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null 4
nullus 4
num 80
number 616
numbered 68
numbering 7
numbers 71
Frequency    [«  »]
622 saying
619 orders
616 me
616 number
612 heart
609 differ
608 confession
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

number

1-500 | 501-616

    Part, Question
1 1, 3 | by length and numbers by number. But God is ~the measure 2 1, 5 | all things in measure, and number, and ~weight" (Wis. 11:21). 3 1, 5 | the mode of ~everything, number gives it its species, and 4 1, 5 | order are caused by weight, number and ~measure, as appears 5 1, 5 | good ~thing has weight, number and measure; for Ambrose 6 1, 5 | to have been created in number, weight and ~measure." Therefore 7 1, 5 | species by its form. Hence the number is said to give the species, 8 1, 5 | added to, or taken from a number, ~changes its species, so 9 1, 5 | spoken of as being without number, ~weight and measure, not 10 1, 7 | potentiality to an infinite ~number of shapes. But if we speak 11 1, 7 | potentiality to be made actual. But number can be ~multiplied to infinity. 12 1, 7 | Therefore an ~infinite number of actual figures is possible.~ 13 1, 7 | therefore an ~actual infinite number of things is possible.~Aquin.: 14 1, 7 | things in ~measure, and number, and weight" (Wis. 11:21).~ 15 1, 7 | would depend on an infinite number of ~causes. But the multitude 16 1, 7 | are used, or an infinite number, if the work is carried 17 1, 7 | numbers. But no species of number is infinite; ~for every 18 1, 7 | is infinite; ~for every number is multitude measured by 19 1, 7 | comprehended in a ~certain number. Therefore it is impossible 20 1, 7 | is divided, the greater ~number of things result. Hence, 21 1, 7 | infinite by infinitude of number. ~Now there are various 22 1, 7 | supposition of an infinite number is ~opposed to any single 23 1, 8 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, number is in things numbered. But 24 1, 8 | universe is ~constituted in number, as appears from the Book 25 1, 8 | Therefore there is some number which is in the whole universe, 26 1, 8 | God alone. For whatever number of places be ~supposed, 27 1, 8 | supposed, even if an infinite number be supposed besides what 28 1, 8 | to Him: because whatever number ~of places be supposed to 29 1, 8 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Number, since it is an accident, 30 1, 10 | things, forasmuch ~as one number exists for all things numbered; 31 1, 10 | things numbered; as time is a number, ~according to the Philosopher ( 32 1, 10 | reason; because time is not a number abstracted from the thing ~ 33 1, 10 | continuous not by reason of the ~number, but by reason of the thing 34 1, 10 | the thing numbered. Now number as it exists in ~the thing 35 1, 11 | it is the principle of ~number, which is a species of quantity. 36 1, 11 | which is the principle of number, were divided into ~contrary 37 1, 11 | which is the principle of number. And because number ~is 38 1, 11 | principle of number. And because number ~is composed of unities, 39 1, 11 | which is the principle of number, added a reality to the 40 1, 11 | substance of ~"being" (otherwise number made of unities would not 41 1, 11 | which is the principle of number, does add a reality to " 42 1, 11 | undivided; as what is divided in number, ~may be undivided in species; 43 1, 11 | accidentally; as what are "many" in number and "one" in species or " 44 1, 11 | subject; and what are many in number, are one in ~species; and 45 1, 11 | which is the principle of number is opposed to "multitude" 46 1, 11 | to "multitude" which is ~number, as the measure is to the 47 1, 11 | of a primary measure; and number is "multitude" measured 48 1, 11 | One," as the principle of number, cannot be predicated ~of 49 1, 11 | which is the principle of number is not predicated of ~God, 50 1, 11 | For "one" the principle of number ~belongs to the "genus" 51 1, 11 | which is the principle of number, are not ~supremely being, 52 1, 14 | animal; or six, ~a perfect number, to the imperfect numbers 53 1, 14 | knowledge; and whoever knows the number ~six, knows the number three 54 1, 14 | the number ~six, knows the number three also by proper knowledge.~ 55 1, 14 | xii), "Although we cannot ~number the infinite, nevertheless 56 1, 14 | however, an actually infinite number of things, for instance, 57 1, 16 | intellect, according to the number of things known. ~Whence 58 1, 19 | multiplied in proportion to the number ~of their objects. If, therefore, 59 1, 19 | absolutely ~necessary that a number must be odd or even. In 60 1, 23 | be saved?~(7) Whether the number of the predestined is certain?~( 61 1, 23 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether the number of the predestined is certain?~ 62 1, 23 | OBJ 1: It seems that the number of the predestined is not 63 1, 23 | predestined is not certain. For a ~number to which an addition can 64 1, 23 | can be ~an addition to the number of the predestined as it 65 1, 23 | The Lord God adds to this number many thousands," ~and a 66 1, 23 | to Him." ~Therefore the number of the predestined is not 67 1, 23 | pre-ordains to ~salvation one number of men more than another. 68 1, 23 | a reason. Therefore the number to be saved pre-ordained 69 1, 23 | minority. If, then, the number of the ~saved were fixed 70 1, 23 | find it!" Therefore the number of ~those pre-ordained by 71 1, 23 | Corr. et Grat. 13): "The number of ~the predestined is certain, 72 1, 23 | 1/2~I answer that, The number of the predestined is certain. 73 1, 23 | must say ~that to God the number of the predestined is certain, 74 1, 23 | however, be observed that the number of the ~predestined is said 75 1, 23 | saved (for in this way ~the number of drops of rain and the 76 1, 23 | thinks out some definite number in the ~essential parts, 77 1, 23 | not select ~any definite number "per se"; but he accepts 78 1, 23 | and also the ~definite number of rooms which he wishes 79 1, 23 | however, select ~a definite number of stones, but accepts and 80 1, 23 | the ~universe, and what number would befit the essential 81 1, 23 | although God knows the total number of individuals, the ~number 82 1, 23 | number of individuals, the ~number of oxen, flies and such 83 1, 23 | ultimate end. Whence the number of ~the predestined is certain 84 1, 23 | thing in the case of the number of the ~reprobate, who would 85 1, 23 | 8:28). ~Concerning the number of all the predestined, 86 1, 23 | others, as many as the number of angels created by God. 87 1, 23 | to God alone is known the number for whom is ~reserved eternal 88 1, 23 | righteousness. For their number is increased and diminished, 89 1, 23 | diminished, but not the ~number of the predestined.~Aquin.: 90 1, 25 | even as ~He cannot make the number four greater than it is; 91 1, 25 | longer be four, but another number. For the addition ~of a 92 1, 28 | from each ~other?~(4) The number of these relations.~Aquin.: 93 1, 29 | this word "person"; (2) the number of the ~persons; (3) what 94 1, 29 | what is involved in the number of persons, or is opposed ~ 95 1, 30 | truly ~one which has no number." But plurality implies 96 1, 30 | But plurality implies number. Therefore there ~are not 97 1, 30 | 1~OBJ 4: Further, where number is, there is whole and part. 98 1, 30 | if in ~God there exist a number of persons, there must be 99 1, 30 | Para. 1/1 ~Reply OBJ 4: Number is twofold, simple or absolute, 100 1, 30 | and three and ~four; and number as existing in things numbered, 101 1, 30 | and two ~horses. So, if number in God is taken absolutely 102 1, 30 | from being in Him, and thus number ~in Him is only in our way 103 1, 30 | understanding; forasmuch as number regarded ~apart from things 104 1, 30 | in the intellect. But if number be ~taken as it is in the 105 1, 30 | but also in an infinite number of ways. Therefore there 106 1, 30 | Therefore there are an ~infinite number of persons in God.~Aquin.: 107 1, 30 | everything within a determinate number is measured, for ~number 108 1, 30 | number is measured, for ~number is a measure. But the divine 109 1, 30 | not contained within the ~number three.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 110 1, 30 | Reply OBJ 5: A determinate number, if taken as a simple number, 111 1, 30 | number, if taken as a simple number, existing ~in the mind only, 112 1, 30 | But when we speak of a number of ~things as applied to 113 1, 30 | divine essence. But every number is ~unity repeated. Therefore 114 1, 30 | continuous; from this results number, which is a species ~of 115 1, 30 | a species ~of quantity. Number in this sense is found only 116 1, 30 | thing as a quality), so number exists in God in the proper 117 1, 30 | God in the proper sense of number, but not in the sense of 118 1, 30 | God are not derived from ~number, a species of quantity, 119 1, 30 | A[3] Body Para. 5/5~But number, if taken as a species of 120 1, 30 | is the principle of that number. ~Therefore the numeral 121 1, 31 | signifies the determinate ~number of persons. And so the plurality 122 1, 31 | it rather ~signifies the number of persons of one essence; 123 1, 31 | Persons, but rather ~the number of persons related to each 124 1, 31 | signifies ~the threefold number of persons. "Triplicity" 125 1, 31 | is to be understood both number and ~the persons numbered. 126 1, 31 | Unity," we do not place ~number in the unity of the essence, 127 1, 31 | trine," by reason of the number ~implied, we signify the 128 1, 31 | the multiplication of that number by itself; since ~the word 129 1, 31 | lest we take away the number of persons. Hence Hilary 130 1, 32 | divine persons?~(3) The number of the notions?~(4) Whether 131 1, 32 | Mundo i, ~2): "Through this number" - namely, three - "we bring 132 1, 32 | Aristotle said, "By this number," etc., we must not take 133 1, 32 | he affirmed a threefold number in God, but that he wished 134 1, 32 | ancients used the threefold number in their sacrifices and 135 1, 32 | perfection residing in the number three. In the Platonic ~ 136 1, 32 | notions are only four in number.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[32] A[ 137 1, 36 | principle" in the singular number does not signify ~"person," 138 1, 36 | created. Hence it takes its number from the form it ~signifies, 139 1, 36 | adjectival words derive ~their number from the "supposita" but 140 1, 41 | but many, according to the number of ideas ~understood. Hence 141 1, 43 | it extends to a greater number of ~objects. To Christ the 142 1, 45 | are reduced ~those three, "number," "weight," and "measure," 143 1, 45 | limited ~by its principles, "number" refers to the species, " 144 1, 46 | there have been ~an infinite number of men. But man's soul is 145 1, 46 | therefore an ~infinite number of human souls would actually 146 1, 46 | was changed an infinite number of times, from being uninhabitable ~ 147 1, 46 | present day there is a ~finite number of days which can be passed 148 1, 46 | extremes, there is an infinite number ~of mean terms.~Aquin.: 149 1, 46 | there cannot be an infinite number of causes that are ~"per 150 1, 47 | matter can be multiplied ~in number, the species remaining the 151 1, 47 | because multiplication in ~number comes from matter. But the 152 1, 47 | world, besides an infinite ~number of other worlds, was made 153 1, 49 | that evil is in the greater number is simply false. For things ~ 154 1, 49 | nature is in the smaller number. In man alone does ~evil 155 1, 49 | appear as in the greater number; because the good of man 156 1, 50 | We ask concerning their number.~(4) Of their difference 157 1, 50 | angels exist in any great number?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 158 1, 50 | not in great numbers. For ~number is a species of quantity, 159 1, 50 | cannot exist in any great ~number.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 160 1, 50 | there is the least possible number in the ~angelic nature.~ 161 1, 50 | within some small determined number, which we can apprehend. ~ 162 1, 50 | angels are not in greater number than the movements of the ~ 163 1, 50 | opinions with regard to the ~number of the separate substances. 164 1, 50 | to be maintained that the number of the separate ~substances 165 1, 50 | separate ~substances is the number of the species of sensible 166 1, 50 | he strove to find out the number of ~the separate substances 167 1, 50 | substances according to the number of the first movements.~ 168 1, 50 | multiplied according to the number of heavenly movements or 169 1, 50 | exist in exceeding great number, far beyond all ~material 170 1, 50 | Reply OBJ 1: In the angels number is not that of discrete 171 1, 50 | in species but differ ~in number, agree in form, but are 172 1, 53 | as a unit is a part of number: ~hence the succession of 173 1, 56 | determinate nature from the number of such ~natures, it would 174 1, 57 | require to have an infinite number of species. Nor ~is it by 175 1, 63 | according to Eccles. 1:15: "The number of fools is infinite." Therefore ~ 176 1, 72 | special relation to the ~number of the elect [*Cf. Augustine, 177 1, 74 | to the perfection of the ~number six, which is the sum of 178 1, 74 | approval because the second ~number is an imperfect number, 179 1, 74 | number is an imperfect number, as receding from the perfection 180 1, 75 | cannot be diversity of ~number without diversity of species 181 1, 76 | numerically ~according to the number of bodies; or is there one 182 1, 76 | multiplied according to the number ~of bodies?~Aquin.: SMT 183 1, 76 | multiplied ~according to the number of bodies, but that there 184 1, 76 | substance is not multiplied in number within one ~species. But 185 1, 76 | multiplied according to the number of ~bodies, it follows that 186 1, 76 | bodies being removed, the number of souls ~would not remain; 187 1, 76 | things ~which differ in number but agree in one species. 188 1, 76 | infinite variety, ~and for any number of purposes.~~Aquin.: SMT 189 1, 77 | power ~is, to a greater number of things does it extend. 190 1, 77 | powers are many; and since ~a number of things that proceed from 191 1, 41 | but many, according to the number of ideas ~understood. Hence 192 1, 43 | it extends to a greater number of ~objects. To Christ the 193 1, 46 | are reduced ~those three, "number," "weight," and "measure," 194 1, 46 | limited ~by its principles, "number" refers to the species, " 195 1, 47 | there have been ~an infinite number of men. But man's soul is 196 1, 47 | therefore an ~infinite number of human souls would actually 197 1, 47 | was changed an infinite number of times, from being uninhabitable ~ 198 1, 47 | present day there is a ~finite number of days which can be passed 199 1, 47 | extremes, there is an infinite number ~of mean terms.~Aquin.: 200 1, 47 | there cannot be an infinite number of causes that are ~"per 201 1, 48 | matter can be multiplied ~in number, the species remaining the 202 1, 48 | because multiplication in ~number comes from matter. But the 203 1, 48 | world, besides an infinite ~number of other worlds, was made 204 1, 50 | that evil is in the greater number is simply false. For things ~ 205 1, 50 | nature is in the smaller number. In man alone does ~evil 206 1, 50 | appear as in the greater number; because the good of man 207 1, 51 | We ask concerning their number.~(4) Of their difference 208 1, 51 | angels exist in any great number?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 209 1, 51 | not in great numbers. For ~number is a species of quantity, 210 1, 51 | cannot exist in any great ~number.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 211 1, 51 | there is the least possible number in the ~angelic nature.~ 212 1, 51 | within some small determined number, which we can apprehend. ~ 213 1, 51 | angels are not in greater number than the movements of the ~ 214 1, 51 | opinions with regard to the ~number of the separate substances. 215 1, 51 | to be maintained that the number of the separate ~substances 216 1, 51 | separate ~substances is the number of the species of sensible 217 1, 51 | he strove to find out the number of ~the separate substances 218 1, 51 | substances according to the number of the first movements.~ 219 1, 51 | multiplied according to the number of heavenly movements or 220 1, 51 | exist in exceeding great number, far beyond all ~material 221 1, 51 | Reply OBJ 1: In the angels number is not that of discrete 222 1, 51 | in species but differ ~in number, agree in form, but are 223 1, 54 | as a unit is a part of number: ~hence the succession of 224 1, 57 | determinate nature from the number of such ~natures, it would 225 1, 58 | require to have an infinite number of species. Nor ~is it by 226 1, 64 | according to Eccles. 1:15: "The number of fools is infinite." Therefore ~ 227 1, 71 | special relation to the ~number of the elect [*Cf. Augustine, 228 1, 73 | to the perfection of the ~number six, which is the sum of 229 1, 73 | approval because the second ~number is an imperfect number, 230 1, 73 | number is an imperfect number, as receding from the perfection 231 1, 74 | cannot be diversity of ~number without diversity of species 232 1, 75 | numerically ~according to the number of bodies; or is there one 233 1, 75 | multiplied according to the number ~of bodies?~Aquin.: SMT 234 1, 75 | multiplied ~according to the number of bodies, but that there 235 1, 75 | substance is not multiplied in number within one ~species. But 236 1, 75 | multiplied according to the number of ~bodies, it follows that 237 1, 75 | bodies being removed, the number of souls ~would not remain; 238 1, 75 | things ~which differ in number but agree in one species. 239 1, 75 | infinite variety, ~and for any number of purposes.~~Aquin.: SMT 240 1, 76 | power ~is, to a greater number of things does it extend. 241 1, 76 | powers are many; and since ~a number of things that proceed from 242 1, 77 | multiplied according to ~the number of the kinds of accidents. ~ 243 1, 77 | reason of the distinction and number of the senses ~has been 244 1, 77 | Para. 2/5~The reason of the number and distinction of the exterior 245 1, 77 | quantity. As to size and number, it is clear that they are ~ 246 1, 78 | multiplied according to the number of ~bodies. But the active 247 1, 78 | multiplied according to the number of men, as we have said 248 1, 80 | there ~is order among a number of motive powers, the second 249 1, 81 | wherever we have order among a number of active powers, that ~ 250 1, 84 | Hence ~quantities, such as number, dimension, and figures, 251 1, 84 | comes into the definition of number, for "number ~is multitude 252 1, 84 | definition of number, for "number ~is multitude measured by 253 1, 84 | Unity is the measure of number: wherefore it is included 254 1, 84 | definition of a measured number. But it is not included 255 1, 85 | species in some genera, as in number, ~proportion, and figure. 256 1, 85 | nothing to prevent an infinite number of bodies being in one ~ 257 1, 85 | knowledge of an infinite ~number of things.~Aquin.: SMT FP 258 1, 85 | definite and not an infinite number ~of species in our intellect.~ 259 1, 85 | extends to an ~infinite number of individuals.~Aquin.: 260 1, 88 | understand by means of a number of species, which nevertheless 261 1, 88 | natures possess a greater number of species, ~which are less 262 1, 90 | of conceiving an infinite number of things, so as to make 263 1, 90 | for ~itself an infinite number of instruments.~Aquin.: 264 1, 93 | facts, as for instance the ~number of pebbles in a stream; 265 1, 93 | natural knowledge, not in the ~number of things known, but in 266 1, 93 | advanced as regards ~the number of things known, by further 267 1, 95 | life cannot exist among a number of people unless under the ~ 268 1, 97 | generation, since the original number of mankind was two only. 269 1, 98 | would have been in equal number.~ 270 1, 102 | cannot ~assign any definite number to the effects of government.~ 271 1, 102 | this way they are ~without number.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[103] A[ 272 1, 103 | cannot possibly be an odd ~number. Now form brings being with 273 1, 104 | Him from Whom is all mode, number, and order in ~nature."~ 274 1, 109 | spiritual substances; the number of which he endeavored to 275 1, 109 | assign ~according to the number of motions apparent in the 276 1, 111 | be given in assigning the number of ~the assisting and ministering 277 1, 111 | of thousands"; ~thus the number of those who minister is 278 1, 111 | signifies ~excess; while the number of assistants is finite 279 1, 111 | the smaller they are in ~number; as the nearer a number 280 1, 111 | number; as the nearer a number is to unity, the lesser 281 1, 111 | verified as regards the number of orders, as ~six administer 282 1, 111 | that this is the precise number of angels, but rather ~that 283 1, 113 | forms of an innumerable number of things, appears to ~other 284 1, 115 | multiplied according to the ~number of creatures. Since, therefore, 285 1, 117 | constitutes another species of number. Now ~it is not possible 286 1, 117 | the ~universe, as to the number of individuals, but not 287 1, 117 | individuals, but not as to the number of ~species.~Aquin.: SMT 288 2, 1 | for an end. For if, in a ~number of causes ordained to one 289 2, 1 | infinite, since, given any number, the reason ~can think of 290 2, 1 | react on itself an infinite number of times: for I can will ~ 291 2, 1 | disposes all things "in number, weight and measure."~Aquin.: 292 2, 1 | to a stated quantity or ~number, as such, that quantity 293 2, 2 | and contains an infinite number of singulars. ~Consequently 294 2, 11 | delightful about ~it, to which a number of preceding things are 295 2, 12 | because of the greater ~number of purposes for which it 296 2, 14 | for as much as an infinite number of things may present themselves 297 2, 18 | ordained to ~an infinite number of ends: for instance, theft 298 2, 18 | ordained to an ~infinite number of good and bad ends. Therefore 299 2, 18 | every unity added to a ~number makes a new species of number; 300 2, 18 | number makes a new species of number; since the good consists 301 2, 18 | since the good consists in "number, ~weight, and measure" ( 302 2, 19 | answer that, Wherever a number of causes are subordinate 303 2, 20 | ways. First in point of number; if, for instance, a man ~ 304 2, 30 | pleasurable object differ "in number."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[30] A[ 305 2, 30 | difference, which is one of number only. Therefore concupiscences 306 2, 30 | men desire an infinite number of things."~Aquin.: SMT 307 2, 30 | potentially an infinite number of singulars.~Aquin.: SMT 308 2, 45 | such as having a great number of ~friends or any other 309 2, 52 | text. 10) that, "as a ~number cannot be more or less, 310 2, 52 | speak of the species of number as varying in respect of 311 2, 53 | a greater or a ~smaller number of things.~Aquin.: SMT FS 312 2, 60 | proximate ends are ~infinite in number. But the moral virtues themselves 313 2, 60 | themselves are not infinite in ~number. Therefore it seems that 314 2, 60 | although they be infinite ~in number, are not infinite in species.~ 315 2, 61 | principal ~virtues?~(2) Of their number;~(3) Which are they?~(4) 316 2, 61 | manner, we find the same number if we consider the subjects 317 2, 63 | De Nat. Boni. iii) or in "number, weight, ~and measure," 318 2, 68 | attain the ~perfection of the number ten, unless all they do 319 2, 69 | to this life?~(3) Of the number of the beatitudes;~(4) Of 320 2, 70 | beatitudes?~(3) Of their number?~(4) Of their opposition 321 2, 70 | 1/4~I answer that, The number of the twelve fruits enumerated 322 2, 71 | not found in the ~greater number of individuals possessed 323 2, 71 | is found ~in the greater number of men; for it is written ( 324 2, 82 | original sin is one in number; and in all men, it is one 325 2, 82 | cause, while the unity of ~number is derived from the subject. 326 2, 82 | in one man will be one in number. Now the cause of this ~ 327 2, 82 | man, can ~be only one in number; while, in different men, 328 2, 83 | far "as it shows us how a number of things ~differ" (Metaph. 329 2, 84 | dispositions are infinite in number. ~Secondly, on account of 330 2, 91 | distinction is the ~cause of number. Now things may be distinguished 331 2, 94 | many, by reason ~of the number of parts of human nature. 332 2, 94 | because the greater the number of ~conditions added, the 333 2, 94 | conditions added, the greater the number of ways in which the principle ~ 334 2, 95 | singulars, which are infinite in number, matter ~pertaining to the 335 2, 96 | being true in the greater number of instances, though at 336 2, 96 | human law is framed for a number of human beings, the majority 337 2, 100 | from one another?~(5) Their number;~(6) Their order;~(7) The 338 2, 100 | all things, ~in measure, number and weight." Much more therefore 339 2, 101 | OBJ 2: Further, the great number of the ceremonial precepts 340 2, 101 | have been ~given in great number.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[101] A[ 341 2, 101 | ceremonies needed to be in great number.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[101] A[ 342 2, 102 | another: for instance, the number ~of animals to be offered, 343 2, 102 | tabernacle seven times"; for the number seven signified universality. ~ 344 2, 104 | since they are ~infinite in number. Therefore it is not possible 345 2, 104 | another are indeed infinite in number: yet they are reducible 346 2, 105 | aristocracy, in so far as a number of persons are set in ~authority; 347 2, 105 | division of the kingdom, and a number of kings, was ~rather a 348 2, 105 | 16:19). It prescribed the number of ~witnesses, viz. two 349 2, 105 | movable goods. ~Because the number of houses in a town was 350 2, 105 | be exceeded, while ~the number of houses in a town could 351 2, 105 | and benefits the greater ~number: and it granted facilities 352 2, 105 | fixing on this particular number, in ~token of the unerring 353 2, 105 | restore only twice the number, as in the case of other 354 2, 107 | solemnization of a small number of most manifest sacraments, 355 2, 108 | result was an increase in the number of ~explicit points of faith. 356 2, 111 | Now there are an infinite ~number of effects - one preceding 357 2, 111 | note of the ~infinite in number. Hence grace is not fittingly 358 2, 111 | grace may be infinite in number, ~even as human acts are 359 2, 111 | Now there are an infinite number of gifts freely ~bestowed 360 2, 1 | divided into a certain ~number of articles?~(7) Whether 361 2, 1 | for all times?~(8) Of the number of articles;~(9) Of the 362 2, 1 | be ~reduced to a certain number. Therefore it seems superfluous 363 2, 1 | words to show their ~gender, number or case. Again in rhetoric, 364 2, 1 | was an increase in the number of articles believed explicitly, 365 2, 1 | there ~is not a sufficient number of articles.~Aquin.: SMT 366 2, 2 | mind, or ~through having a number of occupations, and temporal 367 2, 8 | distinction is the ~origin of number. Now the gift of understanding 368 2, 8 | sense we have assigned the number of the gifts, above (FS, 369 2, 10 | of faith in an ~infinite number of ways. If therefore the 370 2, 10 | unbelief ~correspond to the number of various errors, it would 371 2, 10 | that ~there is an infinite number of species of unbelief, 372 2, 10 | In this way an infinite number of vices are opposed to 373 2, 10 | according to the infinite number of ~ways in which the various 374 2, 10 | unbelief, determinate in number. For, ~since the sin of 375 2, 16 | contrary, There cannot be number without distinction. Now 376 2, 22 | virtue, but is divided into a number of ~various species.~Aquin.: 377 2, 23 | depends not only on the number of objects, ~namely whether 378 2, 23 | whether they be in greater number or of greater excellence, 379 2, 23 | in respect of position or number, and in this way we have ~ 380 2, 23 | line into an indefinite number of ~parts, and take these 381 2, 28 | above (Q[28], A[4]), when a number of acts all ~proceeding 382 2, 31 | on account of the great number of sinners, for whose ~correction 383 2, 31 | there is danger to a great number of people, those ~words 384 2, 34 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The number of envy's daughters may 385 2, 37 | circumstances are infinite in number, ~so too they can be varied 386 2, 37 | be varied in an infinite number of ways: wherefore if one ~ 387 2, 38 | a human ~society: and a number of things are done better 388 2, 38 | better and quicker by a number ~of persons than by one, 389 2, 40 | fight," ~when, to wit, a number of people make preparations 390 2, 43 | virtue is, the greater the number of things to ~which it extends, 391 2, 45 | singulars are infinite in number. But the reason cannot ~ 392 2, 45 | comprehend an infinite number of things. Therefore prudence 393 2, 45 | is because the infinite number of singulars cannot be ~ 394 2, 45 | singulars to a ~certain finite number which occur as a general 395 2, 47 | Tully and Macrobius, who number ~foresight among the parts 396 2, 47 | But ~these are of infinite number, and cannot be considered 397 2, 47 | Reply OBJ 1: Though the number of possible circumstances 398 2, 47 | circumstances be infinite, ~the number of actual circumstances 399 2, 47 | things which are few in number~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[49] A[7] 400 2, 47 | since they are infinite in number, cannot be grasped by reason, ~ 401 2, 49 | discerning can judge a greater number of such things ~by his reason: 402 2, 58 | evil is done, since "the number of fools ~is infinite" ( 403 2, 59 | are distributed among a number of ~individuals each one 404 2, 59 | 1-1/2; since the greater number is the sum of the lesser 405 2, 61 | time, nor counted by the number of ~years; but the understanding 406 2, 64 | clerics ~who in considerable number are to be found in the Catholic 407 2, 64 | happens where there is a great number of ~servants. Secondly, 408 2, 66 | this is the fact that if a number of people ~who have heard 409 2, 67 | cannot be found in so great a number of people as ~human law 410 2, 68 | the truth in the greater number, cases, although it fail 411 2, 68 | three, which is the perfect number. ~Wherefore it is written ( 412 2, 68 | 1: No matter how great a number of witnesses may be ~determined, 413 2, 68 | and if they be equal in ~number on either side, and of equal 414 2, 68 | by considering either the number of ~witnesses, or their 415 2, 71 | almost," both because "the number ~of fools is infinite," [* 416 2, 85 | is, in a way, the perfect number (being the first ~numerical 417 2, 93 | First, because a great ~number of men follow their bodily 418 2, 95 | three thousand men of their number were ~slain, as related 419 2, 108 | so that an ~indefinite number of effects can result from 420 2, 121 | Augustine (De Moribus Eccl. xv), number fortitude among the ~four 421 2, 127 | especially to the ~large number of those who are beneath 422 2, 130 | reckon pride as one of their number: and these do not place 423 2, 145 | to be hindered by a great number of observances no less than ~ 424 2, 145 | no less than ~by a great number of sacraments. For Augustine 425 2, 145 | and the evidence and small number of its ~solemn sacraments, 426 2, 145 | are three reasons for the number. First, "because the power ~ 427 2, 145 | and Holy Ghost: while the ~number "three" refers to the invisible 428 2, 145 | our ~whole mind: and the number "four" refers to the visible 429 2, 145 | cold, wet and dry. Thus the number "ten" [*Ten is the sum ~ 430 2, 145 | of ~things, we have the number forty.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 431 2, 145 | days, on account of the ~number of months in each season: 432 2, 145 | season: or on account of the number of Holy ~orders which are 433 2, 145 | of food not less than the number ~of meals. Now the quantity 434 2, 145 | Therefore neither should the number of meals be limited.~Aquin.: 435 2, 145 | concupiscence by ~minimizing the number of meals. Therefore it is 436 2, 159 | according to a definite number of degrees. Therefore it 437 2, 160 | Caenob. v, 1: ~Collat. v, 2] number pride among the capital 438 2, 162 | Who does all ~things, "in number, weight, and measure [*Vulg.: ' 439 2, 162 | things in measure, and number, and weight.']" (Wis. 11: 440 2, 172 | behooved that nation to have a number of prophets ~especially 441 2, 181 | since thereby the greater number have a ~share in public 442 2, 181 | things that are infinite in number. Therefore human duties 443 2, 185 | scattered on all ~sides a great number of hypocrites wearing the 444 2, 186 | committed to an unlimited number of men; and there ~is no 445 2, 186 | and there ~is no fixed number of those who are received 446 2, 186 | to support an unlimited ~number of persons, which would 447 2, 186 | of finding a sufficient ~number of persons to be appointed 448 3, 1 | age - on account of ~the number of centuries, for Christ 449 3, 2 | species, as unity varies number, as is said (Metaph. viii, ~ 450 3, 2 | parts, but by reason of number, even as that in which two ~ 451 3, 2 | accidentally, so that the ~number of persons might not be 452 3, 2 | which is the principle of number. ~Therefore the union of 453 3, 2 | which is the principle of number. For the unity of a Divine 454 3, 2 | unity, which is a part of number, ~and which is shared in 455 3, 7 | all ~things in measure and number and weight." Therefore the 456 3, 7 | hast ordered all things in ~number, weight and measure." And 457 3, 10 | the extent depends on the number of things known. If, ~therefore, 458 3, 10 | depends not merely on the number of ~knowable things, but 459 3, 10 | of vision as regards the number of things known, ~nevertheless 460 3, 10 | but also as regards the number of things known, as was 461 3, 10 | there is not an infinite number in act, even ~though we 462 3, 10 | consequently there is a certain number not only of things lacking ~ 463 3, 10 | creature there is an infinite number of things, it knows the ~ 464 3, 10 | Christ knows an ~infinite number of things, inasmuch as it 465 3, 10 | there were an ~infinite number of men, they would have 466 3, 10 | predicated of an infinite number. ~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[10] A[ 467 3, 11 | the angels, both in the number of ~things known and in 468 3, 13 | and also as regards the number of ~things known, since 469 3, 17 | property. Now the dual number is placed in Christ with 470 3, 31 | R.O. 3 Para. 2/4~Again, the number forty pertains to the time 471 3, 31 | numbers from one to four. The number ten ~may also refer to the 472 3, 31 | to the decalogue; and the number four to the present life; ~ 473 3, 31 | forty-two persons. Which number may also be ~applied to 474 3, 31 | seven are forty-two. The number fourteen, ~which is the 475 3, 31 | signification as that given to the number forty, which is the product 476 3, 31 | R.O. 3 Para. 4/4~But the number used by Luke in Christ's 477 3, 31 | generality of sins. "For the number ten is shown in the ten 478 3, 31 | precepts of ~the Law to be the number of righteousness. Now, to 479 3, 31 | the Law. And eleven is the number beyond ten." And ~seven 480 3, 31 | seventy-seven: so that this ~number signifies the generality 481 3, 31 | posterity is cut off from the number of kings, ~according to 482 3, 31 | another, inasmuch as the number ten is the sign ~of perfection, 483 3, 33 | follows (De Trin. iv): "This number applies manifestly to the 484 3, 33 | Wherefore in the aforesaid number are ~foreshadowed the number 485 3, 33 | number are ~foreshadowed the number of months during which Christ 486 3, 39 | the very property of the number ~seems to point to this. 487 3, 39 | three and ten: and by ~the number three is implied faith in 488 3, 40 | by Christ's example the number "forty" is observed in ~ 489 3, 40 | the soul, to ~which the number three may be ascribed, for 490 3, 40 | as the body, to which the number four is ~applicable on account 491 3, 40 | moral code, by four, which number may be applied to the body, 492 3, 40 | law, the product is the number forty: in ~which," consequently, " 493 3, 46 | sustained, not as to the number of the ~sufferings and graces, 494 3, 53 | the perfection of the ~number "three" is commended, which 495 3, 53 | commended, which is "the number of everything," as ~having " 496 3, 60 | their cause; (5) Of their number.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[60] Out. 497 3, 60 | sacramental form demands a certain number of ~words, so does it require 498 3, 61 | were instituted, fewer in number, but more efficacious, more 499 3, 65 | Out. Para. 1/1 - OF THE NUMBER OF THE SACRAMENTS (FOUR 500 3, 65 | have now to consider the number of the sacraments: and concerning ~


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