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activity 24
actor 3
actors 3
acts 2071
actual 460
actuality 89
actualized 3
Frequency    [«  »]
2120 out
2098 essence
2082 justice
2071 acts
2055 spiritual
2053 perfect
2051 regards
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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acts

1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1500 | 1501-2000 | 2001-2071

     Part, Question
1 1, 1 | is concerned with human acts, and ~architecture with 2 1, 1 | divine things than with human acts; though it does ~treat even 3 1, 1 | inasmuch as he directs his acts to a fitting ~end: "Wisdom 4 1, 1 | measure and rule of human acts. In ~another way, by knowledge, 5 1, 1 | judge rightly about virtuous acts, though he had not the ~ 6 1, 1 | are also His offspring" (Acts 17:28). Nevertheless, sacred 7 1, 3 | Thirdly, because every agent acts by its form; hence the ~ 8 1, 3 | attributed to God because His acts resemble the ~acts of a 9 1, 3 | because His acts resemble the ~acts of a soul; for, that we 10 1, 3 | rather the composite ~so acts; for the hand does not act, 11 1, 4 | an agent, and everything acts according to the manner 12 1, 5 | so far as it is in act, acts and tends towards that which ~ 13 1, 7 | the Creator; for no ~agent acts aimlessly. Hence everything 14 1, 8 | joined to that wherein it acts ~immediately and touch it 15 1, 8 | however powerful it may be, acts at ~a distance, except through 16 1, 8 | great power of ~God that He acts immediately in all things. 17 1, 9 | a movement, ~even as the acts of understanding, and willing, 18 1, 14 | subsisting, but are the acts of organs, do not ~know 19 1, 14 | lines; but as ~perfect acts to imperfect; as if I were 20 1, 14 | a perfect act imperfect acts can be known not only in ~ 21 1, 14 | relations consequent upon the acts which are ~understood as 22 1, 14 | relations consequent upon the acts which are understood ~to 23 1, 15 | Dionysius says (Div. Nom. v): "Acts of the divine will ~are 24 1, 18 | principal ~agent is that which acts through its form, and sometimes 25 1, 18 | through some instrument that acts by virtue not of its own 26 1, 18 | in God. For it is said ~(Acts 17:28), "In Him we live, 27 1, 19 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, acts of will are multiplied in 28 1, 19 | But every voluntary ~agent acts by reason and pre-election. 29 1, 19 | first agent. Therefore He acts by His ~essence; and that 30 1, 19 | and that is His nature. He acts then by nature, and not 31 1, 19 | of things; ~and that He acts by the will, and not, as 32 1, 19 | must precede the agent that acts by ~nature. Hence, since 33 1, 19 | it has that nature, its acts will be in accordance with 34 1, 19 | being, it cannot be that He acts by a necessity of His nature, 35 1, 19 | essence, it follows that He acts after the ~mode of intellect 36 1, 19 | are masters of their own acts; and for ~this reason certain 37 1, 19 | will are assigned ~to their acts, inasmuch as God ordains 38 1, 20 | faculty. ~For since the acts of the will and of every 39 1, 20 | good; it follows that the acts of the will and appetite 40 1, 20 | truths. Now there are certain acts of the will and appetite ~ 41 1, 20 | movement in animals. Therefore acts of the sensitive appetite, 42 1, 20 | called passions; ~whereas acts of the will are not so called. 43 1, 20 | in so far as they denote acts of the intellective ~appetite, 44 1, 21 | civil matters, but in such acts as are not unbecoming to 45 1, 21 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: God acts mercifully, not indeed by 46 1, 21 | nothing against justice, but acts liberally or mercifully. 47 1, 22 | is connected with these acts in respect ~especially of 48 1, 22 | prudent, who orders well his acts towards the end of ~life-- 49 1, 22 | thus. For since every agent acts for an end, the ordering 50 1, 22 | providence binds together human acts and fortunes by ~the indissoluble 51 1, 23 | are the masters of our own acts by free will. All that ~ 52 1, 25 | upon ~it, for everything acts according as it is actual: 53 1, 25 | has the form by which it acts the greater its ~power to 54 1, 25 | essence, through which ~God acts, is infinite, as was shown 55 1, 25 | Some ~laid it down that God acts from natural necessity in 56 1, 27 | these actions are two, the acts of intelligence ~and of 57 1, 27 | principle whereby one thing acts on another. ~Hence it is 58 1, 28 | understands this; thus the acts of understanding are ~infinitely 59 1, 36 | fittingly signify the notional acts than the relations; so to ~ 60 1, 36 | 4: Further, when anyone acts through another, the same 61 1, 36 | as we say that the king acts through the bailiff, so 62 1, 36 | conversely that the bailiff acts through the king. But we 63 1, 36 | the cause of why the agent acts, whether it be a final ~ 64 1, 36 | when we say, the artisan acts through the mallet, ~for 65 1, 36 | the cause why the artisan acts, ~but that it is the cause 66 1, 36 | and the power whereby it acts; as, for instance, ~fire 67 1, 36 | can say that the bailiff acts through ~the king, because 68 1, 36 | are two spirating, because acts ~refer to subjects. Yet 69 1, 39 | properties, and to the notional acts; and of the comparison of 70 1, 40 | understanding, ~presuppose the acts of the persons, or contrariwise?~ 71 1, 40 | verbs signify the notional acts: ~and acts belong to a " 72 1, 40 | the notional acts: ~and acts belong to a "suppositum." 73 1, 40 | presuppose the notional acts?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[40] A[ 74 1, 40 | would seem that the notional acts are understood before the ~ 75 1, 40 | follow upon the notional acts, so ~that we can say, without 76 1, 41 | REFERENCE TO THE NOTIONAL ACTS (SIX ARTICLES)~We now consider 77 1, 41 | reference to the notional acts, ~concerning which six points 78 1, 41 | 1) Whether the notional acts are to be attributed to 79 1, 41 | persons?~(2) Whether these acts are necessary, or voluntary?~( 80 1, 41 | Whether as regards these acts, a person proceeds from 81 1, 41 | as regards the notional acts?~(5) What this power means?~( 82 1, 41 | 1/1~Whether the notional acts are to be attributed to 83 1, 41 | would seem that the notional acts are not to be attributed 84 1, 41 | addition ~to these, notional acts are not to be attributed 85 1, 41 | Therefore neither are notional acts to ~be placed in God.~Aquin.: 86 1, 41 | Son." Therefore notional acts ~are to be placed in God.~ 87 1, 41 | designated only by certain acts. Wherefore, to ~signify 88 1, 41 | must attribute ~notional acts to the persons.~Aquin.: 89 1, 41 | from person; wherefore the acts which designate the ~order 90 1, 41 | Reply OBJ 2: The notional acts differ from the relations 91 1, 41 | 1/1~Whether the notional acts are voluntary?~Aquin.: SMT 92 1, 41 | would seem that the notional acts are voluntary. For Hilary ~ 93 1, 41 | agent, whereby the latter acts. Now it is manifest that ~ 94 1, 41 | the form whereby the ~will acts is not only one, but many, 95 1, 41 | 1/1~Whether the notional acts proceed from something?~ 96 1, 41 | would seem that the notional acts do not proceed from ~anything. 97 1, 41 | respect of the notional acts?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 98 1, 41 | respect of the ~notional acts. For every kind of power 99 1, 41 | respect of the notional acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 100 1, 41 | as ~regards the notional acts, whereby the divine persons 101 1, 41 | reference to the notional acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 102 1, 41 | God regarding the notional acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 103 1, 41 | answer that, As the notional acts exist in God, so must there 104 1, 41 | power in God regarding these acts; since power only means 105 1, 41 | person, according to notional acts, does not proceed ~as if 106 1, 41 | as regards the notional acts has no ~reference to a person 107 1, 41 | power, by which the agent acts. Now, everything that produces ~ 108 1, 41 | to the form ~by which it acts; just as man begotten is 109 1, 41 | that by which the agent ~acts. Now the agent is distinct 110 1, 42 | operation, for every agent acts through its form. Consequently 111 1, 42 | implies that the Son so acts ~of Himself [per se], that 112 1, 43 | speak with divers tongues" (Acts 2:4). The visible mission 113 1, 44 | thus, since every ~agent acts in proportion to its actuality, 114 1, 44 | answer that, Every agent acts for an end: otherwise one 115 1, 45 | instrumentally, inasmuch as it acts by the power of another; 116 1, 45 | something proper to itself it acts dispositively to the effect 117 1, 45 | can create, for no ~body acts except by touching or moving; 118 1, 45 | the ~intellectual agent acts; and therefore it is said: " 119 1, 45 | Persons are referred to the ~acts of intellect and will, as 120 1, 46 | follows from the cause that acts by nature, ~according to 121 1, 46 | kinds of craftsmen. But God acts by ~intellect: therefore 122 1, 46 | efficient ~cause, which acts by will. For the will of 123 1, 46 | the efficient cause, which acts by motion, of ~necessity 124 1, 46 | accidental, ~as an artificer acts by means of many hammers 125 1, 46 | that one ~particular hammer acts after the action of another; 126 1, 47 | OBJ 1: The natural agent acts by the form which makes 127 1, 47 | shown above (Q[19], ~A[4]), acts by an intellectual form. 128 1, 48 | 4: Further, what is not, acts not. But evil acts, for 129 1, 48 | not, acts not. But evil acts, for it corrupts ~good. 130 1, 48 | other, according as one acts on the other, and according 131 1, 49 | from the fact that the will acts with ~this defect.~Aquin.: 132 1, 50 | said there was no spirit (Acts 23:8).~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 133 1, 50 | operation; for since everything acts according as it is actual, 134 1, 54 | according to the diversity ~of acts must be the diversity of 135 1, 54 | organs; such powers are acts of sundry parts of the body, 136 1, 54 | and will: these are not acts of any parts of ~the body. 137 1, 55 | the form that the agent acts. Now in order that the faculty 138 1, 55 | with ~respect to all the acts of the virtues; which can 139 1, 55 | which in the lion leads to acts of ~magnanimity, and in 140 1, 55 | magnanimity, and in the fox to acts of wariness; and so on of 141 1, 56 | he would not ~act, since acts belong to single subsistences. 142 1, 57 | angel are perfections and acts in regard to that intellect.~ 143 1, 57 | on in this world; since acts belong to individuals: and 144 1, 60 | except the First Agent, Who acts in such a manner that He 145 1, 60 | nor demerit by our natural acts. But ~by their love the 146 1, 60 | In like manner, the ~end acts in the will in the same 147 1, 62 | the succession of their acts. Now their act which merited ~ 148 1, 62 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The acts of the rational creature 149 1, 62 | has not two simultaneous acts, as the ~same line cannot, 150 1, 62 | God. Now whoever wills or acts in this manner cannot sin. 151 1, 63 | succession of their mental acts, or of their affections. 152 1, 64 | he abuses even ~such good acts to evil purpose.~Aquin.: 153 1, 64 | however, as they denote simple acts of the will, they can be 154 1, 64 | sorrow ~and joy imply simple acts of the will; because, not 155 1, 66 | OBJ 3: Further, different acts befit different potentialities, 156 1, 66 | differentiated by their different acts, as sight is by color, hearing ~ 157 1, 67 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: As heat acts towards perfecting the form 158 1, 70 | of an instrument, which acts in virtue of the agent: 159 1, 75 | universal principle of all acts; ~because It is infinite, 160 1, 75 | proportionate to act. But ~the acts received which proceed from 161 1, 75 | potentiality which receives all acts, as there is one act, from 162 1, 75 | which all ~participated acts are derived; for then the 163 1, 76 | whereby ~primarily anything acts is a form of the thing to 164 1, 76 | reason is because nothing acts except so far as it is in 165 1, 76 | act; wherefore a ~thing acts by that whereby it is in 166 1, 76 | form by which the agent acts, as heating is according 167 1, 76 | potentiality to all manner of acts in a ~certain order, what 168 1, 76 | absolutely first among the acts must be understood ~as being 169 1, 76 | Now the first among all acts is existence. ~Therefore, 170 1, 77 | are distinguished by their acts and objects? ~Aquin.: SMT 171 1, 77 | are not distinguished ~by acts and objects. For nothing 172 1, 77 | specifically distinct by acts and objects.~Aquin.: SMT 173 1, 77 | says (De Anima ii, 4) that "acts and ~operations precede 174 1, 77 | distinguished according to their acts and objects.~Aquin.: SMT 175 1, 77 | distinguished by their acts and objects. ~Aquin.: SMT 176 1, 77 | certain aptitude to various acts in a certain order) and 177 1, 77 | furthermore on the part of the acts, as we have said ~above.~ 178 1, 77 | that, as they say also, the acts of these powers remain in 179 1, 39 | properties, and to the notional acts; and of the comparison of 180 1, 40 | understanding, ~presuppose the acts of the persons, or contrariwise?~ 181 1, 40 | verbs signify the notional acts: ~and acts belong to a " 182 1, 40 | the notional acts: ~and acts belong to a "suppositum." 183 1, 40 | presuppose the notional acts?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[40] A[ 184 1, 40 | would seem that the notional acts are understood before the ~ 185 1, 40 | follow upon the notional acts, so ~that we can say, without 186 1, 41 | REFERENCE TO THE NOTIONAL ACTS (SIX ARTICLES)~We now consider 187 1, 41 | reference to the notional acts, ~concerning which six points 188 1, 41 | 1) Whether the notional acts are to be attributed to 189 1, 41 | persons?~(2) Whether these acts are necessary, or voluntary?~( 190 1, 41 | Whether as regards these acts, a person proceeds from 191 1, 41 | as regards the notional acts?~(5) What this power means?~( 192 1, 41 | 1/1~Whether the notional acts are to be attributed to 193 1, 41 | would seem that the notional acts are not to be attributed 194 1, 41 | addition ~to these, notional acts are not to be attributed 195 1, 41 | Therefore neither are notional acts to ~be placed in God.~Aquin.: 196 1, 41 | Son." Therefore notional acts ~are to be placed in God.~ 197 1, 41 | designated only by certain acts. Wherefore, to ~signify 198 1, 41 | must attribute ~notional acts to the persons.~Aquin.: 199 1, 41 | from person; wherefore the acts which designate the ~order 200 1, 41 | Reply OBJ 2: The notional acts differ from the relations 201 1, 41 | 1/1~Whether the notional acts are voluntary?~Aquin.: SMT 202 1, 41 | would seem that the notional acts are voluntary. For Hilary ~ 203 1, 41 | agent, whereby the latter acts. Now it is manifest that ~ 204 1, 41 | the form whereby the ~will acts is not only one, but many, 205 1, 41 | 1/1~Whether the notional acts proceed from something?~ 206 1, 41 | would seem that the notional acts do not proceed from ~anything. 207 1, 41 | respect of the notional acts?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 208 1, 41 | respect of the ~notional acts. For every kind of power 209 1, 41 | respect of the notional acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 210 1, 41 | as ~regards the notional acts, whereby the divine persons 211 1, 41 | reference to the notional acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 212 1, 41 | God regarding the notional acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 213 1, 41 | answer that, As the notional acts exist in God, so must there 214 1, 41 | power in God regarding these acts; since power only means 215 1, 41 | person, according to notional acts, does not proceed ~as if 216 1, 41 | as regards the notional acts has no ~reference to a person 217 1, 41 | power, by which the agent acts. Now, everything that produces ~ 218 1, 41 | to the form ~by which it acts; just as man begotten is 219 1, 41 | that by which the agent ~acts. Now the agent is distinct 220 1, 42 | operation, for every agent acts through its form. Consequently 221 1, 42 | implies that the Son so acts ~of Himself [per se], that 222 1, 43 | speak with divers tongues" (Acts 2:4). The visible mission 223 1, 45 | thus, since every ~agent acts in proportion to its actuality, 224 1, 45 | answer that, Every agent acts for an end: otherwise one 225 1, 46 | instrumentally, inasmuch as it acts by ~the power of another; 226 1, 46 | something proper to itself it acts dispositively to the effect 227 1, 46 | can create, for no ~body acts except by touching or moving; 228 1, 46 | the ~intellectual agent acts; and therefore it is said: " 229 1, 46 | Persons are referred to the ~acts of intellect and will, as 230 1, 47 | follows from the cause that acts by nature, ~according to 231 1, 47 | kinds of craftsmen. But God acts by ~intellect: therefore 232 1, 47 | efficient ~cause, which acts by will. For the will of 233 1, 47 | the efficient cause, which acts by motion, of ~necessity 234 1, 47 | accidental, ~as an artificer acts by means of many hammers 235 1, 47 | that one ~particular hammer acts after the action of another; 236 1, 48 | OBJ 1: The natural agent acts by the form which makes 237 1, 48 | shown above (Q[19], ~A[4]), acts by an intellectual form. 238 1, 49 | 4: Further, what is not, acts not. But evil acts, for 239 1, 49 | not, acts not. But evil acts, for it corrupts ~good. 240 1, 49 | other, according as one acts on the other, and according 241 1, 50 | from the fact that the will acts with ~this defect.~Aquin.: 242 1, 51 | said there was no spirit (Acts 23:8).~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 243 1, 51 | operation; for since everything acts according as it is actual, 244 1, 55 | according to the diversity ~of acts must be the diversity of 245 1, 55 | organs; such powers are acts of sundry parts of ~the 246 1, 55 | and will: these are not acts of any parts of ~the body. 247 1, 56 | the form that the agent acts. Now in order that the faculty 248 1, 56 | with ~respect to all the acts of the virtues; which can 249 1, 56 | which in the lion leads to acts of ~magnanimity, and in 250 1, 56 | magnanimity, and in the fox to acts of wariness; and so on of 251 1, 57 | he would not ~act, since acts belong to single subsistences. 252 1, 58 | angel are perfections and acts in regard to that intellect.~ 253 1, 58 | on in this world; since acts belong to individuals: and 254 1, 61 | except the First Agent, Who acts in such a manner that He 255 1, 61 | nor demerit by our natural acts. But ~by their love the 256 1, 61 | In like manner, the ~end acts in the will in the same 257 1, 63 | the succession of their acts. Now their act which merited ~ 258 1, 63 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The acts of the rational creature 259 1, 63 | has not two simultaneous acts, as the ~same line cannot, 260 1, 63 | God. Now whoever wills or acts in this manner cannot sin. 261 1, 64 | succession of their mental acts, or of their affections. 262 1, 65 | he abuses even ~such good acts to evil purpose.~Aquin.: 263 1, 65 | however, as they denote simple acts of the will, they can be 264 1, 65 | sorrow ~and joy imply simple acts of the will; because, not 265 1, 67 | OBJ 3: Further, different acts befit different potentialities, 266 1, 67 | differentiated by their different acts, as sight is by color, hearing ~ 267 1, 68 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: As heat acts towards perfecting the form 268 1, 71 | of an instrument, which acts in virtue of the agent: 269 1, 74 | universal principle of all acts; ~because It is infinite, 270 1, 74 | proportionate to act. But ~the acts received which proceed from 271 1, 74 | potentiality which receives all acts, as there is one act, from 272 1, 74 | which all ~participated acts are derived; for then the 273 1, 75 | whereby ~primarily anything acts is a form of the thing to 274 1, 75 | reason is because nothing acts except so far as it is in 275 1, 75 | act; wherefore a ~thing acts by that whereby it is in 276 1, 75 | form by which the agent acts, as heating is according 277 1, 75 | potentiality to all manner of acts in a ~certain order, what 278 1, 75 | absolutely first among the acts must be understood ~as being 279 1, 75 | Now the first among all acts is existence. ~Therefore, 280 1, 76 | are distinguished by their acts and objects? ~Aquin.: SMT 281 1, 76 | are not distinguished ~by acts and objects. For nothing 282 1, 76 | specifically distinct by acts and objects.~Aquin.: SMT 283 1, 76 | says (De Anima ii, 4) that "acts and ~operations precede 284 1, 76 | distinguished according to their acts and objects.~Aquin.: SMT 285 1, 76 | distinguished by their acts and objects. ~Aquin.: SMT 286 1, 76 | certain aptitude to various acts in a certain order) and 287 1, 76 | furthermore on the part of the acts, as we have said ~above.~ 288 1, 76 | that, as they say also, the acts of these powers remain in 289 1, 77 | for ~the vegetative power acts only on the body to which 290 1, 77 | to the convenience of the acts of the powers. ~And to be 291 1, 78 | passive by its matter, and acts by its form. But the ~intellectual 292 1, 78 | something which results from acts. But every power flows ~ 293 1, 78 | powers, ~inasmuch as they are acts of corporeal organs, in 294 1, 78 | according to its various acts, the higher and ~lower reason 295 1, 78 | according to the ~variety of acts, not according to the variety 296 1, 78 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: All those acts which Damascene enumerates 297 1, 78 | For every difference of acts does not make the powers 298 1, 78 | taken from the variety of ~acts, and not from the variety 299 1, 78 | variety of powers; and various acts can belong to ~one power.~ 300 1, 78 | syneresis" ~is an opposition of acts, and not of the different 301 1, 80 | the reason in ~their own acts, because in other animals 302 1, 81 | soul to their respective acts, except the natural ~powers 303 1, 81 | include one another in their acts, ~because the intellect 304 1, 81 | soul, and thus they are acts of the will. And ~in this 305 1, 81 | will ~as ordered to such acts. And in this way, too, we 306 1, 82 | of brute animals. But man acts from judgment, because by ~ 307 1, 82 | the ~reason, therefore he acts from free judgment and retains 308 1, 82 | does not prevent their ~acts being natural, so by moving 309 1, 82 | powers are known by their acts. But choice, which is the ~ 310 1, 82 | their respective objects and acts. For the act of ~"understanding" 311 1, 82 | distinction, not of powers, but of acts. ~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[83] A[ 312 1, 82 | willing - are ~different acts: yet they belong to the 313 1, 83 | now have to consider the acts of the soul in regard to 314 1, 83 | theologian. ~Furthermore, the acts of the appetitive part of 315 1, 83 | matters belongs. But of the acts of the intellectual part 316 1, 83 | 2/5~In treating of these acts we shall proceed in the 317 1, 83 | action; ~for that which acts is in every way more excellent 318 1, 83 | excellent than that which it ~acts on." Whence he concludes 319 1, 84 | Therefore ~the intellect acts by composition and division.~ 320 1, 85 | sensitive faculties being ~acts of corporeal organs, the 321 1, 86 | are not known by their acts, but by themselves.~Aquin.: 322 1, 86 | powers are the principles of acts. But as ~is said (De Anima 323 1, 86 | said (De Anima ii, 4), "acts and operations are logically 324 1, 86 | powers, are known by their acts. ~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[87] A[ 325 1, 86 | objects ~are known before acts, and acts before powers ( 326 1, 86 | are known before acts, and acts before powers (De Anima 327 1, 86 | affections of the soul as the ~acts of the will.~Aquin.: SMT 328 1, 87 | and act, since every agent acts according to its actuality, ~ 329 1, 87 | not extend to the other acts of the active ~intellect 330 1, 88 | consider that as nothing acts except so ~far as it is 331 1, 88 | powers. Hence through ~such acts the passive intellect acquires 332 1, 88 | that "habits ~produce acts similar to those whereby 333 1, 88 | knowledge is acquired here by acts of the intellect turning 334 1, 88 | cannot produce any other acts. These acts, ~however, are 335 1, 88 | produce any other acts. These acts, ~however, are not adapted 336 1, 88 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The acts which produce a habit are 337 1, 88 | produce a habit are like the acts caused by ~that habit, in 338 1, 89 | presupposes something to ~its act, acts by making a change therein. 339 1, 89 | Therefore everything else acts ~by producing a change, 340 1, 89 | change, whereas God alone acts by creation. Since, ~therefore, 341 1, 90 | earthly body, yet for the acts of the rational soul the 342 1, 90 | greater freedom of the acts of the interior powers; 343 1, 91 | whole ~human race from one" (Acts 17:26). Secondly, that man 344 1, 92 | power or in his habits and acts?~(8) Whether the image of 345 1, 92 | God is to be found in the acts of the soul?~Aquin.: SMT 346 1, 92 | God is not found in the acts of ~the soul. For Augustine 347 1, 92 | to be found in the soul's acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[93] A[ 348 1, 92 | God does not extend to the acts of the soul.~Aquin.: SMT 349 1, 92 | does not ~extend to the acts of the soul.~Aquin.: SMT 350 1, 92 | does not ~extend to the acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[93] A[ 351 1, 92 | Trinity is to be found in the acts of the ~soul, that is, inasmuch 352 1, 92 | since the principles of acts are the habits and powers, 353 1, 92 | habits, forasmuch as the acts virtually ~exist therein.~ 354 1, 92 | we must say that these acts, ~although not always actually 355 1, 94 | man, but not as to their acts; for he was so disposed 356 1, 95 | regard to ~certain particular acts; whereas man possesses a 357 1, 96 | action of natural heat, which acts as the soul's ~instrument: 358 1, 98 | ordered when it tends to acts which are befitting to man. ~ 359 1, 98 | befitting to man. ~But the same acts are not befitting to man 360 1, 98 | of act; but only for the acts befitting the state of infancy, 361 1, 98 | children even as regards those acts which befit the state of 362 1, 102 | master ~of its own act, and acts of itself; and is not made 363 1, 102 | good only, "for no ~one acts intending evil," as Dionysius 364 1, 103 | for the created nature acts always on something presupposed. 365 1, 104 | necessity. But since He acts by His will and intellect, 366 1, 104 | although the agent also acts through its own form); as 367 1, 104 | order, the second always acts in virtue of the ~first; 368 1, 104 | Contra Faust. xxvi, 3): "God ~acts against the wonted course 369 1, 104 | particular cause. So when He acts outside this order, He does ~ 370 1, 104 | by the shadow of Peter ~(Acts 5:15). Nor do they surpass 371 1, 105 | considered: (1) ~How an angel acts on an angel; (2) How an 372 1, 105 | angel; (2) How an angel acts on a corporeal ~nature; ( 373 1, 105 | nature; (3) How an angel acts on man.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 374 1, 105 | 105], A[6]), God sometimes acts outside the order of corporeal ~ 375 1, 105 | Therefore He also sometimes acts outside the order of ~spiritual 376 1, 107 | reason of other different acts.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[108] A[ 377 1, 107 | able to distinguish ~its acts, powers, and nature, down 378 1, 108 | and measure of all human ~acts."~ 379 1, 111 | an angel according as he acts by Divine command in ~respect 380 1, 112 | men. But God's providence acts ~differently as regards 381 1, 112 | away, the providence of God acts so as to order their ~existence 382 1, 114 | they are the cause of human acts?~(5) Whether demons are 383 1, 114 | bodies: there is one Who acts but is not acted upon; this 384 1, 114 | therefore say that a body acts forasmuch as it is in act, 385 1, 114 | as the spiritual nature acts on the ~corporeal, and the 386 1, 114 | although itself ~an accident, acts nevertheless by virtue of 387 1, 114 | of the soul which are the acts of corporeal organs, but ~ 388 1, 114 | accidentally: because the acts of such powers must needs 389 1, 114 | intellect and will are not ~acts of corporeal organs, it 390 1, 115 | manifest that ~a heavenly body acts after the manner of a natural 391 1, 115 | some ordering cause which acts by the intellect, especially 392 1, 116 | is only inasmuch as he ~acts through his own knowledge, 393 1, 116 | quality through which anyone acts so as to produce his like, 394 1, 116 | exterior principle, art, acts, not as principal agent, ~ 395 1, 117 | sensitive soul. Now nothing acts ~beyond its species. Therefore 396 1, 117 | Again, the seminal power acts by virtue of the soul of 397 1, 117 | whole of corporeal nature acts as the instrument ~of a 398 2, 1 | But that for ~which a man acts, is the cause of his action; 399 2, 1 | act for an end, when he acts ~deliberately. But man does 400 2, 1 | is true to say that man acts ~for an end, even when he 401 2, 1 | to act for an end, never acts for an ~unknown end. On 402 2, 1 | only ~mind but also nature acts for an end."~Aquin.: SMT 403 2, 1 | Every agent, of necessity, acts for an end. For if, in a ~ 404 2, 1 | 1: When a man of himself acts for an end, he knows the 405 2, 1 | another, for instance, when he acts at ~another's command, or 406 2, 1 | Para. 1/1~Whether human acts are specified by their end?~ 407 2, 1 | It would seem that human acts are not specified by their 408 2, 1 | principle. Therefore human acts are not specified by their 409 2, 1 | give the species to human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[1] A[3] 410 2, 1 | nature. And either way, human acts, whether they be considered 411 2, 1 | from the end. For human ~acts can be considered in both 412 2, 1 | stated above (A[1]) that acts are ~called human, inasmuch 413 2, 1 | the principle of human acts, in so far as they are human, 414 2, 1 | properly of man," ~moral acts properly speaking receive 415 2, 1 | from the end, for ~moral acts are the same as human acts.~ 416 2, 1 | acts are the same as human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[1] A[3] 417 2, 1 | there ~would be several acts in different species of 418 2, 1 | there is no ~reason why acts which are the same considered 419 2, 1 | This multiplication of acts of the will reacting on 420 2, 2 | singulars, such as are human acts. For this ~reason human 421 2, 5 | far as they hinder ~many acts of virtue; but they cannot 422 2, 6 | 1/5 - TREATISE ON HUMAN ACTS: ACTS PECULIAR TO MAN (QQ[ 423 2, 6 | TREATISE ON HUMAN ACTS: ACTS PECULIAR TO MAN (QQ[6]-21)~ 424 2, 6 | gained by means of certain acts, we ~must in due sequence 425 2, 6 | sequence consider human acts, in order to know by what 426 2, 6 | in order to know by what acts ~we may obtain Happiness, 427 2, 6 | obtain Happiness, and by what acts we are prevented from obtaining ~ 428 2, 6 | But because operations and acts are concerned with things 429 2, 6 | since it treats of ~human acts, should consider first the 430 2, 6 | consideration are (1) human acts themselves; (2) their ~principles. 431 2, 6 | principles. Now of human acts some are proper to man; 432 2, 6 | man's proper good, those acts ~which are proper to man 433 2, 6 | we must ~consider those acts which are proper to man; 434 2, 6 | to man; secondly, those acts which ~are common to man 435 2, 6 | What distinguishes human acts?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] Out. 436 2, 6 | Para. 3/5~And since those acts are properly called human 437 2, 6 | to man; we ~must consider acts in so far as they are voluntary.~ 438 2, 6 | general; ~secondly, those acts which are voluntary, as 439 2, 6 | immediately; thirdly, those acts which are ~voluntary, as 440 2, 6 | 5~And because voluntary acts have certain circumstances, 441 2, 6 | circumstances of those ~acts which are found to be voluntary 442 2, 6 | anything voluntary in human acts?~(2) Whether in irrational 443 2, 6 | anything voluntary in human acts?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] A[1] 444 2, 6 | nothing voluntary in human acts. For ~that is voluntary " 445 2, 6 | the principle of human ~acts is not in man himself, but 446 2, 6 | nothing voluntary ~in human acts. ~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] A[ 447 2, 6 | without. But ~all human acts are new, since none is eternal. 448 2, 6 | principle of all human acts is from without: and therefore 449 2, 6 | OBJ 3: Further, he that acts voluntarily, can act of 450 2, 6 | nothing voluntary in human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] A[1] 451 2, 6 | operation." Now such are human acts. ~Therefore there is something 452 2, 6 | something voluntary in human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] A[1] 453 2, 6 | something voluntary in human acts. In ~order to make this 454 2, 6 | that the principle of some ~acts or movements is within the 455 2, 6 | principle of some movements or acts is outside. For when a stone 456 2, 6 | every agent or thing moved, ~acts or is moved for an end, 457 2, 6 | Therefore, whatever so acts or is moved by an intrinsic 458 2, 6 | act, so that it not only acts, but acts for an end. On 459 2, 6 | that it not only acts, but acts for an end. On the other 460 2, 6 | that their ~movements and acts are from their own inclination. 461 2, 6 | and moves ~himself, in his acts especially is the voluntary 462 2, 6 | Further, according as human acts are voluntary, man is said 463 2, 6 | Orth. 24) that "voluntary acts ~lead to praise and blame." 464 2, 6 | nor blame is due to the ~acts of irrational minds. Therefore 465 2, 6 | irrational minds. Therefore such acts are not voluntary.~Aquin.: 466 2, 6 | another inasmuch as this other acts; for ~instance, heating 467 2, 6 | As regards the commanded acts of the will, then, the will 468 2, 6 | as it is done. For, since acts are concerned with singulars; ~ 469 2, 6 | the timid man through fear acts counter to that ~which he 470 2, 6 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: He who acts from fear retains the repugnance 471 2, 6 | considered in itself. But he that acts from ~concupiscence, e.g. 472 2, 6 | yields to concupiscence acts counter to that which he ~ 473 2, 6 | whereas ~the timid man acts counter to that which in 474 2, 7 | THE CIRCUMSTANCES OF HUMAN ACTS (FOUR ARTICLES)~We must 475 2, 7 | the circumstances of human acts: under which head ~there 476 2, 7 | circumstances of human ~acts?~(3) How many circumstances 477 2, 7 | are not accidents of human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[1] 478 2, 7 | has no accident. But human acts themselves ~are accidents. 479 2, 7 | circumstances are not accidents of acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[1] 480 2, 7 | individual accidents of human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[1] 481 2, 7 | located things to human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[1] 482 2, 7 | the circumstances of human acts should be called their ~ 483 2, 7 | the accidents of ~human acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[1] 484 2, 7 | circumstances are related to acts in both these ways. For ~ 485 2, 7 | that have a relation to acts, belong to the agent ~otherwise 486 2, 7 | the circumstances of human acts?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[2] 487 2, 7 | circumstances of human acts. Because theologians do 488 2, 7 | theologians do not consider human ~acts otherwise than according 489 2, 7 | cannot give quality to human acts; for a thing ~is never qualified, 490 2, 7 | of the ~circumstances of acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[2] 491 2, 7 | circumstances are the accidents of acts. But one thing ~may be subject 492 2, 7 | theologian ~considers human acts, inasmuch as man is thereby 493 2, 7 | proportionate to ~that end. But acts are made proportionate to 494 2, 7 | theologian considers human acts according as they are found 495 2, 7 | theologian considers human acts under the aspect of merit 496 2, 7 | which is proper to human acts; and for this it is requisite 497 2, 7 | Accordingly, since the goodness of acts ~consists in their utility 498 2, 7 | mean of virtue in human acts ~and passions. To the politician 499 2, 7 | far as ~circumstances make acts to be worthy of praise or 500 2, 7 | consider virtuous and vicious acts, just as ~the moralist does;


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