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subdivides 2
subdue 2
subdued 4
subject 2515
subject-matter 6
subjected 104
subjecting 9
Frequency    [«  »]
2551 time
2540 holy
2518 angels
2515 subject
2462 father
2441 just
2425 us
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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subject

1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1500 | 1501-2000 | 2001-2500 | 2501-2515

     Part, Question
1001 2, 54 | diversity of accidents; for the subject is the cause of ~its accidents; 1002 2, 54 | several can be in one same ~subject: since in one subject we 1003 2, 54 | same ~subject: since in one subject we may take parts in various 1004 2, 54 | dispositions in the same ~subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[54] A[ 1005 2, 54 | reason for this is that the subject of a ~habit is a passive 1006 2, 54 | power that cannot be the subject of a habit, as was clearly ~ 1007 2, 54 | one passive power be the subject of several acts or ~perfections 1008 2, 54 | but to the fact that the subject ~does not acquire all at 1009 2, 54 | being imperfectly in ~the subject, and is gradually perfected. 1010 2, 55 | essence of virtue; ~(2) its subject; (3) the division of virtue; ( 1011 2, 55 | virtue it is that ~makes its subject good. But goodness does 1012 2, 55 | which" it exits, namely, the subject. The matter about which ~ 1013 2, 55 | material cause we have the subject, which is mentioned when 1014 2, 55 | the mind, is the proper subject of virtue.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1015 2, 56 | Out. Para. 1/1 - OF THE SUBJECT OF VIRTUE (SIX ARTICLES)~ 1016 2, 56 | now have to consider the subject of virtue, about which there 1017 2, 56 | inquiry:~(1) Whether the subject of virtue is a power of 1018 2, 56 | the intellect can be the subject of virtue?~(4) Whether the 1019 2, 56 | concupiscible faculties can be the subject ~of virtue?~(5) Whether 1020 2, 56 | apprehension can be the subject of ~virtue?~(6) Whether 1021 2, 56 | Whether the will can be the subject of virtue?~Aquin.: SMT FS 1022 2, 56 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether the subject of virtue is a power of 1023 2, 56 | It would seem that the subject of virtue is not a power 1024 2, 56 | and quality is not the ~subject of quality. Therefore a 1025 2, 56 | power of the soul is not the subject of ~virtue.~Aquin.: SMT 1026 2, 56 | power of the soul is the subject of virtue.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1027 2, 56 | accident is said to be the subject of another, not as ~though 1028 2, 56 | surface is said to be the subject of color. In ~this way a 1029 2, 56 | the soul is said to be the subject of virtue.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1030 2, 56 | 1/1~On the contrary, The subject of virtue is a power of 1031 2, 56 | the intellect can be the subject of virtue?~Aquin.: SMT FS 1032 2, 56 | the intellect is not the subject of virtue. ~For Augustine 1033 2, 56 | virtue is love. But the ~subject of love is not the intellect, 1034 2, 56 | appetitive power. Therefore the subject of virtue ~is not the intellect, 1035 2, 56 | the intellect ~is not the subject of virtue.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1036 2, 56 | the intellect. But the ~subject of virtue is the mind, as 1037 2, 56 | Therefore the intellect is the subject of ~virtue.~Aquin.: SMT 1038 2, 56 | be actually good, and the subject good simply. But the first 1039 2, 56 | Body Para. 3/4~Hence the subject of a habit which is called 1040 2, 56 | intellectual virtues. But the subject of a habit which ~is called 1041 2, 56 | to the ~will, can be the subject of virtue absolutely so 1042 2, 56 | intellect, or the reason, is the subject of Faith: for ~the intellect 1043 2, 56 | practical intellect is the subject of prudence. For since ~ 1044 2, 56 | intellect. And therefore as the subject of science, ~which is the 1045 2, 56 | active intellect, so the subject of ~prudence is the practical 1046 2, 56 | concupiscible powers are the subject of virtue?~Aquin.: SMT FS 1047 2, 56 | concupiscible powers cannot ~be the subject of virtue. For these powers 1048 2, 56 | sensitive appetite cannot be the subject of virtue. ~Aquin.: SMT 1049 2, 56 | not competent to be the ~subject of virtue. Secondly, they 1050 2, 56 | concupiscible power can be the subject ~of human virtue: for, in 1051 2, 56 | this way they can ~be the subject of human virtue.~Aquin.: 1052 2, 56 | of apprehension are the subject of virtue?~Aquin.: SMT FS 1053 2, 56 | sensitive appetite can ~be the subject of virtue, in so far as 1054 2, 56 | sensitive appetite is the subject of virtue. Whereas the ~ 1055 2, 56 | Whether the will can be the subject of virtue?~Aquin.: SMT FS 1056 2, 56 | that the will is not the subject of virtue. Because ~no habit 1057 2, 56 | Therefore the will is not the ~subject of virtue.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1058 2, 56 | Therefore the will cannot be the subject of virtue.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1059 2, 57 | good work. Now a truth is subject ~to a twofold consideration - 1060 2, 57 | has, if we consider their subject and matter: for they are 1061 2, 58 | united to nature in the same subject, as is evident of ~natural 1062 2, 59 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, the subject of the moral virtues is 1063 2, 59 | about all matters that are subject to reason's direction ~and 1064 2, 59 | the will, which is not the subject of a passion, as stated ~ 1065 2, 59 | sensitive appetite which is the subject of the ~passions, is rational 1066 2, 60 | belongs to reason which is the subject ~of the intellectual virtues; 1067 2, 60 | the ~appetite which is the subject of moral virtues. But there 1068 2, 60 | Q[56], A[2]). But the subject of the moral virtues is 1069 2, 60 | the matter of the passive subject bears a twofold ~relation 1070 2, 61 | virtues, in the point of their subject, they do not rank ~before 1071 2, 61 | is ~threefold, the will, subject of "Justice," the concupiscible 1072 2, 61 | concupiscible faculty, ~subject of "Temperance," and the 1073 2, 61 | and the irascible faculty, subject of ~"Fortitude."~Aquin.: 1074 2, 61 | above four, both as to the subject and as to the ~formal principle.~ 1075 2, 62 | hope, in things that are subject to human power, fall short 1076 2, 62 | the perfect, in one same subject faith ~precedes hope, and 1077 2, 63 | use ~of a habit in us is subject to our will, as stated above ( 1078 2, 64 | mean, in so far as it is subject to a measure. Now the good ~ 1079 2, 66 | existing together in one subject are equal?~(3) Of moral 1080 2, 66 | secondly with regard ~to the subject that partakes of it. If 1081 2, 66 | virtue on the part of the subject, it may then ~be greater 1082 2, 66 | of ~participation by the subject, according as a virtue becomes 1083 2, 66 | intense or ~remiss in its subject. In this sense all the virtues 1084 2, 66 | which is on the part of the subject, as stated above (Q[65], ~ 1085 2, 66 | them equal in the one same subject. We might also say that 1086 2, 66 | evident by considering its subject and ~its object: its subject, 1087 2, 66 | subject and ~its object: its subject, because this is the will, 1088 2, 66 | affairs, which are ~the subject of science, than of Divine 1089 2, 67 | in that life, viz. "to be subject to God": because even in 1090 2, 67 | both by reason ~of its subject, since the will is incorruptible; 1091 2, 67 | remain, since their only subject is an organ of the body. ~ 1092 2, 67 | thirdly, on the part of the subject. The difference of perfect 1093 2, 67 | medium. On the part of the ~subject the difference of perfect 1094 2, 67 | same medium or the ~same subject: for nothing hinders a man 1095 2, 67 | them being about the same ~subject or in the same subject: 1096 2, 67 | subject or in the same subject: for one man can know the 1097 2, 67 | perfect on the part of the subject is incompatible with imperfect ~ 1098 2, 67 | imperfect ~knowledge in the same subject. Now faith, of its very 1099 2, 67 | imperfection on the part of the subject, viz. that the believer 1100 2, 67 | perfection ~on the part of the subject, viz. that the Blessed see 1101 2, 67 | incompatible in one and the same subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[67] A[ 1102 2, 67 | implies imperfection of its subject, is incompatible with the 1103 2, 67 | opposite ~perfection in that subject. Thus it is evident that 1104 2, 67 | implies imperfection of its subject, since it is "the act of 1105 2, 67 | they do not regard the same subject: ~whereas the imperfection 1106 2, 67 | another and regard the same subject. Consequently they are ~ 1107 2, 68 | Accordingly, in matters subject to human reason, and directed 1108 2, 68 | and power all things are subject, by His ~motion safeguards 1109 2, 68 | 15:28), and man entirely subject ~unto Him. Secondly, they 1110 2, 70 | is above him, so that he subject his intellect and, ~consequently, 1111 2, 70 | because the ~continent man is subject to concupiscence, but is 1112 2, 70 | the chaste man is neither subject to, nor led away from them.~ 1113 2, 71 | with one another; (4) the ~subject of sin; (5) the cause of 1114 2, 71 | quality which makes its subject good," as was shown above ( 1115 2, 71 | disposition whereby the subject ~is well disposed according 1116 2, 71 | the due disposition of its subject. The reason for ~this is 1117 2, 71 | be together in the same subject. Now sin ~is, in some way, 1118 2, 71 | vice cannot be in the same subject with virtue: neither, therefore, ~ 1119 2, 71 | be ~together in the same subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[71] A[ 1120 2, 71 | be together in the ~same subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[71] A[ 1121 2, 71 | the cause or occasion be subject to ~the will, the omission 1122 2, 72 | 23: "The human race ~is subject to three kinds of sin, for 1123 2, 72 | from being ~in the same subject, in different respects.~ 1124 2, 72 | respect of the thing which the subject is deprived, even as ~other 1125 2, 73 | be together in ~the same subject. Therefore it is impossible 1126 2, 73 | equal in one and the same ~subject: yet one virtue surpasses 1127 2, 73 | first is ~on the part of the subject: because spiritual sins 1128 2, 73 | those things ~which are subject to the dominion of his will, 1129 2, 73 | those things that are not subject to ~the dominion of his 1130 2, 73 | to our ~neighbor are not subject to the dominion of our will, 1131 2, 74 | Out. Para. 1/1 - OF THE SUBJECT OF SIN (TEN ARTICLES)~We 1132 2, 74 | We must now consider the subject of vice or sin: under which 1133 2, 74 | Whether the will can be the subject of sin?~(2) Whether the 1134 2, 74 | Whether the will alone is the subject of sin?~(3) Whether the 1135 2, 74 | the sensuality can be the subject of sin?~(4) Whether it can 1136 2, 74 | 4) Whether it can be the subject of mortal sin?~(5) Whether 1137 2, 74 | Whether the reason can be the subject of sin?~(6) Whether morose 1138 2, 74 | lower reason can be the subject of mortal sin?~(9) Whether 1139 2, 74 | higher reason can be the subject of venial sin?~(10) Whether 1140 2, 74 | 1~Whether the will is a subject of sin?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1141 2, 74 | that the will cannot be a subject of sin. For ~Dionysius says ( 1142 2, 74 | same thing cannot be both subject and efficient ~cause of 1143 2, 74 | Therefore it is not the subject of sin.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1144 2, 74 | have for their matter and subject, the thing into which the 1145 2, 74 | Consequently the proper subject of sin must ~needs be the 1146 2, 74 | sin is in the will as its ~subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[74] A[ 1147 2, 74 | apprehensive power were nowise subject ~to the will, there would 1148 2, 74 | power a defect that is subject to the will, this defect 1149 2, 74 | Whether the will alone is the subject of sin?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1150 2, 74 | that the will alone is the subject of sin. For ~Augustine says ( 1151 2, 74 | except by the ~will." Now the subject of sin is the power by which 1152 2, 74 | Therefore the ~will alone is the subject of sin.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1153 2, 74 | Therefore the will ~alone is the subject of sin.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1154 2, 74 | suffice for them ~to be the subject of sin, because then even 1155 2, 74 | by the will, would be a subject of sin; which is ~clearly 1156 2, 74 | Therefore the will alone is the subject of sin.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1157 2, 74 | besides the will, are the ~subject of virtues, as stated above ( 1158 2, 74 | the will is not ~the only subject of sin.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1159 2, 74 | of ~a voluntary act is a subject of sin. Now voluntary acts 1160 2, 74 | not only the will can be a subject of sin, but ~also all those 1161 2, 74 | habit belong to the same ~subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[74] A[ 1162 2, 74 | of which they can be the subject of virtue, vice, and sin, 1163 2, 74 | and, consequently, the subject of sin.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1164 2, 74 | contraries to be about the same subject, ~sensuality can be the 1165 2, 74 | sensuality can be the subject of mortal sin.~Aquin.: SMT 1166 2, 74 | and habit are in the same subject. Since therefore venial 1167 2, 74 | thing and is in the same ~subject; thus inchoate science is 1168 2, 74 | sometimes it is in the same subject, but is not the same thing; 1169 2, 74 | thing, nor in the same subject, as in those things which 1170 2, 74 | delectation, since whatever is subject to the judgment ~of the 1171 2, 74 | of the lower court, is subject also to the judgment of 1172 2, 74 | the same thing may be the subject of different ~considerations, 1173 2, 75 | also the act which is the subject of that privation, which 1174 2, 76 | OBJ 3: Further, man is the subject of virtue and sin, inasmuch 1175 2, 77 | respect of things which ~are subject to his will. Now it is subject 1176 2, 77 | subject to his will. Now it is subject to man's will, whether he 1177 2, 77 | the human body cease to be subject to its governing and motive ~ 1178 2, 77 | inordinate, when they are not ~subject to the order of reason, 1179 2, 78 | use a habit, since it is subject to the will of the person 1180 2, 79 | consists in man not being subject to Whom he ~ought to be, 1181 2, 80 | written (Jam. 4:7): "Be subject . . . to God, ~but resist 1182 2, 80 | reason, a matter that is subject to the free-will.~Aquin.: 1183 2, 81 | its essence; ~(3) of its subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[81] Out. 1184 2, 81 | way of origin, unless ~its subject be also transmitted, since 1185 2, 81 | accidents do not pass from one ~subject to another. Now the rational 1186 2, 81 | rational soul which is the subject of sin, is ~not transmitted 1187 2, 81 | some, considering that the subject of ~sin is the rational 1188 2, 81 | semen itself is ~not the subject of the guilt.~Aquin.: SMT 1189 2, 81 | guilty stain binding its ~subject to punishment; for, as the 1190 2, 81 | sin, but would have been subject to the ~necessity of dying 1191 2, 81 | long ~as the soul remained subject to God. Now privation of 1192 2, 81 | been liable to suffer and ~subject to the necessity of dying.~ 1193 2, 82 | habit does not incline its subject to ~contraries: since the 1194 2, 82 | number is derived from the subject. For example, take bodily 1195 2, 82 | habit ~cannot incline its subject to contraries. But there 1196 2, 82 | consists in man's will being subject to ~God: which subjection, 1197 2, 82 | whereby the will was made subject to God, is the formal element ~ 1198 2, 82 | the body. But sickness ~is subject to degrees. Therefore original 1199 2, 82 | Therefore original sin is subject to degrees.~Aquin.: SMT 1200 2, 82 | sensitive appetite is ~not kept subject to reason by the bonds of 1201 2, 83 | Out. Para. 1/1 - OF THE SUBJECT OF ORIGINAL SIN (FOUR ARTICLES)~ 1202 2, 83 | We must now consider the subject of original sin, under which 1203 2, 83 | inquiry:~(1) Whether the subject of original sin is the flesh 1204 2, 83 | the other powers is the subject of ~original sin?~(4) Whether 1205 2, 83 | contrary, The same is the subject of a virtue and of the vice 1206 2, 83 | the flesh cannot be the subject of ~virtue: for the Apostle 1207 2, 83 | the ~flesh cannot be the subject of original sin, but only 1208 2, 83 | instrumental; secondly, as in its subject. ~Accordingly the original 1209 2, 83 | nowise be in the flesh as its subject, but only in the ~soul.~ 1210 2, 83 | that guilt, either as its subject or as its instrument, has 1211 2, 83 | since the soul can be the subject of guilt, while the ~flesh, 1212 2, 83 | of itself, cannot be the subject of guilt; whatever accrues 1213 2, 83 | therefore, the soul is the subject of original ~sin, and not 1214 2, 83 | follows ~that the flesh is the subject, not of guilt, but of punishment.~ 1215 2, 83 | naturally apt to be the ~subject of sin, in respect of those 1216 2, 83 | soul, because power is the subject ~of virtue. Therefore original 1217 2, 83 | Therefore the soul is the subject of original sin ~chiefly 1218 2, 83 | 1/1~I answer that, The subject of a sin is chiefly that 1219 2, 83 | concupiscible power ~is the proper subject of that sin. Now it is evident 1220 2, 83 | s origin, is the primary subject of original sin. ~Now the 1221 2, 83 | essence, is the primary subject of original sin.~Aquin.: 1222 2, 83 | related to the powers, as a subject to its proper accidents, 1223 2, 83 | accidents, which follow ~their subject both in the order of generation 1224 2, 83 | First, its inherence to its subject; and in this respect it ~ 1225 2, 83 | generative power is the ~subject of original sin.~Aquin.: 1226 2, 83 | soul which can be first the subject of sin. Now this ~is the 1227 2, 83 | generation, which are not subject to reason. Now those members ~ 1228 2, 83 | be transmitted from one subject to ~another: hence contagious 1229 2, 84 | the effect of not being ~subject to His commandment; and 1230 2, 84 | commandment man refuses to be subject, for which reason it is 1231 2, 84 | that man wishes not to be subject to God, it follows that 1232 2, 84 | pride to be unwilling to be subject to any superior, ~and especially 1233 2, 85 | no accident acts on its subject: because that which is ~ 1234 2, 85 | nature as an accident in a subject. Therefore sin does not ~ 1235 2, 85 | not act effectively on its subject, but it ~acts on it formally, 1236 2, 85 | accident acted on its own subject, ~but in so far as the object 1237 2, 85 | perfected ~by God, and was subject to Him. Now this same original 1238 2, 85 | soul's powers that can be subject of ~virtue, as stated above ( 1239 2, 85 | justice is, the irascible, the subject of ~fortitude, and the concupiscible, 1240 2, 85 | and the concupiscible, the subject of temperance. Therefore 1241 2, 85 | man, in so far as it is subject to reason: whereas, in so 1242 2, 85 | 3]), so ~also it became subject to corruption, by reason 1243 2, 85 | temperaments, some men's bodies are subject to more defects, some to ~ 1244 2, 85 | should remain, for ~a time, subject to suffering, in order that 1245 2, 85 | the latter is not entirely subject to ~matter, as other forms 1246 2, 85 | to Whom every nature is subject, in forming ~man supplied 1247 2, 87 | which the human will is subject. In ~the first place a man' 1248 2, 87 | order whereby man's will is subject to God, the ~disorder will 1249 2, 87 | of the condition of the subject, viz. a ~human being deprived 1250 2, 88 | accustoming his will ~not to be subject to the due order in lesser 1251 2, 88 | matters, is disposed not to ~subject his will even to the order 1252 2, 88 | act's genus, ~because the subject always excels its accident. 1253 2, 89 | sensuality not being ~perfectly subject to reason: and the sudden 1254 2, 89 | the act of ~reason is not subject to the act of deliberation 1255 2, 89 | so long as man remained subject to God, as ~Augustine says ( 1256 2, 89 | highest part of man were ~not subject to God, which constitutes 1257 2, 89 | itself could not ~be the subject of mortal sin, as stated 1258 2, 89 | fact that ~believers are subject to concupiscence is not 1259 2, 90 | law moves those who are subject to it to act aright. ~But 1260 2, 91 | conception of things is not subject to time but is eternal, ~ 1261 2, 91 | therefore other ~animals are not subject to a natural law, neither 1262 2, 91 | natural law, neither is man subject to a ~natural law.~Aquin.: 1263 2, 91 | Wherefore, since all things subject to Divine ~providence are 1264 2, 91 | the rational creature is subject to Divine providence in 1265 2, 91 | which may be found in things subject to the ~law, is called a 1266 2, 91 | ad 1). Now those who are subject to a law may receive a twofold ~ 1267 2, 91 | that a ~lawgiver deprives a subject of some dignity, the latter 1268 2, 91 | of the army, he becomes a subject of rural or of ~mercantile 1269 2, 91 | so far as sensuality is ~subject to reason. But it is called " 1270 2, 92 | is ~"that which makes its subject good." But virtue is in 1271 2, 92 | accordingly "the virtue of every ~subject consists in his being well 1272 2, 92 | obeyed by those ~who are subject to it. Consequently it is 1273 2, 92 | is "that which makes its subject good," it follows that the 1274 2, 93 | Whether necessary things are subject to the eternal law?~(5) 1275 2, 93 | natural contingencies are subject to the eternal law?~(6) 1276 2, 93 | Whether all human things are subject to it?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 1277 2, 93 | be done by ~those who are subject to his government. And just 1278 2, 93 | the eternal ~law is not subject to the judgment of man." 1279 2, 93 | 8:7), that "it cannot be subject to the law of God." Therefore 1280 2, 93 | because ~more things are subject to a higher than to a lower 1281 2, 93 | necessary and eternal things are subject to the eternal law?~Aquin.: 1282 2, 93 | necessary and eternal things are subject to ~the eternal law. For 1283 2, 93 | whatever is reasonable is subject to reason. But the ~Divine 1284 2, 93 | is just. Therefore it is subject to ~(the Divine) reason. 1285 2, 93 | Therefore ~God's will is subject to the eternal law. But 1286 2, 93 | and necessary things are subject to the eternal law.~Aquin.: 1287 2, 93 | 2: Further, whatever is subject to the King, is subject 1288 2, 93 | subject to the King, is subject to the ~King's law. Now 1289 2, 93 | Cor. 15:28,24, "shall be subject ~. . . to God and the Father . . . 1290 2, 93 | Son, Who is eternal, is subject to the ~eternal law.~Aquin.: 1291 2, 93 | many ~necessary things are subject to Divine providence: for 1292 2, 93 | even necessary things are subject to the eternal law.~Aquin.: 1293 2, 93 | necessary things are not subject to the eternal law.~Aquin.: 1294 2, 93 | Consequently whatever is subject to the Divine ~government, 1295 2, 93 | the Divine ~government, is subject to the eternal law: while 1296 2, 93 | while if anything is not ~subject to the Divine government, 1297 2, 93 | government, neither is it subject to the eternal ~law. The 1298 2, 93 | us. For those things are subject to human government, which 1299 2, 93 | the nature of man is not subject to ~human government; for 1300 2, 93 | contingent or necessary, is subject to the eternal law: while 1301 2, 93 | Nature or Essence are not subject to the eternal ~law, but 1302 2, 93 | His very Essence, it is ~subject neither to the Divine government, 1303 2, 93 | creatures; which things ~are subject to the eternal law, in so 1304 2, 93 | Consequently He is not subject to Divine providence or 1305 2, 93 | But He is ~said to be subject to the Father by reason 1306 2, 93 | natural contingents are subject to the eternal law? ~Aquin.: 1307 2, 93 | natural contingents are not subject to the ~eternal law. Because 1308 2, 93 | but rational creatures are subject to the eternal law; and 1309 2, 93 | seems that they are not ~subject to the eternal law.~Aquin.: 1310 2, 93 | Therefore they are not subject to the eternal ~law.~Aquin.: 1311 2, 93 | only to ~rational creatures subject to man. The reason of this 1312 2, 93 | actions of those that are subject to the government of ~someone: 1313 2, 93 | use of irrational things ~subject to man, is done by the act 1314 2, 93 | however much they may be subject to him. But he can ~impose 1315 2, 93 | laws on rational beings subject to him, in so far as by 1316 2, 93 | action on the man that is subject to him, so God imprints 1317 2, 93 | the whole of nature are subject to the eternal law. ~Consequently 1318 2, 93 | irrational creatures are subject to the eternal law, through ~ 1319 2, 93 | defects of natural things are subject to the eternal ~law.~Aquin.: 1320 2, 93 | Whether all human affairs are subject to the eternal law?~Aquin.: 1321 2, 93 | not all human affairs are subject to the ~eternal law. For 1322 2, 93 | enemy to God: for it is not subject to the ~law of God." But 1323 2, 93 | Therefore all men are not subject to the eternal law which 1324 2, 93 | ways in which a thing is subject to the ~eternal law, as 1325 2, 93 | irrational creatures are subject to ~the eternal law, as 1326 2, 93 | rational, consequently it is ~subject to the eternal law in both 1327 2, 93 | the good are perfectly subject to the eternal law, as ~ 1328 2, 93 | whereas the wicked are subject to the ~eternal law, imperfectly 1329 2, 93 | prudence of the flesh cannot be subject to the law of ~God as regards 1330 2, 93 | the ~Divine law: yet it is subject to the law of God, as regards 1331 2, 94 | contained in the ~notion of the subject: although, to one who knows 1332 2, 94 | not the definition of ~the subject, it happens that such a 1333 2, 94 | acts of virtue are ~the subject of natural law.~Aquin.: 1334 2, 94 | virtuous acts also are a subject of the natural law.~Aquin.: 1335 2, 94 | universally just as not to be subject to change in regard ~to 1336 2, 94 | obstacles (just as ~natures subject to generation and corruption 1337 2, 94 | that the natural law is subject to change.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1338 2, 95 | necessary in this way, is not subject to human judgment, wherefore 1339 2, 96 | 5) Whether all men are subject to human law?~(6) Whether 1340 2, 96 | those matters which are the subject of ~decrees," which are 1341 2, 96 | these, he adds ~"all matters subject to decrees."~Aquin.: SMT 1342 2, 96 | Para. 1/1~Whether all are subject to the law?~Aquin.: SMT 1343 2, 96 | would seem that not all are subject to the law. For those ~alone 1344 2, 96 | law. For those ~alone are subject to a law for whom a law 1345 2, 96 | Therefore the just ~are not subject to the law.~Aquin.: SMT 1346 2, 96 | Therefore not ~all men are subject to human law.~Aquin.: SMT 1347 2, 96 | Therefore not all are ~subject to the law.~Aquin.: SMT 1348 2, 96 | 13:1): "Let every soul be subject ~to the higher powers." 1349 2, 96 | Therefore all men should be ~subject to human law.~Aquin.: SMT 1350 2, 96 | Wherefore a man may be subject to ~law in two ways. First, 1351 2, 96 | First, as the regulated is subject to the regulator: ~and, 1352 2, 96 | in this way, whoever is subject to a power, is subject to 1353 2, 96 | is subject to a power, is subject to the law ~framed by that 1354 2, 96 | two ways that one is not ~subject to a power. In one way, 1355 2, 96 | kingdom, since they are not ~subject to his authority. In another 1356 2, 96 | yet higher ~law; thus the subject of a proconsul should be 1357 2, 96 | those matters in which the subject receives his orders from 1358 2, 96 | way, ~one who is simply subject to a law, may not be a subject 1359 2, 96 | subject to a law, may not be a subject thereto in ~certain matters, 1360 2, 96 | Secondly, a man is said to be subject to a law as the coerced 1361 2, 96 | a law as the coerced is subject ~to the coercer. In this 1362 2, 96 | virtuous and righteous are not subject to ~the law, but only the 1363 2, 96 | sense the ~good are not subject to the law, but only the 1364 2, 96 | the ~Holy Ghost, are not subject to the law in those matters 1365 2, 96 | fact that spiritual men are subject to law, is due to the leading 1366 2, 96 | according to 1 Pt. 2:13: "Be ye subject . . . to every human ~creature 1367 2, 96 | of law, the sovereign is subject to the law by his own ~will, 1368 2, 96 | It seems that he who is subject to a law may not act beside 1369 2, 96 | the law. But those who are subject to the law cannot make the 1370 2, 96 | because things are not subject ~to speech, but speech to 1371 2, 97 | imperfect: wherefore ~his law is subject to change. Moreover the 1372 2, 97 | unchangeable in things that are subject to change. And ~therefore 1373 2, 97 | rectitude of this kind is subject to change.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1374 2, 97 | public law to which he is subject. ~Wherefore just as none 1375 2, 98 | Law. ~Because whoever is subject to the king, must needs 1376 2, 98 | the king, must needs be subject to his law. ~But the Old 1377 2, 98 | Reply OBJ 1: Whoever are subject to a king, are bound to 1378 2, 99 | of the Divine law is to subject man to God by fear and ~ 1379 2, 100 | some matters cannot be the subject of judgment without much ~ 1380 2, 100 | belongs to man should be subject to ~reason.~Aquin.: SMT 1381 2, 100 | law are self-evident to a ~subject having natural reason, and 1382 2, 100 | self-evident principle to a subject ~possessed of faith: "for 1383 2, 100 | sanctification of the Sabbath, as the subject of a moral precept, ~requires 1384 2, 100 | that the soldier should be subject to the commander, and the ~ 1385 2, 100 | himself to God, or not to be subject to His justice, even ~in 1386 2, 100 | in such matters as are ~subject to human jurisdiction: for 1387 2, 100 | knowingly": and this is subject to the ~judgment of both 1388 2, 102 | whatever belongs to him, are subject to the authority of ~God, 1389 2, 102 | interior holiness, the ~subject of which is the soul. It 1390 2, 102 | of those things that are ~subject to God, and from which we 1391 2, 102 | purple denotes the flesh subject to passions; the twice dyed ~ 1392 2, 102 | unclean that was already subject ~to corruption, or exposed 1393 2, 102 | cedar-wood, which is not ~subject to putrefaction, was offered 1394 2, 102 | things are most of all ~subject to the power of man. Therefore 1395 2, 102 | as though they were not subject to the power of man, but 1396 2, 103 | sanctuary which could not be the subject of sin is stated to be expiated.~ 1397 2, 103 | exterior worship had to be ~subject to variations according 1398 2, 104 | another, which ordering is subject to the direction of the 1399 2, 104 | to his neighbor are more subject to reason than the ~relations 1400 2, 104 | considered in itself, was subject to reason. But in so far 1401 2, 104 | made use of by men, are not subject to division, since they 1402 2, 104 | relations to one another, are subject to division ~according to 1403 2, 105 | individuals. And since whatever is subject to the power of an ~individual 1404 2, 105 | authority, to whom men are ~subject. On the other hand, the 1405 2, 105 | day . . . he shall not be subject to the punishment, because 1406 2, 105 | reason for his not being subject to a ~pecuniary penalty 1407 2, 106 | state of the New Law is subject to change with regard to 1408 2, 107 | state of the Jews ~who were subject to the sacraments of the 1409 2, 108 | of virtue should be the subject of a prohibition. ~Now judgment 1410 2, 109 | that ~which is to be its subject. But in order that man should 1411 2, 109 | by man's will not being subject to God's; and this order 1412 2, 109 | man's will can ~only be subject to God when God draws man' 1413 2, 109 | lower appetite ought to be subject to the reason, so should 1414 2, 109 | so should the reason be ~subject to God, and should place 1415 2, 109 | the lower appetite is not subject to ~reason, so likewise, 1416 2, 109 | s reason is not entirely subject to God, ~the consequence 1417 2, 110 | infused virtue?~(4) Of the subject of grace.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1418 2, 110 | informs" the matter or subject; whereas the agent ~"informs" 1419 2, 110 | the agent ~"informs" the subject, not by its substance, but 1420 2, 110 | no ~quality acts on its subject, since the action of a quality 1421 2, 110 | without ~the action of its subject, and thus the subject would 1422 2, 110 | its subject, and thus the subject would necessarily act ~upon 1423 2, 110 | has ceased to be in its ~subject. But grace remains; since 1424 2, 110 | corrupted inasmuch as its subject begins or ~ceases to be 1425 2, 110 | grace, since ~"it makes its subject good, and his work good," 1426 2, 110 | essence of the soul as in a subject, or in one of ~the powers?~ 1427 2, 110 | essence of the soul, as in ~a subject, but in one of the powers. 1428 2, 110 | power of the soul, as in a subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[110] A[ 1429 2, 110 | of the soul is the proper subject of ~grace, the soul, inasmuch 1430 2, 110 | the soul is not the proper subject of ~grace.~Aquin.: SMT FS 1431 2, 110 | powers of the soul as ~in a subject; since the soul's powers 1432 2, 110 | s powers are the proper subject of virtue, ~as stated above ( 1433 2, 110 | power of the soul is the subject of grace, since ~every perfection 1434 2, 110 | prior to virtue, has a subject prior to the powers of the 1435 2, 110 | not as an accident to ~a subject.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[110] A[ 1436 2, 110 | Reply OBJ 3: The soul is the subject of grace, as being in the 1437 2, 110 | of the human soul is ~the subject of grace, every soul may 1438 2, 110 | grace, every soul may be the subject of grace; since it ~belongs 1439 2, 111 | the creature ought to be subject to God, that the Divine ~ 1440 2, 111 | accident can act upon its subject. Therefore no grace can ~ 1441 2, 111 | of heat is to make ~its subject hot, and to give heat outwardly. 1442 2, 112 | other on the part of the subject, which more or less participates 1443 2, 112 | God. But as regards the subject, grace can receive more 1444 2, 113 | what is highest in man is subject to God, and the inferior 1445 2, 113 | powers of the ~soul are subject to the superior, i.e. to 1446 2, 113 | disorder of a mind ~not subject to God, may be called injustice, 1447 2, 113 | Further, no one can be subject to two contraries at once. 1448 2, 113 | miserliness. Hence whoever ~is subject to the sin of wastefulness 1449 2, 113 | wastefulness is not simultaneously subject to ~the sin of miserliness, 1450 2, 113 | happen that he has been subject to it ~hitherto. Hence by 1451 2, 113 | is ~moved to God by being subject to Him; hence an act of 1452 2, 113 | received successively by its subject. Now grace may be ~greater 1453 2, 113 | received ~suddenly by its subject. Therefore, seeing that 1454 2, 113 | suddenly impressed upon its subject, it is either because that ~ 1455 2, 113 | is either because that ~subject is not disposed, or because 1456 2, 113 | needs time to dispose the ~subject. Hence we see that immediately 1457 2, 113 | thus we understand the subject and predicate together, ~ 1458 2, 113 | disposition of the matter or subject, as stated above.~Aquin.: 1459 2, 113 | of opposites in the same subject must be ~looked at differently 1460 2, 113 | differently in the things that are subject to time and in those ~that 1461 2, 113 | previous form inheres in the subject; but there is ~the last 1462 2, 113 | inheres in ~the matter or subject; and this for the reason, 1463 2, 113 | itself, above time, but ~is subject to time accidentally, inasmuch 1464 2, 113 | to a term, ~since in the subject of movement the opposite 1465 2, 113 | to the opposite which the subject moved attains to by its 1466 2, 113 | The disposition of the subject precedes the reception of ~ 1467 2, 113 | the agent, ~whereby the subject is disposed. And hence the 1468 2, 2 | faith cannot be in the same subject and about ~the same object: 1469 2, 2 | hence promptness of the will subject to authority, suffices for ~ 1470 2, 2 | grace of God, so that it is subject to the free-will in ~relation 1471 2, 2 | it is evident that the ~subject or the matter cannot act 1472 2, 2 | advent of the form, both the subject and the preceding disposition 1473 2, 2 | assent of science is not subject to free-will, because the ~ 1474 2, 2 | knows scientifically is subject to his free-will, for it 1475 2, 2 | faith, both these things are subject to the free-will so that 1476 2, 2 | meritorious, in so far as it is subject to the will, not only as 1477 2, 4 | is the form are in one ~subject, since together they form 1478 2, 4 | living faith ~in the same subject. Yet again it seems unreasonable 1479 2, 4 | consequently the same ~identical subject who was a child, becomes 1480 2, 4 | the ~disposition of the subject, that grace does not cause 1481 2, 4 | is not changed, ~but its subject, the soul, which at one 1482 2, 4 | is virtue that makes its subject good," as the ~Philosopher 1483 2, 4 | premisses; and which is subject to be false: hence such 1484 2, 4 | Secondly, on the ~part of the subject, and thus faith is differentiated 1485 2, 4 | is ~individualized by its subject. Hence if we take faith 1486 2, 4 | considered on the part of the subject, and thus the more ~a man' 1487 2, 4 | disposition on the part of the subject, it ~follows that faith 1488 2, 5 | its participation by ~the subject.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[5] A[4] 1489 2, 5 | its ~participation by the subject, this happens in two ways, 1490 2, 7 | adhere ~to God and to be subject to Him by charity.~Aquin.: 1491 2, 8 | incompatible in the same subject.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[8] A[2] 1492 2, 8 | understanding in the same ~subject.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[8] A[2] 1493 2, 8 | incompatible in the same subject, as stated above (Q[1], ~ 1494 2, 8 | and faith be in the ~same subject.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[8] A[2] 1495 2, 10 | is a sin?~(2) What is its subject?~(3) Whether it is the greatest 1496 2, 10 | which man is unwilling to subject his intellect to the rules 1497 2, 10 | in the intellect as its subject?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[10] A[ 1498 2, 10 | in the intellect as its ~subject. For every sin is in the 1499 2, 10 | another are in the ~same subject. Now faith, to which unbelief 1500 2, 10 | intellect as its proximate ~subject. But it is in the will as


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