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Alphabetical    [«  »]
agency 10
agens 1
agent 928
agents 86
ageruch 6
ages 29
agg 1
Frequency    [«  »]
87 nat
87 resides
87 sex
86 agents
86 backbiting
86 capacity
86 changes
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

agents

   Part, Question
1 1, 4 | we see in non-univocal agents. For since every agent reproduces 2 1, 8 | the most powerful of all agents. Therefore His action ~can 3 1, 13 | there are some univocal agents which agree with their ~ 4 1, 13 | man; and there are some ~agents which are equivocal, as 5 1, 13 | agent to which all other agents are reduced, is an univocal 6 1, 15 | in two ways. For in some agents the form of the thing to 7 1, 15 | fire. Whereas in ~other agents (the form of the thing to 8 1, 15 | result of a ~succession of agents, as has been supposed by 9 1, 17 | in the case of voluntary agents only, who have it in their 10 1, 19 | is first in the order of agents, He must act by ~intellect 11 1, 37 | actions that ~remain in the agents, as stated above (Q[14], 12 1, 42 | differently as regards free agents and ~natural agents. In 13 1, 42 | free agents and ~natural agents. In free agents, on account 14 1, 42 | natural agents. In free agents, on account of the choice 15 1, 42 | its effect. ~In natural agents, however, the same happens 16 1, 44 | time: these are imperfect agents, and to these it ~belongs 17 1, 46 | principle of action. But in agents ~acting by will, what is 18 1, 47 | distinction of things to secondary agents, as ~did Avicenna, who said 19 1, 56 | principle of action in other ~agents: for, as heat is the formal 20 1, 76 | instrument and several principal agents, we might say that there 21 1, 76 | say that there are several agents, but one act; for example, 22 1, 37 | actions that ~remain in the agents, as stated above (Q[14], 23 1, 42 | differently as regards free agents and ~natural agents. In 24 1, 42 | free agents and ~natural agents. In free agents, on account 25 1, 42 | natural agents. In free agents, on account of the choice 26 1, 42 | its effect. ~In natural agents, however, the same happens 27 1, 45 | time: these are imperfect agents, and to these it ~belongs 28 1, 47 | principle of action. But in agents ~acting by will, what is 29 1, 48 | distinction of things to secondary agents, as ~did Avicenna, who said 30 1, 57 | principle of action in other ~agents: for, as heat is the formal 31 1, 75 | instrument and several principal agents, we might say that there 32 1, 75 | say that there are several agents, but one act; for example, 33 1, 78 | are not in the nature of agents in regard to the passivity ~ 34 1, 103 | may be seen clearly in all agents which do not produce an 35 1, 103 | the action of corrupting agents, and for that ~reason are 36 1, 104 | where there ~are several agents in order, the second always 37 1, 104 | second to act. And thus all agents ~act in virtue of God Himself: 38 1, 104 | but He also gives created agents their forms and ~preserves 39 1, 104 | the operation of secondary agents is ~superfluous.~Aquin.: 40 1, 104 | does not proceed from two agents of the same ~order. But 41 1, 105 | others. Hence also corporeal agents give ~their likeness to 42 1, 109 | only ~over the universal agents, the heavenly bodies. Avicenna 43 1, 109 | power of their principal ~agents, and which cannot be due 44 1, 109 | intellect"; and that corporeal agents only dispose [matter] for ~ 45 1, 109 | way than can corporeal agents, that is by moving the corporeal 46 1, 109 | by moving the corporeal agents ~themselves, as being the 47 1, 109 | which the power of corporeal agents would not ~suffice. This, 48 1, 109 | by employing corporeal agents ~to produce these effects, 49 1, 109 | outside the order of corporeal agents; which is to work ~miracles.~ 50 1, 114 | extent, held that corporeal agents act through ~their accidental 51 1, 114 | and there are ~contrary agents - heat and cold, and the 52 1, 114 | impressions produced by heavenly agents. ~Wherefore it seems that 53 1, 116 | way they held that natural agents only ~dispose (matter) to 54 1, 116 | by employing corporeal ~agents for the production of certain 55 1, 116 | rather than natural contrary agents. Therefore when the soul 56 1, 117 | existence by certain ~corporeal agents that reduce the matter from 57 1, 117 | holds in the case of diverse agents not ~ordered to one another. 58 1, 117 | But where there are many agents ordered to one ~another, 59 1, 117 | the powers of the inferior agents extend only to ~some disposition 60 1, 118 | continuous ~action, because such agents are also patient. Therefore 61 2, 1 | the end; thus in natural agents the form of the ~thing generated 62 2, 22 | suffer much even from petty agents. Therefore ~although the 63 2, 23 | as if they were ~natural agents. For every mover, in a fashion, 64 2, 32 | from habits existing in the agents. ~Therefore the actions 65 2, 32 | pleasing to us, but to the agents ~themselves.~Aquin.: SMT 66 2, 36 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: External agents can be the causes of appetitive 67 2, 51 | can be caused in ~their agents; not indeed with regard 68 2, 60 | happens with ~all univocal agents, so that if the agent be 69 2, 74 | compared to reason as free agents, because ~they both act 70 2, 109 | according to the order of agents or movers, man must ~be 71 2, 56 | though they were so many ~agents: so that metaphorically 72 3, 19 | several mutually ordained agents, the inferior is ~moved 73 3, 46 | nature never employs two agents where one will suffice. ~ 74 3, 63 | pertains to the sacramental ~agents: for it is by this sacrament 75 3, 65 | actions we must consider the agents, the ~recipients and the 76 3, 65 | recipients and the actions. The agents are the ministers of the 77 3, 66 | according to the number of the agents, if it be done ~perfectly 78 3, 67 | argument avails in those agents that act by their own ~power. 79 3, 81 | suffering body with the active agents. But Christ's body, ~according 80 3, 85 | operating as ~principal agents, but not without our co-operating 81 Suppl, 17| every ordered series of agents, the last end belongs ~to 82 Suppl, 17| instrumental or ministerial agents.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[17] A[ 83 Suppl, 55| instanced in all equivocal agents. The first kind of ~procession, 84 Suppl, 83| and all other secondary agents act in virtue thereof and 85 Suppl, 83| thus it is in all univocal ~agents, for instance a thing that 86 Suppl, 83| it ~is in all equivocal agents. In these it happens sometimes


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