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proximately 7
proximity 7
proxy 1
prudence 1124
prudent 79
prudenter 1
prudently 13
Frequency    [«  »]
1141 creature
1133 causes
1129 inasmuch
1124 prudence
1118 directed
1117 themselves
1111 operation
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

prudence

1-500 | 501-1000 | 1001-1124

     Part, Question
1 1, 1 | fitting ~end: "Wisdom is prudence to a man" (Prov. 10: 23). 2 1, 14 | cause; he has "counsel" or "prudence," according as he ~knows 3 1, 22 | comes the consideration of ~prudence, to which providence would 4 1, 22 | Invent. ii), is a part of prudence. But prudence, ~since, according 5 1, 22 | a part of prudence. But prudence, ~since, according to the 6 1, 22 | it is the chief ~part of prudence, to which two other parts 7 1, 22 | future. Now it belongs to ~prudence, according to the Philosopher ( 8 1, 22 | his family." In this way ~prudence or providence may suitably 9 1, 22 | Philosopher (Ethic. vi, 9,10), "Prudence ~is what, strictly speaking, 10 1, 22 | away." In this manner both ~prudence and providence belong to 11 1, 22 | he will that end. Hence prudence presupposes the moral ~virtues, 12 1, 22 | not require ~providence or prudence. Hence, according to the 13 1, 22 | Ethic. vi, ~5,9, 10,11): "Prudence is the right reason of things 14 1, 23 | Now ~providence, as also prudence, is the plan existing in 15 1, 55 | man, there is a universal prudence with ~respect to all the 16 1, 55 | type and likeness of that prudence which in the lion leads 17 1, 56 | man, there is a universal prudence with ~respect to all the 18 1, 56 | type and likeness of that prudence which in the lion leads 19 1, 95 | latter a certain participated prudence of natural instinct, in 20 1, 95 | man possesses a universal prudence as ~regards all practical 21 1, 95 | certain ~participation of prudence and reason: which accounts 22 1, 112 | Ethic. vi) ~attributes to prudence. As regards the first, God 23 2, 3 | happiness. Thus perfect prudence is in man, ~with whom is 24 2, 3 | be done; while imperfect prudence is ~in certain irrational 25 2, 3 | works similar to works of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] A[6] 26 2, 4 | destroys the estimate of prudence (Ethic. vi, 5). ~Therefore 27 2, 4 | hinders the estimate of ~prudence more than it hinders the 28 2, 6 | destroys the judgment of ~prudence." Therefore concupiscence 29 2, 13 | Ethic. vi, 12, "it is from prudence that a ~man makes a good 30 2, 13 | good choice of means." But prudence is found in irrational ~ 31 2, 19 | respect it ~is perfected by prudence. Now in regard to the means, 32 2, 20 | of that virtue; ~whereas prudence, which is in the reason, 33 2, 21 | voluntarily is preferable; but ~in prudence, as in the moral virtues," 34 2, 21 | the moral virtues," which prudence directs, "he is the ~reverse."~ 35 2, 23 | gloss says: "We should have prudence in ~the reason; hatred of 36 2, 33 | inclined to knowledge and prudence"; and it is written (Wis. 37 2, 33 | destroys the estimate of prudence."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[33] A[ 38 2, 33 | destroy the estimate of prudence, but not the speculative 39 2, 34 | For that which ~destroys prudence and hinders the use of reason, 40 2, 34 | But pleasure destroys prudence and hinders the use ~of 41 2, 34 | hinder the reason or destroy ~prudence, but extraneous pleasures, 42 2, 34 | are more the concern of ~prudence and virtue than of art. 43 2, 53 | Philosopher says about prudence (Ethic. vi, 5) that "it 44 2, 56 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, prudence is in the reason since it 45 2, 56 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Prudence is really subjected in reason: 46 2, 56 | intellect is the subject of prudence. For since ~prudence is 47 2, 56 | of prudence. For since ~prudence is the right reason of things 48 2, 56 | intellect, so the subject of ~prudence is the practical intellect 49 2, 56 | end, and this belongs to prudence ~(Ethic. vi, 2,5). But that 50 2, 56 | concupiscible powers, but prudence is in the reason.~Aquin.: 51 2, 56 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, prudence is a virtue, of which Cicero ( 52 2, 56 | Memory is not a part of prudence, as species is of a genus, ~ 53 2, 56 | conditions required for prudence is a good memory; so that, 54 2, 57 | is a virtue?~(4) Whether prudence is a virtue distinct from 55 2, 57 | distinct from art?~(5) Whether prudence is a virtue necessary to 56 2, 57 | are virtues annexed to ~prudence?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[57] A[ 57 2, 57 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence is a distinct virtue from 58 2, 57 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence is not a distinct virtue 59 2, 57 | different. Since therefore prudence is also right ~reason about 60 2, 57 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, prudence has more in common with 61 2, 57 | more, therefore, should prudence be called ~an art.~Aquin.: 62 2, 57 | Further, it belongs to prudence, "to be of good counsel" ( 63 2, 57 | of ~medicine. Therefore prudence is not distinct from art.~ 64 2, 57 | Philosopher distinguishes prudence from art (Ethic. ~vi, 5).~ 65 2, 57 | regard ~the appetite; whereas prudence confers not only aptness 66 2, 57 | things to be made"; whereas prudence is the "right reason of 67 2, 57 | and the like. Accordingly prudence ~stands in the same relation 68 2, 57 | Consequently, it is ~requisite for prudence, which is right reason about 69 2, 57 | appetite. Wherefore, for prudence there is need of a ~moral 70 2, 57 | it is ~more contrary to prudence to sin willingly than unwillingly, 71 2, 57 | the will is essential to prudence, but not to art. ~Accordingly 72 2, 57 | Accordingly it is evident that prudence is a virtue distinct from 73 2, 57 | different kind of virtue. But prudence is ~right reason about human 74 2, 57 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Prudence has more in common with 75 2, 57 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Prudence is of good counsel about 76 2, 57 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence is a virtue necessary to 77 2, 57 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence is not a virtue necessary 78 2, 57 | the ~right reason, so is prudence to things that are done, 79 2, 57 | judge of a man's life: for prudence is the right reason about 80 2, 57 | made. Neither, therefore is prudence necessary to man in order 81 2, 57 | OBJ 2: Further, "It is by prudence that we are of good counsel," 82 2, 57 | Therefore man does not need prudence in ~order to lead a good 83 2, 57 | seem to be the case ~with prudence: for it is not human never 84 2, 57 | Therefore it ~seems that prudence should not be reckoned an 85 2, 57 | teacheth ~temperance and prudence and justice and fortitude, 86 2, 57 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, Prudence is a virtue most necessary 87 2, 57 | end; and this virtue is prudence. Consequently ~prudence 88 2, 57 | prudence. Consequently ~prudence is a virtue necessary to 89 2, 57 | other hand, the good of prudence is in the active ~principle, 90 2, 57 | activity is its perfection: for prudence is right reason ~about things 91 2, 57 | in good keeping: whereas prudence is ~necessary to man, that 92 2, 57 | regards things to be made, and prudence, as regards things to be 93 2, 57 | are virtues annexed to prudence? ~[*{euboulia, synesis, 94 2, 57 | assigned as virtues annexed to prudence. For "{euboulia}" is ~"a 95 2, 57 | 9). Now it "belongs to ~prudence to take good counsel," as 96 2, 57 | not a virtue annexed to prudence, but rather is prudence ~ 97 2, 57 | prudence, but rather is prudence ~itself.~Aquin.: SMT FS 98 2, 57 | not a ~virtue annexed to prudence, but rather is a principal 99 2, 57 | mentions three other parts of prudence; viz. "memory of the past, 100 2, 57 | only virtues annexed to ~prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[57] A[ 101 2, 57 | virtues as being annexed to prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[57] A[ 102 2, 57 | perfects the command, viz. prudence, as obtaining the highest 103 2, 57 | gnome}," which are parts of prudence in ~relation to judgment, 104 2, 57 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Prudence makes us be of good counsel, 105 2, 57 | not virtues distinct from prudence: but are, ~as it were, integral 106 2, 57 | all requisite ~for perfect prudence. There are, moreover, subjective 107 2, 57 | subjective parts or species of ~prudence, e.g. domestic and political 108 2, 57 | fashion, potential parts of prudence; because ~they are subordinate 109 2, 58 | every virtue is a kind of prudence," as stated in ~Ethic. vi, 110 2, 58 | which sense art includes prudence which is the right ~reason 111 2, 58 | conduct," this applies to prudence essentially; but to other ~ 112 2, 58 | as they are directed by prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[58] A[ 113 2, 58 | which is in accord with prudence is included ~in the definition 114 2, 58 | all under the direction of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[58] A[ 115 2, 58 | moral ~and intellectual. For prudence seems to be a mean between 116 2, 58 | wisdom, understanding, prudence, and art, as stated above ( 117 2, 58 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Prudence is essentially an intellectual 118 2, 58 | cannot be real virtues." But ~prudence is an intellectual virtue, 119 2, 58 | without understanding and ~prudence. Moral virtue cannot be 120 2, 58 | virtue cannot be without prudence, because it is a habit ~ 121 2, 58 | which is the function of prudence and the virtues annexed 122 2, 58 | no moral virtue ~without prudence: and consequently neither 123 2, 58 | principles, so also does prudence, which is the right reason ~ 124 2, 58 | morals are the matter of prudence, even as things ~makeable 125 2, 58 | without iron. Therefore prudence can be without the moral ~ 126 2, 58 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, prudence is "a virtue whereby we 127 2, 58 | moral ~virtues. Therefore prudence can be without a moral virtue.~ 128 2, 58 | Now it is contrary to prudence "to sin willingly" (Ethic. 129 2, 58 | Ethic. vi, 5). ~Therefore prudence cannot be without moral 130 2, 58 | intellectual virtues can, but prudence cannot, be ~without moral 131 2, 58 | reason for this is that prudence is the right ~reason about 132 2, 58 | things to be done, viz. prudence, ~requires man to have moral 133 2, 58 | which is the concern of prudence. Even so, in ~speculative 134 2, 58 | perfecting the appetite, as prudence does.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[58] 135 2, 58 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Prudence not only helps us to be 136 2, 58 | judgment and command of prudence, be ~removed; and this is 137 2, 59 | destroy the judgment of ~prudence": and Sallust says (Catilin.) 138 2, 59 | teacheth temperance, and prudence, and justice, and ~fortitude." 139 2, 60 | direct all moral acts, viz. prudence. Therefore ~there is also 140 2, 60 | all such matters, ~viz. prudence. On the other hand, the 141 2, 61 | viz. temperance, justice, prudence, and fortitude." But these ~ 142 2, 61 | the moral virtues, and ~prudence alone, of the intellectual 143 2, 61 | intellectual virtues, except in prudence, rank ~before the moral 144 2, 61 | four cardinal virtues. For ~prudence is the directing principle 145 2, 61 | ranks before them. Therefore prudence alone is a principal ~virtue.~ 146 2, 61 | principal ~virtue, called "Prudence." Secondly, according as 147 2, 61 | and this is perfected by ~"Prudence"; and that which is rational 148 2, 61 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Prudence is the principal of all 149 2, 61 | consideration, may be called prudence; every virtue that causes 150 2, 61 | of their matter: so that prudence is the virtue which ~commands; 151 2, 61 | 1): "There is ~no true prudence, unless it be just, temperate 152 2, 61 | no real justice, without prudence, ~fortitude and temperance." 153 2, 61 | these seems to belong to prudence which ~is rectitude of reason 154 2, 61 | virtues: so ~that, to wit, prudence is merely a certain rectitude 155 2, 61 | discretion, which we ascribed to prudence, that there ~seems to be 156 2, 61 | above explanation, then, prudence would ~be distinct from 157 2, 61 | overflow. For the qualities of prudence overflow ~on to the other 158 2, 61 | as they are directed by prudence. And ~each of the others 159 2, 61 | fortitude, ~temperance, and prudence to God." Therefore these 160 2, 61 | Mind itself may be called prudence; while temperance is ~the 161 2, 61 | perfecting" virtues. Thus prudence, by contemplating the things 162 2, 61 | perfect ~virtues." Thus prudence sees nought else but the 163 2, 63 | teacheth temperance and ~prudence and justice and fortitude."~ 164 2, 64 | virtue, and also the mean of ~prudence - of prudence as ruling 165 2, 64 | the mean of ~prudence - of prudence as ruling and measuring, 166 2, 65 | they are united together in prudence. But this does not ~suffice 167 2, 65 | making certain others. ~Now prudence is right reason about things 168 2, 65 | that discretion belongs to ~prudence, rectitude to justice, moderation 169 2, 65 | for there ~can be no true prudence without temperance, justice 170 2, 65 | moral virtue can be without prudence; since it is proper to moral ~ 171 2, 65 | which choice is made by prudence, that counsels, ~judges, 172 2, 65 | like manner one cannot have prudence unless one has the moral 173 2, 65 | the moral virtues: ~since prudence is "right reason about things 174 2, 65 | so neither can we have prudence without the moral virtues: 175 2, 65 | through the absence of prudence, ~which is wanting in matters 176 2, 65 | character of virtue, if prudence ~be lacking.~Aquin.: SMT 177 2, 65 | falls under the one rule of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[65] A[ 178 2, 65 | of principles; even as prudence depends on the moral virtues, 179 2, 65 | moral ~virtues depend on prudence, because the appetite, in 180 2, 65 | are as the ~principles of prudence: whereas the products of 181 2, 65 | Consequently the lack of prudence in one ~department of things 182 2, 65 | together, through ~depending on prudence. But charity does not depend 183 2, 65 | charity does not depend on prudence; indeed, ~it surpasses prudence, 184 2, 65 | prudence; indeed, ~it surpasses prudence, according to Eph. 3:19: " 185 2, 65 | virtues cannot be without prudence; and that prudence cannot ~ 186 2, 65 | without prudence; and that prudence cannot ~be without the moral 187 2, 65 | starting-point of the procedure of ~prudence. Now for prudence to proceed 188 2, 65 | procedure of ~prudence. Now for prudence to proceed aright, it is 189 2, 65 | that neither can infused prudence be without charity; nor, ~ 190 2, 65 | they cannot be without ~prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[65] A[ 191 2, 65 | charity surpasses science and prudence, yet prudence ~depends on 192 2, 65 | science and prudence, yet prudence ~depends on charity, as 193 2, 65 | connected, not ~only through prudence, but also on account of 194 2, 65 | which is the ~result of prudence; for which reason justice 195 2, 65 | perfect virtue ~without prudence.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[65] A[ 196 2, 65 | fortitude can be without prudence. ~The same applies to hope. 197 2, 65 | Moral virtue depends on prudence: and not even infused ~prudence 198 2, 65 | prudence: and not even infused ~prudence has the character of prudence 199 2, 65 | prudence has the character of prudence without charity; for this 200 2, 65 | do not depend either on ~prudence or charity; so that they 201 2, 66 | good is the reason. Hence prudence ~which perfects the reason, 202 2, 66 | in fortitude are equal in prudence and temperance," and so 203 2, 66 | moral virtues results from ~prudence, and, as to the infused 204 2, 66 | considered on the part of prudence, in regard to that which 205 2, 66 | his greater ~abundance of prudence, or also of charity, in 206 2, 66 | except perhaps in respect of prudence ~alone. Therefore moral 207 2, 66 | intention of the end; whereas ~prudence gives right choice of the 208 2, 66 | is more ~excellent than prudence, which is the intellectual 209 2, 66 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Prudence directs the moral virtues 210 2, 66 | according to the right ruling of prudence, as stated in ~Ethic. ii, 211 2, 66 | three virtues, together with prudence, are called principal ~virtues, 212 2, 66 | the one commanded. Now ~prudence seems to command wisdom, 213 2, 66 | science, which belongs to prudence (Ethic. vi, 8), "orders 214 2, 66 | sciences, it seems that prudence is greater than ~wisdom.~ 215 2, 66 | Phys. vii, text. 17. Now prudence is "right ~reason about 216 2, 66 | attains ~happiness. Therefore prudence is a greater virtue than 217 2, 66 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Since prudence is about human affairs, 218 2, 66 | Cause, it is impossible for prudence to be a greater virtue than ~ 219 2, 66 | book (Ethic. ~vi), that prudence does not command wisdom, 220 2, 66 | man" (1 ~Cor. 2:15). For prudence has no business with supreme 221 2, 66 | obtain wisdom. Wherefore prudence, or political ~science, 222 2, 66 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Prudence considers the means of acquiring 223 2, 66 | that wisdom is ~nearer than prudence to happiness.~Aquin.: SMT 224 2, 66 | charity in the same way ~as prudence to moral virtue; and for 225 2, 66 | the human soul: whereas ~prudence and the moral virtues are 226 2, 66 | beneath man. Secondly, because prudence ~moderates the appetitive 227 2, 67 | De Trin. xiv, 9) that "prudence will be there without any 228 2, 67 | of the desires: so that prudence will neither ~prefer nor 229 2, 68 | virtues, counsel pertains to prudence, piety to a kind ~of justice, 230 2, 68 | intellect, viz. faith and prudence, the others being in the 231 2, 68 | the soul endows it with prudence, temperance, ~justice, and 232 2, 68 | counsel, which corresponds to prudence; whereas nothing is set 233 2, 68 | reason is perfected by prudence. Wherefore, just as the 234 2, 68 | are ~united together in prudence, so the gifts of the Holy 235 2, 68 | understanding and science to prudence and art (yet so that ~wisdom 236 2, 68 | understanding before science, and ~prudence and synesis before eubulia): 237 2, 68 | forms first of all justice, prudence, fortitude, temperance ~. . . 238 2, 69 | compassion gives; mourning, to ~prudence, which deplores perishable 239 2, 73 | things to be done, ~viz. prudence, as stated above (Q[65], 240 2, 73 | which entails the loss of prudence, since when man acts against 241 2, 73 | whatever, he acts against prudence, without which no moral 242 2, 73 | so far as they partake of prudence, yet there ~remain the inclinations 243 2, 74 | accompanied by an ~act of prudence, which perfects the rational 244 2, 85 | viz. the reason, where prudence ~resides, the will, where 245 2, 93 | thereunto pertains the "prudence of the flesh," of which 246 2, 93 | Apostle says (Rm. 8:7): "The prudence [Vulg.: ~'wisdom'] of the 247 2, 93 | many are those in whom the prudence of the flesh ~dominates. 248 2, 93 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The prudence of the flesh cannot be subject 249 2, 93 | Nevertheless in no man does the prudence of the flesh dominate ~so 250 2, 95 | us in experience, age and prudence, as to their ~demonstrations."~ 251 2, 4 | needs to be the habit of prudence in the reason, ~besides 252 2, 4 | the concupiscible, without prudence being in the rational part, ~ 253 2, 4 | contingent matter, viz. prudence and art; ~to which faith 254 2, 20 | temerity is ~opposed to prudence, but also a sort of kindred 255 2, 20 | as cunning is opposed to prudence." ~This agrees with the 256 2, 22 | on (AA[7],8). In this way prudence ~is included in the definition 257 2, 22 | fact that they depend on prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[23] A[ 258 2, 22 | the other virtues, just as prudence, ~which by itself attains 259 2, 22 | teacheth temperance, and ~prudence, and justice, and fortitude, 260 2, 22 | Contra ~Julian. iv, 3), "the prudence of the miser, whereby he 261 2, 23 | either as its ~subject, like prudence is, or as its rule, like 262 2, 31 | counsel, which is an act of prudence, for a ~prudent man is one 263 2, 31 | not of charity, but of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[33] A[ 264 2, 31 | Philosopher (Ethic. vi, 12), prudence ~regulates whatever is directed 265 2, 31 | Nevertheless when, guided by prudence, we perform ~some action 266 2, 31 | but ~secondarily an act of prudence, which executes and directs 267 2, 39 | meekness, but to wisdom or prudence. Therefore strife is ~not 268 2, 45 | VIRTUES (QQ[47]-170)~ON PRUDENCE (QQ[47]-56)~OF PRUDENCE, 269 2, 45 | PRUDENCE (QQ[47]-56)~OF PRUDENCE, CONSIDERED IN ITSELF (SIXTEEN 270 2, 45 | place we shall consider ~prudence in itself; secondly, its 271 2, 45 | the precepts concerning prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] Out. 272 2, 45 | of inquiry:~(1) Whether prudence is in the will or in the 273 2, 45 | watchfulness belongs to prudence?~(10) Whether prudence extends 274 2, 45 | to prudence?~(10) Whether prudence extends to the governing 275 2, 45 | of many?~(11) Whether the prudence which regards private good 276 2, 45 | common good?~(12) Whether prudence is in subjects, or only 277 2, 45 | their rulers?~(13) Whether prudence is in the wicked?~(14) Whether 278 2, 45 | the wicked?~(14) Whether prudence is in all good men?~(15) 279 2, 45 | all good men?~(15) Whether prudence is in us naturally?~(16) 280 2, 45 | naturally?~(16) Whether prudence is lost by forgetfulness ?~ 281 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence is in the cognitive or in 282 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence is not in the cognitive 283 2, 45 | says (De Morib. Eccl. xv): "Prudence is ~love choosing wisely 284 2, 45 | appetitive faculty. ~Therefore prudence is in the appetitive faculty.~ 285 2, 45 | definition it belongs to ~prudence "to choose wisely." But 286 2, 45 | Q[13], A[1]). Therefore prudence is not in ~the cognitive 287 2, 45 | whereas in the case of ~prudence, as of the virtues, it is 288 2, 45 | in the reason. Therefore prudence is in the appetitive rather 289 2, 45 | QQ. lxxxiii, qu. 61): "Prudence is the ~knowledge of what 290 2, 45 | Wherefore it is manifest that prudence belongs ~directly to the 291 2, 45 | past, which pertains to prudence, belongs properly to the ~ 292 2, 45 | follows ~therefore that prudence, properly speaking, is in 293 2, 45 | AA[1],2). Accordingly prudence is said ~to be love, not 294 2, 45 | love moves to the ~act of prudence. Wherefore Augustine goes 295 2, 45 | Augustine goes on to say that "prudence is ~love discerning aright 296 2, 45 | that those things which prudence ~considers stand in relation 297 2, 45 | belongs more ~properly to prudence, since the Philosopher states ( 298 2, 45 | can also be ascribed to prudence ~indirectly, in so far, 299 2, 45 | indirectly, in so far, to wit, as prudence directs the choice by means 300 2, 45 | Reply OBJ 3: The worth of prudence consists not in thought 301 2, 45 | it is most contrary to prudence, ~since, the end being of 302 2, 45 | say (Ethic. vi, 5) that prudence is "something more than 303 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence belongs to the practical 304 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence belongs not only to the 305 2, 45 | Prov. 10:23): ~"Wisdom is prudence to a man." Now wisdom consists 306 2, 45 | contemplation. Therefore prudence does also.~Aquin.: SMT SS 307 2, 45 | says (De Offic. i, 24): "Prudence is concerned ~with the quest 308 2, 45 | speculative reason. Therefore ~prudence resides also in the speculative 309 2, 45 | Philosopher assigns art and prudence to the same ~part of the 310 2, 45 | liberal arts. Therefore prudence ~also is both practical 311 2, 45 | says (Ethic. vi, 5) that prudence is ~right reason applied 312 2, 45 | practical reason. Therefore prudence is in the practical reason 313 2, 45 | Hence it ~is evident that prudence resides only in the practical 314 2, 45 | and ~it is this end that prudence intends. For the Philosopher 315 2, 45 | Wherefore it is clear that prudence is wisdom about human affairs: 316 2, 45 | stated significantly that "prudence is wisdom for man," but ~ 317 2, 45 | ii, 53) take the word ~prudence in a broad sense for any 318 2, 45 | under the ~direction of prudence. On the other hand, as regards 319 2, 45 | under ~neither counsel nor prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 320 2, 45 | belongs to art: but to prudence belongs only the application 321 2, 45 | essentials of art, ~but not of prudence; and so we find such a thing 322 2, 45 | but not a speculative prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 323 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence takes cognizance of singulars?~ 324 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence does not take cognizance 325 2, 45 | cognizance of ~singulars. For prudence is in the reason, as stated 326 2, 45 | to Phys. i, 5. Therefore ~prudence does not take cognizance 327 2, 45 | number of things. Therefore prudence which is ~right reason, 328 2, 45 | known by the senses. But prudence is not ~in a sense, for 329 2, 45 | outward senses are devoid of ~prudence. Therefore prudence does 330 2, 45 | of ~prudence. Therefore prudence does not take cognizance 331 2, 45 | says (Ethic. vi, 7) that "prudence ~does not deal with universals 332 2, 45 | stated above (A[1], ad 3), to prudence belongs not ~only the consideration 333 2, 45 | these suffices for human prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 334 2, 45 | Philosopher says (Ethic. vi, 8), prudence does not ~reside in the 335 2, 45 | does not mean however that ~prudence is in the interior sense 336 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence is a virtue?~Aquin.: SMT 337 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence is not a virtue. For Augustine 338 2, 45 | De Lib. Arb. i, 13) that "prudence is the science of what to 339 2, 45 | Predicaments (vi). Therefore prudence is not a virtue.~Aquin.: 340 2, 45 | a ~virtue. Now there is prudence in art, for it is written ( 341 2, 45 | in the ~work." Therefore prudence is not a virtue.~Aquin.: 342 2, 45 | virtue can be immoderate. But prudence is immoderate, ~else it 343 2, 45 | 4): "Set bounds to thy ~prudence." Therefore prudence is 344 2, 45 | thy ~prudence." Therefore prudence is not a virtue.~Aquin.: 345 2, 45 | states (Moral. ii, 49) that prudence, ~temperance, fortitude 346 2, 45 | Para. 2/2~Now it belongs to prudence, as stated above (A[1], 347 2, 45 | a right appetite. ~Hence prudence has the nature of virtue 348 2, 45 | will ~rectify his appetite. Prudence however has nothing to do 349 2, 45 | wise man does not mean that prudence ~itself should be moderate, 350 2, 45 | other ~things according to prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 351 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence is a special virtue?~Aquin.: 352 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence is not a special virtue. 353 2, 45 | reason in accordance with prudence, as ~stated in Ethic. vi, 354 2, 45 | Ethic. vi, 13. Therefore prudence is not a special virtue. ~ 355 2, 45 | regards the end, and that of prudence, ~right action as regards 356 2, 45 | means to the end. Therefore prudence is in every ~virtue, and 357 2, 45 | has a special object. But prudence has ~not a special object, 358 2, 45 | virtue are actions. Therefore prudence is not a ~special virtue.~ 359 2, 45 | teacheth temperance and ~prudence, justice and fortitude."~ 360 2, 45 | Accordingly we must say that since prudence is in the reason, as stated ~ 361 2, 45 | things, whereas "art" and "prudence" ~are about contingent things, 362 2, 45 | knife and ~so forth; and prudence, being concerned with "things 363 2, 45 | A[4]). On the other hand prudence is differentiated from the 364 2, 45 | intellective power, wherein is prudence, and the appetitive power, ~ 365 2, 45 | Hence it is evident that prudence is a special ~virtue, distinct 366 2, 45 | intellectual ~virtue, viz., prudence, which has the same matter 367 2, 45 | This argument proves that prudence helps all the virtues, ~ 368 2, 45 | are indeed the matter of prudence, in so far as ~they are 369 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence appoints the end to moral 370 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence appoints the end to moral 371 2, 45 | to moral virtues. ~Since prudence is in the reason, while 372 2, 45 | appetite, ~it seems that prudence stands in relation to moral 373 2, 45 | appetitive power. ~Therefore prudence appoints the end to the 374 2, 45 | reason ~as to their end. But prudence is "right reason applied 375 2, 45 | actions are directed to prudence as ~their end. Therefore 376 2, 45 | as ~their end. Therefore prudence appoints the end to all 377 2, 45 | concerned about the means. Now prudence disposes of the other moral ~ 378 2, 45 | intention of the end, while prudence ensures ~the rectitude of 379 2, 45 | Therefore it does not belong to prudence to ~appoint the end to moral 380 2, 45 | themselves. About these ~is prudence, which applies universal 381 2, 45 | Consequently it does not belong to ~prudence to appoint the end to moral 382 2, 45 | FP, Q[79], A[12]): but ~prudence does not do this for the 383 2, 45 | this they are helped by prudence, which prepares the ~way 384 2, 45 | means. Hence it follows that prudence is ~more excellent than 385 2, 45 | yet "synderesis" ~moves prudence, just as the understanding 386 2, 45 | 1~Whether it belongs to prudence to find the mean in moral 387 2, 45 | that it does not belong to prudence to find the ~mean in moral 388 2, 45 | end of ~moral virtues. But prudence does not appoint the end 389 2, 45 | A[5], OBJ[1]). Therefore prudence does not cause the mean 390 2, 45 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, prudence works after the manner of 391 2, 45 | with reason." Therefore prudence does not appoint the mean 392 2, 45 | belongs to the ruling of prudence to decide in what manner 393 2, 45 | to belong to it, so ~too, prudence appoints the mean in passions 394 2, 45 | purpose, and so ~the ruling of prudence is required.~Aquin.: SMT 395 2, 45 | command is the chief act of prudence?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 396 2, 45 | is not the chief act of prudence. For ~command regards the 397 2, 45 | states that it is an act of prudence "to avoid ambushes." Therefore ~ 398 2, 45 | is not the chief act of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 399 2, 45 | is not the chief act of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 400 2, 45 | powers of ~the soul. Now prudence is not in the will, but 401 2, 45 | command is not an act of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 402 2, 45 | says (Ethic. vi, 10) that "prudence ~commands."~Aquin.: SMT 403 2, 45 | Para. 1/2~I answer that, Prudence is "right reason applied 404 2, 45 | needs be the chief act of prudence. Now there are three such ~ 405 2, 45 | reason, and ~consequently of prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 406 2, 45 | hand it is the reverse ~in prudence, as stated in Ethic. vi, 407 2, 45 | lacking in the chief act of prudence, ~viz. command, than to 408 2, 45 | avoidance ~of ambushes" to prudence, not as its chief act, but 409 2, 45 | chief act, but as an act of prudence ~that does not continue 410 2, 45 | wherefore command belongs to ~prudence which takes good counsel.~ 411 2, 45 | Whether solicitude belongs to prudence?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 412 2, 45 | solicitude does not belong to prudence. For ~solicitude implies 413 2, 45 | solicitude does also. But prudence is not in ~the appetitive 414 2, 45 | solicitude does not belong to prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 415 2, 45 | certainty of truth belongs to prudence, since it is ~an intellectual 416 2, 45 | solicitude is in opposition to prudence ~rather than belonging to 417 2, 45 | solicitude. Since ~then prudence is not opposed to magnanimity, 418 2, 45 | solicitude ~does not belong to prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 419 2, 45 | Therefore ~solicitude belongs to prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 420 2, 45 | done. Now this belongs to prudence, whose chief act is a ~command 421 2, 45 | solicitude belongs properly to prudence, and for this ~reason Augustine 422 2, 45 | Morib. Eccl. xxiv) that "prudence keeps most ~careful watch 423 2, 45 | And since the matter of prudence is the ~contingent singulars 424 2, 45 | actions, the certainty of ~prudence cannot be so great as to 425 2, 45 | Whether solicitude belongs to prudence?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 426 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence does not extend to the governing 427 2, 45 | common good is justice. But ~prudence differs from justice. Therefore 428 2, 45 | from justice. Therefore prudence is not directed to the ~ 429 2, 45 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, prudence is specifically distinct 430 2, 45 | Therefore the same applies to prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 431 2, 45 | 8) some have ~held that prudence does not extend to the common 432 2, 45 | Accordingly, since it belongs to prudence rightly to counsel, judge, 433 2, 45 | end, it is evident that ~prudence regards not only the private 434 2, 45 | legal" justice, so the prudence that is directed to the 435 2, 45 | good is ~called "political" prudence, for the latter stands in 436 2, 45 | relation ~to legal justice, as prudence simply so called to moral 437 2, 45 | v, 1: more so, however, prudence and justice, since these 438 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence about one's own good is 439 2, 45 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that prudence about one's own good is 440 2, 45 | vi, 8) that "political prudence, and prudence ~are the same 441 2, 45 | political prudence, and prudence ~are the same habit, yet 442 2, 45 | good ruler." Now political prudence is ~chiefly in the ruler, 443 2, 45 | as it were. Since then ~prudence is a virtue of a good man, 444 2, 45 | good man, it seems that prudence and political ~prudence 445 2, 45 | prudence and political ~prudence are the same habit.~Aquin.: 446 2, 45 | good, ~which belongs to prudence simply so called, is subordinate 447 2, 45 | which belongs to political prudence. Therefore prudence and ~ 448 2, 45 | political prudence. Therefore prudence and ~political prudence 449 2, 45 | prudence and ~political prudence differ neither specifically 450 2, 45 | the contrary, "Political prudence," which is directed to the 451 2, 45 | are different kinds of ~prudence, corresponding to the above 452 2, 45 | be different species of prudence corresponding to these different ~ 453 2, 45 | different ~ends, so that one is "prudence" simply so called, which 454 2, 45 | good; another, "domestic prudence" which is directed to the ~ 455 2, 45 | and a third, "political prudence," which is ~directed to 456 2, 45 | means, not that political prudence is ~substantially the same 457 2, 45 | same habit as any kind of prudence, but that it is the ~same 458 2, 45 | that it is the ~same as the prudence which is directed to the 459 2, 45 | common good. This is called ~"prudence" in respect of the common 460 2, 45 | of the common notion of prudence, i.e. as being ~right reason 461 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence is in subjects, or only 462 2, 45 | OBJ 1: It would seem that prudence is not in subjects but only 463 2, 45 | says (Polit. iii, 2) that "prudence alone is ~the virtue proper 464 2, 45 | subjects ~and rulers, and the prudence of the subject is not a 465 2, 45 | competent to take counsel." But prudence makes a man take good counsel ~( 466 2, 45 | Ethic. vi, 5). Therefore prudence is not befitting slaves 467 2, 45 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, prudence exercises command, as stated 468 2, 45 | only of ~rulers. Therefore prudence is not in subjects but only 469 2, 45 | two ~kinds of political prudence, one of which is "legislative" 470 2, 45 | individual actions. Therefore prudence is not only in rulers but 471 2, 45 | Para. 1/2~I answer that, Prudence is in the reason. Now ruling 472 2, 45 | and governed. Therefore prudence is not the virtue of a slave 473 2, 45 | proportionately ~competent to have prudence. Wherefore it is manifest 474 2, 45 | Wherefore it is manifest that prudence is in ~the ruler "after 475 2, 45 | strictly, ~namely, that prudence is not the virtue of a subject 476 2, 45 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: By prudence a man commands not only 477 2, 45 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether prudence can be in sinners?~Aquin.: 478 2, 45 | would seem that there can be prudence in sinners. For our Lord ~ 479 2, 45 | sinners. Therefore there be prudence in ~sinners.~Aquin.: SMT 480 2, 45 | more excellent virtue than prudence. But ~there can be faith 481 2, 45 | Therefore there can be prudence also.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] 482 2, 45 | Therefore sinners can have prudence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 483 2, 45 | Para. 1/3~I answer that, Prudence is threefold. There is a 484 2, 45 | threefold. There is a false prudence, which ~takes its name from 485 2, 45 | from its likeness to true prudence. For since a prudent ~man 486 2, 45 | an evil ~end, has false prudence, in far as that which he 487 2, 45 | committing robbery. This is the ~prudence of which the Apostle says ( 488 2, 45 | Apostle says (Rm. 8:6): "The prudence [Douay: ~'wisdom'] of the 489 2, 45 | Body Para. 2/3~The second prudence is indeed true prudence, 490 2, 45 | prudence is indeed true prudence, because it devises fitting ~ 491 2, 45 | fails in the chief act of prudence, as when a man takes counsel ~ 492 2, 45 | Body Para. 3/3 ~The third prudence is both true and perfect, 493 2, 45 | life: and this alone is prudence simply so-called, and cannot 494 2, 45 | sinners, whereas the first prudence is in sinners alone, while 495 2, 45 | alone, while imperfect ~prudence is common to good and wicked 496 2, 45 | understood of the first ~prudence, wherefore it is not said 497 2, 45 | alone. On the other ~hand prudence implies a relation to a 498 2, 45 | moral virtues there is no prudence, as ~shown above (FS, Q[ 499 2, 45 | A[5]); secondly because prudence commands right ~actions, 500 2, 45 | object is more excellent than prudence, ~yet prudence, by its very


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