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demonstrated 43
demonstrates 5
demonstrating 3
demonstration 86
demonstrations 14
demonstrative 42
demonstratively 8
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86 changes
86 col
86 committing
86 demonstration
86 denoted
86 discord
86 dispense
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

demonstration

   Part, Question
1 1, 2 | the first principles of demonstration. Thus, when the ~nature 2 1, 2 | the first principles of demonstration. But the opposite of the ~ 3 1, 2 | the first ~principles of demonstration, the terms of which are 4 1, 2 | demonstrated, because a demonstration produces scientific knowledge; ~ 5 1, 2 | essence is the middle term of demonstration. But we ~cannot know in 6 1, 2 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, Demonstration can be made in two ways: 7 1, 2 | effect, and is called a ~demonstration "a posteriori"; this is 8 1, 3 | save through His effects, a demonstration of Him: for a ~definition 9 1, 3 | difference; and the mean of a demonstration ~is a definition. That God 10 1, 10 | instance, all principles of demonstration and ~all demonstrative propositions. 11 1, 12 | is capable of scientific demonstration is ~held only by an opinion 12 1, 12 | anyone knows by scientific ~demonstration that a triangle has three 13 1, 13 | pronouns the same with ~demonstration or relation. But none of 14 1, 14 | comprehended ~when known by demonstration, not, however, when it is 15 1, 39 | persons cannot be proved by demonstration, as was above ~expounded ( 16 1, 42 | intellect, as the principle of demonstration; and ~according to each 17 1, 44 | cause. But in mathematics demonstration is not made by the efficient ~ 18 1, 46 | it cannot be ~proved by demonstration.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[46] A[ 19 1, 46 | alone do we hold, and by no demonstration can it ~be proved, that 20 1, 46 | itself. For the principle of demonstration is the essence of a thing. 21 1, 46 | object of ~faith, but not of demonstration or science. And it is useful 22 1, 47 | speculative things the medium of demonstration, which ~demonstrates the 23 1, 53 | all, because Aristotle's demonstration deals with what is ~indivisible 24 1, 53 | Secondly, because Aristotle's demonstration deals with movement which 25 1, 53 | continuous, Aristotle's demonstration does not hold good. But 26 1, 58 | as when, by ~division and demonstration, we seek out the truth of 27 1, 76 | of the body. This is the demonstration ~used by Aristotle (De Anima 28 1, 39 | persons cannot be proved by demonstration, as was above ~expounded ( 29 1, 42 | intellect, as the principle of demonstration; and ~according to each 30 1, 45 | cause. But in mathematics demonstration is not made by the efficient ~ 31 1, 47 | it cannot be ~proved by demonstration.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[46] A[ 32 1, 47 | alone do we hold, and by no demonstration can it ~be proved, that 33 1, 47 | itself. For the principle of demonstration is the essence of a thing. 34 1, 47 | object of ~faith, but not of demonstration or science. And it is useful 35 1, 48 | speculative things the medium of demonstration, which ~demonstrates the 36 1, 54 | all, because Aristotle's demonstration deals with what is ~indivisible 37 1, 54 | Secondly, because Aristotle's demonstration deals with movement which 38 1, 54 | continuous, Aristotle's demonstration does not hold good. But 39 1, 59 | as when, by ~division and demonstration, we seek out the truth of 40 1, 75 | of the body. This is the demonstration ~used by Aristotle (De Anima 41 1, 81 | necessity until through the ~demonstration it recognizes the necessity 42 1, 83 | science), and likewise all demonstration through moving and ~material 43 1, 93 | such as the medium in a demonstration. God was seen without this 44 1, 93 | the knowledge of God by demonstration drawn ~from an effect, such 45 1, 116 | says (Poster. i, 2) that "a demonstration is a ~syllogism that causes 46 2, 13 | hinders the principle of ~one demonstration or of one science, from 47 2, 13 | the conclusion of ~another demonstration or science; while the first 48 2, 13 | be the conclusion of any demonstration or science; so ~too that 49 2, 14 | is the ~principle of one demonstration, is the conclusion of another: 50 2, 51 | caused by one act. For ~demonstration is an act of reason. But 51 2, 51 | conclusion, is caused by one demonstration. Therefore habit can be 52 2, 54 | Now the whole force of a ~demonstration, which is "a syllogism producing 53 2, 54 | science, he who acquires, by demonstration, ~scientific knowledge of 54 2, 54 | And when he obtains, by demonstration, the scientific ~knowledge 55 2, 57 | Now the principle of a demonstration is the ~formal aspect under 56 2, 57 | hand, the principles of a demonstration can be ~considered apart, 57 2, 94 | principles to matters of ~demonstration. But there are several first 58 2, 1 | science is ~the mean of demonstration, through which the conclusions 59 2, 1 | save through ~the mean of demonstration. Now it has been stated ( 60 2, 1 | conclusion through its ~demonstration]?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[1] A[ 61 2, 1 | object of science, ~since a "demonstration is a syllogism that produces 62 2, 1 | he does not ~know it by demonstration.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[1] A[5] 63 2, 1 | hand, know them, not as by ~demonstration, but by the light of faith 64 2, 1 | Things which can be proved by demonstration are reckoned ~among the 65 2, 1 | who do not known them by demonstration must know them first of ~ 66 2, 1 | manner, one may know by ~demonstration the unity of the Godhead, 67 2, 1 | things, which can be known by demonstration, do not ~belong to faith 68 2, 1 | Now it can be known by demonstration that there is one God; hence 69 2, 2 | demonstrated conclusion through its demonstration.], or understands. ~If, 70 2, 2 | demonstrated conclusion through its demonstration] would ~seem to come under 71 2, 2 | conclusion through its ~demonstration.]. Now the considerations 72 2, 2 | to assent by force of the demonstration, wherefore ~scientific assent 73 2, 2 | although he may have reasons in demonstration of some of them, ~e.g. of 74 2, 5 | their respective ~means of demonstration, one of which may be known 75 2, 9 | Poster. i, 2) that a ~"demonstration is a syllogism which produces 76 2, 46 | attaining ~of science by demonstration, which belongs to "physics" ( 77 2, 47 | reasoning of prudence is not a ~demonstration since it deals with contingencies. 78 2, 49 | common principles; while demonstration which ~tends to judgment, 79 2, 58 | indeed ~the certainty of a demonstration, but such as is befitting 80 2, 169 | way what one man knows by ~demonstration may be revealed to another 81 2, 187 | it requires no further demonstration," as a gloss says on 1 ~ 82 3, 9 | knowledge, which is acquired by demonstration, yet, when this has been ~ 83 3, 60 | science is the effect of a ~demonstration. Therefore not every sign 84 3, 78 | the word "this" implies ~demonstration as conceived, and not as 85 Suppl, 72| things one does not come by a demonstration of ~reason to know non-natural 86 Suppl, 89| thus in one principle of demonstration one who is quick of ~intelligence


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