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Alphabetical    [«  »]
vicar 3
vicariously 1
vicars 1
vice 634
vicegerents 1
viceregent 2
viceregents 1
Frequency    [«  »]
641 remains
639 blood
636 worship
634 vice
632 chiefly
631 disposition
630 hath
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

vice

1-500 | 501-634

    Part, Question
1 1, 11 | good is absolutely bad, or vice versa; likewise what ~is 2 1, 11 | is relatively "many," and vice versa.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 3 1, 13 | idea includes another, and vice versa, then they are simultaneous 4 1, 13 | includes another, and not vice versa, they are not simultaneous ~ 5 1, 13 | the idea of a servant and vice ~versa, these two relative 6 1, 37 | of that impression, or "vice ~versa." And therefore, 7 1, 37 | proceeds by way of love, and "vice versa," so that by "love" 8 1, 46 | to being inhabitable and "vice versa," and likewise they 9 1, 66 | to a ~perfect form, and "vice versa." Matter, therefore, 10 1, 75 | ignorance to knowledge and from vice to ~virtue. Therefore matter 11 1, 37 | of that impression, or "vice ~versa." And therefore, 12 1, 37 | proceeds by way of love, and "vice versa," so that by "love" 13 1, 47 | to being inhabitable and "vice versa," and likewise they 14 1, 67 | to a ~perfect form, and "vice versa." Matter, therefore, 15 1, 74 | ignorance to knowledge and from vice to ~virtue. Therefore matter 16 1, 80 | ought to have the hatred of vice in the irascible power." 17 1, 81 | anger ~is directed against vice. Wherefore Jerome commenting 18 1, 81 | us "to have the hatred of vice in the irascible part." 19 1, 95 | exists between virtue and vice; the result of which is 20 1, 113 | makes man more prone ~to one vice than to another: hence the 21 1, 113 | he may tempt him to that vice to ~which he is most prone.~ 22 2, 1 | virtue, in another, an act of vice. For a ~movement does not 23 2, 5 | changed ~so as to fall to vice from the virtue, in whose 24 2, 5 | happiness to misery, and vice versa; ~because such like 25 2, 17 | praise and blame, virtue and vice: as ~in the case of gluttony 26 2, 17 | Reply OBJ 3: Virtue and vice, praise and blame do not 27 2, 18 | in the ~matter of each vice, acts when he should not, 28 2, 18 | ordained to an evil end, or vice versa. However, an ~action 29 2, 18 | while moral evil belongs ~to vice. But it happens sometimes 30 2, 18 | or to the evil of some vice. ~Thus, if a man's action 31 2, 19 | that which is moved, but ~vice versa. But the will moves 32 2, 19 | under a universal aspect, or vice ~versa, as stated above. 33 2, 19 | a universal aspect, and vice versa. And ~hence too it 34 2, 20 | external action evil, or ~vice versa.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 35 2, 20 | the external action, or vice versa, as stated above ~( 36 2, 20 | goodness of the will, and vice versa; viz. ~according to 37 2, 20 | in the moral order; and vice versa, as we have stated ~ 38 2, 23 | in ~the reason; hatred of vice in the irascible faculty; 39 2, 23 | Jerome ascribes hatred of vice to the irascible faculty, ~ 40 2, 23 | contrary withdrawal, and vice versa. Therefore every ~ 41 2, 25 | concupiscible passions, or ~vice versa?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 42 2, 26 | charity is love, ~but not vice versa. Because dilection 43 2, 28 | lover be in the beloved and vice versa. For that which is 44 2, 28 | lover be in ~the beloved and vice versa.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 45 2, 28 | being in the beloved and vice ~versa, it follows that 46 2, 28 | to be in the ~lover, and vice versa.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 47 2, 28 | contained in its species, and vice versa.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 48 2, 31 | desire and delight, but not vice versa. Consequently whatever 49 2, 31 | things seem bitter, and vice versa - or from an evil 50 2, 31 | virtues and vices: because one vice may be ~contrary to another 51 2, 31 | be ~contrary to another vice, whereas no virtue can be 52 2, 35 | matter of pleasure, ~or vice versa, not essentially but 53 2, 35 | generic form, as virtue and ~vice; or in respect of a specific 54 2, 35 | contrary genera of virtue and vice, are not contrary to one 55 2, 40 | caused by hope, and not vice versa. Because by the very 56 2, 45 | qu. 31) that "daring is a vice." Now vice is contrary to ~ 57 2, 45 | daring is a vice." Now vice is contrary to ~virtue. 58 2, 51 | that habits of ~virtue and vice are caused by acts.~Aquin.: 59 2, 53 | habit either of virtue or of vice, may be corrupted by a ~ 60 2, 53 | motion is contrary to such vice or ~virtue, whether through 61 2, 54 | differ in species, but not vice versa. Wherefore the ~acts 62 2, 54 | bad habit, as virtue to ~vice. Now contraries are divided 63 2, 54 | reason, whereas acts of vice are discordant from human 64 2, 56 | diversity of habits; but not vice versa. In ~another way one 65 2, 59 | OBJ 2: Further, virtue and vice, being contrary to one another, 66 2, 59 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: If by vice we understand a habit of 67 2, 59 | evident that no passion is a vice. But if vice is taken to 68 2, 59 | passion is a vice. But if vice is taken to mean sin which ~ 69 2, 59 | hinders a passion from being a vice, or, on the ~other hand, 70 2, 59 | so ~man's only evil is vice, which cannot be in a virtuous 71 2, 64 | ought to be done, it is a vice by deficiency: for ~instance, 72 2, 66 | not command wisdom, but vice versa: because "the ~spiritual 73 2, 68 | to none of the gifts, or vice versa. For, seeing that 74 2, 69 | strain every nerve to avoid vice." In like manner, although, 75 2, 70 | be called fruits, but not vice ~versa. For the fruits are 76 2, 70 | to reason, while works of vice are contrary to ~nature, 77 2, 70 | fruits, but not ~so works of vice.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[70] A[ 78 2, 71 | AND SINS (QQ[71]-89)~OF VICE AND SIN CONSIDERED IN THEMSELVES ( 79 2, 71 | the next place to consider vice and sin: about which six ~ 80 2, 71 | have to be considered: (1) Vice and sin considered in themselves; ~( 81 2, 71 | of inquiry:~(1) Whether vice is contrary to virtue?~( 82 2, 71 | contrary to virtue?~(2) Whether vice is contrary to nature?~( 83 2, 71 | nature?~(3) Which is worse, a vice or a vicious act?~(4) Whether 84 2, 71 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether vice is contrary to virtue?~Aquin.: 85 2, 71 | OBJ 1: It would seem that vice is not contrary to virtue. 86 2, 71 | contrary to virtue. Therefore vice is not contrary to it: since 87 2, 71 | not contrary to it: since vice ~applies also to undue disposition 88 2, 71 | perfection of power. But vice ~does not denote anything 89 2, 71 | relative to power. Therefore vice is not ~contrary to virtue.~ 90 2, 71 | or disease, rather than vice, is opposed to ~health. 91 2, 71 | opposed to ~health. Therefore vice is not contrary to virtue.~ 92 2, 71 | Perfect. Justit. ii) that "vice is a ~quality in respect 93 2, 71 | 55], AA[3],4). ~Therefore vice is contrary to virtue.~Aquin.: 94 2, 71 | directly, its contrary is "vice": ~because the vice of a 95 2, 71 | is "vice": ~because the vice of a thing seems to consist 96 2, 71 | perfection may be called a ~vice."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[71] A[ 97 2, 71 | kind of ~goodness; while vice is opposed to virtue properly 98 2, 71 | is ~in this respect that vice is contrary to virtue.~Aquin.: 99 2, 71 | attended with weakness"; and ~vice "when the parts of the body 100 2, 71 | according to Mt. 12:33. But "vice ~of the soul," as Cicero 101 2, 71 | or passion. Consequently vice is of wider ~extent than 102 2, 71 | text. 17). Consequently vice is reckoned as contrary 103 2, 71 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether vice is contrary to nature?~Aquin.: 104 2, 71 | OBJ 1: It would seem that vice is not contrary to nature. 105 2, 71 | contrary to nature. Because vice ~is contrary to virtue, 106 2, 71 | AA[1]~,2,3). Therefore vice is not contrary to nature.~ 107 2, 71 | men become habituated to vice. ~Therefore vice is not 108 2, 71 | habituated to vice. ~Therefore vice is not contrary to nature.~ 109 2, 71 | possessed of that nature. Now vice is found ~in the greater 110 2, 71 | in thereat." ~Therefore vice is not contrary to nature.~ 111 2, 71 | Further, sin is compared to vice, as act to habit, as stated ~ 112 2, 71 | Therefore we should say that vice is contrary to ~the Law, 113 2, 71 | Lib. Arb. iii, 13): "Every vice, ~simply because it is a 114 2, 71 | simply because it is a vice, is contrary to nature."~ 115 2, 71 | As stated above (A[1]), vice is contrary to virtue. Now ~ 116 2, 71 | above (A[1]). Hence the vice of any thing ~consists in 117 2, 71 | which word is derived from ~"vice" according to Augustine ( 118 2, 71 | with his ~reason: while vice is contrary to man's nature, 119 2, 71 | on the other hand that vice is contrary to nature.~Aquin.: 120 2, 71 | amounts to ~the same that vice and sin are against the 121 2, 71 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether vice is worse than a vicious 122 2, 71 | OBJ 1: It would seem that vice, i.e. a bad habit, is worse 123 2, 71 | Further, sin is worse than vice, i.e. evil act than evil 124 2, 71 | act than evil habit. ~But vice cannot be in the same subject 125 2, 71 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Vice is directly contrary to 126 2, 71 | to ~virtuous act: and so vice excludes virtue, just as 127 2, 71 | so is sin compared with vice. Now there can be ~no merit 128 2, 72 | 7; iv, 1) that "every ~vice sins by doing more than 129 2, 73 | Lib. Arb. iii, 14): "Since vice is ~contrary to nature, 130 2, 73 | is ~contrary to nature, a vice is the more grievous according 131 2, 74 | consider the subject of vice or sin: under which head 132 2, 74 | be the subject of virtue, vice, and sin, in so far as ~ 133 2, 77 | negative proposition, or vice ~versa: but it may well 134 2, 77 | covetousness, as a special vice, which goes by the name 135 2, 78 | without having the habit of a vice, may choose ~evil, which 136 2, 81 | redound into the body, and vice versa, in like ~manner, 137 2, 83 | subject of a virtue and of the vice or ~sin contrary to that 138 2, 84 | should be ~called a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[84] A[ 139 2, 84 | heads. Accordingly a capital vice is so called, ~in the first 140 2, 84 | In this ~way a capital vice is one from which other 141 2, 84 | Wherefore a capital vice is not only the principle 142 2, 84 | that most frequently one vice arises from another, so 143 2, 84 | Reply OBJ 1: Virtue and vice do not originate in the 144 2, 84 | good, which is God, whereas vice arises from the appetite ~ 145 2, 84 | pride, like a universal vice, is not counted along with 146 2, 86 | into a sin of the opposite vice. Therefore the ~stain does 147 2, 88 | boy becomes a man and not vice ~versa. Hence the argument 148 2, 91 | a measure of things, but vice ~versa, as stated in Metaph. 149 2, 92 | generically, viz. acts of vice, ~and in respect of these 150 2, 95 | be depraved, and prone to vice, ~and not easily amenable 151 2, 96 | forbear from all kinds ~of vice. Therefore it belongs to 152 2, 96 | forbids certain acts of each vice, just as it prescribes ~ 153 2, 100 | ceremonial ~precepts, but rather vice versa. But among the precepts 154 2, 100 | included in a negative, or vice versa, we do not find that 155 2, 100 | affirmative ~precepts, and acts of vice are forbidden by the negative 156 2, 100 | knowledge, virtue precedes vice, ~because "the crooked line 157 2, 100 | withdraw him from acts of vice. But ~in every matter there 158 2, 102 | with man's apparel, or ~vice versa, for two reasons. 159 2, 102 | male attire by a woman, or ~vice versa, has an incentive 160 2, 102 | detestation of the unnatural vice.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[102] A[ 161 2, 113 | Hence by sinning with the vice of wastefulness he is freed 162 2, 113 | passes ~from the sin of one vice to the sin of a contrary 163 2, 113 | to the sin of a contrary vice, he ceases to have ~the 164 2, 8 | hidden in their causes, and vice versa. Hence we may speak 165 2, 10 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Vice is opposed to virtue. Now 166 2, 10 | contrary, Several species of vice are opposed to each virtue, ~ 167 2, 10 | Therefore several species of vice are opposed to it.~Aquin.: 168 2, 10 | thus to a moral virtue one vice is opposed by ~exceeding 169 2, 10 | are various ~species of vice opposed to charity, which 170 2, 11 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, vice takes its species chiefly 171 2, 11 | glory, which belong to the vice ~of pride or covetousness: 172 2, 16 | Yet ~this is reckoned a vice in some, as appears from 173 2, 19 | arises from despair, ~and not vice versa.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 174 2, 20 | it opposed?~(4) From what vice does it arise?~Aquin.: SMT 175 2, 20 | not only has a contrary vice manifestly distinct from 176 2, 20 | but also a sort of kindred vice, alike, not in truth ~but 177 2, 20 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, the vice of presumption consists 178 2, 21 | the act of the opposite vice. Now no precept is to be ~ 179 2, 23 | may be less effort, and vice versa. Thus the ~comparison 180 2, 25 | and so is their child than vice versa. ~Thirdly, because 181 2, 25 | reason is that virtue and vice may make such a difference 182 2, 25 | benefactions, rather than vice versa."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 183 2, 27 | that joy is a virtue. For vice is contrary to ~virtue. 184 2, 27 | sorrow is set down as a vice, as in the case of sloth 185 2, 27 | 1: The sorrow which is a vice is caused by inordinate ~ 186 2, 27 | and this is not a special vice, but a general source of 187 2, 27 | special, but from a general vice. On the other hand love 188 2, 31 | He that is ~subject to vice should not correct the vices 189 2, 32 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, vice is a moral evil. Now hatred 190 2, 32 | 84], AA[3],4), a capital vice is ~one from which other 191 2, 32 | arise most frequently. Now vice is contrary to ~man's nature, 192 2, 32 | of virtue ~resulting from vice: and therefore it is not 193 2, 32 | therefore it is not a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[34] A[ 194 2, 33 | Whether it is a special vice?~(3) Whether it is a mortal 195 2, 33 | Whether sloth is a special vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[35] A[ 196 2, 33 | that sloth is not a special vice. For that which is ~common 197 2, 33 | constitute a special kind of vice. But every ~vice makes a 198 2, 33 | kind of vice. But every ~vice makes a man sorrowful about 199 2, 33 | not be reckoned a special vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[35] A[ 200 2, 33 | which ~virtue seeks, and vice shuns, it does not constitute 201 2, 33 | constitute a special virtue or ~vice, unless it be determined 202 2, 33 | sloth, if this be a special vice; ~because the reason why 203 2, 33 | Therefore sloth is not a special vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[35] A[ 204 2, 33 | Therefore it is a special vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[35] A[ 205 2, 33 | sloth will not be a special vice, ~because, as stated above ( 206 2, 33 | FS, Q[71], A[1]), every vice shuns the ~spiritual good 207 2, 33 | that sloth ~is a special vice, in so far as it shuns spiritual 208 2, 33 | belongs, not to any special vice, but to every vice, but 209 2, 33 | special vice, but to every vice, but sorrow ~in the Divine 210 2, 33 | rejoices, belongs to a special ~vice, which is called sloth. 211 2, 33 | should be accounted a capital vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[35] A[ 212 2, 33 | be accounted a capital ~vice. For a capital vice is one 213 2, 33 | capital ~vice. For a capital vice is one that moves a man 214 2, 33 | is to be found in every ~vice; "sluggishness" about the 215 2, 33 | Isidore distinguishes the vice of sloth from the vice of ~ 216 2, 33 | the vice of sloth from the vice of ~sorrow, saying (De Summo 217 2, 33 | 84], AA[3],4), a capital vice is ~one which easily gives 218 2, 33 | sorrow is not a distinct vice, in so far as a man shirks 219 2, 34 | Whether envy is a capital vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[36] A[ 220 2, 34 | that envy is not a capital vice. For the capital ~vices 221 2, 34 | Therefore envy is not a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[36] A[ 222 2, 34 | that sloth is a capital vice for the reason that it incites ~ 223 2, 34 | envy is accounted a capital vice for ~the same reason.~Aquin.: 224 2, 34 | the notion of a capital vice does not exclude its ~originating 225 2, 34 | originating from another vice, but it demands that it 226 2, 35 | vainglory. For ~anger is a vice distinct from vainglory. 227 2, 35 | would seem to be a ~capital vice. Now such is discord, because 228 2, 35 | itself be reckoned a ~capital vice, rather than a daughter 229 2, 35 | though it were a ~capital vice.~ 230 2, 40 | sins, is ~either a capital vice, or arises from some capital 231 2, 40 | arises from some capital vice. Now sedition is ~reckoned 232 2, 40 | 45, where both kinds of ~vice are enumerated. Therefore 233 2, 42 | included in the means, and vice versa: and yet it behooved 234 2, 43 | secondly, the opposite vice. Under the first ~head there 235 2, 51 | imprudence too is one ~special vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[53] A[ 236 2, 51 | Para. 1/2~I answer that, A vice or sin may be styled general 237 2, 51 | species. In the first way, a vice may be said to be general 238 2, 51 | nature, denotes a moral vice; and ~for this reason it 239 2, 51 | precipitation is not a vice contained under imprudence.~ 240 2, 51 | it is evident that the vice of ~precipitation is contained 241 2, 51 | judgment belongs to the ~vice of thoughtlessness, in so 242 2, 51 | Whether inconstancy is a vice contained under prudence?~ 243 2, 51 | that inconstancy is not a vice contained under ~imprudence. 244 2, 51 | But envy ~is a distinct vice from lust.~Aquin.: SMT SS 245 2, 52 | negligence is not a special ~vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[54] A[ 246 2, 53 | carried out by another ~vice, just as the execution of 247 2, 54 | prohibiting the act of a contrary vice. But acts of ~prudence are 248 2, 56 | will ~to hurt the man; or vice versa, a man may covet another' 249 2, 57 | Whether injustice is a special vice?~(2) Whether it is proper 250 2, 57 | injustice is not a special vice. For it is ~written (1 Jn. 251 2, 57 | Therefore injustice is a special vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[59] A[ 252 2, 57 | is essentially a special ~vice, in so far as it regards 253 2, 57 | and yet it is a general vice, as regards the ~intention, 254 2, 57 | matter and is a particular vice opposed to particular justice.~ 255 2, 58 | denotes a certain amount of vice, and the further it goes, 256 2, 67 | xxii, 15): "It is a common vice of mankind to ~sin in secret, 257 2, 70 | convicium], ~because "vice" is commonly spoken of in 258 2, 70 | reproach']." But anger is a vice distinct from pride. Therefore ~ 259 2, 70 | reproaches']." Now folly is a vice opposed to wisdom, ~as stated 260 2, 71 | race is in peril from this vice." But ~no mortal sin is 261 2, 71 | reviling: since a lesser vice ~can give rise to a greater 262 2, 75 | belongs to the other, and vice ~versa, as the Philosopher 263 2, 75 | not from nature but from vice, wherefore it is common 264 2, 76 | use of it for a time, or vice versa, he may grant the 265 2, 90 | Whether superstition is a vice opposed to religion?~(2) 266 2, 90 | Whether superstition is a vice contrary to religion?~Aquin.: 267 2, 90 | that superstition is not a vice contrary to ~religion. One 268 2, 90 | Therefore superstition is not a vice contrary to religion.~Aquin.: 269 2, 90 | Therefore superstition is not a vice opposed to ~religion.~Aquin.: 270 2, 90 | Therefore superstition is not a vice contrary to religion.~Aquin.: 271 2, 90 | 1]). Therefore a twofold vice is opposed to a moral virtue. 272 2, 90 | magnanimity and magnificence; vice exceeds the ~mean of virtue, 273 2, 90 | Accordingly superstition is a vice contrary to religion by 274 2, 92 | not at all." Therefore the vice of heretical depravity is 275 2, 93 | does not seem to imply any vice other than vanity, as in ~ 276 2, 98 | principal part in virtue and vice. ~Nor does everyone sin 277 2, 98 | Pope can be guilty of the vice of simony, like any ~other 278 2, 98 | escape being guilty of the vice of simony. ~In like manner 279 2, 99 | longer of virtue but of vice. Hence it belongs ~to piety 280 2, 101 | OBSERVANCE AND ORDINARY VICE (QQ[103]-109)~OF DULIA ( 281 2, 105 | 1/2~I answer that, Every vice is denominated from a deficiency 282 2, 105 | than prodigality is. Now a vice may be opposed to ~the virtue 283 2, 105 | opposed to ~gratitude is the vice denoting deficiency of gratitude, 284 2, 106 | Further, there is a special vice opposed to every special 285 2, 106 | But seemingly no special vice is opposed to vengeance. 286 2, 106 | punishing: while the other is a vice by way of deficiency and 287 2, 107 | The habits of virtue and vice take their species from 288 2, 108 | boasting and the opposite vice. ~Concerning lying there 289 2, 109 | Q[55], AA[3],4,5), the vice directly ~opposed to prudence 290 2, 113 | renders it susceptive ~of vice." Much more, therefore, 291 2, 114 | their causes, since one vice may arise from many causes, 292 2, 114 | grievous sin than the contrary ~vice, viz. adulation or flattery. 293 2, 114 | sin, and thus the more a vice ~is at variance with the 294 2, 116 | Whether it is a capital vice?~(8) Of its daughters.~Aquin.: 295 2, 116 | so far as it is a special vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 296 2, 116 | justice has no opposite vice: ~since it consists in having 297 2, 116 | opposed to liberality has the vice ~of prodigality opposed 298 2, 116 | term "wherefrom." Hence a vice of the flesh is so called 299 2, 116 | covetousness is a capital vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 300 2, 116 | covetousness is not a capital vice. For ~covetousness is opposed 301 2, 116 | nor prodigality a ~capital vice. Therefore covetousness 302 2, 116 | not be reckoned a ~capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 303 2, 116 | covetousness is not a capital ~vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 304 2, 116 | instead of being a capital ~vice in respect of other vices.~ 305 2, 116 | Second Objection, a capital vice is one ~which under the 306 2, 116 | for money, is a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 307 2, 116 | accordance with reason, but vice is ~perfected in accordance 308 2, 116 | not follow that principal vice is opposed ~to principal 309 2, 116 | covetousness is a principal vice, because it regards money, 310 2, 116 | Nothing prevents a capital vice from arising sometimes out ~ 311 2, 116 | belong to that same kind of vice: because a sin of one kind 312 2, 117 | prudence: wherefore if a vice be opposed to prudence alone, ~ 313 2, 118 | Therefore "epikeia" is a ~vice rather than a virtue.~Aquin.: 314 2, 120 | and this ~pertains to the vice of irreligion, as stated 315 2, 121 | an inexorable war on all vice, undeterred ~by toil, brave 316 2, 123 | St. Thomas calls this vice indifferently ~'fear' or ' 317 2, 123 | particular kind of virtue or ~vice: but ordinate love is included 318 2, 124 | We must now consider the vice of fearlessness: under which 319 2, 124 | evident that fearlessness is a vice, whether it ~result from 320 2, 124 | Further, fearlessness is a vice, either through lack of 321 2, 124 | or wisdom. Therefore the vice of fearlessness is not opposed 322 2, 124 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The vice of daring is opposed to 323 2, 125 | meet armed men']." But no ~vice redounds to a man's praise. 324 2, 125 | act rashly, ~which is a vice contrary to prudence, as 325 2, 125 | of fear, there is another vice opposed to timidity ~in 326 2, 125 | there will likewise be a vice opposed to ~it in the point 327 2, 125 | daring. But there is no such vice. Therefore ~neither should 328 2, 125 | should daring be accounted a vice in opposition to fortitude.~ 329 2, 125 | concerned. Wherefore every vice that denotes lack of moderation 330 2, 125 | in so far as it denotes a vice, implies excess of ~passion, 331 2, 125 | OBJ 1: Opposition between vice and virtue does not depend 332 2, 125 | chiefly ~on the cause of the vice but on the vice's very species. 333 2, 125 | cause of the vice but on the vice's very species. Wherefore 334 2, 125 | the direct opposition of a vice does not depend on ~its 335 2, 125 | from that source. Hence the vice which exceeds in ~daring 336 2, 130 | Whether it is a capital vice?~(5) Of its daughters.~Aquin.: 337 2, 130 | Dei v, 14) ~that "this vice," namely the love of human 338 2, 130 | Whether vainglory is a capital vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[132] A[ 339 2, 130 | vainglory is not a capital vice. For a vice that ~always 340 2, 130 | not a capital vice. For a vice that ~always arises from 341 2, 130 | always arises from another vice is seemingly not capital. 342 2, 130 | vainglory is not a capital vice. ~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[132] 343 2, 130 | honor is not a ~capital vice. Neither therefore is the 344 2, 130 | OBJ 3: Further, a capital vice has a certain prominence. 345 2, 130 | vainglory is not a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[132] A[ 346 2, 130 | reckons to be a capital vice: and not without ~reason. 347 2, 130 | wherefore the end of every vice is directed to the end of 348 2, 130 | of pride, so that ~this vice seems to exercise a kind 349 2, 130 | among the special sources of vice, known as the ~capital vices. 350 2, 130 | vainglory is a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[132] A[ 351 2, 130 | impossible for a capital vice to arise from ~pride, since 352 2, 130 | to be ~reckoned a capital vice. Nor is it always necessary 353 2, 130 | necessary for a capital vice to ~be a mortal sin; for 354 2, 130 | But anger is a capital vice condivided with vainglory. 355 2, 130 | end of a certain capital vice, are called its daughters. 356 2, 131 | 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, the vice that is in opposition to 357 2, 131 | ad 3), opposition between vice and virtue depends rather ~ 358 2, 133 | 1) Whether meanness is a vice?~(2) Of the vice opposed 359 2, 133 | meanness is a vice?~(2) Of the vice opposed to it.~Aquin.: SMT 360 2, 133 | 1~Whether meanness is a vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[135] A[ 361 2, 133 | seems that meanness is not a vice. For just as vice moderates ~ 362 2, 133 | not a vice. For just as vice moderates ~great things, 363 2, 133 | is a virtue rather than a vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[135] A[ 364 2, 133 | Therefore meanness is not a vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[135] A[ 365 2, 133 | meanness is not a distinct vice from the others.~Aquin.: 366 2, 133 | accounts meanness a special ~vice opposed to magnificence.~ 367 2, 133 | work. Now the essence of vice is that it consists in failing 368 2, 133 | manifest that meanness is a ~vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[135] A[ 369 2, 133 | things: ~hence meanness is a vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[135] A[ 370 2, 133 | meanness and its contrary vice are sinful, they do not 371 2, 133 | 1/1~Whether there is a vice opposed to meanness?~Aquin.: 372 2, 133 | It seems that there is no vice opposed to meanness. For 373 2, 133 | Now, magnificence is not a vice, but a virtue. ~Therefore 374 2, 133 | a virtue. ~Therefore no vice is opposed to meanness.~ 375 2, 133 | Further, since meanness is a vice by deficiency, as stated 376 2, 133 | it seems that if any vice is opposed to meanness, 377 2, 133 | Therefore ~there is not a vice opposed to meanness.~Aquin.: 378 2, 133 | 131], A[2]~). Therefore no vice is opposed to meanness.~ 379 2, 133 | it is manifest that the vice of ~meanness, whereby a 380 2, 133 | expenditure and his ~work, has a vice opposed to it, whereby a 381 2, 133 | proportionate to his work. This vice ~is called in Greek {banausia}, 382 2, 133 | for this belongs to the ~vice which is opposed to meanness.~ 383 2, 133 | Reply OBJ 2: To the one same vice there is opposed the virtue 384 2, 133 | the mean, and a contrary vice. Accordingly, then, the 385 2, 133 | Accordingly, then, the vice of ~waste is opposed to 386 2, 133 | directed to the end of ~another vice, such as vainglory or any 387 2, 136 | obscene, given ~to unnatural vice." But this is opposed to 388 2, 136 | Therefore effeminacy ~is not a vice opposed to perseverance. ~ 389 2, 138 | include the negative, but not vice versa. ~Therefore it is 390 2, 140 | Whether insensibility is a vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[142] A[ 391 2, 140 | that insensibility is not a vice. For those are ~called insensible 392 2, 140 | the contrary, Nothing save vice is opposed to virtue. Now ~ 393 2, 140 | Therefore insensibility is a vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[142] A[ 394 2, 140 | And this pertains to the vice of ~insensibility.~Aquin.: 395 2, 140 | these things pertain to the vice of insensibility, because 396 2, 140 | cowardice* is a greater vice than intemperance? [*Cf. 397 2, 140 | that cowardice is a greater vice than intemperance. ~For 398 2, 140 | than intemperance. ~For a vice deserves reproach through 399 2, 140 | cowardice is a greater vice than intemperance.~Aquin.: 400 2, 140 | intemperance is a ~more grievous vice than cowardice, on the part 401 2, 140 | cowardice, is a greater vice. Thirdly, because it is 402 2, 140 | force is proof ~of a lesser vice, and to succumb to a weaker 403 2, 140 | the proof of a ~greater vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[142] A[ 404 2, 140 | committing the unnatural vice.~ 405 2, 142 | 1~OBJ 4: Further, every vice is opposed to a virtue. 406 2, 142 | Q[142], A[4]) that the vice of ~intemperance is most 407 2, 142 | 4: Every defect causes a vice, but not every good is ~ 408 2, 142 | whatever is directly opposed to vice is a virtue, although every 409 2, 142 | a virtue, although every vice is ~opposed to a virtue, 410 2, 142 | the disgrace inherent to vice, which consists in the deformity 411 2, 142 | reproach is properly due to vice, as ~honor is due to virtue, 412 2, 142 | the ~disgrace inherent to vice. Hence the Philosopher says ( 413 2, 142 | are ashamed ~not only of vice, but also of the signs of 414 2, 142 | virtuous man to avoid not only vice, but ~also whatever has 415 2, 142 | whatever has the semblance of vice, according to 1 Thess. 5: 416 2, 144 | fasting; (3) its opposite vice ~which is gluttony. Under 417 2, 145 | movements be wrecked by vice." And Augustine says (in 418 2, 145 | by the conjunction of any vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[147] A[ 419 2, 146 | 2: As stated above, the vice of gluttony does not regard 420 2, 146 | these powers virtue ~and vice are impossible, since they 421 2, 146 | of this appetite that the vice of gluttony ~consists. Hence 422 2, 146 | xxx, 18): "As long as the ~vice of gluttony has a hold on 423 2, 146 | stated above (A[1]), the vice of gluttony properly ~consists 424 2, 146 | inordinate concupiscence in the vice of gluttony be found to ~ 425 2, 146 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: The vice of gluttony becomes a mortal 426 2, 146 | A[4]). Now man, by the vice of gluttony, inflicts an ~ 427 2, 146 | says (Moral. xxx, 18): "The vice of gluttony ~tempts us in 428 2, 146 | specific difference of vice: but this does not apply 429 2, 146 | Whether gluttony is a capital vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[148] A[ 430 2, 146 | gluttony is not a capital vice. For capital ~vices denote 431 2, 146 | gluttony is not a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[148] A[ 432 2, 146 | OBJ 2: Further, a capital vice would seem to have a certain 433 2, 146 | gluttony is ~not a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[148] A[ 434 2, 146 | there is but ~one capital vice, namely covetousness. Therefore, 435 2, 146 | would ~be but one capital vice in respect of pleasures: 436 2, 146 | lust, which ~is a greater vice than gluttony, and is about 437 2, 146 | gluttony is not a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[148] A[ 438 2, 146 | Q[84], A[3]), a capital vice denotes ~one from which, 439 2, 146 | x, 3,7,8. Therefore the vice of gluttony, being ~about 440 2, 146 | there is but one capital vice, in respect of such things.~ 441 2, 146 | may be referred ~to either vice.~ 442 2, 147 | sobriety and the contrary vice, namely drunkenness. ~As 443 2, 148 | has no name. ~Hence the vice opposed to drunkenness is 444 2, 148 | necessary belongs to the ~vice of gluttony, which is not 445 2, 149 | which is the contrary ~vice. Under the first head there 446 2, 149 | and ~of lust its contrary vice, so too the spiritual union 447 2, 149 | indicate their complicity in vice." ~Therefore abstinence 448 2, 149 | Reply OBJ 2: Although every vice has a certain disgrace, 449 2, 150 | punishment is not due save for a vice. Now in olden ~times those 450 2, 151 | We must next consider the vice of lust which is opposed 451 2, 151 | Whether lust is a capital vice?~(5) Concerning its daughters.~ 452 2, 151 | every sin has an opposite vice. But, seemingly, no vice ~ 453 2, 151 | vice. But, seemingly, no vice ~is opposed to lust. Therefore 454 2, 151 | pleasure. Yet the contrary vice is comprised under ~insensibility, 455 2, 151 | Whether lust is a capital vice?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[153] A[ 456 2, 151 | that lust is not a capital vice. For lust is apparently ~ 457 2, 151 | Therefore lust is not a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[153] A[ 458 2, 151 | the nature of ~a capital vice to arise from another vice. 459 2, 151 | vice to arise from another vice. Therefore lust is not a ~ 460 2, 151 | Therefore lust is not a ~capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[153] A[ 461 2, 151 | despair is ~not a capital vice; indeed, it is accounted 462 2, 151 | therefore, is lust a capital ~vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[153] A[ 463 2, 151 | 84], AA[3],4), a ~capital vice is one that has a very desirable 464 2, 151 | said ~to arise from that vice as from a principal vice. 465 2, 151 | vice as from a principal vice. Now the end of lust is ~ 466 2, 151 | evident that lust is a capital vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[153] A[ 467 2, 151 | necessary for a capital ~vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[153] A[ 468 2, 151 | acts. Now the effect of the vice of lust is that the lower ~ 469 2, 151 | the daughters of a capital vice to agree with ~it in matter ( 470 2, 152 | rape, and the ~unnatural vice." For diversity of matter 471 2, 152 | seemingly the species of one vice are not differentiated ~ 472 2, 152 | things that belong to another vice. Now adultery does not differ 473 2, 152 | children, there is the "vice ~against nature," which 474 2, 152 | that, When the matter of a vice has a special deformity, 475 2, 152 | determinate species of that vice. Now lust is a ~sin concerned 476 2, 152 | a determinate species of vice. But intercourse between ~ 477 2, 152 | done by ~the other kinds of vice, as well as by lust. But 478 2, 152 | or of any other similar vice. Therefore ~neither should 479 2, 152 | the act of a virtue ~or vice, that is directed to the 480 2, 152 | end of another virtue or vice, assumes ~the latter's species: 481 2, 152 | being directed to another vice as its end, becomes ~a species 482 2, 152 | becomes ~a species of that vice: and so a species of lust 483 2, 152 | it is directed to another vice as its end, and may ~coincide 484 2, 152 | 1~Whether the unnatural vice is a species of lust?~Aquin.: 485 2, 152 | seem that the unnatural vice is not a species of lust. ~ 486 2, 152 | For no mention of the vice against nature is made in 487 2, 152 | so it is comprised under ~vice. But the unnatural vice 488 2, 152 | vice. But the unnatural vice is comprised not under vice, 489 2, 152 | vice is comprised not under vice, but under ~bestiality, 490 2, 152 | Therefore the ~unnatural vice is not a species of lust.~ 491 2, 152 | Whereas the unnatural vice concerns acts ~from which 492 2, 152 | Therefore the unnatural vice is not ~a species of lust.~ 493 2, 152 | is called "the unnatural vice." This may happen in several 494 2, 152 | and this is called the "vice of sodomy." Fourthly, by 495 2, 152 | wherefore the unnatural vice was omitted.~Aquin.: SMT 496 2, 152 | Bestiality differs from vice, for the latter is opposed 497 2, 152 | sought in the unnatural ~vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[154] A[ 498 2, 152 | 1~Whether the unnatural vice is the greatest sin among 499 2, 152 | seem that the unnatural vice is not the greatest sin ~ 500 2, 152 | sin than ~the unnatural vice.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[154] A[


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