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acted 42
acting 118
actio 1
action 1852
actions 836
active 929
actively 30
Frequency    [«  »]
1925 effect
1921 principle
1907 lord
1852 action
1844 punishment
1843 kind
1826 before
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

action

1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1500 | 1501-1852

     Part, Question
501 1, 94 | measured ~by the degree of the action itself. This degree is of 502 1, 95 | himself, more or less, to ~action, desire, or knowledge; hence 503 1, 96 | passion is the effect of action; and in nature ~contraries 504 1, 96 | the body: so that by the action of heat, the body might 505 1, 96 | lost of ~humidity by the action of natural heat, which acts 506 1, 97 | desire, but of deliberate action."~ 507 1, 100 | latter are hindered, the action of the former ~is of necessity 508 1, 102 | of the arrow shows ~the action of the archer, so the natural 509 1, 102 | that, The effect of any action may be judged from its end; ~ 510 1, 102 | its end; ~because it is by action that the attainment of the 511 1, 103 | God were to ~withdraw His action.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[104] A[ 512 1, 103 | being, this is done by some ~action. Now every action of an 513 1, 103 | some ~action. Now every action of an agent, if that action 514 1, 103 | action of an agent, if that action be efficacious, ~produces 515 1, 103 | is not so; because this ~action does not give being to the 516 1, 103 | becoming" depends on the action of the builder. ~The same 517 1, 103 | cannot continue when that action of ~the agent ceases which 518 1, 103 | thing continue after that action of the agent has ~ceased, 519 1, 103 | cessation of the ~fire's action; while, on the contrary, 520 1, 103 | the light ceases with the ~action of the sun.~Aquin.: SMT 521 1, 103 | influence of the Divine action; just as light results from 522 1, 103 | nature of the air, given the action of the sun. Wherefore the ~ 523 1, 103 | a continuation of that ~action whereby He gives existence, 524 1, 103 | He gives existence, which action is without either motion ~ 525 1, 103 | preserves things by the same action, as above stated ~(A[1], 526 1, 103 | removing or hindering ~the action of a corrupting cause; secondly, 527 1, 103 | causes which hinder the action of corrupting agents, and 528 1, 103 | anything it would be by His ~action. But this cannot be; because 529 1, 103 | because the term of every action is ~existence. Hence even 530 1, 103 | existence. Hence even the action of a corrupting cause has 531 1, 103 | non-existence, by withdrawing His action ~therefrom.~Aquin.: SMT 532 1, 103 | this would not imply an ~action on God's part; but a mere 533 1, 103 | a mere cessation of His action.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[104] A[ 534 1, 104 | created ~intellect. For the action of the intellect is governed 535 1, 104 | ix, Did. viii, 8. But the action of what is moved by another 536 1, 104 | matter is not a principle of action, but is the subject that ~ 537 1, 104 | receives the effect of action. On the other hand, the 538 1, 104 | the form are principles of action, but in a certain order. 539 1, 104 | the first ~principle of action is the end which moves the 540 1, 104 | which the agent applies to action ~(although the agent also 541 1, 104 | the craftsman is moved to action by the ~end, which is the 542 1, 104 | or a bed; and ~applies to action the axe which cuts through 543 1, 104 | therefore He is the cause of action in ~every agent. Thirdly, 544 1, 104 | Therefore He is the cause of action not only by ~giving the 545 1, 104 | which is the principle of action, as the generator is ~said 546 1, 104 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: One action does not proceed from two 547 1, 104 | nothing hinders the same action from proceeding from a primary ~ 548 1, 104 | moreover the end of ~every action, as above explained.~Aquin.: 549 1, 104 | ways. It may happen by the action of an agent which did not ~ 550 1, 104 | may also happen by ~the action of the agent on whom the 551 1, 104 | being accomplished by the action of any ~natural cause. Yet 552 1, 104 | Divine ~Power; because no action is of any account compared 553 1, 106 | to the performing of ~an action, or to being made known 554 1, 107 | is ~order, knowledge, and action." But all the angels agree 555 1, 107 | being of most penetrating ~action, and reaching even to the 556 1, 107 | whereby is signified the action of these angels, ~exercised 557 1, 107 | in the execution of any action there are beginners and ~ 558 1, 108 | 1/1~I answer that, Since action follows the nature of a 559 1, 108 | actions are subject to the action of those above ~them, and 560 1, 108 | by precedence - that the action of the ~subject should be 561 1, 108 | subject should be under the action of the prelate. So the very 562 1, 109 | possesses a determinate mode of action, needs not to ~be governed 563 1, 110 | 111] Out. Para. 1/2 - THE ACTION OF THE ANGELS ON MAN (FOUR 564 1, 110 | ARTICLES)~We now consider the action of the angels on man, and 565 1, 110 | is strengthened by ~the action of the superior intellect, 566 1, 110 | is strengthened by the action of the angelic intellect. 567 1, 111 | said: "He that is less in action, shall receive wisdom" ~( 568 1, 111 | Body Para. 2/2~Yet the action performed by the angel who 569 1, 111 | moved by another, and its action is ordered to another. ~ 570 1, 111 | world." In another sense an action is said to be intellectual ~ 571 1, 111 | because we give ourselves to action through the ~sensitive faculties, 572 1, 111 | sensitive faculties, the action of which when intense impedes 573 1, 111 | when intense impedes the action ~of the intellectual powers. 574 1, 111 | immediately by God ~without the action of the heavenly bodies. 575 1, 112 | are required for a good action; first, that the ~affection 576 1, 113 | cause of something, when its action ~tends directly thereunto. 577 1, 114 | Out. Para. 1/1 - OF THE ACTION OF THE CORPOREAL CREATURE ( 578 1, 114 | have now to consider the action of the corporeal creature; 579 1, 114 | subject susceptible of its action. But there is not substance 580 1, 114 | susceptible of the latter's action; ~since it belongs to the 581 1, 114 | substance from movement and action, because it surrounds ~it 582 1, 114 | 4: Further, the power of action in every agent is according 583 1, 114 | an agent, the term of its action is either ~a substantial, 584 1, 114 | a body any principle of action, save an ~active quality, 585 1, 114 | shows its greatness in its action and ~power on that of which 586 1, 114 | active. ~But concerning the action of bodies there have been 587 1, 114 | errors. For ~some denied all action to bodies. This is the opinion 588 1, 114 | so as to be ~unable by action to extend to any other matter: 589 1, 114 | to that. Hence such ~an action is effected by the contact 590 1, 114 | second opinion concerning the action of bodies; of which we have 591 1, 114 | Democritus, who held that action takes ~place through the 592 1, 114 | be diminished through its action; which things are ~manifestly 593 1, 114 | the corporeal form from ~action, as stated above; but from 594 1, 114 | thereto. Thirdly, because action is ~not effected by local 595 1, 114 | 5: The term of a body's action is both an accidental form 596 1, 114 | instrument: wherefore its action can terminate in a substantial 597 1, 114 | instrument of the soul, has an action ~terminating in the generation 598 1, 114 | thus Democritus explained action by an issue of ~atoms.~Aquin.: 599 1, 114 | is produced through the ~action of heat and cold, moisture 600 1, 114 | cause of human choice and action. It would also follow that 601 1, 114 | here below in virtue of the action of heavenly bodies, ~is 602 1, 114 | powers be disturbed, the action of the intellect is, of ~ 603 1, 114 | the demons subject to the action of heavenly bodies.~Aquin.: 604 1, 114 | are not subject to the ~action of heavenly bodies.~Aquin.: 605 1, 114 | they are subject ~to the action of heavenly bodies neither 606 1, 114 | the most ~subject to the action of the moon, the property 607 1, 114 | things subject to their ~action?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[115] A[ 608 1, 114 | things ~subject to their action. For given a sufficient 609 1, 114 | shown that ~although the action of heavenly bodies produces 610 1, 114 | bodies being hindered by the action of the will, not only in 611 1, 114 | other things to which human action extends.~Aquin.: SMT FP 612 1, 114 | cause ~which hinders the action of a cause so ordered to 613 1, 115 | are not subject to the action of heavenly bodies, save 614 1, 115 | nor a unity. But every ~action of nature terminates in 615 1, 116 | THINGS PERTAINING TO THE ACTION OF MAN (FOUR ARTICLES)~We 616 1, 116 | things which pertain to the action of ~man, who is composed 617 1, 116 | place we shall consider that action (in general) and secondly 618 1, 117 | agent, the greater scope its action has: for ~instance, the 619 1, 117 | and the same agent whose action is directed to ~the matter 620 1, 117 | in matter ~to extend its action to the production of an 621 1, 117 | afterwards through the action of the seminal power, becomes 622 1, 117 | that which is caused by the action of God is ~something subsistent: 623 1, 117 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 5: In the action of the adulterer, what is 624 1, 118 | help nature to resist the action of natural heat, and ~prevent 625 1, 118 | that which is lost by the ~action of natural heat. But there 626 1, 118 | weakened by continuous ~action, because such agents are 627 2, 1 | acts, is the cause of his action; since this preposition ~" 628 2, 1 | cases the last end is an action, as the Philosopher states ~( 629 2, 1 | Reply OBJ 2: If any human action be the last end, it must 630 2, 1 | as stated above. Now an action is voluntary ~in one of 631 2, 1 | follows that if a ~human action be the last end, it must 632 2, 1 | last end, it must be an action commanded by the will: ~ 633 2, 1 | will: ~so that there, some action of man, at least the act 634 2, 1 | even when he does that action in which the last end consists.~ 635 2, 1 | an end is to order one's action to an end. ~But this is 636 2, 1 | tends to an end, by its ~action or movement, in two ways: 637 2, 1 | archer who ~directs his action to the end. Therefore those 638 2, 1 | in a way, divided into action and passion, each of these 639 2, 1 | its ~species from an act; action indeed from the act which 640 2, 1 | Wherefore heating, as an action, is nothing else than a 641 2, 1 | something, considered ~as action, and to proceed towards 642 2, 1 | desired, nor would any ~action have its term, nor would 643 2, 1 | the end is the term of action. But actions are of ~individuals. 644 2, 1 | their first ~principle of action is nature, which tends to 645 2, 3 | stated in Metaph. ix, 7 action is twofold. One proceeds ~ 646 2, 3 | such an operation is an action ~and a perfection, not of 647 2, 3 | passage. The other is an action that remains in the ~agent, 648 2, 3 | and to will: and such an action is ~a perfection and an 649 2, 3 | sake but for the sake of action: and these very ~actions 650 2, 4 | opposition; thus cold hinders the action of heat: and such a hindrance ~ 651 2, 4 | approaches nearer than that of action to the likeness of that 652 2, 5 | attains Happiness through the action of some higher ~creature?~( 653 2, 5 | naturally the principle of his action, by his ~intellect and will. 654 2, 5 | attains happiness through the action of some higher creature?~ 655 2, 5 | be made happy through the action of ~some higher creature, 656 2, 5 | fact that its power and action are limited: that which ~ 657 2, 5 | be bestowed through the action of any creature: but by 658 2, 5 | can be the principle of action on something else: for instance 659 2, 5 | previous disposition or action on the ~part of the creature, 660 2, 6 | voluntariness without any action?~(4) Whether violence can 661 2, 6 | intrinsic ~principle of action or movement, nevertheless 662 2, 6 | which the principle of its action towards an end is not in 663 2, 6 | which the principle of its action towards an ~end is imprinted 664 2, 6 | It is thus that voluntary action is attributed to ~irrational 665 2, 6 | what follows from want of ~action is not always the agent 666 2, 6 | will directly, as from its action; but also to that ~which 667 2, 6 | inclination to receive an action from an extrinsic principle: 668 2, 6 | ways. First, in regard to action, for instance, when ~one 669 2, 6 | passive to another. Hence when action is brought to bear ~on something, 670 2, 6 | the will to suffer that ~action remains in the passive subject, 671 2, 6 | patient does nothing by way of action, he does something by ~being 672 2, 6 | through fear, a violent action is defined as not only one, " 673 2, 8 | the genus "quality," or "action," or ~"passion"; whereas 674 2, 9 | with regard to this or that action. Thus the sight sometimes ~ 675 2, 12 | something." Now both the action of the mover and the movement 676 2, 12 | anything, is due to the action of the mover. Consequently 677 2, 13 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, action is distinct from contemplation. 678 2, 13 | by those who exercise no action in their regard. ~Therefore 679 2, 13 | Now the end is either an action or a thing. And when the 680 2, 13 | is a thing, some human action must intervene; either in 681 2, 13 | must ~needs be either an action; or a thing, with some action 682 2, 13 | action; or a thing, with some action intervening ~whereby man 683 2, 13 | opinion. It is exterior action that is put in ~contradistinction 684 2, 13 | in conjunction with some ~action of the chooser.~Aquin.: 685 2, 13 | intellect and the external ~action: for the intellect proposes 686 2, 13 | will ~causes the external action. Hence the principle of 687 2, 13 | observed in its relation to the action whereby a man tends ~to 688 2, 14 | as being useful towards ~action, because actions bear on 689 2, 14 | the law is not due to ~the action of him who seeks counsel, 690 2, 14 | nevertheless it directs him in his ~action: since the mandate of the 691 2, 14 | by certain fixed rules of action; thus a writer does not 692 2, 14 | Counsel is indeed about action. But actions take their ~ 693 2, 14 | particular things with which action is ~concerned. But singulars 694 2, 14 | obstacles. But every human action can be ~hindered, and an 695 2, 14 | Reply OBJ 2: Although human action can be hindered, the hindrance 696 2, 15 | to touch a stone is an ~action suitable to a stick, but 697 2, 15 | application. ~Now the order of action is this: First there is 698 2, 15 | reason. For "delight follows action, and perfects it, just as ~ 699 2, 15 | thinking, considered as an action; and in ~like manner on 700 2, 16 | interior principles of ~action, viz. the powers of the 701 2, 16 | the principal agent. Now action is properly ~ascribed, not 702 2, 16 | to apply the members to action is to use them. But ~irrational 703 2, 16 | animals apply their members to action; for instance, their ~feet, 704 2, 16 | an active ~principle to action: thus to consent is to apply 705 2, 16 | apply their members ~to action, nor do they use them.~Aquin.: 706 2, 17 | has an impulse towards an action. ~But impulse to action 707 2, 17 | action. ~But impulse to action is to be found in irrational 708 2, 17 | Reply OBJ 3: Impulse to action is in irrational animals 709 2, 17 | For the impulse of man to action arises from the directing ~ 710 2, 17 | ii, 22) that impulse to ~action precedes use. But impulse 711 2, 18 | 1) Whether every human action is good, or are there evil 712 2, 18 | good or evil of a human action is derived from its ~object?~( 713 2, 18 | end?~(5) Whether a human action is good or evil in its species?~( 714 2, 18 | species?~(6) Whether an action has the species of good 715 2, 18 | conversely?~(8) Whether any action is indifferent in its species?~( 716 2, 18 | 9) Whether an individual action can be indifferent?~(10) 717 2, 18 | circumstance places a moral action in the species of good ~ 718 2, 18 | circumstance that makes an action better or worse, ~places 719 2, 18 | worse, ~places the moral action in the species of good or 720 2, 18 | 1/1~Whether every human action is good, or are there evil 721 2, 18 | would seem that every human action is good, and that none is ~ 722 2, 18 | the good. Therefore ~no action is evil.~Aquin.: SMT FS 723 2, 18 | is good. ~Therefore every action is good, and none is evil.~ 724 2, 18 | Div. Nom. iv). But every action has some effect which is 725 2, 18 | proper ~to it. Therefore no action is evil, but every action 726 2, 18 | action is evil, but every action is good.~Aquin.: SMT FS 727 2, 18 | therefore say that every action has goodness, in so far 728 2, 18 | being nor possibility ~of action. On the other hand if good 729 2, 18 | no evil. Consequently the action done is a deficient good, 730 2, 18 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: An evil action can have a proper effect, 731 2, 18 | good or evil of a man's action is derived from its object?~ 732 2, 18 | that the good or evil of an action is not derived ~from its 733 2, 18 | object. For the object of any action is a thing. But "evil is ~ 734 2, 18 | good or evil of a human action is ~not derived from their 735 2, 18 | object is compared to the action as its matter. But ~the 736 2, 18 | power is compared to the action ~as effect to cause. But 737 2, 18 | account of the malice of his action. Therefore the malice of 738 2, 18 | Therefore the malice of his action ~is according to the evil 739 2, 18 | to ~the goodness of his action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[18] A[ 740 2, 18 | the good or evil of an action, as ~of other things, depends 741 2, 18 | species from its form, so an action has its species from its ~ 742 2, 18 | primary goodness of a moral action is derived from its ~suitable 743 2, 18 | hence some call such an action "good in its genus"; for ~ 744 2, 18 | belongs to another." And this ~action is said to be "evil in its 745 2, 18 | proportion to this or that ~action. And so, inasmuch as they 746 2, 18 | The object of the human action is not always the object 747 2, 18 | that it is the term ~of its action, and consequently that it 748 2, 18 | although the ~goodness of an action is not caused by the goodness 749 2, 18 | goodness of its effect, yet an ~action is said to be good from 750 2, 18 | the very proportion of an action to its effect is ~the measure 751 2, 18 | Para. 1/1~Whether man's action is good or evil from a circumstance?~ 752 2, 18 | 1: It would seem that an action is not good or evil from 753 2, 18 | around [circumstant] an action, as ~being outside it, as 754 2, 18 | Metaph. vi, 4. Therefore an action ~does not derive goodness 755 2, 18 | goodness or malice of an action is considered ~principally 756 2, 18 | goodness or malice of an action is not taken from a ~circumstance.~ 757 2, 18 | good and ~evil belong to an action in respect of its substance; 758 2, 18 | its substance; because an action ~can be good or evil in 759 2, 18 | above (A[2]). Therefore an ~action is not good or bad from 760 2, 18 | the ~result. So it is with action. For the plenitude of its 761 2, 18 | a due circumstance ~the action will be evil.~Aquin.: SMT 762 2, 18 | Circumstances are outside an action, inasmuch as they are ~not 763 2, 18 | essence; but they are in an action as accidents thereof. ~Thus, 764 2, 18 | Para. 1/1~Whether a human action is good or evil from its 765 2, 18 | to evil." If therefore an action were good or evil from its 766 2, 18 | or evil from its end, no ~action would be evil. Which is 767 2, 18 | Further, the goodness of an action is something in the action. ~ 768 2, 18 | action is something in the action. ~But the end is an extrinsic 769 2, 18 | extrinsic cause. Therefore an action is not said to be ~good 770 2, 18 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, a good action may happen to be ordained 771 2, 18 | and conversely, an evil ~action may happen to be ordained 772 2, 18 | to the poor. Therefore an action is not good or ~evil from 773 2, 18 | be considered in a human action. ~First, that which, as 774 2, 18 | First, that which, as an action, it derives from its genus; 775 2, 18 | because as ~much as it has of action and being so much has it 776 2, 18 | the latter event, an evil action results from the end in 777 2, 18 | end, are inherent to the ~action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[18] A[ 778 2, 18 | OBJ 3: Nothing hinders an action that is good in one of the 779 2, 18 | thus it may ~happen that an action which is good in its species 780 2, 18 | vice versa. However, an ~action is not good simply, unless 781 2, 18 | Para. 1/1~Whether a human action is good or evil in its species?~ 782 2, 18 | species, it seems ~that an action is not constituted in a 783 2, 18 | a good and from an evil action: ~thus a man is born of 784 2, 18 | accident, it does not give an action its species. Therefore human 785 2, 18 | 1/2~I answer that, Every action derives its species from 786 2, 18 | some ~potentiality. For an action is said to be evil in its 787 2, 18 | circumstance transforms ~an action from good to evil; for a 788 2, 18 | circumstance would not make an action ~evil, except through being 789 2, 18 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether an action has the species of good 790 2, 18 | diversify the ~species of an action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[18] A[ 791 2, 18 | But it is accidental to an action to be ~ordained to some 792 2, 18 | diversify the species of action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[18] A[ 793 2, 18 | 1]). Now, in a voluntary action, ~there is a twofold action, 794 2, 18 | action, ~there is a twofold action, viz. the interior action 795 2, 18 | action, viz. the interior action of the will, and the ~external 796 2, 18 | will, and the ~external action: and each of these actions 797 2, 18 | object of ~the external action, is that on which the action 798 2, 18 | action, is that on which the action is brought to bear. ~Therefore 799 2, 18 | Therefore just as the external action takes its species from the 800 2, 18 | the part of the external action: because the will uses the ~ 801 2, 18 | the object of the external action. Hence the ~Philosopher 802 2, 18 | accidental to the external action to be ~ordained to some 803 2, 18 | the part of the internal action.~~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[18] A[ 804 2, 18 | order to give alms. For an action takes its species from its ~ 805 2, 18 | determinate differences. But an ~action of one same species on the 806 2, 18 | other; but then the moral action is contained ~under two 807 2, 18 | a ~twofold malice in one action. On the other hand, if the 808 2, 18 | things. In like ~manner an action which, as to its substance, 809 2, 18 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether any action is indifferent in its species? ~ 810 2, 18 | 1: It would seem that no action is indifferent in its species. 811 2, 18 | is not such thing as an ~action that is indifferent in its 812 2, 18 | bad. Therefore every human action is good or ~evil according 813 2, 18 | stated above (A[1]), an action is said to be good, ~when 814 2, 18 | that ~complement. But every action must needs either have the 815 2, 18 | respect. Therefore every action must ~needs be either good 816 2, 18 | stated above (AA[2],5), every action takes its species ~from 817 2, 18 | its object; while human action, which is called moral, 818 2, 18 | Wherefore if the object of an action includes ~something in accord 819 2, 18 | reason, it will be a good action ~according to its species; 820 2, 18 | happen ~that the object of an action does not include something 821 2, 18 | everything belonging to an action belongs also to its ~species. 822 2, 18 | species. Wherefore although an action's specific nature may not 823 2, 18 | it is not ~therefore an action specifically bad; nor is 824 2, 18 | 1~Whether an individual action can be indifferent?~Aquin.: 825 2, 18 | seem that an individual action can be indifferent. For ~ 826 2, 18 | contain an individual. But an ~action can be indifferent in its 827 2, 18 | Therefore an individual action can be indifferent.~Aquin.: 828 2, 18 | specifically indifferent action to a vicious or virtuous 829 2, 18 | Therefore ~an individual action may happen to be indifferent.~ 830 2, 18 | same reason every other action is either good or bad. Therefore 831 2, 18 | Therefore no ~individual action is indifferent.~Aquin.: 832 2, 18 | sometimes happens that an action is indifferent in its ~species, 833 2, 18 | this is because a moral action, as stated above (A[3]), 834 2, 18 | species. And every individual ~action must needs have some circumstance 835 2, 18 | reason to direct; if an action that proceeds from deliberate 836 2, 18 | Consequently every human action that proceeds from deliberate 837 2, 18 | his ~hand or foot; such an action, properly speaking, is not 838 2, 18 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: For an action to be indifferent in its 839 2, 18 | along this line. ~But no action can be specifically indifferent 840 2, 18 | since no object of ~human action is such that it cannot be 841 2, 18 | specific ~indifference of an action may be due to the fact that 842 2, 18 | this sense every individual action is ~either good or bad, 843 2, 18 | vice. ~Thus, if a man's action is directed to the support 844 2, 18 | circumstance places a moral action in the species of good or ~ 845 2, 18 | circumstance cannot place a moral action in ~the species of good 846 2, 18 | evil. For the species of an action is taken from ~its object. 847 2, 18 | circumstances do not give an action its species.~Aquin.: SMT 848 2, 18 | in relation to the moral ~action, as stated above (Q[7], 849 2, 18 | several species. But one action has ~several circumstances. 850 2, 18 | does not place a moral ~action in a species of good or 851 2, 18 | But place makes a moral action ~to be in a certain species 852 2, 18 | circumstance makes a moral action to be ~specifically good 853 2, 18 | consequently that which, in one ~action, is taken as a circumstance 854 2, 18 | object that specifies the ~action, can again be taken by the 855 2, 18 | object that determines the action's species. Thus to ~appropriate 856 2, 18 | and if we consider that action also in its bearing on place 857 2, 18 | needs specify the moral action whether ~good or bad.~Aquin.: 858 2, 18 | so far as it specifies an action, is ~considered as a condition 859 2, 18 | circumstance, does ~not specify an action, since thus it is a mere 860 2, 18 | then it does specify the ~action. ~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[18] A[ 861 2, 18 | circumstance that places the moral action ~in the species of good 862 2, 18 | Consequently, although one action may ~have many circumstances, 863 2, 18 | there is no reason why one action should not be in several, ~ 864 2, 18 | circumstance that makes an action better or worse, places 865 2, 18 | or worse, places a ~moral action in a species of good or 866 2, 18 | good or evil, ~specifies an action. For good and evil are specific 867 2, 18 | goodness or ~malice of a moral action, causes a specific difference, 868 2, 18 | Now that which makes an action better or ~worse, makes 869 2, 18 | circumstance that makes an action ~better or worse, constitutes 870 2, 18 | not, it cannot make ~the action better or worse; because 871 2, 18 | circumstance that ~makes an action better or worse, constitutes 872 2, 18 | circumstance that makes a moral action better or worse, places 873 2, 18 | good or evil to a moral action, in so far as it regards 874 2, 18 | circumstance, from which the moral ~action takes its species of good 875 2, 18 | presupposed, from ~which the action takes its malice or goodness; 876 2, 18 | another, which makes the action to be discordant with ~reason. 877 2, 18 | circumstance that makes a moral action ~better or worse, changes 878 2, 18 | manner that which makes an action ~to be more or less good 879 2, 18 | evil, does not make the action differ in ~species.~Aquin.: 880 2, 18 | adds to the ~goodness of an action, sometimes has no goodness 881 2, 18 | some other condition of the action, as stated above. ~Consequently 882 2, 18 | this other condition of the action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[18] A[ 883 2, 19 | Ethic. vi, 5), "goodness of action is the end, but goodness ~ 884 2, 19 | Reply OBJ 2: Although an action can, in a certain way, be 885 2, 19 | end; nevertheless such action is not an act of the will, 886 2, 19 | Further, the goodness of an action is derived not only from 887 2, 19 | 1/1~On the contrary, An action does not take its species 888 2, 19 | application of knowledge to some action. Now ~knowledge is in the 889 2, 19 | application of knowledge to action, as was stated in the FP, ~ 890 2, 19 | good and evil consist in action in so ~far as it is voluntary, 891 2, 19 | not only to the external action, but also to the act of ~ 892 2, 19 | in regard to the exterior action, which ~obstacles we are 893 2, 19 | the will is a principle of action. But our action cannot ~ 894 2, 19 | principle of action. But our action cannot ~be conformed to 895 2, 19 | knows truth: and ~human action is conformed to the Divine, 896 2, 20 | will, or in ~the external action?~(2) Whether the whole goodness 897 2, 20 | or malice of the external action depends ~on the goodness 898 2, 20 | as ~those of the external action?~(4) Whether the external 899 2, 20 | 4) Whether the external action adds any goodness or malice 900 2, 20 | consequences of an external action increase its goodness ~or 901 2, 20 | one and the same external action can be both good and evil?~ 902 2, 20 | or malice is first in the action of the will, or in the ~ 903 2, 20 | will, or in the ~external action?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[20] A[ 904 2, 20 | evil are in the external action prior ~to being in the act 905 2, 20 | 1],2). But the external action is the ~object of the interior 906 2, 20 | evil are ~in the external action, prior to being in the act 907 2, 20 | relation to the ~external action, as stated above (Q[18], 908 2, 20 | evil are in the external action, prior to being in the act 909 2, 20 | evil, which the external action ~derives from its relation 910 2, 20 | it passes to the external action. On the other ~hand, the 911 2, 20 | malice which the external action has of itself, on ~account 912 2, 20 | goodness of the external action, in so ~far as it comes 913 2, 20 | in the execution of the action done, it is subsequent to 914 2, 20 | Reply OBJ 1: The exterior action is the object of the will, 915 2, 20 | in the execution of the action, it ~is an effect of the 916 2, 20 | compared to the exterior action, as its efficient cause. ~ 917 2, 20 | the form of the exterior action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[20] A[ 918 2, 20 | and malice of the external action depends on ~the goodness 919 2, 20 | malice of the external ~action depend on the goodness of 920 2, 20 | be good, and the external action evil, or ~vice versa.~Aquin.: 921 2, 20 | be ~none in the external action. And so the whole goodness 922 2, 20 | malice of the ~external action depends on the will.~Aquin.: 923 2, 20 | or malice in the external action: one in respect of due matter ~ 924 2, 20 | follows that the external action ~is good. But if the will 925 2, 20 | enough to make the external action good: and if the will be 926 2, 20 | follows that the external action is evil.~Aquin.: SMT FS 927 2, 20 | and malice of the external action are the same as ~those of 928 2, 20 | as those of the external action. For the ~principle of the 929 2, 20 | principle of the external action is the ~power that accomplishes 930 2, 20 | where the principles of action ~are different, the actions 931 2, 20 | different. Moreover, it is the ~action which is the subject of 932 2, 20 | as that of the external action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[20] A[ 933 2, 20 | good, and renders ~its action good also" (Ethic. ii, 6). 934 2, 20 | goodness of the external action, which belongs to the power 935 2, 20 | goodness of the external action, or vice versa, as stated 936 2, 20 | it were, of the external action. Now that which ~results 937 2, 20 | will, and the external action, considered morally, are 938 2, 20 | as that of the external action, and sometimes not. For 939 2, 20 | say that when the external action derives goodness or ~malice 940 2, 20 | end, and ~of the external action, which regards the end through 941 2, 20 | will. But when the external action has goodness or malice of ~ 942 2, 20 | goodness ~of the external action is distinct from the goodness 943 2, 20 | passes into the ~external action, and the goodness of the 944 2, 20 | goodness of the external ~action is derived from the goodness 945 2, 20 | 1/1~Whether the external action adds any goodness or malice 946 2, 20 | would seem that the external action does not add any goodness ~ 947 2, 20 | to that of the interior action. For Chrysostom says (Hom. 948 2, 20 | Therefore the external action adds no goodness or ~malice 949 2, 20 | Therefore the external action does not ~add to the goodness 950 2, 20 | goodness of the external action is derived from the ~goodness 951 2, 20 | therefore by the external action no further goodness or malice 952 2, 20 | goodness which the external action ~derives from the will tending 953 2, 20 | the end, then the external action adds ~nothing to this goodness, 954 2, 20 | goodness which the external action ~derives from its matter 955 2, 20 | derived from the external action, is simply involuntary. 956 2, 20 | goodness which the external ~action derives from the will as 957 2, 20 | goodness ~which the external action takes from its matter and 958 2, 20 | consequences of the external action increase its goodness or ~ 959 2, 20 | consequences of the external action ~increase its goodness or 960 2, 20 | consequences result from the action as an effect from ~its cause. 961 2, 20 | goodness or malice of an action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[20] A[ 962 2, 20 | the consequences of an ~action increase its goodness or 963 2, 20 | goodness or malice of an action.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[20] A[ 964 2, 20 | Therefore the ~consequence of an action increase its goodness or 965 2, 20 | consequences do not make an action that was evil, ~to be good; 966 2, 20 | Therefore the consequences of an action doe not increase its ~goodness 967 2, 20 | The consequences of an action are either foreseen or not. ~ 968 2, 20 | evils may follow from his ~action, and yet does not therefore 969 2, 20 | follow from the nature of the action and in the majority ~of 970 2, 20 | goodness or ~malice of that action: for it is evident that 971 2, 20 | for it is evident that an action is specifically ~better, 972 2, 20 | goodness or malice of the action: because we do not judge 973 2, 20 | one and the same external action can be both good and evil?~ 974 2, 20 | one and the same external action can be both ~good and evil. 975 2, 20 | Therefore one and the same ~action can be both good and bad.~ 976 2, 20 | Philosopher (Phys. iii, 3), action and ~passion are one act. 977 2, 20 | as Christ's was; and ~the action evil, as that of the Jews. 978 2, 20 | his ~master, the servant's action is his master's, just as 979 2, 20 | his master's, just as the action of a ~tool is the workman' 980 2, 20 | a ~tool is the workman's action. But it may happen that 981 2, 20 | happen that the servant's action ~result from his master' 982 2, 20 | evil. Therefore the same ~action can be both good and evil.~ 983 2, 20 | contraries. Therefore the same action cannot be both ~good and 984 2, 20 | contraries. Therefore the same action cannot be both ~good and 985 2, 20 | accordingly, nothing hinders an ~action from being one, considered 986 2, 20 | continuous walking is one ~action, considered in the natural 987 2, 20 | therefore we consider one action in the moral order, it is 988 2, 20 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Action and passion belong to the 989 2, 20 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The action of the servant, in so far 990 2, 20 | servant, is not the master's action: but only in so far ~as 991 2, 20 | servant does not make the action evil in this respect.~ 992 2, 21 | inquiry:~(1) Whether a human action is right or sinful by reason 993 2, 21 | Para. 1/1~Whether a human action is right or sinful, in so 994 2, 21 | 1: It seems that a human action is not right or sinful, 995 2, 21 | Phys. ii, 8). Therefore an ~action is not sinful by reason 996 2, 21 | goodness ~or malice of a human action depends, before all, on 997 2, 21 | seems that the malice of an ~action does not make it sinful.~ 998 2, 21 | Further, if the malice of an action makes it sinful, it follows ~ 999 2, 21 | is an evil. Therefore an action is ~not sinful by reason 1000 2, 21 | the goodness of a human ~action depends principally on the


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