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Alphabetical    [«  »]
seneca 59
senile 1
sens 1
sensation 80
sensations 5
sensato 4
sense 2148
Frequency    [«  »]
80 passing
80 praised
80 secular
80 sensation
80 tending
79 148
79 accept
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

sensation

   Part, Question
1 1, 17 | affection of sense is its sensation itself. Hence, from ~the 2 1, 17 | judge that we experience sensation. ~Since, however, sense 3 1, 17 | but not about the fact of ~sensation.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[17] A[ 4 1, 18 | life, namely, nourishment, sensation, local movement and ~understanding. 5 1, 18 | would be better to say that sensation and intelligence and ~the 6 1, 18 | have a nature capable ~of sensation or understanding. Thus, 7 1, 27 | and of will. The act of sensation, which also appears to be 8 1, 27 | actions; for ~the act of sensation is perfected by the action 9 1, 51 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Sensation is entirely a vital function. 10 1, 51 | fashioned for the purpose of sensation through them, but to this 11 1, 54 | object. But the act of ~sensation is relatively infinite, 12 1, 70 | of these operations, as sensation ~and nutrition, our body 13 1, 72 | desire of ~propagation, nor sensation in generating, they are 14 1, 75 | organ. On the other hand, sensation and the consequent operations 15 1, 75 | shown above (A[3]) that sensation is not the operation of ~ 16 1, 75 | soul only. Since, then, sensation is an operation of man, 17 1, 75 | through supposing that sensation was ~proper to the soul, 18 1, 76 | principle of our nourishment, sensation, and local ~movement; and 19 1, 77 | Somno et Vigilia i) that ~"sensation belongs neither to the soul, 20 1, 77 | Plato's opinion was that sensation is an operation proper ~ 21 1, 77 | body, because the action of sensation cannot proceed ~from the 22 1, 52 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Sensation is entirely a vital function. 23 1, 52 | fashioned for the purpose of sensation through them, but to this 24 1, 55 | object. But the act of ~sensation is relatively infinite, 25 1, 71 | of these operations, as sensation ~and nutrition, our body 26 1, 71 | desire of ~propagation, nor sensation in generating, they are 27 1, 74 | organ. On the other hand, sensation and the ~consequent operations 28 1, 74 | shown above (A[3]) that sensation is not the operation of ~ 29 1, 74 | soul only. Since, then, sensation is an operation of man, 30 1, 74 | through supposing that sensation was ~proper to the soul, 31 1, 75 | principle of our nourishment, sensation, and local ~movement; and 32 1, 76 | Somno et Vigilia i) that ~"sensation belongs neither to the soul, 33 1, 76 | Plato's opinion was that sensation is an operation proper ~ 34 1, 76 | body, because the action of sensation cannot proceed ~from the 35 1, 77 | only at the actual time of sensation, but ~also when it is absent. 36 1, 83 | his senses, to the act ~of sensation - by instruction or discovery, 37 1, 83 | produced in accordance with sensation" (De Anima iii, 3), that ~ 38 1, 88 | soul as united, just as sensation is, for he had not as yet ~ 39 1, 96 | man was passible. ~For "sensation is a kind of passion." But 40 1, 96 | Thus understanding and sensation are said ~to be passions. 41 1, 96 | first two objections; since ~sensation and sleep do not remove 42 2, 6 | reason of some pleasurable sensation or some vicious ~habit.~ 43 2, 32 | is that which arises from sensation which requires the ~presence 44 2, 47 | incapable of sorrow and sensation; and ~this is chiefly what 45 2, 84 | other ~members, in so far as sensation and movement follow from 46 2, 42 | because our nourishment, sensation, and ~understanding ought 47 2, 171 | for objects of external sensation. Yet ~this abstraction from 48 2, 177 | the life of animals in sensation and movement; and the ~life 49 2, 177 | says (De Anima iii, 7) that sensation and ~understanding are movements 50 3, 15 | suffer in this way through sensation and intelligence, as was ~ 51 Suppl, 3 | world. For sorrow is the sensation of hurt. But some hurts 52 Suppl, 3 | sorrow is on account of the sensation of ~hurt, so interior sorrow 53 Suppl, 32| movement proceeding from sensation (De Anima ii). ~Hence the 54 Suppl, 79| impassibility excludes actual sensation from glorified bodies?~Aquin.: 55 Suppl, 79| impassibility excludes actual sensation from ~glorified bodies. 56 Suppl, 79| Philosopher (De Anima ii, 11), ~"sensation is a kind of passion." But 57 Suppl, 79| they will not have actual sensation.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[82] A[ 58 Suppl, 79| alteration which is requisite for sensation.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[82] A[ 59 Suppl, 79| Further, whenever actual sensation is due to a new perception, ~ 60 Suppl, 79| there will be no actual sensation.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[82] A[ 61 Suppl, 79| soul will have no actual sensation whatever.~Aquin.: SMT XP 62 Suppl, 79| Therefore there will be actual sensation.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[82] A[ 63 Suppl, 79| distinct from the inanimate by sensation and movement." Now there 64 Suppl, 79| there will also be actual sensation.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[82] A[ 65 Suppl, 79| agreed that there is some sensation in the bodies ~of the blessed: 66 Suppl, 79| opinion as to the mode of sensation.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[82] A[ 67 Suppl, 79| does not result in real sensation, because every ~passive 68 Suppl, 79| active principle in external sensation is a thing existing outside ~ 69 Suppl, 79| powers, there will be no true sensation. ~Hence we do not say that 70 Suppl, 79| must say with others that sensation in glorified bodies ~will 71 Suppl, 79| reception does not cause sensation, properly speaking, because ~ 72 Suppl, 79| of itself causes actual ~sensation, without changing the nature 73 Suppl, 79| that takes place in ~actual sensation and is no other than the 74 Suppl, 79| species in the ~organs of sensation, so there will be new judgment 75 Suppl, 79| accidentally related to the act of sensation which is effected by a ~ 76 Suppl, 79| and the ~instrument of sensation with a spiritual alteration, 77 Suppl, 81| bodies as ~perfecting them in sensation. Therefore neither should 78 Suppl, 81| local movement but also for sensation, and for the ~execution 79 Suppl, 83| are in a manner patient to sensation, will ~nevertheless not 80 Appen1, 2| And, because all bodily sensation ~is from the soul, it follows


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