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sense 2148
sensed 7
senseless 23
senses 680
sensibilibus 1
sensibility 5
sensible 706
Frequency    [«  »]
682 difference
682 dionysius
681 religion
680 senses
679 22
678 potentiality
676 third
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

senses

1-500 | 501-680

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | expounded in ~different senses?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[1] 2 1, 1 | is whatever ~affects the senses, including, therefore, whatever 3 1, 1 | the ~objects of the five senses. Similarly, objects which 4 1, 1 | a word may have several senses?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[10] 5 1, 1 | word cannot have several senses, ~historical or literal, 6 1, 1 | anagogical. For many different senses in one text produce confusion 7 1, 1 | there cannot be several senses to a word.~Aquin.: SMT FP 8 1, 1 | according to the four ~different senses mentioned above.~Aquin.: 9 1, 1 | Further, besides these senses, there is the parabolical, 10 1, 1 | Writ should have several senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[10] 11 1, 1 | The multiplicity of these senses does not produce ~equivocation 12 1, 1 | multiplicity, seeing that these senses ~are not multiplied because 13 1, 1 | confusion results, for all the senses are ~founded on one - the 14 1, 1 | for the three spiritual senses. Thus Hugh of St. ~Victor ( 15 1, 1 | sense, laying down three senses only - the historical, the ~ 16 1, 2 | certain, and evident to our senses, that in the world some 17 1, 5 | due proportion; for the senses ~delight in things duly 18 1, 8 | place. Now in both these senses, in some way God is in every 19 1, 8 | this can be ~taken in two senses. In one sense the adverb " 20 1, 12 | alienations of the bodily senses ~divine revelations and 21 1, 12 | figures are formed in ~the senses or imagination, according 22 1, 13 | Therefore GOD in both senses is spoken of univocally.~ 23 1, 13 | same word taken in other senses; as, for instance, "being" 24 1, 13 | false," can be taken in two senses, accordingly ~as this adverb " 25 1, 14 | the case of each of the senses; whereas those ~cognitive 26 1, 14 | be ~white"; for in both senses it is false. Now to be known 27 1, 16 | Anima iii) that as ~the senses are always true as regards 28 1, 16 | division are neither in the senses nor in the intellect knowing " 29 1, 16 | therefore may be in the senses, or in the intellect knowing " 30 1, 16 | dividing; and not in the senses; nor in ~the intellect knowing " 31 1, 16 | all things," through the senses and the intellect. And ~ 32 1, 17 | there is falsity in the senses?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[17] A[ 33 1, 17 | that falsity is not in the senses. For Augustine says ~(De 34 1, 17 | 33): "If all the bodily senses report as they are ~affected, 35 1, 17 | are not deceived by the senses; and therefore that falsity ~ 36 1, 17 | falsity is ~not proper to the senses, but to the imagination.~ 37 1, 17 | negation do not belong to ~the senses. Therefore in the senses 38 1, 17 | senses. Therefore in the senses there is no falsity.~Aquin.: 39 1, 17 | It appears that the ~senses entrap us into error by 40 1, 17 | not to be sought in the senses except as truth ~is in them. 41 1, 17 | in such a way as that the senses ~know truth, but in so far 42 1, 17 | takes place through the senses ~apprehending things as 43 1, 17 | that falsity exists ~in the senses through their apprehending 44 1, 17 | knowledge of things by the senses is in proportion to the 45 1, 17 | of their likeness in the senses; and the likeness of a thing 46 1, 17 | thing can exist in ~the senses in three ways. In the first 47 1, 24 | may be understood in two senses. In one ~sense as the inscription 48 1, 31 | can be taken in several senses. If "alone" means solitude 49 1, 38 | be understood in several senses. In one way it means identity, 50 1, 39 | as in the objects of the senses, whence the intellect derives 51 1, 41 | can be understood in two senses. In one sense, the ablative ~ 52 1, 49 | good of man as regards ~the senses is not the good of man as 53 1, 49 | seek good in regard to the senses than good according to ~ 54 1, 51 | things through the bodily senses, as will be ~explained later 55 1, 51 | other instruments of the senses, ~would be fashioned without 56 1, 54 | Hom. 29 in Ev.), that "man senses in ~common with the brutes, 57 1, 54 | single objects through the senses: the angels likewise know 58 1, 54 | 2]), yet not through the senses. But ~memory can be allowed 59 1, 55 | universally can be taken in two senses. In ~one way, on the part 60 1, 57 | place now, except by the ~senses. But administration, providence 61 1, 57 | singular and corporeal ~by the senses, so an angel knows both 62 1, 57 | apprehended by the five ~outward senses, and some other things which 63 1, 59 | good as delectable to the senses. But the Divine goodness, 64 1, 64 | experience comes of the senses. Consequently there is no 65 1, 64 | as deriving it from the senses; but when the ~similitude 66 1, 65 | the more honorable, as the senses for the ~intellect, the 67 1, 67 | most trustworthy of the ~senses, extended in common speech 68 1, 67 | obtained through the ~other senses. Thus we say, "Seeing how 69 1, 67 | themselves objects of the senses; for the object of the intellect 70 1, 68 | explained in a multiplicity of senses, one should ~adhere to a 71 1, 68 | can be understood in two senses. They may be ~understood, 72 1, 68 | day; and there are several senses ~in which this may be understood. 73 1, 68 | heaven perceived by our senses, but that a body of water, ~ 74 1, 68 | uneducated can perceive by their ~senses that earth and water are 75 1, 69 | clearly ~perceptible to the senses; rather they understand 76 1, 69 | were ~manifest to their senses, as we have said (Q[67], 77 1, 70 | the spheres; and yet our senses perceive the movement of 78 1, 70 | is not apparent to the ~senses, the testimony of which 79 1, 70 | 43). For although to the senses there appears but one ~firmament; 80 1, 70 | more perceptible to the senses in this lower world. Moreover, ~ 81 1, 70 | Moreover, ~as far as the senses are concerned, its apparent 82 1, 70 | derived from the bodily senses, and thus far ~is dependent 83 1, 70 | heavenly body, since all the ~senses depend on the sense of touch, 84 1, 70 | and all the organs of the senses require a certain proportion 85 1, 70 | supply phantasms through the senses. ~Moreover, the operations 86 1, 71 | being so apparent to the senses, is not ~enumerated by itself, 87 1, 73 | Hence rest is taken in two senses, in one sense meaning a ~ 88 1, 74 | things not evident to the senses of mankind. Or, again, ~ 89 1, 75 | thing" can be taken in two senses. ~Firstly, for anything 90 1, 75 | external objects of the senses in order to perform its 91 1, 75 | color: and so with the other senses. Hence ~it is clear that 92 1, 75 | man," can be taken in two ~senses. First, that man is a soul; 93 1, 75 | observation does not go beyond the senses. And this is called the ~" 94 1, 75 | ensues upon ~knowledge. The senses indeed do not know existence, 95 1, 76 | of individuals, like the senses. Therefore ~the intellect 96 1, 76 | understands, and that he senses. But one cannot sense without 97 1, 76 | apparent in regard to the senses; ~for several see the same 98 1, 76 | individual things by way of the senses, as ~Dionysius says (Div. 99 1, 76 | Now the ~action of the senses is not performed without 100 1, 76 | Para. 2/2~Now all the other senses are based on the sense of 101 1, 77 | nature is ~directed. Thus the senses of their very nature are 102 1, 77 | xii, 7,24) that the soul ~senses certain things, not through 103 1, 77 | it is said that the soul senses some things with the ~body, 104 1, 77 | sentient. Thus the soul senses ~nothing without the body, 105 1, 77 | object ~sensed. Thus the soul senses some things with the body, 106 1, 77 | of that sort; ~while it senses some things without the 107 1, 77 | imagination by the action of the senses. Therefore one power of 108 1, 77 | principle. For we see that the senses are for the ~sake of the 109 1, 77 | the other way about. The senses, ~moreover, are a certain 110 1, 77 | and the body with its ~senses." Therefore the body being 111 1, 38 | be understood in several senses. In one way it means identity, 112 1, 39 | as in the objects of the senses, whence the intellect derives 113 1, 41 | can be understood in two senses. In one sense, the ablative ~ 114 1, 50 | good of man as regards ~the senses is not the good of man as 115 1, 50 | seek good in regard to the senses than good according to ~ 116 1, 52 | things through the bodily senses, as will be ~explained later 117 1, 52 | other instruments of the senses, ~would be fashioned without 118 1, 55 | Hom. 29 in Ev.), that "man senses in ~common with the brutes, 119 1, 55 | single objects through the senses: the angels likewise know 120 1, 55 | 2]), yet not through the senses. But ~memory can be allowed 121 1, 56 | universally can be taken in two senses. In ~one way, on the part 122 1, 58 | place now, except by the ~senses. But administration, providence 123 1, 58 | singular and corporeal ~by the senses, so an angel knows both 124 1, 58 | apprehended by the five ~outward senses, and some other things which 125 1, 60 | good as delectable to the senses. But the Divine goodness, 126 1, 65 | experience comes of the senses. Consequently there is no 127 1, 65 | as deriving it from the senses; but when the ~similitude 128 1, 66 | the more honorable, as the senses for the ~intellect, the 129 1, 68 | most trustworthy of the ~senses, extended in common speech 130 1, 68 | obtained through the ~other senses. Thus we say, "Seeing how 131 1, 68 | themselves objects of the senses; for the object of the intellect 132 1, 69 | explained in a multiplicity of senses, one should ~adhere to a 133 1, 69 | can be understood in two senses. They may be ~understood, 134 1, 69 | day; and there are several senses ~in which this may be understood. 135 1, 69 | heaven perceived by our senses, but that a body of water, ~ 136 1, 69 | uneducated can perceive by their ~senses that earth and water are 137 1, 70 | clearly ~perceptible to the senses; rather they understand 138 1, 70 | were ~manifest to their senses, as we have said (Q[67], 139 1, 71 | the spheres; and yet our senses perceive the movement of 140 1, 71 | is not apparent to the ~senses, the testimony of which 141 1, 71 | 43). For although to the senses there appears but one ~firmament; 142 1, 71 | more perceptible to the senses in this lower world. Moreover, ~ 143 1, 71 | Moreover, ~as far as the senses are concerned, its apparent 144 1, 71 | derived from the bodily senses, and thus far ~is dependent 145 1, 71 | heavenly body, since all the ~senses depend on the sense of touch, 146 1, 71 | and all the organs of the senses require a certain proportion 147 1, 71 | supply phantasms through the senses. ~Moreover, the operations 148 1, 71 | being so apparent to the senses, is not ~enumerated by itself, 149 1, 72 | Hence rest is taken in two senses, in one sense meaning a ~ 150 1, 73 | things not evident to the senses of mankind. Or, again, ~ 151 1, 74 | thing" can be taken in two senses. ~Firstly, for anything 152 1, 74 | external objects of the senses in order to perform its 153 1, 74 | color: and so with the other senses. Hence ~it is clear that 154 1, 74 | man," can be taken in two ~senses. First, that man is a soul; 155 1, 74 | observation does not go beyond the senses. And this is called the ~" 156 1, 74 | ensues upon ~knowledge. The senses indeed do not know existence, 157 1, 75 | of individuals, like the senses. Therefore ~the intellect 158 1, 75 | understands, and that he senses. But one cannot sense without 159 1, 75 | apparent in regard to the senses; ~for several see the same 160 1, 75 | individual things by way of the senses, as ~Dionysius says (Div. 161 1, 75 | Now the ~action of the senses is not performed without 162 1, 75 | Para. 2/2~Now all the other senses are based on the sense of 163 1, 76 | nature is ~directed. Thus the senses of their very nature are 164 1, 76 | xii, 7,24) that the soul ~senses certain things, not through 165 1, 76 | it is said that the soul senses some things with the ~body, 166 1, 76 | sentient. Thus the soul senses ~nothing without the body, 167 1, 76 | object ~sensed. Thus the soul senses some things with the body, 168 1, 76 | of that sort; ~while it senses some things without the 169 1, 76 | imagination by the action of the senses. Therefore one power of 170 1, 76 | principle. For we see that the senses are for the ~sake of the 171 1, 76 | the other way about. The senses, ~moreover, are a certain 172 1, 76 | and the body with its ~senses." Therefore the body being 173 1, 77 | vegetative part;~(3) The exterior senses;~(4) The interior senses.~ 174 1, 77 | senses;~(4) The interior senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 175 1, 77 | required for ~the work of the senses, yet they are not required 176 1, 77 | that the ~operation of the senses takes place by virtue of 177 1, 77 | things perceived by the senses, ~except on account of the 178 1, 77 | account of the actions of the senses, that is, for the purpose ~ 179 1, 77 | Whether the five exterior senses are properly distinguished?~ 180 1, 77 | distinguish five exterior senses. But ~there are many kinds 181 1, 77 | objects, it seems that the senses are multiplied according 182 1, 77 | there are more than five senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 183 1, 77 | other besides the five senses."~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 184 1, 77 | distinction and number of the senses ~has been assigned by some 185 1, 77 | mediums for the ~various senses, according to the convenience 186 1, 77 | does not pertain ~to the senses, but to the intellect.~Aquin.: 187 1, 77 | distinction of the exterior senses must ~therefore be ascribed 188 1, 77 | that which belongs to the senses properly and ~"per se." 189 1, 77 | for the ~operation of the senses, a spiritual immutation 190 1, 77 | Body Para. 4/5~But in some senses we find spiritual immutation 191 1, 77 | most ~universal of all the senses. After this comes the hearing 192 1, 77 | is that the three other senses ~are not exercised through 193 1, 77 | happens as regards these two senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 194 1, 77 | are the objects of the ~senses; because "the senses are 195 1, 77 | the ~senses; because "the senses are affected by the same 196 1, 77 | which are the objects of the senses. For the proper sensibles ~ 197 1, 77 | very nature, affect the senses; since they are ~qualities 198 1, 77 | sensibles do not move the senses first and of their own ~ 199 1, 77 | in the immutation of the senses. For sense is immuted ~differently 200 1, 77 | divided into several specific ~senses, and for this reason it 201 1, 77 | various contrarieties; which ~senses, however, are not separate 202 1, 77 | 1/1~Whether the interior senses are suitably distinguished?~ 203 1, 77 | would seem that the interior senses are not suitably ~distinguished. 204 1, 77 | addition to the proper exterior senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 205 1, 77 | the proper ~and exterior senses suffice for us to judge 206 1, 77 | like manner with the other senses. Therefore for ~this there 207 1, 77 | powers distinct from the senses. ~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 208 1, 77 | intellect depends on the senses less than any power ~of 209 1, 77 | what it ~receives from the senses; whence we read (Poster. 210 1, 77 | of those ~forms which the senses perceive, and in which the 211 1, 77 | pleasing or otherwise to ~the senses, but also on account of 212 1, 77 | forms ~received through the senses. Furthermore, for the apprehension 213 1, 77 | not received through the senses, the "estimative" ~power 214 1, 77 | principle of the exterior senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 215 1, 77 | all apprehensions of ~the senses must be referred: and by 216 1, 77 | all the intentions of ~the senses are perceived; as when someone 217 1, 77 | intellect has its origin in ~the senses: yet, in the thing apprehended 218 1, 77 | apprehended through the senses, the ~intellect knows many 219 1, 77 | knows many things which the senses cannot perceive. In like ~ 220 1, 78 | in the first and ~second senses, which belong to primary 221 1, 78 | be taken in the two first senses; forasmuch as this ~so-called 222 1, 78 | active intellect. For as the ~senses are to things sensible, 223 1, 78 | we say that also in the senses there is something ~active, 224 1, 78 | something in act; as the senses as ~made actual by what 225 1, 78 | corporeal things through the senses of the body, ~and commit 226 1, 78 | intellect, as well as in the senses. Because our soul's act 227 1, 80 | is directed to the bodily senses is common to ~us and beasts." 228 1, 80 | beasts." But the bodily senses belong to the apprehensive 229 1, 80 | directed ~to the bodily senses, Augustine does not give 230 1, 80 | understand that the ~bodily senses are included in sensuality, 231 1, 80 | inclination to the bodily senses, since we desire ~things 232 1, 80 | apprehended through the bodily senses. And thus the ~bodily senses 233 1, 80 | senses. And thus the ~bodily senses appertain to sensuality 234 1, 80 | suitable ~according to the senses. But such is the object 235 1, 80 | suitable, according to the senses, and to fly from what is ~ 236 1, 80 | which do not impress ~the senses, as we have said above ( 237 1, 80 | not because it pleases the senses, but because it is useful 238 1, 80 | Reply OBJ 3: The exterior senses require for action exterior 239 1, 81 | because neither do the senses apprehend the universal. 240 1, 81 | something pleasant to the senses and suitable to ~nature: 241 1, 81 | are on ~the part of the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[82] A[ 242 1, 83 | intellectual knowledge from the senses?~(7) Whether the intellect 243 1, 83 | can ~be perceived by the senses." He says also (Gen. ad 244 1, 83 | by no means, through the senses, ~understand spiritual things, 245 1, 83 | to the soul, and in the senses ~which receive the forms 246 1, 83 | things through the bodily senses." But the soul ~itself cannot 247 1, 83 | known through the bodily senses. Therefore it does not ~ 248 1, 83 | perfect knowledge than the ~senses, which receive the form 249 1, 83 | conditions. Moreover, among the senses, sight has ~the most perfect 250 1, 83 | potentiality to ~all - through the senses, to all things sensible - 251 1, 83 | sensible objects on his senses, to the act ~of sensation - 252 1, 83 | species which are in the senses, and by ~which we sense, 253 1, 83 | true we should not need the senses in ~order to understand. 254 1, 83 | to receive them from the senses, it would not ~need the 255 1, 83 | that our soul needs the senses in order to understand, ~ 256 1, 83 | with the body: and thus the senses would ~be of no use to the 257 1, 83 | with Avicenna, that the senses are necessary to the ~soul, 258 1, 83 | individual wanting in one of the senses can turn to the ~active 259 1, 83 | fulness of truth from the senses of the body." This ~he proves 260 1, 83 | because "whatever the bodily senses reach, ~is continually being 261 1, 83 | when not present to the senses, may be present to the imagination, 262 1, 83 | we cannot discern by the senses, whether ~what we perceive 263 1, 83 | learn the ~truth from the senses. But intellectual knowledge 264 1, 83 | cannot be conveyed by the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[84] A[ 265 1, 83 | cannot be perceived by the senses. Therefore ~intellectual 266 1, 83 | principle of knowledge is in the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[84] A[ 267 1, 83 | intellect is distinct from the ~senses: and that it is an immaterial 268 1, 83 | sentient act, while the senses rouse ~the intellect to 269 1, 83 | phantasms received from the ~senses to be actually intelligible, 270 1, 83 | knowledge is caused by the senses. But since the phantasms 271 1, 83 | the ~entire truth from the senses. For the light of the active 272 1, 83 | things not perceived by the ~senses. And Augustine's words may 273 1, 83 | is more dependent on the senses than the ~intellect on the 274 1, 83 | the individual through the senses and ~the imagination. And, 275 1, 83 | intellect is higher than the ~senses. Therefore the judgment 276 1, 83 | through ~suspension of the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[84] A[ 277 1, 83 | intellect. But during ~sleep the senses are suspended, as is said 278 1, 83 | through suspension of the ~senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[84] A[ 279 1, 83 | hindered ~by suspension of the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[84] A[ 280 1, 83 | principally through the senses"; for ~the smith does not 281 1, 83 | which he perceives with his senses. Now it is ~clear that a 282 1, 83 | perfect judgment, while the senses are ~suspended, through 283 1, 83 | intellect is superior to the senses, ~nevertheless in a manner 284 1, 83 | manner it receives from the senses, and its first and ~principal 285 1, 83 | therefore ~suspension of the senses necessarily involves a hindrance 286 1, 83 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The senses are suspended in the sleeper 287 1, 83 | of such ~evaporation, the senses are more or less suspended. 288 1, 83 | considerable, not only are the senses suspended, but also the ~ 289 1, 84 | appears in the case of the senses. For if we understood or 290 1, 84 | similar to this is in the senses. For the sight sees the ~ 291 1, 84 | thus the operation of the senses takes ~place by the senses 292 1, 84 | senses takes ~place by the senses being impressed by the sensible. 293 1, 84 | knowledge appears in the senses. For by sense we ~judge 294 1, 84 | under ~the action of the senses and the imagination. Now 295 1, 84 | another may ~be taken in two senses. First, so that the word " 296 1, 85 | Further, man, while his senses are in suspense, can know 297 1, 85 | withdrawn from the corporeal senses ~it would know the future.~ 298 1, 85 | receiving its knowledge from the senses; it is not natural for the ~ 299 1, 85 | when withdrawn from the senses: rather does it ~know the 300 1, 85 | it is ~withdrawn from the senses, as it is then nearer to 301 1, 87 | by means of the corporeal senses, so it gains from ~itself 302 1, 87 | are not grasped by the senses, is due not merely to the 303 1, 88 | understanding when the ~senses are tied, and by a distracted 304 1, 88 | But death destroys the senses and imagination, as we ~ 305 1, 88 | sensible is done through the ~senses and other sensible faculties 306 1, 90 | certain way through the senses, the organs of which cannot 307 1, 90 | foundation of the other senses. For the organ of any ~particular 308 1, 90 | which are not perceived by senses of uncultured men such as ~ 309 1, 90 | some animals have sharper senses and quicker movement ~than 310 1, 90 | foundation of the other ~senses, is more perfect in man 311 1, 90 | in some of the exterior ~senses; thus of all animals he 312 1, 90 | account of a hindrance to his senses arising necessarily from 313 1, 90 | reasons. ~First, because the senses are given to man, not only 314 1, 90 | delight in the objects of the senses only as ordered to food ~ 315 1, 90 | sake. Therefore, as the senses are situated chiefly in 316 1, 90 | erect, in order that by the senses, and chiefly by sight, which 317 1, 90 | face, ~on account of the senses which are there expressed; 318 1, 96 | Passion" may be taken in two senses. First, in its ~proper sense, 319 1, 100 | acquire knowledge through the senses, as ~above explained (Q[ 320 1, 100 | powers; wherefore, while ~the senses are tired and the interior 321 1, 104 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, as the senses are moved by the sensible, 322 1, 104 | concerns things manifest to the senses. But sometimes things ~happen 323 1, 104 | are not manifest to the senses; ~as when the Apostles were 324 1, 110 | Whether he can change man's senses?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[111] A[ 325 1, 110 | alienation from the bodily senses, sometimes without such ~ 326 1, 110 | have never perceived by the senses, ~either wholly or partly; 327 1, 110 | previously received from the ~senses (for he cannot make a man 328 1, 110 | angel can change the human senses?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[111] A[ 329 1, 110 | cannot change the human senses. For the ~sensitive operation 330 1, 110 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, the senses are naturally moved by the 331 1, 110 | angel cannot change the senses; but these are changed always 332 1, 110 | 1/1~I answer that, The senses may be changed in a twofold 333 1, 110 | within, for we ~see that the senses are changed when the spirits 334 1, 110 | the like with the other senses. ~Now an angel, by his natural 335 1, 110 | can work a change in the senses both ~ways. For an angel 336 1, 110 | For an angel can offer the senses a sensible object from without, ~ 337 1, 110 | above remarked, whereby the senses are changed in ~various 338 1, 110 | can work ~a change in the senses outside the common mode 339 1, 113 | because he will deceive ~men's senses by means of phantoms, so 340 1, 113 | and even on his corporeal senses, so ~that something seems 341 1, 113 | appears to ~other men's senses, as it were embodied in 342 1, 113 | appears embodied to the ~senses of another man: but that 343 1, 113 | picture to another man's senses.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[114] A[ 344 1, 114 | that, It is apparent to the senses that some bodies are active. ~ 345 1, 116 | he acquires through ~the senses; then by his own research 346 1, 117 | indeed is apparent ~to the senses in animals generated from 347 1, 117 | through receiving from the senses, and turning to ~phantasms, 348 2, 2 | fact that operations of the senses, through being the principles 349 2, 3 | 1: Life is taken in two senses. First for the very being 350 2, 3 | consists in an operation of the senses also. For there is no more 351 2, 3 | in man than that of ~the senses, except the intellective 352 2, 3 | in an operation ~of the senses also.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] 353 2, 3 | by the operation of the senses. Therefore ~it seems that 354 2, 3 | that the operation of the senses is needed for happiness.~ 355 2, 3 | by an ~operation of his senses. Again, in like manner, 356 2, 3 | through the operation of the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] A[3] 357 2, 3 | Nevertheless the operations of the senses can belong to happiness, 358 2, 3 | the body and the bodily senses will receive a certain ~ 359 2, 3 | will not ~depend on the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] A[3] 360 2, 3 | that the operation of the senses is ~required antecedently 361 2, 3 | are received through the senses, as the Philosopher ~clearly 362 2, 4 | The apprehension of the senses does not attain to the ~ 363 2, 5 | its knowledge: since the ~senses have no knowledge whatever 364 2, 6 | extrinsic motion an animal's senses are confronted with something ~ 365 2, 6 | proposing the appetible ~to the senses, or by effecting a change 366 2, 6 | irrational animals, through their senses and their natural ~estimative 367 2, 6 | to wish" is said in two senses. First, as though it ~were 368 2, 9 | through being offered to ~the senses, and also the organs themselves 369 2, 11 | which appeal most to the senses: wherefore it seems that 370 2, 14 | facts received through the senses - for instance, that this 371 2, 17 | the ~apprehension of the senses, it is not in our power 372 2, 17 | apprehend anything ~by the senses, unless the sensible be 373 2, 17 | then that man can use his ~senses if he will so to do; unless 374 2, 17 | is the principle of the ~senses; and from the organ of generation 375 2, 26 | not ~apprehended by the senses. Therefore love is not in 376 2, 27 | known. Consequently those senses ~chiefly regard the beautiful, 377 2, 27 | other objects of the other ~senses, we do not use the expression " 378 2, 28 | just as ~it happens in the senses, and in every act of a power 379 2, 29 | by an apprehension in the senses. But the senses cannot apprehend ~ 380 2, 29 | apprehension in the senses. But the senses cannot apprehend ~the universal. 381 2, 29 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: The senses do not apprehend the universal, 382 2, 30 | good perceptible to the ~senses. The former pleasure seems 383 2, 30 | something delightful to the senses, wherein ~concupiscence 384 2, 30 | something delightful to the ~senses; and this is also the object 385 2, 30 | which gives ~pleasure to the senses is the common object of 386 2, 31 | More intimate, because the senses stop at the outward ~accidents 387 2, 31 | pleasures afforded by ~the other senses?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[31] A[ 388 2, 31 | pleasures afforded by the other senses. Because the greatest pleasure ~ 389 2, 31 | i, 11). But "of all the senses the sight is loved ~most" [* 390 2, 31 | stated in ~Metaph. i, 1, the senses are loved for two reasons: 391 2, 31 | usefulness. Wherefore the senses ~afford pleasure in both 392 2, 31 | former ~pleasures of the senses, i.e. those which arise 393 2, 31 | whereas pleasures of the senses, as loved for their ~usefulness, 394 2, 31 | pleasure from the other ~senses except as subordinated to 395 2, 32 | in a perception of the senses," since knowledge is requisite 396 2, 35 | We speak of pain of the senses, not as though it were an ~ 397 2, 35 | sensitive power; but because the senses are required for ~bodily 398 2, 35 | sorrow can arise from all the senses. Therefore sorrow is not 399 2, 35 | the objects of the other senses ~can indeed be disproportionate 400 2, 35 | the objects of the other senses for their own sake; whereas ~ 401 2, 35 | the ~objects of the other senses, we do not speak of pain 402 2, 35 | accidentally, in so far as the senses are requisite for pleasure 403 2, 38 | bodily pain, which is in the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[38] A[ 404 2, 38 | that pain which is in the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[38] A[ 405 2, 38 | to pertain to the outward senses and limbs, rather than to 406 2, 39 | which it is due ~that the senses perceive, and that nature 407 2, 40 | knowledge is confined to the senses and does not extend to the 408 2, 41 | of an apprehension of the senses. But sense ~apprehends, 409 2, 41 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The senses do not apprehend the future: 410 2, 51 | principles comes to us from ~the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[51] A[ 411 2, 60 | the pleasures of the other senses, they are not ~intense, 412 2, 60 | good discerned not by the senses, but by an inner ~power, 413 2, 66 | question can be taken in two senses. First, as applying to ~ 414 2, 71 | through the operation of his senses ~that man accomplishes acts 415 2, 74 | perceived by the bodily senses, so far ~approves of any 416 2, 75 | an apprehension of the ~senses that the sensitive appetite 417 2, 75 | the apprehension of the senses and to the appetite; while ~ 418 2, 75 | proposed as ~appetible to the senses, and because the appetite 419 2, 77 | sight, but also by the other senses. Therefore "concupiscence 420 2, 77 | hearing" and of the other senses should also have been mentioned.~ 421 2, 77 | in respect of the fleshly senses, but are ~delectable in 422 2, 77 | most excellent of all the senses, ~and covers a larger ground, 423 2, 77 | transferred to all the other senses, and even to the inner apprehensions, ~ 424 2, 79 | charity. And since two of the senses excel in ~rendering service 425 2, 80 | object ~of appetite to the senses, or by persuading the reason. 426 2, 80 | arise from the external ~senses according to the order of 427 2, 80 | perceived by the ~external senses.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[80] A[ 428 2, 80 | received originally from the senses.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[80] A[ 429 2, 80 | offered outwardly to the senses, or are represented to the ~ 430 2, 80 | knowledge arises from the senses, and we ~cannot understand 431 2, 80 | and also ~the external senses, for Augustine says (Qq. 432 2, 80 | all the approaches to the senses, it adapts itself to shapes, ~ 433 2, 80 | which is apprehended by the senses or the imagination ~does 434 2, 83 | OBJ 3: Further, of all the senses the sight is the most spiritual 435 2, 85 | words of Gn. 8:21: "Man's ~senses are prone to evil from his 436 2, 99 | but also offered to the senses. Wherefore the things of 437 2, 100 | than God by the way ~of the senses, nevertheless the love of 438 2, 102 | have to keep the spiritual senses, i.e. the offspring, ~and 439 2, 109 | eyes of the mind are the senses of the soul." Now the ~bodily 440 2, 109 | the soul." Now the ~bodily senses, however pure, cannot see 441 2, 109 | come to know through the senses. Higher intelligible things 442 2, 1 | move the ~intellect or the senses to knowledge of them. Wherefore 443 2, 1 | things seen either by the senses ~or by the intellect.~Aquin.: 444 2, 10 | faith, because "his bodily senses are deceived, ~while his 445 2, 14 | in corporeal things the ~senses are said to be acute when 446 2, 14 | in Ethic. vi, even as the senses ~are cognizant of sensible 447 2, 15 | attracting the notice ~of our senses, whether by touch, as those 448 2, 26 | indicates the objects of the senses. ~Therefore God is to be 449 2, 26 | knowledge is derived through the senses, those things are knowable ~ 450 2, 26 | which are nearer to our senses, and the last term of knowledge 451 2, 26 | is most remote from our senses.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[27] A[ 452 2, 28 | they are present to the senses. ~Hence the signs of evil 453 2, 43 | is said to be good in two senses: first in the ~sense that 454 2, 44 | heart and dullness in the senses, while fatuity denotes ~ 455 2, 45 | and offers itself to ~the senses: while to obtain knowledge 456 2, 45 | particulars are known by the senses. But prudence is not ~in 457 2, 45 | persons who have keen outward senses are devoid of ~prudence. 458 2, 45 | reside in the external senses whereby we know sensible 459 2, 45 | who by custom have their senses exercised to the ~discerning 460 2, 56 | to another in both these senses. Now ~it is evident that 461 2, 56 | particular goods, even as the senses are cognitive of ~particulars. 462 2, 63 | pleasure or rest of the senses, and to this ~striking or 463 2, 82 | cannot reach God with the senses, our mind is ~urged by sensible 464 2, 92 | latria may be taken in two senses. In one sense it ~may denote 465 2, 112 | to curb pleasures of the senses. ~But this virtue regards 466 2, 116 | consummated in the carnal senses - for instance, the pleasures 467 2, 121 | wherefore the pain in his senses hinders the ~mind of the 468 2, 139 | for pleasures of the other senses, for ~these, too, belong 469 2, 139 | The pleasures of the other senses play a different part in ~ 470 2, 139 | not result ~from the other senses save in relation to sensibles 471 2, 139 | pleasure from the other senses, not ~only for this reason, 472 2, 139 | pleasures of the other ~senses, in relation to pleasures 473 2, 139 | sensible objects of the other senses ~are pleasant on account 474 2, 139 | not so perceptible to the senses, and ~consequently they 475 2, 139 | sensible objects of these ~senses conduce to the pleasurable 476 2, 139 | the touch than ~the other senses are, it follows that temperance 477 2, 139 | taste ~than about the other senses.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[141] A[ 478 2, 143 | becoming according to the ~senses, but not according to reason. 479 2, 145 | before the well-being of his senses."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[147] 480 2, 146 | life, or pleasing to the ~senses. Now as regards goods having 481 2, 149 | the pleasures of the other senses are the concern of ~temperance 482 2, 149 | The pleasures of the other senses do not pertain to the ~maintenance 483 2, 154 | intellect receives from the senses, and the ~will is urged 484 2, 165 | some things known by the senses of touch and taste. Now 485 2, 165 | acquired through all the senses. According to Augustine ~( 486 2, 165 | curiosity ~is the object of the senses; for pleasure seeketh objects 487 2, 170 | deprived of the natural senses. In the same way a man might 488 2, 171 | represented first to the senses, secondly to the imagination, ~ 489 2, 171 | only as received from the senses, but also ~transformed in 490 2, 171 | asleep or out of their ~senses), or through the coordination 491 2, 171 | externally by means of the senses - thus Daniel saw the writing ~ 492 2, 171 | not received through the senses (for ~instance, if images 493 2, 171 | those derived from the ~senses - thus Jeremiah saw the " 494 2, 171 | previously derived from the senses are divinely ~coordinated 495 2, 171 | by abstraction from ~the senses?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[173] A[ 496 2, 171 | by ~abstraction from the senses. For it is written (Num. 497 2, 171 | is abstraction from the ~senses. Therefore prophecy is always 498 2, 171 | by abstraction from the ~senses. ~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[173] 499 2, 171 | by abstraction from the senses.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[173] A[ 500 2, 171 | by abstraction from the ~senses.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[173] A[


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