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Alphabetical    [«  »]
religimus 1
religio 1
religion 681
religious 668
relish 5
reluctance 1
reluctant 1
Frequency    [«  »]
675 sake
673 vow
669 too
668 religious
667 latter
665 exist
664 consent
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

religious

1-500 | 501-668

    Part, Question
1 2, 98 | are not bound; ~likewise religious are bound by their profession 2 2, 98 | laity, and the state of religious than that of folk living 3 2, 98 | persons to those of ~the religious, although they can be saved 4 2, 102 | the Gentiles, in their religious rites, used garments of 5 2, 105 | they would adopt ~their religious practices. When, however, 6 2, 108 | Moreover, every form of the ~religious life that professes the 7 2, 10 | the judgment of the most religious synod, if anyone ventures 8 2, 12 | supererogation such as the religious ~life, the clerical state, 9 2, 12 | by withdrawing from the ~religious life to which he was bound 10 2, 12 | is called "apostasy from religious ~life" or "Orders." A man 11 2, 28 | more in accordance with religious feeling, when he says: ' 12 2, 30 | power can give ~alms. For religious are under the power of their 13 2, 31 | not suffice, and because religious would have to ~leave the 14 2, 31 | that there is no need for religious to leave their ~cloister 15 2, 31 | the customs observed by ~religious in general are contrary 16 2, 31 | Now it is ~customary among religious orders to proclaim this 17 2, 31 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 5: Further, religious are bound to obey their 18 2, 31 | Proclamations made in the chapter of religious are about ~little faults 19 2, 69 | this reason ~some, like religious and clerics, are debarred 20 2, 79 | state of grace are called religious, but ~only those who bind 21 2, 79 | Cicero, a man is ~said to be religious from 'religio,' because 22 2, 79 | OBJ 5: Although the name "religious" may be given to all in ~ 23 2, 79 | God, yet in a special way religious are those who ~consecrate 24 2, 79 | differentiated by the fact that religious worship ~is paid to the 25 2, 80 | and whom He wills He makes religious: the profane Samaritans, 26 2, 81 | To Him alone do we offer religious worship when praying, ~from 27 2, 84 | Reply OBJ 2: Monks or other religious may receive oblations under 28 2, 85 | Church in fee; and certain religious ~receive tithes. Therefore 29 2, 85 | of alms to certain lay ~religious, or to those that have no 30 2, 85 | have no care of souls. Some religious, ~however, are competent 31 2, 85 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, some religious are clerics; and yet they 32 2, 85 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Religious who are clerics, if they 33 2, 85 | reason applies to other religious, who ~though clerics do 34 2, 86 | bind himself to enter the ~religious life, so that, in consequence, 35 2, 86 | this particular form of ~religious life, or this place, as 36 2, 86 | received there, to enter the religious ~life elsewhere. But if 37 2, 86 | this ~particular kind of religious life, or to this particular 38 2, 86 | bound to ~enter another religious house, if they are unwilling 39 2, 86 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, religious worship should be offered 40 2, 86 | one's ~superiors, to whom religious vow obedience when they 41 2, 86 | Yet children ~may make religious profession even without 42 2, 86 | more than to promise. But religious who are ~under the power 43 2, 86 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: A religious is subject to his superior 44 2, 86 | with something, no vow of a religious stands ~without the consent 45 2, 86 | cannot be bound by a solemn religious vow, on account of ~the 46 2, 86 | they can bind themselves by religious vows, ~simple or solemn, 47 2, 86 | continency is part of the religious ~profession, whereby the 48 2, 86 | a man who has ~made his religious profession cease to be a 49 2, 86 | profession cease to be a religious, although certain ~jurists 50 2, 86 | essential ~condition of the religious state, whereby a man renounces 51 2, 86 | a vow solemnized by the religious profession; and ~the reason 52 2, 86 | human use. Now a professed ~religious is dead to the world and 53 2, 86 | but ~because through the religious profession it is already 54 2, 86 | Para. 1/2~Reply OBJ 4: A religious who is made a bishop is 55 2, 86 | particular works, whereas by ~the religious life a man consecrates his 56 2, 86 | it is unsuitable to the religious life that each one should ~ 57 2, 86 | from a vow to enter the religious life, ~without any apparent 58 2, 87 | stated above (A[4]). ~But religious worship is not due to any 59 2, 87 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Religious worship is shown to one 60 2, 87 | you shall not swear." But religious worship is not given to ~ 61 2, 90 | in accordance with true ~religious worship. Therefore superstition 62 2, 93 | future in connection with religious matters. ~Hence where it 63 2, 98 | places are looked upon as ~religious, if Ephron intended to accept 64 2, 99 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, religious are bound by a vow which 65 2, 99 | his superiors, and his religious state withal, to make points 66 2, 102 | OBJ 3: Further, just as religious in making their profession 67 2, 102 | also vow obedience. Now a religious ~is bound to observe chastity 68 2, 102 | Para. 1/2 ~Reply OBJ 3: Religious profess obedience as to 69 2, 108 | lies. The first is "in religious doctrine"; the second is " 70 2, 108 | then we have the ~lie "in religious doctrine," or against man, 71 2, 109 | holiness, for instance the religious or the ~clerical habit, 72 2, 111 | a lie about a matter of religious doctrine is most ~grievous - 73 2, 159 | the case with all acts of religious ~worship. Therefore, by 74 2, 182 | relating to the perfection of ~religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] Out. 75 2, 182 | especially prelates and religious are in the state of ~perfection?~( 76 2, 182 | perfect, the episcopal or the religious state?~(8) The comparison 77 2, 182 | The comparison between religious and parish priests and archdeacons.~ 78 2, 182 | instance wicked bishops or religious. ~Therefore it would seem 79 2, 182 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether religious and prelates are in the 80 2, 182 | would seem that prelates and religious are not in the state of ~ 81 2, 182 | there are many prelates and religious who have not the ~inward 82 2, 182 | charity. Therefore, if all religious and prelates ~are in the 83 2, 182 | the martyrs rather than to religious and ~bishops.~Aquin.: SMT 84 2, 182 | and (Eccl. Hier. vi) to religious (whom he ~calls monks or { 85 2, 182 | conditions are ~competent to religious and bishops. For religious 86 2, 182 | religious and bishops. For religious bind themselves by vow ~ 87 2, 182 | Hier. vi), speaking of ~religious: "Some call them {therapeutai}," 88 2, 182 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether the religious state is more perfect than 89 2, 182 | It would seem that the religious state is more perfect than 90 2, 182 | give to the poor"; and ~religious do this. But bishops are 91 2, 182 | them personally." Therefore religious are in a more perfect ~state 92 2, 182 | of our neighbor. Now the religious state is directly ~ordered 93 2, 182 | it would ~seem that the religious state is more perfect than 94 2, 182 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, the religious state is directed to the 95 2, 182 | it would seem that the religious state is more perfect than 96 2, 182 | a man may pass from the religious to the episcopal state, ~ 97 2, 182 | is more ~perfect than the religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] A[ 98 2, 182 | of "perfecters," whereas religious are in the position of being ~" 99 2, 182 | excellent in bishops than in religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] A[ 100 2, 182 | archdeacons are more perfect than religious?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] A[ 101 2, 182 | archdeacons are more ~perfect than religious. For Chrysostom says in 102 2, 182 | souls are more perfect ~than religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] A[ 103 2, 182 | Valerium, Ep. xxi): "Let thy ~religious prudence observe that in 104 2, 182 | Commander-in-chief." Therefore religious are not more perfect than ~ 105 2, 182 | state are more ~perfect than religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] A[ 106 2, 182 | archdeacons are more perfect than ~religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] A[ 107 2, 182 | more perfect state than religious, as ~shown above (A[7]). 108 2, 182 | are more like bishops than religious are. Therefore they ~are 109 2, 182 | or archdeacon than in the religious state. ~Therefore parish 110 2, 182 | more perfect virtue than ~religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[184] A[ 111 2, 182 | Therefore it would seem ~that religious are more perfect than archdeacons 112 2, 182 | these with one who is a religious by state, a ~deacon or priest 113 2, 182 | agree in order, such as religious ~priests and deacons not 114 2, 182 | a ~view to goodness, the religious state surpasses the office 115 2, 182 | or archdeacon, because a religious pledges his whole life to 116 2, 182 | the ~comparison of their religious state with their office 117 2, 182 | outward dangers: although the ~religious life is more difficult as 118 2, 182 | reason of the strictness of religious observance. If, however, 119 2, 182 | observance. If, however, the ~religious is also without orders, 120 2, 182 | orders, as in the case of religious lay ~brethren, then it is 121 2, 182 | which is requisite ~for the religious state, since as Dionysius 122 2, 182 | contrary ~to holiness than a religious who is not in holy orders: 123 2, 182 | holy orders: although a ~religious who is not in orders is 124 2, 182 | the distinction between religious ~and secular life.~Aquin.: 125 2, 182 | Those who are taken from the religious state to receive the ~cure 126 2, 182 | shows the excellence of the religious life. When religious ~who 127 2, 182 | the religious life. When religious ~who are not in orders are 128 2, 182 | more like bishops than ~religious are, in a certain respect, 129 2, 182 | obligation in ~perpetuity, religious are more like a bishop, 130 2, 182 | unavoidable cause. In the religious state ~there is greater 131 2, 182 | virtue, which obstacles ~the religious has had the foresight to 132 2, 183 | bishop may pass over to the religious state?~(5) Whether he may 133 2, 183 | to the poor?~(8) Whether religious who are appointed to the 134 2, 183 | episcopal office are ~bound to religious observances?~Aquin.: SMT 135 2, 183 | is more perfect than the religious, ~as we have said above ( 136 2, 183 | to desire to ~enter the religious state. Therefore it is also 137 2, 183 | is no parity between the religious and the episcopal ~state, 138 2, 183 | not a prerequisite of the ~religious state, since the latter 139 2, 183 | because he who enters ~the religious state subjects himself to 140 2, 183 | is more perfect than the religious, as shown above ~(Q[184], 141 2, 183 | return to the world ~from the religious state, so is it unlawful 142 2, 183 | from the episcopal to ~the religious state.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 143 2, 183 | lawful to pass from the religious to the episcopal state. 144 2, 183 | from the episcopal to the religious ~state.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 145 2, 183 | OBJ 1: The perfection of religious and that of bishops are ~ 146 2, 183 | to the perfection of ~a religious to occupy oneself in working 147 2, 183 | he wished to pass ~to the religious state, to busy himself only 148 2, 183 | salvation, which pertains to the religious state. But there may ~be 149 2, 183 | of others, may enter the religious life, and may return to 150 2, 183 | episcopate entered the religious life, he can be reappointed 151 2, 183 | be obliged to enter the religious state. Yet he is ~under 152 2, 183 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether religious who are raised to the episcopate 153 2, 183 | episcopate are bound to religious ~observances?~Aquin.: SMT 154 2, 183 | OBJ 1: It would seem that religious who are raised to the episcopate 155 2, 183 | episcopate are ~not bound to religious observances. For it is said ( 156 2, 183 | of the ~rule. Therefore religious who are appointed bishops 157 2, 183 | bishops are not bound to ~religious observances.~Aquin.: SMT 158 2, 183 | 88], A[12], ad 1) that a religious is not ~bound to keep the 159 2, 183 | made in the world. But a religious who is ~appointed to the 160 2, 183 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, religious would seem to be bound above 161 2, 183 | property of their own. But religious who are ~appointed bishops, 162 2, 183 | stated above (A[1], ad 2) the religious state pertains ~to perfection, 163 2, 183 | of perfection. Hence the ~religious state is compared to the 164 2, 183 | assert that if there be among religious observances ~any that instead 165 2, 183 | poverty, and so forth, a ~religious, even after he has been 166 2, 183 | is not bound to keep such religious observances ~as may be incompatible 167 2, 183 | dwells, in the ~same way as religious superiors dispense themselves 168 2, 183 | 3: It is accidental that religious who are bishops are not ~ 169 2, 183 | subjects; even as those same religious superiors. ~Nevertheless 170 2, 184 | THOSE THINGS IN WHICH THE RELIGIOUS STATE PROPERLY CONSISTS ( 171 2, 184 | things pertaining to the religious state: which ~consideration 172 2, 184 | those things in which the religious state consists chiefly; 173 2, 184 | are lawfully befitting to religious; thirdly, the ~different 174 2, 184 | the ~different kinds of religious orders; fourthly, the entrance 175 2, 184 | the entrance into the ~religious state.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 176 2, 184 | inquiry:~(1) Whether the religious state is perfect?~(2) Whether 177 2, 184 | is perfect?~(2) Whether religious are bound to all the counsels?~( 178 2, 184 | poverty is required for the religious state?~(4) Whether continency 179 2, 184 | with another;~(9) Whether a religious sins mortally whenever he 180 2, 184 | other things being equal, a religious sins more grievously ~by 181 2, 184 | abbot ~Moses speaking of religious says: "We must recognize 182 2, 184 | intention of the end. Therefore ~religious belong to the state of perfection.~ 183 2, 184 | Wherefore those are called religious ~antonomastically, who give 184 2, 184 | and thus by reason of ~the religious life that they lead, those 185 2, 184 | of ~perfection are called religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[186] A[ 186 2, 184 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: The religious state was instituted chiefly 187 2, 184 | sin, it follows that the religious state is a most fitting ~ 188 2, 184 | Para. 1/1~Whether every religious is bound to keep all the 189 2, 184 | It would seem that every religious is bound to keep all the ~ 190 2, 184 | to that state. Now each religious professes the ~state of 191 2, 184 | perfection. Therefore every religious is bound to keep all the ~ 192 2, 184 | it belongs specially ~to religious to renounce the world. Therefore 193 2, 184 | it would ~seem that every religious who is in the state of perfection 194 2, 184 | supererogation. But every religious does not bind himself to 195 2, 184 | charity is the end ~of the religious state. And the religious 196 2, 184 | religious state. And the religious state is a school or exercise ~ 197 2, 184 | Hence he who enters the religious ~state is not bound to have 198 2, 184 | lover of wisdom." Hence a religious does not ~violate his profession 199 2, 184 | ad 1), so too, all, both religious and seculars, are bound, 200 2, 184 | religion themselves; ~wherefore religious are bound to keep all such 201 2, 184 | wherefore there is no need for religious to be bound to fulfil ~all 202 2, 184 | poverty is required for religious perfection?~Aquin.: SMT 203 2, 184 | poverty is not required for religious ~perfection. For that which 204 2, 184 | poverty is not ~requisite for religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 205 2, 184 | requisite for the perfection of religious life.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[186] 206 2, 184 | poverty is not requisite for religious ~perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 207 2, 184 | is more perfect than the religious ~state. But bishops may 208 2, 184 | 185], A[6]). ~Therefore religious may also.~Aquin.: SMT SS 209 2, 184 | poverty does not pertain to religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 210 2, 184 | it belongs properly to ~religious to brace themselves up in 211 2, 184 | stated above (A[2]), the religious state is an ~exercise and 212 2, 184 | whereas it is required of religious who make profession of ~ 213 2, 184 | continence is required for religious perfection?~Aquin.: SMT 214 2, 184 | continence is not required for ~religious perfection. For all perfection 215 2, 184 | continence is not requisite ~for religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 216 2, 184 | continence is not requisite for religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 217 2, 184 | that which is required for religious perfection is to be ~found 218 2, 184 | is to be ~found in every religious order. Now there are some 219 2, 184 | order. Now there are some religious who lead a ~married life. 220 2, 184 | married life. Therefore religious perfection does not require 221 2, 184 | in spirit']." ~Therefore religious perfection requires continence.~ 222 2, 184 | 1/2~I answer that, The religious state requires the removal 223 2, 184 | poverty, is ~requisite for religious perfection. Wherefore just 224 2, 184 | of marriage are not ~the religious life simply and absolutely 225 2, 184 | things that belong ~to the religious state.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 226 2, 184 | Whether obedience belongs to religious perfection?~Aquin.: SMT 227 2, 184 | obedience does not belong to religious ~perfection. For those things 228 2, 184 | things seemingly belong to religious perfection, ~which are works 229 2, 184 | obedience does not belong to religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 230 2, 184 | obedience were requisite for religious perfection, it ~would follow 231 2, 184 | that it is befitting to all religious. But it is not ~becoming 232 2, 184 | becoming to all; since some religious lead a solitary life, and 233 2, 184 | superior whom they obey. Again religious superiors apparently are 234 2, 184 | seem not to pertain to ~religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 235 2, 184 | religion, it ~would follow that religious are bound to obey their 236 2, 184 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Religious perfection consists chiefly 237 2, 184 | seemingly ~obedience belongs to religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 238 2, 184 | stated above (AA[2],3) the religious state is a school ~and exercise 239 2, 184 | disciples under a master. Hence ~religious need to be placed under 240 2, 184 | things pertaining to the religious life; wherefore it is said ~( 241 2, 184 | obedience is requisite for ~religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 242 2, 184 | perfection belongs properly ~to religious. This latter obedience is 243 2, 184 | OBJ 3: The subjection of religious is chiefly in reference 244 2, 184 | Hence neither hermits nor ~religious superiors are exempt from 245 2, 184 | which pertain specially to ~religious discipline.~Aquin.: SMT 246 2, 184 | vow of obedience taken by religious, extends to the ~disposition 247 2, 184 | Whether it is requisite for religious perfection that poverty, ~ 248 2, 184 | it is not requisite for religious perfection ~that the three 249 2, 184 | Therefore it suffices for religious perfection that ~one keep 250 2, 184 | vow is not ~requisite for religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 251 2, 184 | a vow is requisite for ~religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 252 2, 184 | answer that, It belongs to religious to be in the state of perfection, ~ 253 2, 184 | life. Consequently ~the religious state requires that one 254 2, 184 | wherefore a vow is requisite for religious perfection.~Aquin.: SMT 255 2, 184 | Gregory says (Moral. ii) religious perfection requires ~that 256 2, 184 | it is right to say that religious perfection consists in these ~ 257 2, 184 | is not right to say that religious ~perfection consists in 258 2, 184 | the Holy Ghost." Now the religious vow binds a man to things 259 2, 184 | should pertain to the ~religious state, rather than the vows 260 2, 184 | aforesaid come under the religious vow, in so ~far as they 261 2, 184 | are many other things that religious practice, such as abstinence, ~ 262 2, 184 | also honors. ~Therefore, if religious, by the vow of poverty, 263 2, 184 | 1/3~I answer that, The religious state may be considered 264 2, 184 | corresponding manner the religious state is constituted by ~ 265 2, 184 | the soul. Therefore ~the religious state is fittingly constituted 266 2, 184 | the end whereunto the religious vow ~is directed is the 267 2, 184 | do not come under the ~religious vow, but this is directed 268 2, 184 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: All other religious observances are directed 269 2, 184 | the safeguarding of which religious seek a ~livelihood by these 270 2, 184 | of continence. And such religious ~observances as regard human 271 2, 184 | by them: wherefore ~the religious habit is given or blessed 272 2, 184 | excellence. Therefore since ~religious tend to the perfection of 273 2, 184 | is the chief of the three religious vows?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[186] 274 2, 184 | the chief of the ~three religious vows. For the perfection 275 2, 184 | For the perfection of the religious life was ~inaugurated by 276 2, 184 | yet he can dispense a religious from obeying his superior. ~ 277 2, 184 | is sacrificed." Now the religious vows are holocausts, as ~ 278 2, 184 | obedience is the chief ~of all religious vows.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[186] 279 2, 184 | is the chief of the three religious ~vows, and this for three 280 2, 184 | but not ~vice versa: for a religious, though bound by vow to 281 2, 184 | is more essential to the ~religious life. For if a man without 282 2, 184 | therefore belong to the religious state, which is to be preferred 283 2, 184 | The Pope cannot dispense a religious from his vow of ~obedience 284 2, 184 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether a religious sins mortally whenever he 285 2, 184 | 1: It would seem that a religious sins mortally whenever he ~ 286 2, 184 | their first faith." But religious ~are bound to a rule by 287 2, 184 | rule is enjoined upon a religious in the same way as ~a law. 288 2, 184 | Therefore it ~would seem that a religious sins mortally by frequently 289 2, 184 | 1/1~On the contrary, The religious state is safer than the 290 2, 184 | the stormy sea, and the ~religious life to the calm port. But 291 2, 184 | his rule were to involve a religious in mortal sin, the ~religious 292 2, 184 | religious in mortal sin, the ~religious life would be fraught with 293 2, 184 | stated above (A[2]), a ~religious is not bound to be perfect, 294 2, 184 | observances, to some of which a ~religious is bound by the vow of his 295 2, 184 | things. Hence in certain religious ~orders precaution is taken 296 2, 184 | precaution is observed in some religious orders by professing ~obedience 297 2, 184 | Para. 2/2~There is also a religious order, that of the Friars 298 2, 184 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether a religious sins more grievously than 299 2, 184 | 1: It would seem that a religious does not sin more grievously 300 2, 184 | are not sanctified." Now religious apparently ~follow the Lord 301 2, 184 | are found in ~thee." Now religious do more good works than 302 2, 184 | Therefore if the ~sins of religious were more grievous than 303 2, 184 | seculars it would ~follow that religious are worse off than seculars: 304 2, 184 | their wickedness." Therefore religious and others who are in the 305 2, 184 | that, A sin committed by a religious may be in three ways more ~ 306 2, 184 | First, if it be against ~his religious vow; for instance if he 307 2, 184 | Thirdly, the sin of a religious may be greater on account 308 2, 184 | On the other hand, if a religious, not out of contempt, but 309 2, 185 | THINGS THAT ARE COMPETENT TO RELIGIOUS (SIX ARTICLES)~We must now 310 2, 185 | things that are competent to religious; and ~under this head there 311 2, 185 | Whether it is lawful for religious to teach, preach, and the 312 2, 185 | would seem unlawful for religious to teach, preach, and the ~ 313 2, 185 | seemingly it is ~unlawful for religious to teach, preach, and the 314 2, 185 | would seem unlawful for religious to preach, ~teach, and the 315 2, 185 | way it is not unlawful for religious to preach, teach, and do ~ 316 2, 185 | foolish to declare that the religious state is an ~obstacle to 317 2, 185 | unlawful for monks and other ~religious to preach, teach, and so 318 2, 185 | and so forth, because the religious state ~does not give them 319 2, 185 | prevent monks and other religious from ~being sometimes occupied 320 2, 185 | especially members of ~religious orders that are especially 321 2, 185 | Whether it is lawful for religious to occupy themselves with 322 2, 185 | would seem unlawful for religious to occupy themselves with ~ 323 2, 185 | the Fathers, not only to ~religious, but also to all the canonical 324 2, 185 | Now it is the duty of all religious to be soldiers of God. ~ 325 2, 185 | of your own life." Now ~religious devote themselves in a special 326 2, 185 | Therefore it is ~unlawful for religious to occupy themselves with 327 2, 185 | 186], AA[1],7, ad 1), the religious ~state is directed to the 328 2, 185 | Consequently that which religious intend chiefly and for ~ 329 2, 185 | And the same applies to religious as to clerics, because they ~ 330 2, 185 | avarice is not becoming to religious, but there is nothing ~unseemly 331 2, 185 | army?" Likewise it becomes ~religious to go to the palaces of 332 2, 185 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether religious are bound to manual labor?~ 333 2, 185 | OBJ 1: It would seem that religious are bound to manual labor. 334 2, 185 | bound to manual labor. For ~religious are not exempt from the 335 2, 185 | these insolent men," namely religious ~that do no work, of whom 336 2, 185 | Therefore it would seem that religious are bound to manual ~labor.~ 337 2, 185 | with their bodies." Now religious ~especially are called servants 338 2, 185 | Therefore it would seem that ~religious should not desist from manual 339 2, 185 | Now it belongs properly to religious ~to renounce all they have. 340 2, 185 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 5: Further, religious especially would seem to 341 2, 185 | Therefore it would seem that ~religious are bound to manual labor.~ 342 2, 185 | are ~equally binding on religious and seculars. But the precept 343 2, 185 | let him eat." ~Therefore religious are not bound to manual 344 2, 185 | Consequently for these reasons religious are not bound to manual 345 2, 185 | poor: for in such a case religious would be bound as well as 346 2, 185 | law, is binding on both religious ~and seculars alike. Yet 347 2, 185 | words do not imply that ~religious are bound to work with their 348 2, 185 | this does not apply ~to religious any more than to seculars, 349 2, 185 | brothers, since at that time ~religious orders were not as yet founded. 350 2, 185 | founded. Secondly, because religious ~have no other obligations 351 2, 185 | nothing about ~manual labor, religious are not otherwise bound 352 2, 185 | oper. ~Monach. xviii). Yet religious are not for this reason 353 2, 185 | Whether it is lawful for religious to live on alms?~Aquin.: 354 2, 185 | would seem unlawful for religious to live on alms. For the ~ 355 2, 185 | judgment to themselves." Now religious if they be ~able-bodied 356 2, 185 | Now it ~belongs not to religious to preach the Gospel, but 357 2, 185 | and teachers. Therefore religious cannot lawfully live on ~ 358 2, 185 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, religious are in the state of perfection. 359 2, 185 | Further, it belongs to religious to avoid obstacles to virtue 360 2, 185 | Therefore it would seem that religious should not live on alms.~ 361 2, 185 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 5: Further, religious especially are bound to 362 2, 185 | would ~seem therefore that religious ought for the same reasons 363 2, 185 | of his hands. Therefore religious may lawfully live ~on alms.~ 364 2, 185 | whom it is given. Wherefore religious and clerics whose monasteries 365 2, 185 | Wherefore in like manner if religious receive movable ~goods from 366 2, 185 | seem to be bestowed on religious in order that they may have 367 2, 185 | may have more leisure ~for religious works, in which the donors 368 2, 185 | if they ~abstained from religious works, because in that case, 369 2, 185 | asserts. Consequently if ~religious be in need they can lawfully 370 2, 185 | things?" And in this sense religious may live on alms as ~being 371 2, 185 | others, it is unlawful for religious to wish to ~live in idleness 372 2, 185 | virtue of their office, ~but religious may be competent to do so 373 2, 185 | But this does not apply to religious, as stated above.~Aquin.: 374 2, 185 | is evident necessity for religious living on ~alms without 375 2, 185 | Whether it is lawful for religious to beg?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 376 2, 185 | would seem unlawful for religious to beg. For Augustine says ~( 377 2, 185 | that the life of mendicant ~religious is to be condemned.~Aquin.: 378 2, 185 | justice, ~is unbecoming to religious. Now begging is forbidden 379 2, 185 | Therefore it ~is unfitting for religious to beg.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 380 2, 185 | consequently this is unbecoming to religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[187] A[ 381 2, 185 | would seem ~unbecoming for religious to beg.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 382 2, 185 | the contrary, It becomes religious to live in imitation of 383 2, 185 | Therefore it becomes ~religious to beg.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 384 2, 185 | mendicancy is lawful to religious no less than to seculars.~ 385 2, 185 | Whether it is lawful for religious to wear coarser clothes 386 2, 185 | would seem unlawful for religious to wear coarser clothes 387 2, 185 | Therefore it would ~seem that religious should not wear coarse clothes.~ 388 2, 185 | pleasure, it would seem that religious who should aim at what is 389 2, 185 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, religious should aim especially at 390 2, 185 | service." Therefore seemingly religious ought not to wear coarse 391 2, 185 | those who wear coarse and religious ~apparel they must be reproved. 392 2, 185 | ways it is becoming for religious to wear coarse attire, since ~ 393 2, 185 | dress or by affectation." Religious, however, would especially ~ 394 2, 186 | OF THE DIFFERENT KINDS OF RELIGIOUS LIFE (EIGHT ARTICLES)~We 395 2, 186 | consider the different kinds of religious life, and under ~this head 396 2, 186 | there are different kinds of religious life or only one?~(2) Whether 397 2, 186 | only one?~(2) Whether a religious order can be established 398 2, 186 | active life?~(3) Whether a religious order can be directed to 399 2, 186 | soldiering?~(4) Whether a religious order can be established 400 2, 186 | like works?~(5) Whether a religious order can be established 401 2, 186 | science?~(6) Whether a religious order that is directed to 402 2, 186 | active life?~(7) Whether religious perfection is diminished 403 2, 186 | common?~(8) Whether the religious life of solitaries is to 404 2, 186 | to be preferred to the ~religious life of those who live in 405 2, 186 | Whether there is only one religious order?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 406 2, 186 | seem that there is but one religious order. For there ~can be 407 2, 186 | without which there is no religious life. Therefore it would ~ 408 2, 186 | that there are not many religious orders but only one.~Aquin.: 409 2, 186 | accidentally. Now there is no religious order without the three 410 2, 186 | Therefore it would ~seem that religious orders differ not specifically, 411 2, 186 | perfection is competent both to religious ~and to bishops, as stated 412 2, 186 | manner there is but one religious ~order.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 413 2, 186 | seem that a diversity of religious orders ~might confuse the 414 2, 186 | ought not to be different religious orders.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 415 2, 186 | 7; Q[187], A[2]), the ~religious state is a training school 416 2, 186 | of exercise. ~Wherefore religious orders may be differentiated 417 2, 186 | Secondly, there may be various religious orders ~according to the 418 2, 186 | of practices; thus in one religious order the ~body is chastised 419 2, 186 | Arist., Topic. ~vi 8] religious orders differ more especially 420 2, 186 | service is ~common to every religious order; hence religious do 421 2, 186 | every religious order; hence religious do not differ in this ~respect, 422 2, 186 | respect, as though in one religious order a person retained 423 2, 186 | compatible with ~diversity of religious life, both on account of 424 2, 186 | position of agent, and the religious as passive, as stated above ( 425 2, 186 | episcopal state is one, while religious orders are many.~Aquin.: 426 2, 186 | Accordingly ~the multitude of religious orders would lead to confusion, 427 2, 186 | confusion, if different ~religious orders were directed to 428 2, 186 | forbidden to establish a new religious order without the ~authority 429 2, 186 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether a religious order should be established 430 2, 186 | 1: It would seem that no religious order should be established 431 2, 186 | the active life. For every religious order belongs to the ~state 432 2, 186 | Now ~the perfection of the religious state consists in the contemplation 433 2, 186 | Therefore seemingly ~no religious order should be established 434 2, 186 | seem to apply to all other religious. Now the monastic rule was ~ 435 2, 186 | it would seem that every ~religious order is directed to the 436 2, 186 | present world. Now ~all religious are said to renounce the 437 2, 186 | Therefore it would seem that no religious order can be ~directed to 438 2, 186 | active life. ~Therefore religious life can be fittingly directed 439 2, 186 | stated above (A[1]), the religious state is directed ~to the 440 2, 186 | it follows that certain ~religious orders are fittingly directed 441 2, 186 | distinguishing the various aims of religious orders says: ~"Some direct 442 2, 186 | service of God; and since religious occupy themselves ~with 443 2, 186 | monks and to all other ~religious, as regards things common 444 2, 186 | regards things common to all religious orders: for instance ~as 445 2, 186 | to Thee." Although, then, religious who are ~occupied with the 446 2, 186 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether a religious order can be directed to 447 2, 186 | 1: It would seem that no religious order can be directed to ~ 448 2, 186 | to ~soldiering. For all religious orders belong to the state 449 2, 186 | a soldier. Therefore no religious order can be established 450 2, 186 | between counsel at law. Yet ~religious are forbidden to plead at 451 2, 186 | much less seemly ~for a religious order to be established 452 2, 186 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, the religious state is a state of penance, 453 2, 186 | it is ~unfitting for any religious order to be established 454 2, 186 | 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, no religious order may be established 455 2, 186 | the emperor." Since then religious are private ~individuals, 456 2, 186 | war; and ~consequently no religious order may be established 457 2, 186 | gave great testimony." Now ~religious orders are established in 458 2, 186 | hinders the establishing of a religious order for the ~purpose of 459 2, 186 | As stated above (A[2]), a religious order may be ~established 460 2, 186 | Body Para. 2/2~Hence a religious order may be fittingly established 461 2, 186 | is inconsistent with any religious order to act as ~counsel 462 2, 186 | object is contrary to all religious life, but this does not ~ 463 2, 186 | The establishment of a religious order for the purpose of ~ 464 2, 186 | does not imply that the religious can wage war on their own ~ 465 2, 186 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether a religious order can be established 466 2, 186 | 1: It would seem that no religious order may be established 467 2, 186 | same apparently applies to religious. Now preaching and ~hearing 468 2, 186 | and teacher. Therefore a ~religious order should not be established 469 2, 186 | the purpose for which a religious order is established ~would 470 2, 186 | something most proper to the religious life, as stated ~above ( 471 2, 186 | actions are not proper to religious but ~to bishops. Therefore 472 2, 186 | to bishops. Therefore a religious order should not be established 473 2, 186 | who are received into a religious order. ~Therefore it is 474 2, 186 | Therefore it is unfitting for a religious order to be established 475 2, 186 | preaching be committed to a religious order established for that 476 2, 186 | burden on them. Therefore a ~religious order should not be established 477 2, 186 | and parish priests, no ~religious order should be established 478 2, 186 | of the various kinds of religious orders, says: "Some ~choosing 479 2, 186 | piety." Therefore just as a religious order may be ~established 480 2, 186 | 2]), it is fitting for a religious ~order to be established 481 2, 186 | it is most fitting for a religious order to be ~established 482 2, 186 | which is competent to ~religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[188] A[ 483 2, 186 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Some religious orders are established for 484 2, 186 | In the same way certain religious orders ~are established 485 2, 186 | ministry is proper to a ~religious order of this kind.~Aquin.: 486 2, 186 | Bishops do not allow these religious severally and ~indiscriminately 487 2, 186 | to the ~discretion of the religious superiors, or according 488 2, 186 | necessary to establish religious orders for military service, 489 2, 186 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether a religious order should be established 490 2, 186 | 1: It would seem that a religious order should not be established ~ 491 2, 186 | pertains especially to ~religious. Therefore it is not for 492 2, 186 | dissent is unbecoming to ~religious, who are gathered together 493 2, 186 | Therefore it would seem that no ~religious order should be established 494 2, 186 | letters does not ~become religious.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[188] A[ 495 2, 186 | letters ~is becoming to the religious life in three ways. First, 496 2, 186 | letters is necessary in those religious orders ~that are founded 497 2, 186 | of letters is becoming to religious as regards that ~which is 498 2, 186 | which is common to all religious orders. For it helps us 499 2, 186 | is clearly fitting that a religious ~order be established for 500 2, 186 | learning: whereas it becomes religious to devote ~themselves chiefly


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