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Alphabetical    [«  »]
drunkards 9
drunken 7
drunkenness 95
dry 44
drying 3
dryness 9
dryshod 1
Frequency    [«  »]
44 dark
44 defend
44 dilection
44 dry
44 dulia
44 expressions
44 expressive
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

dry

   Part, Question
1 1, 29 | fire is a ~simple, hot, and dry body: for proper accidents 2 1, 69 | gathered together, and the dry ~land appear," mean that 3 1, 69 | suitable words, "Let ~the dry land appear."~Aquin.: SMT 4 1, 69 | contrasted with the place of the dry land, ~so that the sense 5 1, 69 | that is, apart from the dry land. That the waters occupied 6 1, 69 | written: "He called ~the dry land, Earth." It may also 7 1, 69 | again, it is said that "the dry land," that is, the part 8 1, 69 | together into one place and the dry land appeared"; secondly, 9 1, 70 | was ~divided into sea and dry land. So also is it in the 10 1, 74 | waters, and the appearing of dry land, to ~denote the impression 11 1, 76 | as hot and ~cold, wet and dry, and the like, of which 12 1, 70 | gathered together, and the dry ~land appear," mean that 13 1, 70 | suitable words, "Let ~the dry land appear."~Aquin.: SMT 14 1, 70 | contrasted with the place of the dry land, ~so that the sense 15 1, 70 | that is, apart from the dry land. That the waters occupied 16 1, 70 | written: "He called ~the dry land, Earth." It may also 17 1, 70 | again, it is said that "the dry land," that is, the part 18 1, 70 | together into one place and the dry land appeared"; secondly, 19 1, 71 | was ~divided into sea and dry land. So also is it in the 20 1, 73 | waters, and the appearing of dry land, to ~denote the impression 21 1, 75 | as hot and ~cold, wet and dry, and the like, of which 22 1, 77 | though hot and ~cold, wet and dry, and other such corporeal 23 1, 77 | as hot or cold, damp or dry, and suchlike. Therefore 24 1, 77 | it is the ~reverse with dry things. Wherefore, since 25 1, 90 | His hands laid down the ~dry land"; but in this, that 26 2, 88 | is not opposed to "being dry"; but if we ~speak of the 27 2, 102 | flesh: also, if he have "a dry scurf," which covers ~the 28 2, 102 | through being too moist or too dry, engenders ~corrupt humors 29 2, 102 | and their flesh is very dry, such as the flesh of ~lions 30 2, 102 | the flesh of which is very dry, and certain ~water-fowl 31 2, 105 | eunuch say: Behold I am a dry tree."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 32 2, 99 | turn not aside, but with dry eyes hasten to the standard 33 2, 139 | is hot or cold, wet or ~dry." To the taste belongs the 34 2, 145 | reason of heat, cold, wet and dry. Thus the number "ten" [* 35 2, 147 | a combination of wet and dry nourishment. Therefore ~ 36 2, 187 | water lest the river run dry. [*St. Thomas ~gives no 37 3, 28 | gift of "agility" when with dry feet He walked on the ~sea. 38 3, 31 | born. If the sun's rays can dry up the ~filth in the drain, 39 3, 50 | fountain of life would have run dry. Accordingly, He ~experienced 40 3, 73 | namely, food, which is dry sustenance, and drink, which 41 3, 83 | means the blest;~What is dry, means the living;~What 42 Suppl, 3 | of my inmost soul, as to dry ~up the marrow of my body"; 43 Suppl, 88| are hot and cold, wet and dry. qualities proper to the ~ 44 Suppl, 94| follow the mode of humid and dry: for in the same corporeal


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