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Alphabetical    [«  »]
sensation 80
sensations 5
sensato 4
sense 2148
sensed 7
senseless 23
senses 680
Frequency    [«  »]
2224 nor
2188 written
2155 about
2148 sense
2143 nothing
2120 out
2098 essence
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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sense

1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1500 | 1501-2000 | 2001-2148

     Part, Question
1 1, 1 | the object of the "common sense" is whatever ~affects the 2 1, 1 | audible. ~Hence the "common sense," although one faculty, 3 1, 1 | sacred doctrine does in a ~sense depend upon philosophical 4 1, 1 | 2: This science can in a sense depend upon the philosophical ~ 5 1, 1 | knowledge originates from sense. Hence in Holy ~Writ, spiritual 6 1, 1 | things belongs to the ~first sense, the historical or literal. 7 1, 1 | is called the ~spiritual sense, which is based on the literal, 8 1, 1 | it. Now ~this spiritual sense has a threefold division. 9 1, 1 | there is the allegorical sense; so far as the things done 10 1, 1 | to do, there is the moral sense. But so far as they signify 11 1, 1 | there is the anagogical sense. Since the ~literal sense 12 1, 1 | sense. Since the ~literal sense is that which the author 13 1, 1 | according ~to the literal sense, one word in Holy Writ should 14 1, 1 | contained under the spiritual sense ~which is not elsewhere 15 1, 1 | Scripture in its literal sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[10] 16 1, 1 | grouped ~under the literal sense. For it is called history, 17 1, 1 | anagogical under the ~allegorical sense, laying down three senses 18 1, 1 | Reply OBJ 3: The parabolical sense is contained in the literal, 19 1, 1 | is figured, the literal sense. When Scripture ~speaks 20 1, 1 | of God's arm, the literal sense is not that God has such 21 1, 1 | ever underlie the literal sense of ~Holy Writ.~ 22 1, 2 | cause. In the world ~of sense we find there is an order 23 1, 3 | added to it in the first sense; whereas ~universal being 24 1, 3 | added to it in the second sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[3] A[4] 25 1, 3 | Taking "to be" in the first ~sense, we cannot understand God' 26 1, 3 | but only in ~the second sense. We know that this proposition 27 1, 3 | intelligence is compared to sense, as actuality is to ~potentiality. 28 1, 3 | measure of all things, ~in the sense that everything has being 29 1, 3 | for a subject is in some sense made actual by ~its accidents. 30 1, 5 | or nature. Now in this ~sense, goodness does not add anything 31 1, 5 | own ~kind - because even sense is a sort of reason, just 32 1, 5 | as self-diffusive in the sense that ~an end is said to 33 1, 8 | understood ~in a twofold sense; either by way of other 34 1, 8 | taken in two senses. In one sense the adverb "anywhere" determines 35 1, 8 | the object; and in this sense it is true ~that while it 36 1, 8 | exterior object. In another sense it can be understood ~according 37 1, 10 | ceasing to exist; in that sense it is said of the earth, " 38 1, 10 | mind. Therefore in ~this sense the true and necessary are 39 1, 10 | be taken ~in a different sense according to the acceptation 40 1, 11 | addition to "being," in the sense of limiting it. Therefore " 41 1, 11 | whole" is twofold. In one sense it is homogeneous, ~composed 42 1, 11 | of like parts; in another sense it is heterogeneous, composed 43 1, 11 | absolutely, and in that sense ~it is opposed to "one"; 44 1, 11 | kind of excess, ~in which sense it is opposed to "few"; 45 1, 11 | few"; hence in the first sense two are ~many but not in 46 1, 11 | many but not in the second sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[11] A[ 47 1, 12 | God: ~"Neither is there sense, nor image, nor opinion, 48 1, 12 | Proportion is twofold. In one sense it means a certain ~relation 49 1, 12 | of proportion. In another sense every relation of one ~thing 50 1, 12 | proportion. And in this sense there can be a ~proportion 51 1, 12 | actual intelligible; as ~sense in act is the actual sensible. 52 1, 12 | comes about inasmuch as ~sense is informed with the likeness 53 1, 12 | imaginary vision originates from sense; for the ~imagination is 54 1, 12 | imagination is moved by sense to act. Therefore God can 55 1, 12 | be seen by a ~vision of sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[12] A[ 56 1, 12 | for God to be seen by the sense of ~sight, or by any other 57 1, 12 | sight, or by any other sense, or faculty of the sensitive 58 1, 12 | He cannot ~be seen by the sense or the imagination, but 59 1, 12 | indirect object of the sense; which indeed is not known 60 1, 12 | which indeed is not known by sense, but at ~once, together 61 1, 12 | at ~once, together with sense, by some other cognitive 62 1, 12 | OBJ 3: Further, corporeal sense cannot be raised up to understand ~ 63 1, 12 | individual ~matter; hence sense knows only the singular. 64 1, 12 | beyond the power of the sense. Now the angelic intellect 65 1, 12 | taken negatively, in that sense every creature is ~defective, 66 1, 12 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The sense of sight, as being altogether 67 1, 12 | the intellect and not by sense, as was shown above (A[3]~). 68 1, 12 | Comprehension" is twofold: in one sense it is taken ~strictly and 69 1, 12 | His own infinity. In this sense we now take ~comprehension. 70 1, 12 | comprehension. But in another sense "comprehension" is taken 71 1, 12 | attains to him. And in this sense God is ~comprehended by 72 1, 12 | go" (Cant 3:4); in this sense also are to be understood ~ 73 1, 12 | actual intelligible, and the sense in ~act becomes the actual 74 1, 12 | Scriptures to see God in the sense that certain figures are 75 1, 12 | flesh beyond the use of sense, even up to the vision of 76 1, 12 | natural knowledge begins from sense. Hence our ~natural knowledge 77 1, 12 | our mind cannot be led by sense so far as to see the essence 78 1, 12 | images either received from sense in the natural ~order, or 79 1, 13 | said of God in a concrete sense, to signify His ~subsistence 80 1, 13 | being taken in a secondary sense, as healthy is ~secondarily 81 1, 13 | we say "God ~lives," the sense were, "life proceeds from 82 1, 13 | applied to God in its literal sense?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[13] A[ 83 1, 13 | to God in a metaphorical sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[13] A[ 84 1, 13 | to God in their literal sense. ~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[13] A[ 85 1, 13 | to God in a metaphorical ~sense only; since He is incorporeal. 86 1, 13 | to God in a metaphorical sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[13] A[ 87 1, 13 | to God in a metaphorical sense, but there are some ~which 88 1, 13 | of Him in their literal sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[13] A[ 89 1, 13 | only in a metaphorical ~sense. Other names, however, express 90 1, 13 | to Him in the ~ordinary sense of its signification, but 91 1, 13 | hot only in an equivocal sense. Therefore it seems that 92 1, 13 | name but not in the same sense, is predicated equivocally. 93 1, 13 | belongs to God in the same sense that it belongs to creatures; 94 1, 13 | creatures in a ~purely equivocal sense, as some have said. Because 95 1, 13 | creatures in an analogous sense, i.e. according to proportion.~ 96 1, 13 | nor in a purely univocal sense. For we can name God only ~ 97 1, 13 | thus used in a multiple sense signifies various proportions 98 1, 13 | adduced in the contrary sense prove indeed that these ~ 99 1, 13 | of many in an analogical sense, all ~are predicated because 100 1, 13 | to God in a ~metaphorical sense, the same rule would apply 101 1, 13 | are not of one order; as sense and science refer respectively 102 1, 13 | Therefore in science and in sense a real relation ~exists, 103 1, 13 | relation to ~science and sense, but only in idea, inasmuch 104 1, 13 | relations of science and sense. Hence the ~Philosopher 105 1, 13 | at the same time; in the ~sense that God is spoken of relatively 106 1, 13 | properly communicable in the sense that its whole ~signification 107 1, 13 | falsely, is predicated ~in one sense. But it would be multiplied 108 1, 13 | sometimes use the name in the sense, as in the Psalm, "All the 109 1, 13 | equivocal names in a ~large sense, including analogous names; 110 1, 14 | that "the soul is in a sense all things." Now the contraction 111 1, 14 | are wholly material. But sense is ~cognitive because it 112 1, 14 | the sensible in ~act is sense in act, and the intelligible 113 1, 14 | because our ~intellect or sense is actually informed by 114 1, 14 | this only, it follows that sense or intellect is ~distinct 115 1, 14 | includes another; and in this sense everything ~comprehended 116 1, 14 | comprehended by Himself in this sense, as if His ~intellect were 117 1, 14 | finite ~to Himself in this sense, as if He understood Himself 118 1, 14 | outside Himself, but in the sense that what is outside Himself 119 1, 14 | thing known; and in that sense it is false. ~For the knower 120 1, 14 | part of the knower, in that sense it is true that only ~the 121 1, 14 | should be in a ~certain sense. For things absolutely are 122 1, 14 | to do with ~universals, sense with singular things." Therefore 123 1, 14 | in the ~imagination and sense, yet its power extends to 124 1, 14 | For the sensible image in sense is the likeness of only 125 1, 14 | now in act: ~and in this sense it is not considered as 126 1, 14 | knowledge, for instance to the sense of sight, as when ~I see 127 1, 14 | opposite things: and in this sense ~a contingent thing is not 128 1, 14 | divided and ~false; for the sense is, "Everything which God 129 1, 14 | composite and true; for the sense is, ~"This proposition, ' 130 1, 16 | and this is true also of sense apprehending a thing as 131 1, 16 | truth. But in no way can sense know this. For although 132 1, 16 | clearly shows ~that the sense is true of any thing, as 133 1, 16 | is used in a ~particular sense, inasmuch as a man fulfills 134 1, 16 | 1~I answer that, In one sense truth, whereby all things 135 1, 16 | is one, ~and in another sense it is not. In proof of which 136 1, 17 | Whether it exists in the sense?~(3) Whether it exists in 137 1, 17 | knowledge takes ~its rise from sense, which principally and naturally 138 1, 17 | common to more than one sense. Thirdly, neither ~primarily 139 1, 17 | 17] A[2] Body Para. 3/3~Sense, then, has no false knowledge 140 1, 17 | as to common objects of ~sense, and accidental objects, 141 1, 17 | even a rightly disposed sense may have a ~false judgment, 142 1, 17 | OBJ 1: The affection of sense is its sensation itself. 143 1, 17 | Hence, from ~the fact that sense reports as it is affected, 144 1, 17 | sensation. ~Since, however, sense is sometimes affected erroneously 145 1, 17 | thus ~we are deceived by sense about the object, but not 146 1, 17 | said not to be proper to sense, since sense is ~not deceived 147 1, 17 | be proper to sense, since sense is ~not deceived as to its 148 1, 17 | is ~said more plainly, "Sense, about its proper object, 149 1, 17 | the false is not in the sense, as ~in that which knows 150 1, 17 | about accidental ~objects of sense. Now as the sense is directly 151 1, 17 | objects of sense. Now as the sense is directly informed by 152 1, 17 | a ~thing, as neither the sense about its proper object. 153 1, 17 | judging of such things, as sense is as to judging of common, 154 1, 17 | conscious of truth; whereas in sense falsity does not ~exist 155 1, 17 | there is no falsity. In this sense Augustine's ~words must 156 1, 17 | deceived;" and not in the sense that no one is ever ~deceived 157 1, 18 | movement ~in a more general sense, as when said of the act 158 1, 18 | movement in its general sense. In either way is movement 159 1, 18 | life in them in its real ~sense, since this movement of 160 1, 18 | object, gains knowledge from sense, of which the proper objects 161 1, 18 | dimensions themselves; in which sense body is said to be a species 162 1, 18 | to live is principally to sense or to understand.~Aquin.: 163 1, 18 | 9) that to live ~is to sense or to understand - in other 164 1, 18 | are able, in addition, to sense, as we see in the case ~ 165 1, 18 | but one received through sense. Hence the more perfect 166 1, 18 | the more perfect is ~their sense, the more perfect is their 167 1, 18 | Such as ~have only the sense of touch, as shellfish, 168 1, 18 | latter kind receive through sense the form ~that is the principle 169 1, 18 | the form apprehended by sense. Hence ~such animals as 170 1, 18 | agent, as to understand, to sense ~and to will. The difference 171 1, 18 | De ~Anima iii, 28. In the sense, therefore, in which understanding 172 1, 18 | move itself. It is in ~this sense that Plato also taught that 173 1, 18 | moves Himself; not in the ~sense in which movement is an 174 1, 18 | to be in God in a twofold sense. In one ~way, so far are 175 1, 18 | their own natures. In ~this sense we must understand the words 176 1, 18 | caused by God. In another sense things are said to be in 177 1, 18 | who knows them, in which sense they are in God through 178 1, 19 | itself alone, in ~the same sense as understanding and willing 179 1, 19 | absolutely; but only in a certain sense, in so far, ~that is, as 180 1, 19 | the will of God. In this sense Augustine says (De Trin. 181 1, 19 | thing taken in its primary sense, and ~absolutely considered, 182 1, 19 | said of God in their strict sense; others ~by metaphor, as 183 1, 19 | distinguished will in its proper sense, and ~will as attributed 184 1, 19 | metaphor. Will in its proper sense is called ~the will of good 185 1, 20 | passions. It is in this latter sense that they are ~in God. Hence 186 1, 20 | beloved; but, in a ~certain sense, John was the better, and 187 1, 21 | destroy justice, but ~in a sense is the fulness thereof. 188 1, 21 | goodness; and it is in this sense, as we have said, that anything 189 1, 22 | city or ~kingdom; in which sense it is said (Mt. 24:45), " 190 1, 23 | taken, however, in another sense for a mission which a ~person 191 1, 23 | taking it in a ~composite sense, thought, absolutely speaking, 192 1, 24 | taken in a metaphorical sense, ~according to a comparison 193 1, 24 | understood in two senses. In one ~sense as the inscription of those 194 1, 24 | book of life. In another sense the inscription of those ~ 195 1, 24 | to ~possess the power of sense, or any of those things 196 1, 25 | objection is false; for the sense is that God can do nothing ~ 197 1, 25 | would then be true in this sense: "God ~cannot do anything 198 1, 26 | operation, by which in some sense it grasps everything. ~Whence 199 1, 27 | have understood it in the sense of an effect, proceeding 200 1, 27 | creature of both. In this sense neither the Son nor the ~ 201 1, 27 | likeness on ~it; in which sense it was understood by Sabellius, 202 1, 27 | remains in him. In ~that sense the Catholic Faith understands 203 1, 27 | idea of procession in the ~sense of local motion, or of an 204 1, 27 | and corruption; in which ~sense generation is nothing but 205 1, 27 | to existence. ~In another sense it is proper and belongs 206 1, 27 | living things; in which ~sense it signifies the origin 207 1, 27 | generation in the ~first sense, importing the issuing forth 208 1, 27 | potentiality to act; in ~which sense it is not found in God.~ 209 1, 27 | the sensible object ~upon sense. It follows that no other 210 1, 28 | generation in ~the proper sense of the term, whereby it 211 1, 29 | here taken in a general sense, as divided into first and 212 1, 29 | kind of movement. In this sense he defines "nature" ~(Phys. 213 1, 29 | nature ~is taken in that sense. Hence Boethius says (De 214 1, 29 | substance is ~twofold. In one sense it means the quiddity of 215 1, 29 | substance of a ~thing; in which sense substance is called by the 216 1, 29 | call "essence." In another sense substance means a subject 217 1, 29 | this, taken in ~a general sense, can be applied a name expressive 218 1, 29 | among us in an equivocal sense, since it sometimes ~means 219 1, 29 | God only in a metaphorical sense. Therefore the word "person" 220 1, 29 | lead us astray ~from the sense of Scripture. The Apostle 221 1, 29 | to ~Him in its objective sense, for it is imposed to signify 222 1, 29 | thought, but in a general sense, an ~intelligent nature. 223 1, 29 | called an "individual" in the sense ~that His individuality 224 1, 29 | matter; but only in the sense which ~implies incommunicability. " 225 1, 29 | be applied to God in the sense ~of signifying self-subsistence. 226 1, 29 | definition of ~person in the sense we use when speaking of 227 1, 29 | to be taken in a relative sense, and especially in the ~ 228 1, 29 | is a hypostasis. In that sense Augustine says that it ~ 229 1, 29 | Reply OBJ 4: The different sense of the less common term 230 1, 29 | is used in an equivocal sense. Though neither is it applied ~ 231 1, 30 | things numbered, in that sense as existing in ~creatures, 232 1, 30 | a negative and removing sense, as plurality ~is employed 233 1, 30 | quantity. Number in this sense is found only in material 234 1, 30 | is transcendental ~in the sense in which being is divided 235 1, 30 | according to the strict ~sense of the word, but not in 236 1, 30 | the word, but not in the sense of its genus (as in God 237 1, 30 | exists in God in the proper sense of number, but not in the 238 1, 30 | of number, but not in the sense of its genus, which is quantity.~ 239 1, 30 | of quantity, for in that sense they could bear only a ~ 240 1, 30 | bear only a ~metaphorical sense in God, like other corporeal 241 1, 30 | multitude in ~a transcendent sense. Now multitude so understood 242 1, 30 | multitude in this latter ~sense points to those things as 243 1, 31 | OBJ 1: In its etymological sense, this word "Trinity" seems 244 1, 31 | certain order. In the first sense, ~this word "trinity" is 245 1, 31 | words; but in the second ~sense it differs from them, because 246 1, 31 | is taken in an absolute sense; for it signifies ~the threefold 247 1, 31 | however, in the masculine sense, means only a ~distinction 248 1, 31 | distinct substance in the sense of hypostasis or person. ~ 249 1, 31 | distinct substance in the sense of essence. Thus ~we cannot 250 1, 31 | alone" is taken in this sense, it cannot in any way be 251 1, 31 | alone is God." In ~that sense it can be true to say that 252 1, 31 | though not in a univocal sense. Likewise it is true to ~ 253 1, 31 | false in a categorematical sense; but if taken in a ~syncategorematical 254 1, 31 | in a ~syncategorematical sense it can again be understood 255 1, 31 | subject, it is true, the ~sense being "the Father alone 256 1, 31 | God." But in the strict sense the exclusion ~affects the 257 1, 31 | another in the masculine sense; but true if it excludes 258 1, 31 | excludes it in the neuter ~sense; because the Son is another 259 1, 31 | speaking in a distributive sense, to mean any rational nature.~ 260 1, 33 | and taken in an essential sense it is common to the ~whole 261 1, 33 | name before its personal sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[33] A[ 262 1, 33 | paternity ~taken in a personal sense is not prior to, but has 263 1, 33 | God is taken in a personal sense as ~regards the Son, before 264 1, 33 | the Son not in a univocal sense, but according to a certain 265 1, 33 | privative, or in a ~negative sense. If in a negative sense, 266 1, 33 | sense. If in a negative sense, then whatever is not begotten 267 1, 33 | be taken in a privative ~sense, as every privation signifies 268 1, 33 | sometimes in a negative sense only, ~and in that sense 269 1, 33 | sense only, ~and in that sense Jerome says that "the Holy 270 1, 33 | in a kind of ~privation sense, but not as implying any 271 1, 33 | other things. In another sense, privation ~is so called 272 1, 33 | called blind. In a ~third sense privation means the absence 273 1, 33 | ought to have; ~in which sense, privation imports an imperfection. 274 1, 33 | an imperfection. In this sense, ~"unbegotten" is not attributed 275 1, 33 | attributed in the second sense, meaning that a certain 276 1, 33 | nature ~is begotten. In this sense the term "unbegotten" can 277 1, 33 | only of generation. In this sense the term "unbegotten" ~does 278 1, 33 | 9), "unbegotten" ~in one sense signifies the same as "uncreated"; 279 1, 33 | the ~uncreated. In another sense it signifies what is not 280 1, 33 | not begotten, and in ~this sense it is a relative term; just 281 1, 34 | applied to God in a proper sense, as Father and Son. ~But 282 1, 34 | and ~not in a personal sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[34] A[ 283 1, 34 | if taken in its proper sense, is ~a personal name, and 284 1, 34 | word taken in its ~proper sense has a threefold meaning; 285 1, 34 | meaning; while in a fourth sense it is taken ~improperly 286 1, 34 | clearest and most common sense is when it ~is said of the 287 1, 34 | understood ~in a strict sense; lest the idea of the Word 288 1, 34 | admit Word in its strict sense. For ~if a thing be called 289 1, 34 | admit ~Word in the proper sense, and which is said personally.~ 290 1, 34 | thought" in an improper sense for "contemplation."~Aquin.: 291 1, 34 | said of God in its proper sense, is used ~personally, and 292 1, 34 | the Holy Ghost; ~in the sense perhaps that everything 293 1, 34 | it is applied in a plural sense to God; and it ~is not said 294 1, 35 | the name of Image in this ~sense when he says that the divine 295 1, 35 | thing to another. In this sense ~image is said to be the 296 1, 35 | the coin. In the ~first sense the Son is the Image of 297 1, 35 | the Father; in the second sense man ~is called the image 298 1, 36 | spiritus," whether in the sense of ~"breath" or "blast," 299 1, 36 | breath" or "blast," or in the sense of "spirit," as an immaterial ~ 300 1, 36 | Thus, we read in the former sense (Hampole, Psalter x, 7), ~" 301 1, 36 | spiration, which in the strict sense ~more fittingly signify 302 1, 36 | each other in any absolute sense; for it would follow that 303 1, 36 | spoken of God in an absolute sense, belongs to the unity of 304 1, 36 | still we do find it in the sense of Scripture, especially ~ 305 1, 36 | of the Son; and in either sense it is false. Therefore this ~ 306 1, 36 | to be ~explained in the sense that the substantive here 307 1, 37 | relation in the strict sense of the term. Nevertheless 308 1, 37 | love proceeding," in that sense "love" is the name of ~the 309 1, 37 | is taken in a notional sense. Again, the love ~wherewith 310 1, 37 | are to be taken in this sense. But ~when the term Love 311 1, 37 | Love is taken in a notional sense it means nothing else ~than " 312 1, 37 | but also in a notional ~sense; and in this way, we can 313 1, 37 | love, taken in a notional sense, means to produce love; 314 1, 37 | love, taken in a ~notional sense, not only imports the production 315 1, 38 | Tract. xxix); and in that sense "gift" is the ~same as " 316 1, 38 | Ghost gives Himself in that sense. In another sense, a thing 317 1, 38 | in that sense. In another sense, a thing is ~another's as 318 1, 38 | as a slave; and in that sense gift is ~essentially distinct 319 1, 38 | created thing. In a third sense "this is this one's" through 320 1, 38 | origin ~only; and in this sense the Son is the Father's; 321 1, 38 | Father's gift in the first sense, ~as being the Father's 322 1, 39 | names taken in a concrete sense?~(5) Whether the same can 323 1, 39 | 4: Form, in the absolute sense, is wont to be designated 324 1, 39 | understood in an adjectival sense. But if ~taken in a substantive 325 1, 39 | taken in a substantive sense, we say "one uncreated, 326 1, 39 | signification; but only as to the sense signified in ~the predicate. 327 1, 39 | signification, can, in its proper sense, stand for person, as does 328 1, 39 | in the affirmative the sense is that "to be God the ~ 329 1, 39 | Son; and in the negative sense ~is that "to be God the 330 1, 39 | wisdom"; we ~should take the sense to be, "the Son" who is 331 1, 39 | except in an accidental sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[39] A[ 332 1, 39 | be taken in a ~confused sense." And (Contra Maxim. ii) "' 333 1, 39 | use" be taken in a wide sense, as including also the sense 334 1, 39 | sense, as including also the sense of "to ~enjoy"; according 335 1, 39 | in His knowledge. In this sense the expression "in ~Him" 336 1, 39 | appropriated to the Son. In another sense things are ~contained in 337 1, 39 | fitting end; and in this sense the expression ~"in Him" 338 1, 39 | movement, agreeing in that sense with the property of the 339 1, 39 | is taken in a relative sense, ~it may sometimes relate 340 1, 39 | of the Son; and in that sense it ~would be taken personally; 341 1, 39 | speaking in a grammatical sense, so far as ~the word "God" 342 1, 40 | origin taken ~in an active sense signifies proceeding from 343 1, 40 | latter; while in a passive sense origin, as ~"nativity," 344 1, 40 | he speaks in a ~general sense, forasmuch as not every 345 1, 40 | origin, in the passive sense, simply ~precedes the personal 346 1, 40 | considered in a twofold ~sense: firstly, as a relation; 347 1, 41 | action, in its primary ~sense, means origin of movement; 348 1, 41 | passion; but action in that sense is not attributed to God. ~ 349 1, 41 | understood in two senses. In one sense, the ablative ~designates 350 1, 41 | beget the Son. In the other sense, the ~ablative imports the 351 1, 41 | work; and ~thus in that sense it must be said the God 352 1, 41 | will, taking will in the sense of principle. ~But we, on 353 1, 41 | another." Taken in the latter sense, it has a twofold meaning: ~ 354 1, 41 | which cannot but be: in this sense it is ~necessary for God 355 1, 41 | God to be; and in the same sense it is necessary that the ~ 356 1, 41 | taken in a metaphorical sense, according to a certain 357 1, 41 | by the Son, so that the sense be, "From the ~beginning 358 1, 41 | way ~Hilary expounds the sense of this text of Scripture ( 359 1, 41 | thing as possibility in this sense, but only in the sense of ~ 360 1, 41 | this sense, but only in the sense of ~possible as contained 361 1, 41 | necessary; and in this latter sense it ~can be said that as 362 1, 41 | power to God in its proper sense of ~principle. And as we 363 1, 41 | power to God in its proper ~sense, but only after our way 364 1, 41 | like to Him. And in this sense Damascene says (De Fide ~ 365 1, 41 | principle; not, indeed, in the sense in which we call the ~agent 366 1, 41 | a principle, but in the sense of being that by which the 367 1, 41 | active verb, so that the sense would be that the Son has 368 1, 41 | impersonal verb, so that the sense be "the power of ~generation" - 369 1, 42 | species from matter, as ~sense receives the species from 370 1, 42 | are to be ~taken in the sense that the Father communicates 371 1, 42 | be explained ~in the same sense, as giving Him from eternity 372 1, 43 | only temporal?~(3) In what sense a divine person is invisibly 373 1, 43 | is fittingly sent in the sense that He ~exists newly in 374 1, 43 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: In the sense of "giving" as a free bestowal 375 1, 43 | according to origin, in this sense the Son's mission is ~distinguished 376 1, 43 | effect of grace, in this sense the two missions are united 377 1, 43 | but in a new way, in which sense mission is ascribed to the 378 1, 43 | Para. 2/2~Thus in a special sense, a mission of the Holy Ghost 379 1, 43 | the person sent, in this sense not each person sends, but ~ 380 1, 43 | in the mission, in that sense the whole ~Trinity sends 381 1, 45 | creation in an equivocal sense, ~according as to be created 382 1, 45 | it. If taken in the first sense, then we affirm the order 383 1, 45 | order is denied, ~and the sense is, "It is made from nothing - 384 1, 45 | this reply. In ~the second sense, it imports the material 385 1, 45 | creation taken in a passive sense is attributed to the creature, 386 1, 45 | creation taken in an active sense is attributed to the Creator. 387 1, 46 | to each other; in ~which sense possible is opposed to impossible, 388 1, 46 | expounded in a threefold sense in order to exclude ~three 389 1, 47 | order. But the best in this sense is not the intention of 390 1, 48 | reason, but the delight of sense without the order of reason. 391 1, 48 | said to act in a threefold sense. In one way, ~formally, 392 1, 48 | makes white; and in that sense ~evil considered even as 393 1, 48 | privation of good. In another sense a thing ~is said to act 394 1, 48 | Thirdly, it is said in the sense of the final cause, as the 395 1, 48 | predicaments"; and in that sense it is ~convertible with 396 1, 48 | evil a being. In another sense being conveys the truth 397 1, 48 | this word "is"; and in this sense being is what answers to ~ 398 1, 48 | privative and in a negative sense. Absence of good, taken ~ 399 1, 48 | good, taken in a privative sense, is an evil; as, for ~instance, 400 1, 48 | contraries in a special sense, because they exist in some ~ 401 1, 48 | derived from "poena." In this sense we say "Pain of death, Pain 402 1, 48 | Pain of loss, ~Pain of sense." - Ed.]~Aquin.: SMT FP 403 1, 48 | only ~more than pain of sense, consisting in the privation 404 1, 49 | death" (Wis. 1:13), the sense is that God does not will 405 1, 50 | proper distinction between sense and intellect, ~thought 406 1, 50 | could be apprehended ~by sense and imagination. And because 407 1, 50 | that intellect is above sense is a reasonable proof ~that 408 1, 50 | Movement is there taken in the sense in which it is applied ~ 409 1, 50 | they are infinite in the sense that their forms are not 410 1, 52 | place in quite a different sense. A body is said to be in 411 1, 54 | it is not taken in this sense by the ~Philosopher, when 412 1, 54 | But to "understand is in a sense to live" (De Anima ii, text. ~ 413 1, 54 | to ~understand is, in a sense, to live: for there he distinguishes 414 1, 54 | similitude. Because, since sense has a sure apprehension 415 1, 54 | certain, to say that we "sense it." And hence ~it is that 416 1, 55 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: As the sense in act is the sensible in 417 1, 55 | likeness contained in the sense, but because one thing is 418 1, 56 | must be ~in contact with sense, in order that sense may 419 1, 56 | with sense, in order that sense may actually perceive. And 420 1, 57 | knowable by apprehension of sense and of imagination, which 421 1, 57 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Sense does not apprehend the essences 422 1, 57 | not err; as neither does sense regarding its proper ~sensible 423 1, 57 | Poster. i, text. 22): "The sense has for its object ~singulars, 424 1, 57 | manifest that the common sense which is higher than the 425 1, 57 | is higher than the proper sense, ~although it is but one 426 1, 57 | other things which no outer sense knows; for ~example, the 427 1, 58 | consequently neither by sense nor by intellect are they 428 1, 58 | they are grasped both by sense and ~intellect all at once 429 1, 58 | angels can syllogize, in the sense of knowing a ~syllogism; 430 1, 58 | a thing is, just as the sense ~regarding its proper object, 431 1, 59 | particular good; as in the sense, which knows the sweet, 432 1, 59 | OBJ 1: Reason surpasses sense in a different way from 433 1, 59 | reason. Reason surpasses sense according to the ~diversity 434 1, 59 | of the objects known; for sense judges of particular objects, ~ 435 1, 59 | which appetite ~belongs to sense. But intellect and reason 436 1, 59 | intellective part: in this sense to love is to wish ~well 437 1, 60 | the perfection of either sense or intellect. ~Aquin.: SMT 438 1, 63 | understand this in the sense, that he was in the truth, 439 1, 63 | before God. And in this sense Damascene ~says (De Fide 440 1, 64 | 59], A[1]); as also the sense ~apprehends particular objects, 441 1, 64 | maintained that the pain of sense for demons and ~souls is 442 1, 65 | says, speaking in the same sense, "Whose god is their belly" ( 443 1, 66 | of matter in a different sense from the others. In ~his 444 1, 66 | from the others. In ~his sense it means the absence of 445 1, 66 | said (A[1]) how, in this sense, the earth was, ~according 446 1, 66 | argument in the contrary sense, we say that if, ~according 447 1, 66 | genus is taken in a physical sense, corruptible and ~incorruptible 448 1, 66 | an empyrean heaven in the sense understood by modern writers.~ 449 1, 67 | light is used in its proper sense in speaking of ~spiritual 450 1, 67 | light" is used in its proper sense in speaking of ~spiritual 451 1, 67 | light" is used in its proper sense in ~spiritual things. For 452 1, 67 | called ~Light in the same sense as He is called the Stone; 453 1, 67 | are used in their proper sense ~in spiritual things. Therefore 454 1, 67 | light is used in its proper sense in ~spiritual matters.~Aquin.: 455 1, 67 | applied to the act of the ~sense, and then, as sight is the 456 1, 67 | which makes manifest to the sense of ~sight; afterwards it 457 1, 67 | to reason, but to ~common sense, we must conclude that light 458 1, 68 | here used in an equivocal sense, it is expressly said that ~" 459 1, 68 | cannot be held to be the sense of Holy Scripture. It should 460 1, 68 | things as ~are apparent to sense. Now even the most uneducated 461 1, 68 | firmament, ~whatever be the sense in which the word is used.~ 462 1, 68 | of heaven in a threefold sense. ~Sometimes it uses the 463 1, 68 | corporeal creation, for in that sense it is one.~Aquin.: SMT FP 464 1, 69 | the dry land, ~so that the sense would be, "Let the waters 465 1, 69 | hidden, since they lack sense and local ~movement, by 466 1, 70 | describes what is obvious to sense, out of condescension to 467 1, 70 | they have ~neither life nor sense."~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[70] A[ 468 1, 70 | seems to explain in that sense the words (Eccles. 1:6), " 469 1, 70 | the ~senses depend on the sense of touch, which perceives 470 1, 70 | living beings in the same sense as plants and animals, and 471 1, 73 | subsequently made had in a sense been made before in the 472 1, 73 | things, and in a twofold sense. On the one ~hand, every 473 1, 73 | taken in two senses, in one sense meaning a ~cessation from 474 1, 73 | desire. Now, in ~either sense God is said to have rested 475 1, 75 | specific nature. The former sense excludes the inherence ~ 476 1, 75 | particular ~thing" in the first sense, but not in the second. 477 1, 75 | particular ~thing," in the first sense, as being something subsistent; 478 1, 75 | the ~second, for in this sense, what is composed of body 479 1, 75 | neither inherent in the above sense, nor part of anything else. 480 1, 75 | of anything else. In this sense, the eye or the hand ~cannot 481 1, 75 | hand, and not in the same sense as when we say that what 482 1, 75 | no distinction between ~sense and intellect, and referred 483 1, 75 | distinction between intellect and ~sense; yet he referred both to 484 1, 75 | impression of ~the object on the sense is accompanied with change 485 1, 75 | of the sensible corrupts sense; a thing that never ~occurs 486 1, 75 | also be understood in this sense, that this soul is this 487 1, 76 | he senses. But one cannot sense without a ~body: therefore 488 1, 76 | relation of ~colors to the sense of sight, as he says De 489 1, 76 | several intellects ~and one sense - for instance, if two men 490 1, 76 | Aristotle, between the ~sense and the intelligence - that 491 1, 76 | thing is perceived by the sense ~according to the disposition 492 1, 76 | operations of the soul, as sense and appetite. ~Now this 493 1, 76 | only a ~mixture apparent to sense, by the juxtaposition of 494 1, 76 | be a convenient organ of sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[76] A[ 495 1, 76 | senses are based on the sense of touch. But the organ ~ 496 1, 76 | and the like, of which the sense of touch has the ~perception; 497 1, 76 | intellectual soul has the power of sense in all its completeness; 498 1, 76 | animals, ~man has the best sense of touch. And among men, 499 1, 76 | those who have the best ~sense of touch have the best intelligence. 500 1, 77 | 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, we sense by the sensitive power and


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