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Alphabetical    [«  »]
mustard 2
musti 1
mutability 9
mutable 76
mute 1
mutilated 2
mutilation 5
Frequency    [«  »]
76 explain
76 filial
76 fulfilment
76 mutable
76 perfecting
76 preach
76 supposita
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

mutable

   Part, Question
1 1, 9 | moves ~itself is in some way mutable. But, as Augustine says ( 2 1, 9 | Therefore God is in some way mutable.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[9] A[1] 3 1, 9 | James 4:8). Therefore God is mutable.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[9] A[1] 4 1, 9 | Further, everything which is mutable is variable. But forms are ~ 5 1, 9 | being from nothing, are ~mutable."~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[9] A[ 6 1, 9 | creature ~is in some way mutable. Be it known therefore that 7 1, 9 | it known therefore that a mutable thing can be ~called so 8 1, 9 | namely, of God - they are mutable, inasmuch as they are ~producible 9 1, 9 | however, a thing is called mutable by a power in itself, thus 10 1, 9 | manner every creature is mutable. For every creature has 11 1, 9 | way all creatures are not ~mutable, but those only in which 12 1, 9 | therefore these bodies are not mutable ~as to substantial being, 13 1, 9 | creatures generally are mutable by the power of the Creator, 14 1, 9 | is in none of ~these ways mutable, it belongs to Him alone 15 1, 16 | otherwise ~truth would be mutable, as the mind is."~Aquin.: 16 1, 16 | truth of our intellect is mutable; ~not because it is itself 17 1, 16 | thus forms may be called ~mutable. Whereas the truth of the 18 1, 19 | Whether the will of God is mutable?~(8) Whether the will of 19 1, 19 | otherwise His will would be mutable. Therefore whatever He ~ 20 1, 19 | contingent is imperfect and mutable.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[19] A[ 21 1, 65 | substance, though they are mutable ~in other respects, such 22 1, 69 | forms are imperfect and mutable. Hence the ~impression of 23 1, 66 | substance, though they are mutable ~in other respects, such 24 1, 70 | forms are imperfect and mutable. Hence the ~impression of 25 1, 83 | the ~various conditions of mutable things are themselves immovable; 26 2, 72 | consists in the desire for some mutable ~good, for which man has 27 2, 73 | man turns unduly to some mutable ~good, it follows that he 28 2, 75 | law, and intent on some mutable ~good, causes the act of 29 2, 77 | part of the adherence to a ~mutable good; in which respect every 30 2, 82 | turning inordinately to mutable good; which inordinateness 31 2, 84 | inordinate turning to a mutable good, as stated above ~( 32 2, 84 | arises from the desire of mutable good; and consequently the 33 2, 84 | sin as turning towards the mutable good by which sin is, as 34 2, 84 | arises from the appetite ~for mutable good. Wherefore there is 35 2, 86 | much higher ~nature than mutable things, to which it turns 36 2, 87 | the inordinate turning to mutable good. In this respect sin 37 2, 87 | finite, ~both because the mutable good itself is finite, and 38 2, 87 | of their turning towards mutable good, which constitutes 39 2, 88 | in sinning, cleaves to a mutable good as using it: ~because 40 2, 88 | Therefore whoever sins enjoys a mutable good. Now "to ~enjoy what 41 2, 88 | whoever sins, approaches a mutable good, and, ~consequently 42 2, 88 | 4 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: Mutable good is not considered to 43 2, 88 | since man can love any mutable good, either less than ~ 44 2, 113 | terminates at the good of mutable nature. Hence, Augustine, 45 2, 19 | includes ~conversion to a mutable good, together with aversion 46 2, 19 | includes no ~conversion to a mutable good. Therefore it is not 47 2, 19 | good, and conversion to a mutable good, but not always in ~ 48 2, 19 | they imply conversion to a mutable good, in so ~far as the 49 2, 19 | principally in conversion to a ~mutable good, and, consequently, 50 2, 19 | were possible to turn to a mutable good, ~even inordinately, 51 2, 20 | inordinate conversion to a mutable ~good. Now presumption is 52 2, 20 | human ~power, which is a mutable good, rather than from turning 53 2, 20 | implies both conversion to a ~mutable good, in so far as it arises 54 2, 37 | turning inordinately to a mutable good, and so it is not schism ~ 55 2, 77 | inordinate conversion to a mutable good. In like manner ~omission 56 2, 77 | imply ~conversion to any mutable good.~ 57 2, 102 | contemning God and adhering ~to mutable things, so the merit of 58 2, 116 | immutable good, and adhering to mutable goods, as state above (FS, 59 2, 116 | sin, while conversion to a mutable good is the material ~element, 60 2, 156 | there is conversion to some mutable good. ~But in anger there 61 2, 156 | there is conversion not to a mutable good, but to a person's ~ 62 2, 156 | appetite turns as to ~a mutable good.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[158] 63 2, 160 | in sin, conversion to a ~mutable good, and this is the material 64 3, 1 | creature which by nature is mutable, should not always be in 65 3, 1 | and incorporeal, ~produced mutable and corporeal creatures 66 3, 1 | assume a nature created, mutable, corporeal, ~and subject 67 3, 16 | be created temporal and mutable. Therefore what belongs 68 3, 86 | through being turned ~to some mutable good. Consequently, for 69 3, 86 | as they turn ~towards a mutable good, yet they are connected 70 3, 86 | an inordinate ~turning to mutable good. Accordingly, in so 71 3, 86 | turns inordinately to a mutable good, it ~gives rise to 72 3, 86 | however, the turning to mutable good is finite, sin does 73 3, 86 | turns inordinately to a mutable good, without turning from 74 3, 86 | turns inordinately to a ~mutable good, produces in the soul 75 3, 86 | inordinate turning to a mutable good can remain, since this ~ 76 Suppl, 13| finite as turning to a mutable good, in which respect it


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