" line corresponding to the first ~ 70 Suppl, 54| relationship, the "ascending" line corresponding to the second, 71 Suppl, 54| second, and the ~"collateral" line corresponding to the third. 72 Suppl, 54| various degrees in ~one line. And seeing that the degrees 73 Suppl, 54| ascending and descending ~line is contracted from the fact 74 Suppl, 54| ascending or in the descending ~line, is distant from a certain 75 Suppl, 54| of consanguinity in this line must be reckoned ~in relation 76 Suppl, 54| the series of whom forms a line of consanguinity.~Aquin.: 77 Suppl, 54| sense attaches to every line of ~consanguinity, because 78 Suppl, 54| that makes the ~descending line.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[54] A[ 79 Suppl, 54| Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: A line may be taken in two ways. 80 Suppl, 54| quantity: and thus a straight line contains actually but two 81 Suppl, 54| actually designated, the line is divided, and becomes 82 Suppl, 54| lines. But ~sometimes a line designates things which 83 Suppl, 54| which are arranged in a line, and thus ~we have line 84 Suppl, 54| line, and thus ~we have line and figure in numbers, in 85 Suppl, 54| degree in a particular ~line: and it is the same with 86 Suppl, 54| it is the same with the line of consanguinity: wherefore 87 Suppl, 54| consanguinity: wherefore one ~line contains several degrees.~ 88 Suppl, 55| a point there proceeds a line and not a ~point, because 89 Suppl, 55| point by being moved makes a line; and from a line ~moved 90 Suppl, 55| makes a line; and from a line ~moved lineally, there proceeds 91 Suppl, 55| lineally, there proceeds not a line but a surface, and from 92 Suppl, 71| the process in dividing a line, which though finite, ~is 93 Suppl, 71| because in the division of a line we come at length to ~something 94 Suppl, 80| point is to point, so is line to line, surface to ~surface, 95 Suppl, 80| to point, so is line to line, surface to ~surface, and 96 Suppl, 80| the example of a separate line, ~supposing there to be 97 Suppl, 80| lines, or two parts of one line, they must ~needs occupy 98 Suppl, 80| distinct places, else one line added to another would not ~ 99 Suppl, 80| lines, or two parts of a line, unless they occupy distinct 100 Suppl, 80| nothing can be done to a line that is contrary to the ~ 101 Suppl, 80| to the ~definition of a line, because to sever the definition 102 Suppl, 80| to the ~definition of a line, for two bodies to be in 103 Suppl, 80| contrary to the definition of a line that there be more than 104 Suppl, 80| more than one straight ~line between two points: yet 105 Suppl, 80| against ~the definition of a line, or against any conclusions 106 Suppl, 80| subject. Thus then ~one line may be understood as being 107 Suppl, 80| considering a material ~line), or because it is placed 108 Suppl, 80| considering a mathematical line, which is understood apart 109 Suppl, 80| geometry cannot suppose one line to ~be added to another, 110 Suppl, 80| placed body, ~because a line is not said to be drawn 111 Suppl, 81| the movable, as when one line is added to another: for ~ 112 Suppl, 81| whereas not every part of a line has as much of the ~dimensive 113 Suppl, 81| dimensive quantity as the whole line has. Hence any retardation 114 Suppl, 81| added is a part of the total line.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[84] A[


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