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Alphabetical    [«  »]
examples 26
exasperated 4
excandescentia 1
exceed 72
exceeded 18
exceeding 65
exceedingly 14
Frequency    [«  »]
72 chrism
72 continue
72 denied
72 exceed
72 foreknowledge
72 idols
72 incontinence
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

exceed

   Part, Question
1 1, 1 | that certain truths which exceed human reason should ~be 2 1, 32 | with invisible things, that exceed human reason; wherefore 3 1, 50 | that incorruptible bodies, exceed corruptible bodies almost 4 1, 50 | as it were ~incomparably exceed material substances as to 5 1, 77 | whatever is so, does not exceed the subject in which it 6 1, 51 | that incorruptible bodies, exceed corruptible bodies almost 7 1, 51 | as it were ~incomparably exceed material substances as to 8 1, 76 | whatever ~is so, does not exceed the subject in which it 9 1, 88 | As a less good man may exceed a better man in bodily ~ 10 1, 96 | as an effect ~does not exceed its cause. But the tree 11 1, 109 | substantial form does not exceed the power of a corporeal 12 1, 111 | as the ~superior bodies exceed the inferior in magnitude 13 1, 115 | state of immobility, and ~exceed the changeable order of 14 1, 116 | the power of God, it ~can exceed those limits.~Aquin.: SMT 15 2, 21 | since the mean does not ~exceed its limits, viz. the action 16 2, 32 | measure. Wherefore if it exceed that measure, it will be 17 2, 33 | on the contrary, do not exceed the natural mode of ~being, 18 2, 51 | which ~dispose to this end, exceed the proportion of human 19 2, 60 | as the internal passions exceed their due measure. Thus 20 2, 61 | all things, and does not exceed its ~bounds, which has been 21 2, 64 | measure, in so far as one may exceed or ~fall short of that rule. 22 2, 72 | proof." In ~this way to exceed reason or to fall short 23 2, 88 | accident, its quantity ~cannot exceed that of the act itself, 24 2, 96 | law that is made does not exceed ~the power of the lawgiver - 25 2, 102 | from lack of ~discretion, exceed in one direction or in another, 26 2, 109 | everlasting life, which exceed the ~capability of nature. 27 2, 22 | just as one hundred pounds exceed ~sixty. ~Aquin.: SMT SS 28 2, 30 | cause. But spiritual goods exceed ~corporal goods. Therefore 29 2, 39 | or if he does not much exceed moderation in defending 30 2, 46 | Further, the parts do not exceed the whole. Now the intellective ~ 31 2, 62 | force, provided one does not exceed the ~limits of a blameless 32 2, 75 | Therefore ~if either the price exceed the quantity of the thing' 33 2, 75 | conversely, the thing exceed the price, there is no longer 34 2, 77 | evil one. But parts do not exceed the whole. Therefore to ~ 35 2, 77 | boundary that man ~must not exceed in his moral actions. Wherefore 36 2, 91 | can, ~for He will yet far exceed." Now the divine worship 37 2, 92 | belongs to superstition ~to exceed the due mode of divine worship, 38 2, 107 | considered ~logically, they exceed one another, even as the 39 2, 107 | as the intellect and will exceed ~one another. For the intellect 40 2, 113 | pleasantly to others, he would exceed the mode of pleasing, and ~ 41 2, 113 | applied to all who wish to ~exceed the mode of virtue in pleasing 42 2, 116 | will ~be a sin for him to exceed this measure, by wishing 43 2, 116 | excused ~from sin if they exceed this due measure of reason 44 2, 116 | belongs to covetousness ~to exceed in receiving, and in this 45 2, 117 | prodigal does not always exceed in giving for the sake ~ 46 2, 117 | belongs to prodigality to exceed in giving and to be ~deficient 47 2, 117 | and makes him unable to exceed in giving. Moreover, ~prodigality 48 2, 128 | which he tends, does not ~exceed the magnanimous, but sometimes 49 2, 128 | short of him: but he does ~exceed in proportion to his own 50 2, 128 | magnanimous man does ~not exceed his. It is in this way that 51 2, 129 | according to ~reason, and if it exceed this rule it will be sinful. 52 2, 131 | presumption makes a man exceed what is proportionate to 53 2, 131 | what one falsely deems to exceed one's ability. ~Thirdly, 54 2, 140 | nature. But those vices which exceed the mode of human nature 55 2, 146 | reason. Wherefore if a man exceed in quantity of food, not 56 2, 156 | angry inwardly, or if one exceed in the ~outward signs of 57 2, 157 | are said to be cruel who exceed in ~punishing," which is 58 2, 163 | the principal agent must exceed in power, which ~is not 59 2, 166 | especially would seem to exceed in play, since ~they direct 60 2, 167 | dwell, but ~frequently to exceed their bounds, so that, whereas 61 2, 167 | things in such a way as to exceed the bounds observed by the 62 2, 183 | faith; and if he fail or ~exceed in a slight degree, this 63 2, 185 | Now it is not lawful to exceed the bounds of one's office 64 3, 7 | infinite, since it ~cannot exceed its subject. Secondly it 65 3, 10 | perfection of vision does not exceed the power of ~seeing. But 66 3, 57 | is no place so high as to exceed the dignity of a ~spiritual 67 Suppl, 21| the punishment should not exceed the fault. But the ~punishment 68 Suppl, 21| harm ~done, it does not exceed the measure of the sin.~ 69 Suppl, 25| are often ~published which exceed that just estimate. Therefore 70 Suppl, 69| their ~damnation does not exceed that of the demons who wander 71 Suppl, 93| is more difficult not to exceed the measure in food ~which 72 Suppl, 96| the punishment should not exceed the ~fault: "According to


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