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take 1288
taken 1669
taker 4
takes 703
taketh 21
taking 361
talaric 2
Frequency    [«  »]
705 rm
704 sent
703 purpose
703 takes
700 aa
698 fortitude
698 opinion
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

takes

1-500 | 501-703

    Part, Question
1 1, 2 | an ~effect, this effect takes the place of the definition 2 1, 7 | actually ~infinite, but takes some actually finite line, 3 1, 11 | 1: No privation entirely takes away the being of a thing, ~ 4 1, 11 | Nevertheless every privation takes away some ~being; and so 5 1, 12 | one who knows. Now this takes place in two ways. For as 6 1, 13 | equivocal; for the Philosopher takes equivocal names in a ~large 7 1, 17 | intellect; since whatever takes place ~in things proceeds 8 1, 17 | appearances, since our knowledge takes ~its rise from sense, which 9 1, 17 | Q[16], A[2]), and this takes place through the senses ~ 10 1, 17 | judge of it thereby; as takes place in ~demonstrations, 11 1, 18 | our ~intellect, which takes cognizance of the essence 12 1, 18 | 1: The Philosopher here takes "to live" to mean an operation ~ 13 1, 18 | of work in ~which a man takes delight, so that his bent 14 1, 19 | is different with one who takes ~a draught that is pleasant, 15 1, 19 | whatever God simply wills takes place; although ~what He 16 1, 22 | effects of an agent ~something takes place which has no reference 17 1, 22 | not reach to that which takes place in nature from necessity; 18 1, 23 | certainly and infallibly takes ~effect; yet it does not 19 1, 23 | thus lost, inasmuch as he takes the former's place. ~For 20 1, 25 | happen beyond what actually ~takes place - as, for instance, 21 1, 27 | each procession in God takes its name from the ~proper 22 1, 27 | operation ~within the agent, takes place outside the intellectual 23 1, 34 | Hence Anselm ~(Monol. lx) takes "thought" in an improper 24 1, 36 | indicate a ~relation, still it takes the place of a relative 25 1, 36 | things created. Hence it takes its number from the form 26 1, 43 | was. Hence such a mission takes place without a separation, 27 1, 43 | so the invisible mission takes ~place according to the 28 1, 43 | other, because neither takes place without sanctifying 29 1, 43 | 2: The invisible mission takes place also as regards progress ~ 30 1, 43 | Further, the visible mission takes place by way of union to 31 1, 43 | or His visible mission takes place in all these things.~ 32 1, 45 | The operation of nature takes place only on the ~presupposition 33 1, 48 | evil hurts ~inasmuch as it takes away good." But good is 34 1, 48 | as it lasts, hurts, and takes away good. ~But that from 35 1, 48 | because the ~evil of pain takes away the creature's good, 36 1, 54 | changed, ~but the whole action takes place within the agent. 37 1, 63 | possible, regarding which one takes deliberation. Therefore 38 1, 63 | the very instant when he takes thought; and in the ~last 39 1, 66 | but little; for Augustine ~takes the formlessness of matter 40 1, 67 | Arb. iii, 5) that "light takes the first place among bodies." 41 1, 67 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Augustine takes light to be a luminous body 42 1, 70 | lights ~are the cause of what takes place upon the earth. Therefore 43 1, 74 | First, because Augustine takes the earth and the water 44 1, 74 | Hexaem.), the entire period takes its ~name, as is customary, 45 1, 76 | exceeds the sensitive soul, it takes as formal and ~perfecting; 46 1, 77 | we may ~say that the soul takes with itself these powers, 47 1, 43 | was. Hence such a mission takes place without a separation, 48 1, 43 | so the invisible mission takes ~place according to the 49 1, 43 | other, because neither takes place without sanctifying 50 1, 43 | 2: The invisible mission takes place also as regards progress ~ 51 1, 43 | Further, the visible mission takes place by way of union to 52 1, 43 | or His visible mission takes place in all these things.~ 53 1, 46 | The operation of nature takes place only on the ~presupposition 54 1, 49 | evil hurts ~inasmuch as it takes away good." But good is 55 1, 49 | as it lasts, hurts, and takes away good. ~But that from 56 1, 49 | because the ~evil of pain takes away the creature's good, 57 1, 55 | changed, ~but the whole action takes place within the agent. 58 1, 64 | possible, regarding which one takes deliberation. Therefore 59 1, 64 | the very instant when he takes thought; and in the ~last 60 1, 67 | but little; for Augustine ~takes the formlessness of matter 61 1, 68 | Arb. iii, 5) that "light takes the first place among bodies." 62 1, 68 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Augustine takes light to be a luminous body 63 1, 71 | lights ~are the cause of what takes place upon the earth. Therefore 64 1, 73 | First, because Augustine takes the earth and the water 65 1, 73 | Hexaem.), the entire period takes its ~name, as is customary, 66 1, 75 | exceeds the sensitive soul, it takes as formal and ~perfecting; 67 1, 76 | we may ~say that the soul takes with itself these powers, 68 1, 77 | operation of the senses takes place by virtue of such 69 1, 77 | spiritual. ~Natural immutation takes place by the form of the 70 1, 77 | Whereas spiritual immutation takes place ~by the form of the 71 1, 77 | organ, natural immutation takes place in "touch" and "taste"; 72 1, 77 | and in which the animal takes pleasure, ~or from which 73 1, 78 | for the sensitive soul takes its name from its chief ~ 74 1, 78 | and in consultation it takes its rules of action from ~ 75 1, 78 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: Boethius takes intelligence as meaning 76 1, 82 | free-will. But ~Bernard takes habit, not as divided against 77 1, 82 | judgment from which ~free-will takes its name.~Aquin.: SMT FP 78 1, 83 | observed ~that all knowledge takes place through some kind 79 1, 83 | imaginary ~vision, which takes place through the image 80 1, 83 | participation of an idea takes place by some image of the 81 1, 84 | operation of the senses takes ~place by the senses being 82 1, 88 | separated souls know that takes place on earth?~Aquin.: 83 1, 88 | separated souls know what takes place on ~earth; for otherwise 84 1, 88 | and tell them of what takes place there; as Samuel appeared 85 1, 88 | be unless they knew what takes place ~here. Therefore they 86 1, 88 | Therefore they know what takes place on earth.~Aquin.: 87 1, 88 | therefore, they do not know what takes place among us, it must 88 1, 90 | food ~and sex, man alone takes pleasure in the beauty of 89 1, 90 | animal is that by which it takes food, and the ~inferior 90 1, 91 | signified that the Church takes her origin from ~Christ. 91 1, 92 | equal proportion to mind, he takes three things in the soul ~ 92 1, 94 | kind of spiritual marriage takes place between ~God and the 93 1, 96 | as water added to wine takes ~at first the taste of wine, 94 1, 97 | vehement delight which he ~takes therein; whence contingency 95 1, 106 | another. But exterior speech ~takes place by some sensible sign, 96 1, 106 | intellectual ~operation takes place by abstraction from 97 1, 107 | Q[27], A[3]), knowledge takes place ~accordingly as the 98 1, 107 | grades among the angels takes place according to the ~ 99 1, 109 | this visible world nothing takes place without the agency 100 1, 109 | instrument; and this ~it is that takes the principal place in the 101 1, 109 | the substantial form which takes the principal ~place in 102 1, 110 | be grasped thereby. This takes place in the angels when 103 1, 111 | there afresh. Now all this takes ~place by Divine command. 104 1, 111 | those who assist; because he takes the ~words (Dan. 7:10) " 105 1, 112 | the ~good angels, which takes place invisibly when they 106 1, 113 | whether thinking or ~dreaming, takes the forms of an innumerable 107 1, 114 | Democritus, who held that action takes ~place through the issue 108 1, 114 | are the causes of all that takes place here below. Therefore, ~ 109 1, 114 | would follow that all that takes place here below happens 110 1, 115 | considered that everything that takes place ~here below by luck 111 1, 115 | itself the ~cause of what takes place. Secondly, as to all 112 1, 115 | of itself effects what takes place by accident here below, 113 1, 116 | also here where when it takes place and is ~made public," 114 1, 116 | which change in the spirits ~takes place especially in the 115 1, 117 | operation in which the body takes no part whatever. It is ~ 116 2, 1 | his affections, since he takes therefrom his entire rule 117 2, 1 | he who has the best taste takes most ~pleasure. In like 118 2, 5 | happiness: ~since operation takes its species from its object. 119 2, 9 | is variously ~disposed, takes to a thing in various ways, 120 2, 12 | in so far as the ~reason takes them as one: either because 121 2, 12 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes intention in the sense of 122 2, 13 | there, being thus assured, takes to the third road ~without 123 2, 13 | 2: An irrational animal takes one thing in preference 124 2, 14 | Fide Orth. ii, 22): "God takes not counsel: those only ~ 125 2, 14 | certainty, since what one takes note of, escapes the notice ~ 126 2, 14 | other; thus the master takes counsel about what he would 127 2, 14 | several. Therefore counsel takes place ~in all things that 128 2, 14 | Ethic. iii, 3) that "he who takes ~counsel seems to inquire 129 2, 15 | cleaves, ~in so far as it takes complacency in it. Hence 130 2, 15 | consent to the reason, he takes reason as ~including the 131 2, 15 | sentence," i.e. the consent, takes place "when a man approves 132 2, 17 | part the power of the soul takes in the act, follows ~apprehension. 133 2, 18 | of art: ~because "no art takes notice of what is accidental" ( 134 2, 18 | and of these every art takes notice. And thus it is ~ 135 2, 18 | just as the external action takes its species from the object ~ 136 2, 18 | interior act of the will takes its species from the end, 137 2, 18 | give alms. For an action takes its species from its ~object, 138 2, 18 | AA[2],5), every action takes its species ~from its object; 139 2, 18 | which is called moral, takes its ~species from the object, 140 2, 18 | this leaves nothing, but takes all away: thus ~blindness 141 2, 18 | all away: thus ~blindness takes away sight altogether; darkness, 142 2, 18 | privation of health; not that it takes health ~away altogether, 143 2, 18 | from its object, whence it takes its species; but ~also from 144 2, 18 | which the moral ~action takes its species of good or evil. 145 2, 18 | from ~which the action takes its malice or goodness; 146 2, 19 | act to be involuntary, it takes away the ~character of moral 147 2, 19 | 2) Moreover, the will takes its form from the object, 148 2, 20 | which the external action takes from its matter and circumstances, 149 2, 21 | weakness or inability either takes away or diminishes ~guilt. 150 2, 21 | power: wherefore it neither takes away nor diminishes guilt.~ 151 2, 21 | but man, for his part, takes something from God, or offers ~ 152 2, 22 | to them by love: and this takes place without ~any alteration 153 2, 25 | ii, 4). Therefore desire takes precedence ~of love.~Aquin.: 154 2, 25 | place belongs to that which takes place first in the thing 155 2, 25 | passions, that the power takes its name.~Aquin.: SMT FS 156 2, 25 | regards good more ~directly, takes precedence: although at 157 2, 27 | desire for its act; and it takes pleasure in its realization, 158 2, 27 | preceding love; for none takes pleasure save in that ~which 159 2, 28 | Reply OBJ 1: This objection takes love as a passion existing 160 2, 30 | concupiscible ~faculty, which takes its name from it.~Aquin.: 161 2, 30 | suitable, and consequently takes pleasure in it: and concupiscence 162 2, 31 | Ethic. x, 4) that "no one takes ~pleasure according to time."~ 163 2, 31 | sensible pleasures. For man takes much more delight in ~knowing 164 2, 31 | usefulness: for the ~touch takes cognizance of those things 165 2, 32 | knowledge; as when a man takes pleasure in knowing ~that 166 2, 32 | gather that man rejoices and takes pleasure in some kind ~of 167 2, 32 | Since therefore everyone takes pleasure in a ~connatural 168 2, 32 | contrary causes. But man ~takes a natural pleasure in certain 169 2, 32 | which reason the liberal man takes pleasure in giving to others. 170 2, 32 | OBJ 3: Further, everyone takes pleasure in what he is accustomed 171 2, 32 | ignorance. This is why man takes the greatest ~pleasure in 172 2, 33 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: He that takes pleasure in a thing holds 173 2, 33 | act of reason, as when one takes pleasure in ~contemplating 174 2, 34 | for the fact that ~a thing takes pleasure is due to its being 175 2, 34 | intellectual pleasures: because one takes pleasure, not only in the ~" 176 2, 34 | is good and virtuous, who takes pleasure in the works of 177 2, 34 | and that man evil, who takes pleasure in evil works.~ 178 2, 34 | the will of the ~good man takes pleasure in them in accordance 179 2, 35 | perfectly cognizant animal, takes ~pleasure in the objects 180 2, 35 | in accidents the subject takes the place of matter. Now 181 2, 35 | object and cause; as when one takes pleasure in the ~very act 182 2, 35 | annoyances; thus a man ~takes pleasure in drinking through 183 2, 36 | eaten ~to repletion, he takes no further pleasure in eating; 184 2, 37 | learning, in so far as it takes away an excess of pleasure. ~ 185 2, 37 | But bodily ~transmutation takes place in all the passions 186 2, 38 | of pleasure to him that takes pleasure in it: because 187 2, 40 | movement of the ~appetite takes its name from the knowledge 188 2, 42 | endanger things beloved, and takes ~forethought for their safety."~ 189 2, 42 | cannot be ~foreseen, but takes one by surprise. For this 190 2, 44 | contraction. For when ~contraction takes place, the heat and vital 191 2, 44 | towards the inner parts takes place in regard ~to the 192 2, 44 | says (Rhet. ii, 5), "no man takes counsel in matters he ~despairs 193 2, 44 | above (A[1]), in fear there takes place a ~certain contraction 194 2, 45 | Confess. ii, 6) that "fear takes forethought ~for safety." 195 2, 46 | For the ~irascible power takes its name from anger [ira]. 196 2, 46 | OBJ 1: The irascible power takes its name from "ira" [anger], 197 2, 46 | being a good, wherefore it takes pleasure in it; and to the 198 2, 46 | is ~imperfect, since it takes no account of utterance.~ 199 2, 47 | those "who despise what he takes a great interest in; ~thus 200 2, 47 | ignorance or through passion takes ~away from the notion of 201 2, 47 | man ~suffers an injury, takes away from the notion of 202 2, 48 | Accordingly an angry man takes pleasure in thinking much 203 2, 48 | the wrong done, while he takes pleasure in the ~thought 204 2, 48 | stammers, the countenance takes fire, the eyes grow ~fierce, 205 2, 48 | exhalation of the bile whence it takes its name {chole}."~Aquin.: 206 2, 48 | stammers, the countenance takes fire, the eyes grow fierce." 207 2, 49 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes "to have" in the general 208 2, 49 | Reply OBJ 2: This argument takes habit in the sense in which 209 2, 50 | and so, when a ~change takes place in these same passion-like 210 2, 50 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Habit takes precedence of power, according 211 2, 50 | Or, we may say that habit takes precedence of power, as 212 2, 50 | power, as the complete ~takes precedence of the incomplete, 213 2, 50 | the incomplete, and as act takes precedence of ~potentiality. 214 2, 51 | Reply OBJ 1: This objection takes nature as divided against 215 2, 55 | sixty. But the objection takes virtue as being ~essentially 216 2, 57 | vi, 5). But counselling takes place in certain arts also, 217 2, 58 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes "mos" in the sense of "custom."~ 218 2, 64 | as human opinion itself takes a middle position between 219 2, 66 | nature. Accordingly, a virtue takes its species from its object, 220 2, 66 | happiness: ~whereas wisdom takes no notice of human acts, 221 2, 72 | pleasure, e.g. when one takes pleasure in ~human praise 222 2, 72 | which the ~covetous man takes pleasure is something bodily, 223 2, 72 | their ~causes. For a thing takes its species from that whence 224 2, 72 | term, from which movement takes ~its species (Phys. v, text. 225 2, 72 | For the covetous man both takes what belongs to others, 226 2, 72 | man, for the same motive, takes when he ought ~not, where 227 2, 73 | aggravate a sin. ~Because sin takes its gravity from its species. 228 2, 73 | for instance, when a man takes a short cut ~through a field, 229 2, 73 | slave sins once: he ~that takes his father's life sins many 230 2, 73 | twofold. There is a sin which takes us unawares on ~account 231 2, 74 | object in which a ~person takes delight. Now it happens 232 2, 74 | thinking of fornication takes pleasure in the act ~thought 233 2, 74 | fornication: ~for no man takes pleasure except in that 234 2, 74 | sometimes that a sin which takes us unawares, ~is a venial 235 2, 74 | Therefore if a movement that takes us unawares is not a mortal 236 2, 77 | use of reason. That this takes place in the passions is 237 2, 81 | man born blind; one rather takes pity on him."~Aquin.: SMT 238 2, 82 | answer that, Everything takes its species from its form: 239 2, 82 | principle ~original sin takes the nature of guilt; for 240 2, 83 | Reply OBJ 5: The common good takes precedence of private good. 241 2, 87 | a principle ~whereby one takes part in that order. Consequently 242 2, 87 | satisfactory punishment, which one ~takes upon oneself voluntarily, 243 2, 88 | reason. And since a moral act takes its species from deliberate 244 2, 90 | 3: The promulgation that takes place now, extends to future ~ 245 2, 91 | that the same procedure ~takes place in the practical and 246 2, 95 | except materially. But ~art takes no notice of such a distinction: 247 2, 98 | OBJ 2: Respect of persons takes place in those things which 248 2, 100 | Reply OBJ 1: The Apostle takes justification for the execution 249 2, 102 | worship. Thus our church takes the place of both temple 250 2, 102 | intelligible types of whatsoever takes place in this world, just 251 2, 105 | together in peace, if one man takes what belongs to another. 252 2, 105 | his ~rent as soon as he takes a house. Therefore it seems 253 2, 109 | to nature. For this only takes place with ~regard to certain 254 2, 109 | is presupposed to grace, takes place without grace. But ~ 255 2, 109 | from all mortal ~sin, which takes its stand in his reason, 256 2, 111 | to lead men to God, this takes place in a certain order, 257 2, 111 | species of grace. Now no art takes note of the ~infinite in 258 2, 113 | justification of the ungodly takes place in an instant or ~ 259 2, 113 | justification ~of the ungodly takes place not all at once, but 260 2, 113 | Now the infusion of grace takes place in an ~instant and 261 2, 113 | justification of the ungodly by God takes place in an ~instant.~Aquin.: 262 2, 113 | to God; and this consent takes place suddenly. Sometimes, 263 2, 113 | removed before the movement takes place. ~Hence the remission 264 2, 113 | but only whenever this takes place beyond the order of 265 2, 114 | can it be urged that this takes place because of the ~impediment 266 2, 1 | the kind of progress that takes place in ~sciences devised 267 2, 1 | The Greek {symballein}] takes its name.~Aquin.: SMT SS 268 2, 2 | realizes what we know and takes form therefrom, it becomes 269 2, 2 | Christ, through Whom He takes away the sin of the world, 270 2, 2 | believes, he thinks out and takes to heart whatever reasons 271 2, 4 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Augustine takes faith for the act of faith, 272 2, 4 | directed, ~both because it takes its species therefrom, and 273 2, 4 | just as any other ~habit, takes its species from the formal 274 2, 5 | happiness of heaven and takes the place of faith. Consequently, 275 2, 8 | knowledge, which, in us, takes its ~foundation from faith. 276 2, 9 | Reply OBJ 2: This argument takes knowledge in the generic 277 2, 10 | Reply OBJ 2: This argument takes unbelief as denoting a pure 278 2, 10 | 85], AA[2],4) mortal sin takes ~away sanctifying grace, 279 2, 11 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, vice takes its species chiefly from 280 2, 11 | because eternal ~salvation takes precedence of temporal good, 281 2, 12 | it is the movement that takes its species from the terms. 282 2, 12 | something ~false about God, takes His name in vain even more 283 2, 12 | murderer. ~Nevertheless murder takes precedence, as to punishment, 284 2, 13 | means of cure, as when it takes away the ~power of nature, 285 2, 14 | attention on that which he takes pleasure in: wherefore the ~ 286 2, 17 | specifically. ~Now hope takes its species from its principal 287 2, 18 | ix) that "when charity takes ~up its abode, it drives 288 2, 18 | God and is subject to Him, takes no ~delight in things other 289 2, 19 | principally. Now every ~mortal sin takes its principal malice and 290 2, 23 | soon as charity is born it takes food," which refers to beginners, " 291 2, 24 | sensitive and corporeal nature takes ~the second place, the former 292 2, 24 | things to him; fourthly, he takes pleasure in his company; 293 2, 25 | OBJ 1: The love of charity takes its quantity not only from 294 2, 25 | But from its object it takes its species, while, from 295 2, 25 | the ~power of the agent it takes the mode of its intensity: 296 2, 25 | mover. Accordingly love takes its species from its object, 297 2, 25 | choice, love of this kind takes precedence of the love of ~ 298 2, 25 | beloved, while the ~beloved takes a passive part in receiving 299 2, 26 | third sense, while the last ~takes it in the second sense.~ 300 2, 26 | which is so by its essence takes precedence of that ~which 301 2, 26 | has the mode essentially, takes precedence of the goodness 302 2, 27 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes the fulness of joy in reference 303 2, 27 | these acts, that virtue takes its name, not from joy, 304 2, 28 | him if we can. ~For mercy takes its name "misericordia" 305 2, 28 | defect in ~the person who takes pity. For it is proper to 306 2, 28 | Therefore the ~reason why one takes pity is a defect in oneself.~ 307 2, 28 | very fact that a person takes pity on anyone, it ~follows 308 2, 28 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: God takes pity on us through love 309 2, 28 | subject. In itself, ~mercy takes precedence of other virtues, 310 2, 30 | will, and thus the ~remedy takes the form of "reproof." Secondly, 311 2, 30 | by its nutritive power, takes what it requires for the 312 2, 31 | first correction, then it takes ~justice as denoting a general 313 2, 31 | virtuous act, as entirely takes away the ~good of virtue, 314 2, 31 | no matter how badly he takes it.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[33] 315 2, 32 | is so by itself, always takes precedence of that which 316 2, 37 | worship, as ~others, and takes pleasure in the mere disunion 317 2, 37 | Etym. viii, 3), schism takes its name ~"from being a 318 2, 39 | private war, because it takes place between ~private persons, 319 2, 40 | of division. Now schism takes ~its name from scission, 320 2, 41 | it is this other one who takes the occasion ~according 321 2, 41 | and the fact ~that a man takes occasion to sin from another' 322 2, 41 | mind of the person who ~takes scandal is unsettled in 323 2, 42 | which is ~for its own sake takes precedence of that which 324 2, 42 | works], on the other hand, takes "heart" and "soul" in the 325 2, 43 | also wisdom [sapientia] takes its name, in so far as it 326 2, 44 | worldly wisdom," because it takes for the highest ~cause and 327 2, 45 | speculative reason?~(3) Whether it takes cognizance of singulars?~( 328 2, 45 | 9) ~that a prudent man "takes good counsel." But as choice 329 2, 45 | Para. 1/1~Whether prudence takes cognizance of singulars?~ 330 2, 45 | Reply OBJ 1: Augustine there takes science in the broad sense 331 2, 45 | that "the prudent ~man takes good counsel." Now "to take 332 2, 45 | belongs to ~prudence which takes good counsel.~Aquin.: SMT 333 2, 45 | a false prudence, which ~takes its name from its likeness 334 2, 45 | in far as that which he takes for an end, is ~good, not 335 2, 45 | because the good which it takes for an end, is not the ~ 336 2, 45 | prudence, as when a man takes counsel ~aright, and forms 337 2, 45 | true and perfect, for it takes counsel, ~judges and commands 338 2, 45 | a prudent man is one who takes good counsel, as stated ~ 339 2, 45 | among them, because it ~takes counsel about the means.~ 340 2, 45 | account of his reason, ~which takes cognizance of universals, 341 2, 47 | whereas understanding takes cognizance of universal 342 2, 47 | shrewdness a part of prudence, takes it for {eustochia}, in ~ 343 2, 47 | different acts. For intelligence takes its name ~from being an 344 2, 49 | hand, every virtuous man takes good counsel in those things 345 2, 49 | man is, seemingly, one who takes good counsel." Now ~this 346 2, 50 | not to that counsel which takes place in heaven. Even so ~ 347 2, 51 | Reply OBJ 2: This argument takes imprudence in the negative 348 2, 51 | opinions of others. He that takes ~counsel descends by these 349 2, 51 | OBJ 2: Further, whoever takes counsel must needs give 350 2, 51 | things of which counsel takes ~cognizance, is directed 351 2, 55 | first instance whether it takes one form or ~another, it 352 2, 56 | instead of the habit, which takes its species from that act, ~ 353 2, 56 | OBJ 3: This argument again takes legal justice for the virtue ~ 354 2, 56 | does so ~in so far as he takes into consideration the good 355 2, 57 | object. For ~the operation takes its species and name from 356 2, 59 | 1~Reply OBJ 4: Movement takes its species from the term " 357 2, 59 | things, as when one man takes from or restores to another 358 2, 60 | answer that, When a man takes another's thing unjustly, 359 2, 60 | another person, seemingly, ~takes from him the amount of the 360 2, 60 | entirety. Therefore he that takes a thing is not ~always bound 361 2, 60 | committed. Secondly, a man ~takes another's property for his 362 2, 60 | thereby. Thirdly, a man takes ~another's property without 363 2, 60 | deposit; wherefore he that takes a thing thus, incurs no ~ 364 2, 60 | latter, ~as when a person takes a light from another's candle. 365 2, 60 | not only on the man who takes a ~thing but also on all 366 2, 60 | participation; when a man takes part ~in the theft and in 367 2, 61 | is a sin?~(2) Whether it takes place in the dispensation 368 2, 61 | spiritualities?~(3) Whether it takes place in showing honor?~( 369 2, 61 | showing honor?~(4) Whether it takes place in judicial sentences?~ 370 2, 61 | givings respect of ~persons takes place. The other giving 371 2, 61 | Whether respect of persons takes place in the dispensation 372 2, 61 | Whether respect of persons takes place in showing honor and 373 2, 61 | sin of respect of persons takes place in judicial sentences?~ 374 2, 61 | commutative justice, the judge takes from one and gives to another, 375 2, 62 | makes to live. Hence whoever takes his own life, sins against 376 2, 64 | fuscus' [dark], because he takes advantage of the ~night."~ 377 2, 64 | possessed: for if a man takes what is another's not as 378 2, 64 | thing that is not his and takes it, he ~seems to commit 379 2, 64 | to commit a theft, for he takes another's property. Yet 380 2, 64 | OBJ 3: Further, he that takes what is his own does not 381 2, 64 | OBJ 3: He who by stealth takes his own property which is 382 2, 64 | hand ~he who, by stealth, takes his own property, if this 383 2, 64 | matters: and the ~person who takes such things can presume 384 2, 64 | because that which he ~takes for the support of his life 385 2, 64 | having public authority takes ~another's property by violence, 386 2, 65 | 1: God, in judging man, takes the sinner's conscience 387 2, 65 | one another"; or again, He takes the evidence ~of the fact 388 2, 65 | Reply OBJ 2: Public disgrace takes the place of an accuser. 389 2, 69 | consider the injustice which takes place in judgment on the ~ 390 2, 71 | which a man's good name takes precedence ~of wealth because 391 2, 71 | wherefore backbiting which takes place in secret, is not ~ 392 2, 72 | The susurro [tale-bearer] takes his ~name from the sound 393 2, 72 | greatness of the good which it takes away. Now of all one's ~ 394 2, 72 | external goods a friend takes the first place, since " 395 2, 73 | charity, for sometimes it takes place in jest among friends, 396 2, 75 | are ~of less value, and he takes nothing off the price on 397 2, 78 | the revenge which a man takes on his own initiative, though 398 2, 79 | Whatever is directed to an end takes its goodness from ~being 399 2, 79 | only logically. For it takes the name of religion according 400 2, 80 | produces ecstasy, for it takes the lover away from himself ~ 401 2, 81 | condition, do not ~know what takes place in this world, especially 402 2, 84 | does but not in what she takes," and consequently what 403 2, 84 | and consequently what she takes she ~possesses lawfully. 404 2, 85 | whoever refuses to pay them takes what belongs to another."~ 405 2, 86 | subject to his will, and a vow takes its name from the will ~ 406 2, 86 | 2: De Mendac. ~xx] faith takes its name "from a man's deed 407 2, 86 | to danger. But whoever ~takes a vow exposes himself to 408 2, 86 | ceremonial rites. But he who takes a ~vow does not yet offer 409 2, 86 | Therefore the solemnization that takes place in ~the reception 410 2, 86 | conditio]: thus when a man takes up arms he solemnizes the 411 2, 86 | the nuptial ~solemnization takes place only when the marriage 412 2, 86 | dispensation. Now a simple vow takes its ~efficacy from the deliberation 413 2, 86 | subject to human law, which takes into account that which 414 2, 86 | like manner a person who takes a vow makes a law for himself 415 2, 86 | continency. Now one who takes a vow of abstinence can 416 2, 86 | blessing of the person who takes ~the vow, as stated above ( 417 2, 86 | divided." Hence the "monk" takes his name from "unity" [* 418 2, 87 | the very fact that a man takes God as witness by way of ~ 419 2, 87 | in the oath which a man takes ~under compulsion: one, 420 2, 87 | is doubly guilty who both takes God's name ~in vain, and 421 2, 87 | xxvi, 7): "The human ear takes such like words in ~their 422 2, 87 | part of the person who takes the vow: but it has a greater 423 2, 90 | sometimes: for "lapis" [a stone] takes its name from hurting the 424 2, 92 | Secondly, because man takes a natural ~pleasure in representations, 425 2, 93 | Reply OBJ 1: Divination takes its name not from a rightly 426 2, 93 | 2: Further, a human act takes it species from its end, 427 2, 93 | unequal sticks and ~noting who takes the greater or the lesser. 428 2, 93 | ultimate ~end whence divination takes its general formality. But 429 2, 93 | bodies are the cause of what takes place in the world, according 430 2, 96 | which is ~called perjury, takes its species chiefly from 431 2, 96 | false gods, yet perjury takes its name from that kind 432 2, 96 | the state's ~burdens if he takes a share of its goods.~Aquin.: 433 2, 98 | 1~OBJ 4: Further, simony takes its name from Simon the 434 2, 98 | proceeds from choice, which takes the principal part in virtue 435 2, 98 | monastery by ~simony, and there takes the solemn vow of profession. 436 2, 99 | piety of ~divine religion takes precedence of the claims 437 2, 100 | Therefore observance ~takes the first place after religion.~ 438 2, 100 | dignity. For this reason piety takes ~precedence of observance, 439 2, 101 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes dulia in a wide sense.~Aquin.: 440 2, 102 | not follow that ~obedience takes precedence of all virtues 441 2, 105 | deficiency or privation takes its ~species from the opposite 442 2, 105 | love. And if the recipient ~takes therefrom an occasion of 443 2, 106 | OBJ 2: Further, he that takes vengeance on a man does 444 2, 106 | to avenge himself when he takes revenge ~for wrongs inflicted 445 2, 106 | of the person on whom he takes vengeance and rests ~there, 446 2, 106 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: He who takes vengeance on the wicked 447 2, 106 | evil." If, however, a man takes vengeance outside the order 448 2, 107 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes truth in the first sense.~ 449 2, 108 | answer that, A moral act takes its species from two things, 450 2, 109 | for instance when a ~man takes pleasure in the pretense 451 2, 110 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes boasting as exceeding men' 452 2, 110 | though sometimes a man takes to boasting, not from arrogance, 453 2, 112 | kind of ~friend that he "takes everything in a right manner 454 2, 115 | relating to one's own body, takes precedence of liberality: 455 2, 116 | desires riches too much, or takes too much pleasure in them, 456 2, 116 | covetousness: for the covetous man takes ~pleasure in the consideration 457 2, 116 | soul, forasmuch as a man takes ~pleasure in the fact that 458 2, 116 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: Movement takes its species from the term " 459 2, 117 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, sin takes its species chiefly from 460 2, 121 | own good?~(8) Whether it takes pleasure in its own action?~( 461 2, 121 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Ambrose takes fortitude in a broad sense, 462 2, 121 | Reply OBJ 3: This objection takes fortitude in the first sense.~ 463 2, 121 | Therefore the brave man takes pleasure in his act.~Aquin.: 464 2, 121 | of virtue. Therefore he takes pleasure in ~his act.~Aquin.: 465 2, 121 | be likely to happen; he takes measures beforehand, ~and 466 2, 122 | blood for Christ's sake takes the place ~of Baptism. Wherefore 467 2, 127 | points to the fact that he takes no ~pleasure in accepting 468 2, 127 | the virtue of fortitude ~takes precedence of the virtue 469 2, 127 | answer that, Confidence takes its name from "fides" [faith]: 470 2, 127 | counsel," because, to wit he takes care to avoid what he fears. 471 2, 127 | he fears. Now ~security takes its name from the removal 472 2, 127 | itself." Now magnanimity takes every virtue great, as stated 473 2, 131 | soul; on the ~contrary, it takes it away. If, however, we 474 2, 132 | great, whence ~magnificence takes its name, belongs properly 475 2, 134 | manner longanimity which takes count of time, in so far ~ 476 2, 135 | hindrances. Hence perseverance takes precedence ~of constancy 477 2, 136 | many difficulties: yet he takes a certain pleasure in ~the 478 2, 139 | quoted Augustine apparently takes ~temperance, not as a special 479 2, 139 | Reply OBJ 2: The Philosopher takes temperance as denoting moderation 480 2, 139 | end. Wherefore temperance takes the need of this life, as 481 2, 139 | as a movement of the soul takes precedence of ~desire and 482 2, 140 | unmindful of ~injuries, takes no pleasure in seeing a 483 2, 140 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes the term "childish" as denoting 484 2, 140 | circumstances in which the act takes place, is simply more ~voluntary. 485 2, 144 | or how much food ~a man takes, so long as he does it with 486 2, 145 | the virtue of abstinence ~takes account of the necessity 487 2, 145 | institution of fasting, the Church takes account of ~the more common 488 2, 145 | prohibition of flesh meat takes precedence of the prohibition 489 2, 146 | sanctis)]: "Whenever a man ~takes more meat and drink than 490 2, 147 | pleasures of touch. Now sobriety takes its name from "measure," 491 2, 148 | works]: "Whenever a man takes more meat and drink than 492 2, 148 | in another by that which takes away the ~use of reason. 493 2, 148 | an evil, than that which takes away the use of reason for 494 2, 149 | I answer that, Chastity takes its name from the fact that 495 2, 149 | OBJ 2: Further, "Chastity" takes its name from "chastisement" [* 496 2, 149 | Reply OBJ 1: This argument takes chastity in the metaphorical 497 2, 149 | chastising. Now "chastity" ~takes its name from "chastisement" 498 2, 149 | pudicitia" [purity] takes its name from "pudor," which 499 2, 150 | I answer that, Virginity takes its name apparently from " 500 2, 150 | virginity, whether copulation takes place or not. Augustine,


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