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Alphabetical    [«  »]
accurately 4
accursed 20
accus 1
accusation 93
accusationibus 1
accusations 4
accusatorum 1
Frequency    [«  »]
94 inclines
94 plurality
94 whereof
93 accusation
93 adopted
93 bond
93 clemency
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

accusation

   Part, Question
1 2, 31 | nothing else need precede ~accusation except inscription." [*The 2 2, 31 | inscribere) the writ of accusation. The effect of this ~endorsement 3 2, 31 | he ~failed to prove the accusation, to suffer the same punishment 4 2, 65 | knowledge otherwise than by accusation; for instance, ~by denunciation, 5 2, 66 | MATTERS CONCERNING UNJUST ACCUSATION (FOUR ARTICLES)~We must 6 2, 66 | matters pertaining to unjust accusation. Under this ~head there 7 2, 66 | accuse?~(2) Whether the accusation should be made in writing?~( 8 2, 66 | in writing?~(3) How is an accusation vitiated?~(4) How should 9 2, 66 | between denunciation and accusation is that in denunciation ~ 10 2, 66 | s amendment, whereas in accusation we intend the ~punishment 11 2, 66 | second regards properly accusation. ~Hence in the case of a 12 2, 66 | commonwealth, a man is bound to accusation, provided he can offer ~ 13 2, 66 | it is necessary for the accusation to be made in writing?~Aquin.: 14 2, 66 | seem unnecessary for the accusation to be made in ~writing. 15 2, 66 | memory of the ~past. But an accusation is made in the present. 16 2, 66 | the present. Therefore the accusation ~needs not to be made in 17 2, 66 | Trin. x, 1). Therefore the ~accusation need not be in writing: 18 2, 66 | canon ~declares that "no accusation in writing should be accepted."~ 19 2, 66 | denunciation, even as by ~accusation. Now writing is unnecessary 20 2, 66 | seemingly unnecessary in accusation.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[68] A[ 21 2, 66 | sanctioned without ~the accusation be in writing."~Aquin.: 22 2, 66 | criminal case goes by way of accusation, the accuser is in the position ~ 23 2, 66 | been established that the accusation, as well as other ~parts 24 2, 66 | judgment requires that ~the accusation be drawn up in writing.~ 25 2, 66 | the canon says, "Let no accusation be accepted in writing" ~ 26 2, 66 | refers to the sending of an accusation by one who is absent: but 27 2, 66 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether an accusation is rendered unjust by calumny, 28 2, 66 | 1: It would seem that an accusation is not rendered unjust by ~ 29 2, 66 | Therefore it seems that an accusation is not always rendered unjust ~ 30 2, 66 | Therefore it seems that an accusation is not ~rendered unjust 31 2, 66 | withdrawing altogether from an accusation." But this can be ~done 32 2, 66 | of ~having made a wicked accusation and inscription* in a matter 33 2, 66 | inscribere) the writ of accusation. The effect ~of this endorsement 34 2, 66 | he failed to prove the accusation, to suffer the same punishment 35 2, 66 | evasion does ~not render an accusation unjust.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 36 2, 66 | As stated above (A[1]), accusation is ordered for the ~common 37 2, 66 | two ways when making an ~accusation: first through acting unjustly 38 2, 66 | intended ~chiefly in an accusation, when anyone with wicked 39 2, 66 | to fraud in making the accusation. This belongs to collusion ~[ 40 2, 66 | withdrawing altogether from the accusation. This is evasion ~[tergiversatio] 41 2, 66 | a man is led to make an accusation on account ~of an error 42 2, 66 | blamed has uttered a false accusation.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[68] A[ 43 2, 66 | about which he ~makes the accusation, by collusion with the defendant, 44 2, 66 | withdrawing altogether from the ~accusation, by renouncing the intention 45 2, 66 | in the very ~process of accusation, if it come to his knowledge 46 2, 66 | that the matter of his ~accusation is false, and then by mutual 47 2, 66 | in another way, if the accusation be ~quashed by the sovereign 48 2, 66 | intended to procure by the accusation.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[68] A[ 49 2, 66 | a just error to make an accusation, in which case the judge 50 2, 66 | has failed to prove his accusation.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[68] A[ 51 2, 66 | he who fails to prove his accusation, ~incurs the punishment 52 2, 66 | that fails to prove ~his accusation, must himself suffer the 53 2, 66 | the punishment which his accusation ~inferred."~Aquin.: SMT 54 2, 66 | procedure is ~by way of accusation, the accuser holds the position 55 2, 66 | that a man has made a false accusation, not with a mind to ~do 56 2, 66 | himself, particularly if the accusation were made not ~calumniously 57 2, 67 | if he fail to ~prove his accusation. Hence it is written (Ps. 58 2, 106 | hath been afraid . . . the accusation of a city, and the gathering ~ 59 3, 36 | meanwhile on account of an accusation brought against ~him, or 60 3, 40 | the Jews threw this false accusation in ~His face, saying (Jn. 61 Suppl, 8 | confession is a sacramental accusation, as appears from the ~definition 62 Suppl, 9 | Wherefore it ~should be an "accusation" on the part of the penitent, 63 Suppl, 55| should ~always be by way of accusation?~(11) Whether witnesses 64 Suppl, 55| necessary to proceed by way of accusation for the annulment ~of a 65 Suppl, 55| not to proceed by way of accusation ~in order to sever a marriage 66 Suppl, 55| or consanguinity. Because accusation is preceded by inscription* ~ 67 Suppl, 55| if ~he fail to prove his accusation. [*The accuser was bound 68 Suppl, 55| inscribere) the writ of accusation; Cf. SS, Q[33], A[7]]. But ~ 69 Suppl, 55| is at issue. Therefore ~accusation has no place then.~Aquin.: 70 Suppl, 55| process is not by way of accusation.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[55] A[ 71 Suppl, 55| is denounced. Therefore accusation should never take place 72 Suppl, 55| Para. 1/1~I answer that, Accusation is instituted lest the guilty 73 Suppl, 55| fact sometimes an object of accusation. It is in this way that 74 Suppl, 55| punishment. ~Moreover, the accusation may be made either in words 75 Suppl, 55| whom he cannot prove his accusation. On the other hand the relatives, ~ 76 Suppl, 55| contract. When, ~however, the accusation is based on a denial of 77 Suppl, 55| betrothal, there can be no accusation, for what is not, cannot 78 Suppl, 55| be allowed to voice his accusation. In this matter ~we deem 79 Suppl, 55| other lawful cause, his accusation should ~be heard. otherwise 80 Suppl, 55| by ill-will to make ~his accusation."~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[55] A[ 81 Suppl, 60| without sin, bring a criminal accusation of adultery upon his wife 82 Suppl, 60| any other crime. Such an accusation however cannot be made in 83 Suppl, 62| Para. 1/1~OBJ 5: Further, accusation should be preceded by inscription [* 84 Suppl, 62| ought not to be summoned by accusation to receive the judgment 85 Suppl, 62| fornication, and so proceed to accusation. Moreover, if he has ~no 86 Suppl, 62| notoriety; secondly, by ~accusation, which should be preceded 87 Suppl, 62| denunciation, and not by accusation, because ~then the end in 88 Suppl, 62| repentance against her husband's accusation ~of fornication. Therefore 89 Suppl, 62| oppose ~her repentance to his accusation, because although she is 90 Suppl, 84| and this suffices ~for the accusation or absolution necessary 91 Suppl, 85| Now the evidence both of accusation and of defense will be mental, ~ 92 Suppl, 85| inquiry, ~or as regards the accusation of the wicked and the approval 93 Suppl, 86| all men ~(which is like an accusation or approval), or the repayment


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