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schooled 2
schooling 1
schools 5
science 504
sciences 139
scientia 6
scientiam 1
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506 76
505 let
504 degree
504 science
503 58
503 mercy
502 31
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

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science

1-500 | 501-504

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | necessary?~(2) Whether it is a science?~(3) Whether it is one or 2 1, 1 | that, besides philosophical science, we have no need of ~any 3 1, 1 | treated of in philosophical ~science. Therefore any other knowledge 4 1, 1 | knowledge besides philosophical science is ~superfluous.~Aquin.: 5 1, 1 | treated of in philosophical science - even God Himself; so ~ 6 1, 1 | theology, or the divine ~science, as Aristotle has proved ( 7 1, 1 | besides ~philosophical science, there is no need of any 8 1, 1 | no part of philosophical ~science, which has been built up 9 1, 1 | that besides philosophical science, there should be other knowledge, 10 1, 1 | God besides philosophical science built up by ~human reason. 11 1, 1 | that besides philosophical science built up by reason, there 12 1, 1 | there should be a ~sacred science learned through revelation.~ 13 1, 1 | And in this, the sacred science consists.~Aquin.: SMT FP 14 1, 1 | learned from philosophical science, ~so far as they can be 15 1, 1 | be taught us ~by another science so far as they fall within 16 1, 1 | Whether sacred doctrine is a science?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[2] 17 1, 1 | sacred doctrine is not a science. For every science ~proceeds 18 1, 1 | not a science. For every science ~proceeds from self-evident 19 1, 1 | sacred doctrine is not a science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[2] 20 1, 1 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, no science deals with individual facts. 21 1, 1 | facts. But this sacred ~science treats of individual facts, 22 1, 1 | sacred doctrine is not a science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[2] 23 1, 1 | De Trin. xiv, 1) "to this science alone ~belongs that whereby 24 1, 1 | But this can be said of no science except sacred doctrine. ~ 25 1, 1 | Therefore sacred doctrine is a science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[2] 26 1, 1 | that, Sacred doctrine is a science. We must bear in mind that ~ 27 1, 1 | by the light of a higher science: thus the science of perspective ~ 28 1, 1 | higher science: thus the science of perspective ~proceeds 29 1, 1 | that sacred doctrine is a ~science because it proceeds from 30 1, 1 | by the light of ~a higher science, namely, the science of 31 1, 1 | higher science, namely, the science of God and the blessed. 32 1, 1 | mathematician, so sacred science is established on principles 33 1, 1 | 1: The principles of any science are either in themselves ~ 34 1, 1 | conclusions of a higher science; and ~such, as we have said, 35 1, 1 | Whether sacred doctrine is one science?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[3] 36 1, 1 | sacred doctrine is not one science; for according ~to the Philosopher ( 37 1, 1 | Philosopher (Poster. i) "that science is one which treats only 38 1, 1 | sacred doctrine is not one science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[3] 39 1, 1 | sacred doctrine cannot be one science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[3] 40 1, 1 | Scripture speaks of it as one science: "Wisdom ~gave him the knowledge [ 41 1, 1 | Sacred doctrine is one science. The unity of a faculty 42 1, 1 | formality of the object of this science; and therefore is ~included 43 1, 1 | sacred doctrine as under one science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[3] 44 1, 1 | Hence the unity of this ~science is not impaired.~Aquin.: 45 1, 1 | by this one single sacred science under one aspect precisely 46 1, 1 | the stamp of the divine science which is one and ~simple, 47 1, 1 | doctrine is a practical science?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[4] 48 1, 1 | doctrine is a practical science; for a ~practical science 49 1, 1 | science; for a ~practical science is that which ends in action 50 1, 1 | doctrine is a practical science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[4] 51 1, 1 | But law implies a moral science which is a practical science. 52 1, 1 | science which is a practical science. Therefore ~sacred doctrine 53 1, 1 | doctrine is a practical science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[4] 54 1, 1 | contrary, Every practical science is concerned with human ~ 55 1, 1 | human ~operations; as moral science is concerned with human 56 1, 1 | practical but a speculative science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[4] 57 1, 1 | God, by one and the same science, knows both Himself ~and 58 1, 1 | for the nobility of a science depends on the certitude 59 1, 1 | it is the sign of a lower science to depend upon a ~higher; 60 1, 1 | answer that, Since this science is partly speculative and 61 1, 1 | practical. Now one ~speculative science is said to be nobler than 62 1, 1 | both these respects this science surpasses other ~speculative 63 1, 1 | subject-matter because this science treats chiefly of those 64 1, 1 | further ~purpose, as political science is nobler than military 65 1, 1 | is nobler than military science; for the ~good of the army 66 1, 1 | But the purpose of ~this science, in so far as it is practical, 67 1, 1 | purposes of every practical science are directed. ~Hence it 68 1, 1 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: This science can in a sense depend upon 69 1, 1 | as political of military ~science. That it thus uses them 70 1, 1 | are the ~teachings of this science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[6] 71 1, 1 | principles. Therefore this science is not ~wisdom.~Aquin.: 72 1, 1 | reason through some other ~science. But the knowledge proper 73 1, 1 | knowledge proper to this science comes through ~revelation 74 1, 1 | contrary to any truth of this ~science must be condemned as false: " 75 1, 1 | as a man learned in moral science might ~be able to judge 76 1, 1 | God is the object of this science?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[7] 77 1, 1 | is not the object of this science. For in every ~science, 78 1, 1 | this science. For in every ~science, the nature of its object 79 1, 1 | is presupposed. But this science cannot ~presuppose the essence 80 1, 1 | not the ~object of this science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[7] 81 1, 1 | conclusions are reached in any science must be ~comprehended under 82 1, 1 | under the object of the science. But in Holy Writ we reach ~ 83 1, 1 | not the object of ~this science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[7] 84 1, 1 | contrary, The object of the science is that of which it ~principally 85 1, 1 | principally treats. But in this science, the treatment is mainly 86 1, 1 | God is the ~object of this science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[7] 87 1, 1 | God is the object of this science. The relation between a ~ 88 1, 1 | The relation between a ~science and its object is the same 89 1, 1 | of ~sight. But in sacred science, all things are treated 90 1, 1 | truth ~the object of this science. This is clear also from 91 1, 1 | the principles of ~this science, namely, the articles of 92 1, 1 | principles and of the whole science must be the same, since ~ 93 1, 1 | the same, since ~the whole science is contained virtually in 94 1, 1 | what is treated of in this science, and not to the ~aspect 95 1, 1 | asserted the object of this ~science to be something other than 96 1, 1 | truth, we treat in this science, but so ~far as they have 97 1, 1 | God, nevertheless in this science we make use of His effects, 98 1, 1 | whatever is ~treated of in this science concerning God; even as 99 1, 1 | reached in this sacred ~science are comprehended under God, 100 1, 1 | but leave this to a higher science; whereas the highest of ~ 101 1, 1 | Scripture, since it has no science above itself, ~can dispute 102 1, 1 | is proper to the lowest science seems not to befit this 103 1, 1 | seems not to befit this science, ~which holds the highest 104 1, 1 | is not fitting that this science should make use ~of such 105 1, 1 | things does not befit this science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] A[9] 106 1, 1 | Therefore ~this sacred science may use metaphors.~Aquin.: 107 1, 1 | speech transcends every science, because in one and the 108 1, 1 | whereas in every other science things are ~signified by 109 1, 1 | signified by words, this science has the property, that the 110 1, 2 | endeavor to ~expound this science, we shall treat: (1) Of 111 1, 5 | otherwise there ~would be no science of mathematics. Therefore 112 1, 12 | knowledge which belongs to science, for ~science determines 113 1, 12 | belongs to science, for ~science determines the intellect 114 1, 13 | one order; as sense and science refer respectively to ~sensible 115 1, 13 | existence. Therefore in science and in sense a real relation ~ 116 1, 13 | is no real relation to ~science and sense, but only in idea, 117 1, 13 | terms of the relations of science and sense. Hence the ~Philosopher 118 1, 13 | nature. This applies to science and its object; for the 119 1, 13 | a potentiality, and the science as a habit, or ~as an act. 120 1, 13 | signification exists ~before science, but if the same object 121 1, 13 | it is ~simultaneous with science in act; for the object known 122 1, 14 | 1~OBJ 2: Further, since science is about conclusions, it 123 1, 14 | caused in God; therefore science is not in God.~Aquin.: SMT 124 1, 14 | knowledge of principles; he has "science" ~as regards knowledge of 125 1, 16 | its perfection; even as science may be said to be ~greater 126 1, 19 | divine will alone. Thus all science would be in vain, since 127 1, 19 | would be in vain, since science seeks ~to assign causes 128 1, 22 | eternal salvation. For in the science of ~morals, after the moral 129 1, 22 | himself. For ~every operative science is the more perfect, the 130 1, 28 | real relation, both of science to its object, and of the 131 1, 32 | principle, as in natural science, where sufficient proof 132 1, 44 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The science of mathematics treats its 133 1, 44 | things, because there is ~no science or definition of particular 134 1, 44 | Reply OBJ 3: Although every science and definition is concerned 135 1, 46 | not of demonstration or science. And it is useful to consider ~ 136 1, 75 | for it is a subject to science, and ~virtue; and it changes 137 1, 45 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The science of mathematics treats its 138 1, 45 | things, because there is ~no science or definition of particular 139 1, 45 | Reply OBJ 3: Although every science and definition is concerned 140 1, 47 | not of demonstration or science. And it is useful to consider ~ 141 1, 74 | for it is a subject to science, and ~virtue; and it changes 142 1, 78 | belong to the habit of science. And so it happens that 143 1, 78 | a conclusion in another science - for ~example, perspective. 144 1, 78 | attributed to the higher reason, science to ~the lower.~Aquin.: SMT 145 1, 78 | things, of which natural science and mathematics treat. And 146 1, 78 | application ~of knowledge or science to what we do: which application 147 1, 83 | the ~consideration of the science of morals; wherefore we 148 1, 83 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Science is in the intellect. If, 149 1, 83 | follows that there is no science of ~bodies; and thus perishes 150 1, 83 | and thus perishes natural science, which treats of mobile 151 1, 83 | matter would be excluded from science (which knowledge is proper 152 1, 83 | knowledge is proper to ~natural science), and likewise all demonstration 153 1, 83 | our having an immovable science of movable ~things.~Aquin.: 154 1, 83 | as the end of a practical science is action, so the end of 155 1, 83 | so the end of natural ~science is that which is perceived 156 1, 84 | understand are the objects of science; therefore if what we ~understand 157 1, 84 | would ~follow that every science would not be concerned with 158 1, 84 | teaching of the Platonists all science is about ideas, ~which they 159 1, 85 | consider the objects ~of science in their universal principles, 160 1, 85 | universal principles, then all science is of ~necessary things. 161 1, 85 | and become the objects of science.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[86] A[ 162 1, 87 | obtainable by speculative science; and not by being united 163 1, 87 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, science resides in the intellect. 164 1, 87 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Science treats of higher things 165 1, 105 | beings are taught Divine science by the higher ~minds."~Aquin.: 166 1, 105 | are not conspicuous for science; and some also are eminent 167 1, 105 | eminent in ~one kind of science, and fail in another; and 168 1, 107 | who can teach ~a higher science. By this similitude we can 169 1, 116 | for the acquisition ~of science: for instance, he may put 170 2, 1 | 1,[2] that speculative science is sought for its own sake. 171 2, 1 | said that each speculative science is the last end. Therefore 172 2, 1 | same applies to speculative science; which is desired ~as the 173 2, 3 | consideration of a speculative science does not extend beyond ~ 174 2, 3 | of the principles of that science: since the entire science 175 2, 3 | science: since the entire science is ~virtually contained 176 2, 3 | consideration of speculative ~science. ~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[3] A[ 177 2, 4 | instruction is necessary ~for science. Secondly, as perfecting 178 2, 7 | vi, 2) that "no art or science considers accidental being, ~ 179 2, 8 | principles are in speculative science (Ethic. viii, 8).~Aquin.: 180 2, 13 | demonstration or of one science, from being the conclusion 181 2, 13 | another demonstration or science; while the first indemonstrable ~ 182 2, 13 | of any demonstration or science; so ~too that which is the 183 2, 14 | found in us: thus in us science is of ~conclusions derived 184 2, 14 | from causes to effects: but science when ~said of God means 185 2, 14 | that are done according to science ~or art."~Aquin.: SMT FS 186 2, 14 | inquiry of demonstrative science does not go on ~indefinitely, 187 2, 14 | demonstrative sciences one science ~postulates certain things 188 2, 14 | speculative or through practical science; for instance, that adultery 189 2, 15 | through the principles ~is science, whereas the knowledge of 190 2, 15 | of the principles is not science, but ~something higher, 191 2, 27 | Reply OBJ 1: He who seeks science, is not entirely without 192 2, 27 | know that rhetoric is a science that enables man to ~persuade 193 2, 30 | outside the purview of ~science. But if some concupiscences 194 2, 34 | good at all. Thus a certain science is supremely ~good, but 195 2, 34 | supremely ~good, but not every science is.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[34] 196 2, 35 | Hence one and ~the same science considers contraries.~Aquin.: 197 2, 39 | Because, however, ~in the science of Morals, we consider things 198 2, 49 | usefulness," such as ~inchoate science and virtue: "and when he 199 2, 49 | habits," such as ~perfected science and virtue.~Aquin.: SMT 200 2, 49 | supposing a man to have a science imperfectly, so as to be 201 2, 49 | that he is disposed to that science, rather than ~that he has 202 2, 49 | rather than ~that he has the science. From this it is clear that 203 2, 50 | examples, as of virtue and science; and because in Phys. ~vii, 204 2, 50 | and virtues: and ~just as science is related to the apprehensive 205 2, 50 | are no ~sciences: since science is of universals, which 206 2, 50 | Ethic. vi, 2,3,10) puts science, ~wisdom and understanding, 207 2, 50 | of all men, the habits of science, in which ~men differ from 208 2, 50 | virtues, which are wisdom, science and ~understanding, in that 209 2, 50 | subject of the habit of science, by which the intellect, ~ 210 2, 51 | reason, and as the ~habits of science are caused in the intellect, 211 2, 51 | excellent principle than the science of conclusions.~Aquin.: 212 2, 51 | is an act of reason. But science, which is the habit of one ~ 213 2, 51 | intellect: whereas ~a habit of science can be caused by a single 214 2, 51 | gave to the apostles the science of the Scriptures and of 215 2, 52 | great or little health or science. But in so far ~as we consider 216 2, 52 | health; greater or less science, which extends to more or ~ 217 2, 52 | subject: in so ~far as equal science or health is participated 218 2, 52 | alteration follows as to science ~and virtue (Phys. viii, 219 2, 52 | readily. In like ~manner, science can increase in itself by 220 2, 52 | same specific habit of ~science increases in that man. Yet 221 2, 52 | in that man. Yet a man's science increases, as to the ~subject' 222 2, 53 | the advent of health. Now ~science, which is a habit, cannot 223 2, 53 | Therefore the habit of science can nowise be lost.~Aquin.: 224 2, 53 | movement. But the habit ~of science, which is in the soul, cannot 225 2, 53 | through death. Therefore ~science cannot be corrupted. For 226 2, 53 | deception are the corruption of science." Moreover, by ~sinning 227 2, 53 | subject; such ~is the habit of science which is chiefly indeed 228 2, 53 | Consequently the habit of science ~cannot be corrupted indirectly, 229 2, 53 | conclusions, which is called ~science, to the cause of which something 230 2, 53 | true opinion or even of ~science. Hence the Philosopher, 231 2, 53 | deception is ~the corruption of science." As to virtues, some of 232 2, 53 | applies what we have said of science and opinion. Some, however, 233 2, 53 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Science is not taken away by movement 234 2, 53 | obstacle to the act of science; in so far as the intellect, 235 2, 53 | can corrupt ~the habit of science, even as regards the very 236 2, 53 | Further, the habits of science and virtue are in the intellectual ~ 237 2, 53 | forgetfulness, is the corruption of ~science." Moreover he says (Ethic. 238 2, 53 | seen in the case both of ~science and of virtue. For it is 239 2, 54 | species. Now the same habit of science regards ~contraries: thus 240 2, 54 | is "a syllogism producing science," as stated in ~Poster. 241 2, 54 | of which the habits of ~science are distinguished.~Aquin.: 242 2, 54 | conclusions belong to but one science, ~to geometry, for instance, 243 2, 54 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: In any science, he who acquires, by demonstration, ~ 244 2, 54 | and demonstrations of ~one science are coordinate, and one 245 2, 55 | says (Categor. vi) that science and ~virtue are habits. ~ 246 2, 56 | good man on account of his science or his art. Therefore the 247 2, 56 | through being gifted in science or art, a man ~is said to 248 2, 56 | smith. And for this reason science and art are often ~divided 249 2, 56 | Ethic. vi, 3) holds that science, wisdom and understanding, ~ 250 2, 56 | therefore as the subject of science, ~which is the right reason 251 2, 57 | are three, namely, wisdom, science and understanding?~(3) Whether 252 2, 57 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, science is a speculative habit. 253 2, 57 | a speculative habit. But science and virtue ~are distinct 254 2, 57 | possess a habit of speculative science, it does not follow that 255 2, 57 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Science is contrasted with virtue 256 2, 57 | intellect, viz. ~wisdom, science and understanding?~Aquin.: 257 2, 57 | intellect, viz. wisdom, science and understanding. Because 258 2, 57 | a ~species is a kind of science, as stated in Ethic. vi, 259 2, 57 | should not be condivided with science among the intellectual virtues.~ 260 2, 57 | syllogism. Therefore as science, which is the result of 261 2, 57 | intellectual virtues, viz. wisdom, science and ~understanding.~Aquin.: 262 2, 57 | knowable matter, it is "science" which perfects the ~intellect. 263 2, 57 | OBJ 1: Wisdom is a kind of science, in so far as it has that 264 2, 57 | more perfect virtue than science.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[57] A[ 265 2, 57 | this second way, belongs to science, which considers the ~conclusions 266 2, 57 | vegetal. For it is ~thus that science depends on understanding 267 2, 57 | itself both understanding and science, by ~judging both of the 268 2, 57 | both of the conclusions of science, and of the principles on ~ 269 2, 57 | thereto. Wherefore, just as science has ~always a relation to 270 2, 57 | above (A[2], ad ~2) that science depends on and presupposes 271 2, 57 | speculative matters, there is one science of ~dialectics, which inquires 272 2, 58 | Further, some authors put science in the definition of virtues: ~ 273 2, 58 | define perseverance as a "science or habit regarding those ~ 274 2, 58 | hold"; and holiness as "a science ~which makes man to be faithful 275 2, 58 | do his duty to God." Now science is ~an intellectual virtue. 276 2, 58 | only five of these, viz. science, ~wisdom, understanding, 277 2, 58 | intellectual ~virtues, viz. wisdom, science, and art; but not without 278 2, 58 | again by some practical science. But this is not ~enough 279 2, 58 | means ~of understanding or science, is destroyed in a particular 280 2, 58 | natural understanding or of science, man is made to be rightly 281 2, 63 | but that the hindrances to science and virtue, ~which are due 282 2, 63 | a ~natural aptitude for science, another for fortitude, 283 2, 63 | more excellent than the ~science of conclusions, and the 284 2, 65 | since we may have ~one science, without having another. 285 2, 65 | cannot have ~speculative science unless we have the understanding 286 2, 65 | he cannot acquire the science of geometry, ~because he 287 2, 65 | Though charity surpasses science and prudence, yet prudence ~ 288 2, 65 | a man who has a habit of science, finds it ~difficult to 289 2, 66 | But this does not apply to science and ~art: for every grammarian 290 2, 66 | cannot be more or less, as ~science and art can; because the 291 2, 66 | Ethic. i, 2 that ~political science, which belongs to prudence ( 292 2, 66 | which are ~the subject of science, than of Divine things, 293 2, 66 | our knowledge." Therefore science is a ~greater virtue than 294 2, 66 | prudence, or political ~science, is, in this way, the servant 295 2, 67 | just as the knowledge of science is in part, i.e. imperfect; 296 2, 67 | Categor. vi) that since science is ~a habit, it is a quality 297 2, 67 | that of death. Therefore science and the other ~intellectual 298 2, 67 | remain, which belong to ~science and the other intellectual 299 2, 67 | to ~this opinion, neither science nor any other intellectual 300 2, 67 | the material element in science, and to the mode of understanding; ~ 301 2, 67 | is ~destroyed; nor will science be applied by turning to 302 2, 67 | Sickness destroys the habit of science as to its material ~element, 303 2, 67 | phantasms. ~Consequently science remains, yet not as to the 304 2, 67 | is more excellent than science. Now science remains after 305 2, 67 | excellent than science. Now science remains after this life, 306 2, 67 | 6]]; and a man can have science through a ~demonstrative 307 2, 67 | to ~opinion, faith, and science. For it is essential to 308 2, 67 | adhesion is not firm: to science it is essential to have 309 2, 67 | intellectual vision, for science possesses certitude which ~ 310 2, 67 | firm, but ~falls short of science in so far as it lacks vision.~ 311 2, 67 | Faith is more excellent than science, on the part of the ~object, 312 2, 67 | is the First Truth. Yet science has a more perfect mode 313 2, 68 | appetitive power, while ~science belongs to reason. But reason 314 2, 68 | wisdom, understanding and science to prudence and art (yet 315 2, 68 | and understanding before science, and ~prudence and synesis 316 2, 74 | to the considerations of science, ~sometimes an unpremeditated 317 2, 74 | subject; thus inchoate science is a disposition to perfect 318 2, 74 | a disposition to perfect science: ~sometimes it is in the 319 2, 74 | imagination is a disposition to science which is in ~the intellect. 320 2, 82 | inclined to an act: thus ~science and virtue are called habits. 321 2, 88 | species; thus imperfect science, by being perfected, ~becomes 322 2, 89 | are ~outside the pale of science. Therefore, venial sins 323 2, 94 | unable to use the ~habit of science. In like manner, through 324 2, 99 | notice that the loftier the science, the higher the means of ~ 325 2, 101 | the end comes under the science ~whose object is the end. 326 2, 111 | would teach another in any science must first ~be certain of 327 2, 111 | of the principles of the science, and with regard to this ~ 328 2, 111 | principal conclusions of the science, and hence we have the word 329 2, 1 | the object. Thus in the science of geometry, the conclusions ~ 330 2, 1 | the formal aspect of the science is ~the mean of demonstration, 331 2, 1 | Faith is a mean between science and opinion. Now the ~mean 332 2, 1 | the extremes. Since, then, science and ~opinion are about propositions, 333 2, 1 | but in a thing. For as in science we do not ~form propositions, 334 2, 1 | are held by the habit of science). Secondly ~the intellect 335 2, 1 | faith can be an object of science ~[*Science is certain knowledge 336 2, 1 | an object of science ~[*Science is certain knowledge of 337 2, 1 | faith can be an ~object of science. For where science is lacking 338 2, 1 | object of science. For where science is lacking there is ignorance, 339 2, 1 | ignorance is the opposite of science. Now we are not in ignorance 340 2, 1 | faith can be an object of science.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[1] A[5] 341 2, 1 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, science is acquired by reasons. 342 2, 1 | things can be an object of science.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[1] A[5] 343 2, 1 | demonstrated are an object of science, ~since a "demonstration 344 2, 1 | syllogism that produces science." Now certain ~matters of 345 2, 1 | faith can be an object of science.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[1] A[5] 346 2, 1 | opinion is further from science than faith is, since ~faith 347 2, 1 | stand between opinion and science. Now opinion and ~science 348 2, 1 | science. Now opinion and ~science can, in a way, be about 349 2, 1 | i. ~Therefore faith and science can be about the same object 350 2, 1 | whereas what is an object of science is the object of perception. ~ 351 2, 1 | which are an object of ~science.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[1] A[5] 352 2, 1 | 1/3~I answer that, All science is derived from self-evident 353 2, 1 | wherefore all objects of science must needs be, in a ~fashion, 354 2, 1 | thing to be an object of science and of ~belief for the same 355 2, 1 | an object of vision or science for one, is believed by 356 2, 1 | unknown by all as an object of science: such are the things which ~ 357 2, 1 | Consequently faith and science are not about the ~same 358 2, 1 | Hence again, theology is a science, as we stated at the outset 359 2, 1 | Philosopher says (Poster. i), "science and opinion ~about the same 360 2, 1 | have ~stated above about science and faith; yet it is possible 361 2, 1 | and the ~same man to have science and faith about the same 362 2, 1 | and in ~the same respect, science is incompatible with either 363 2, 1 | different reasons. Because science is incompatible with opinion ~ 364 2, 1 | simply, for the reason that science demands that ~its object 365 2, 1 | otherwise; and the ~reason why science and faith cannot be about 366 2, 1 | is because the object of science is something seen whereas ~ 367 2, 2 | considers what he knows by science [*Science is certain knowledge ~ 368 2, 2 | what he knows by science [*Science is certain knowledge ~of 369 2, 2 | things that he knows ~by science, or understands, for this 370 2, 2 | something in common with science ~and understanding; yet 371 2, 2 | order that he may acquire science in a perfect degree; ~thus 372 2, 2 | the object of ~faith. Now science and faith are not about 373 2, 2 | reason are an object of science, it seems that there is 374 2, 2 | knowable scientifically [*Science is certain ~knowledge of 375 2, 2 | Divine truth. Because the science to ~whose province it belongs 376 2, 2 | progress in the study of science, either through dullness 377 2, 2 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Science and faith cannot be in the 378 2, 2 | but what is an object of science for one, can be an ~object 379 2, 2 | things that can be known by science are of one ~common scientific 380 2, 2 | things scientifically known [*Science ~is a certain knowledge 381 2, 2 | Now the considerations of science are not meritorious, ~nor 382 2, 2 | things may be considered in science: namely the ~scientist's 383 2, 2 | fact. Now the assent of science is not subject to free-will, 384 2, 4 | principles are the ~substance of science, because, to wit, these 385 2, 4 | the ~first beginnings of science, the whole of which is itself 386 2, 4 | we distinguish it from science and understanding, the object 387 2, 4 | opinion but ~falls short of science," these all amount to the 388 2, 4 | faith is more certain than science and the other intellectual ~ 389 2, 4 | is not more certain than science and the ~other intellectual 390 2, 4 | black. ~Now understanding, science and also wisdom are free 391 2, 4 | whereas understanding, science ~and wisdom imply some kind 392 2, 4 | intellectual sight. Therefore science and ~understanding are more 393 2, 4 | faith is strengthened by science." Therefore it seems that 394 2, 4 | Therefore it seems that science ~or understanding is more 395 2, 4 | the word of God. Therefore science ~is not more certain than 396 2, 4 | intellectual virtues, viz. wisdom, science [*In English the ~corresponding ' 397 2, 4 | be ~observed that wisdom, science and understanding may be 398 2, 4 | sight: ~thus a man of little science is more certain about what 399 2, 4 | authority of an expert in science, than about what is apparent 400 2, 4 | premisses. But in so far as science, wisdom and ~understanding 401 2, 5 | many articles, so does one ~science, viz. geometry, contain 402 2, 5 | Now a man may possess ~the science of geometry as to some geometrical 403 2, 5 | various conclusions of a science have their respective ~means 404 2, 5 | know some conclusions of a science without knowing the ~others. 405 2, 6 | says (De Trin. xiv) that "science begets faith in us, and ~ 406 2, 6 | Now those things which science ~begets in us seem to be 407 2, 6 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Science begets and nourishes faith, 408 2, 6 | persuasion afforded by science; but the chief and proper 409 2, 8 | understanding is more certain than science. But science ~and faith 410 2, 8 | certain than science. But science ~and faith are incompatible 411 2, 9 | things, for ~instance, the science of metaphysics. Much more 412 2, 9 | cannot apply to a speculative science. ~Therefore the gift of 413 2, 22 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, science and art are virtues, according 414 2, 22 | can be no strictly true science, ~if a right estimate of 415 2, 22 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Science and art of their very nature 416 2, 23 | extend ~before: thus the science of geometry increases in 417 2, 23 | iv, 9. In like ~manner science, as a habit, has its quantity 418 2, 24 | have something greater than science, namely understanding.~Aquin.: 419 2, 43 | described as ~"sweet-tasting science [sapida scientia]," and 420 2, 43 | judgment, if he has learnt the ~science of morals, while he who 421 2, 45 | 13) that "prudence is the science of what to desire and ~what 422 2, 45 | and ~what to avoid." Now science is condivided with virtue, 423 2, 45 | 1: Augustine there takes science in the broad sense for any ~ 424 2, 45 | conclusions, about which is ~"science," so in the practical reason, 425 2, 45 | understanding of principles moves science.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 426 2, 45 | prudence as of speculative ~science, because the primary universal 427 2, 45 | forgetfulness. ~For since science is about necessary things, 428 2, 45 | contingent matters of action. But science is lost ~by forgetfulness. 429 2, 45 | one can ~forget art and science, so as to lose them altogether, 430 2, 45 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Science is in the reason only: hence 431 2, 46 | specifically distinct from science. But ~politics, economics, 432 2, 46 | these is the attaining ~of science by demonstration, which 433 2, 47 | and chiefly in wisdom and science, which ~employ a demonstrative 434 2, 49 | decision belong to ~the same science. Therefore in like manner 435 2, 49 | speculative matters the rational science of ~dialectics, which is 436 2, 49 | distinct from ~demonstrative science, which decides the truth.~ 437 2, 49 | higher ~principles than science does, and consequently is 438 2, 51 | matters a ~demonstrative science is said to exercise judgment, 439 2, 53 | applied to action," just as ~science is "right reason applied 440 2, 78 | which he describes as "the science of political commutations ~ 441 2, 78 | he ~says that it is the science of "the service of God" ( 442 2, 80 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Science and anything else conducive 443 2, 80 | perfectly submits to God his ~science or any other perfection, 444 2, 93 | 1~OBJ 2: Further, human science originates from experiments, 445 2, 93 | is no one like ~me in the science of divining?" Therefore 446 2, 93 | was no one like him in the science of divining, he ~spoke in 447 2, 94 | namely, the ~acquisition of science. Therefore it is not unlawful 448 2, 94 | themselves the power to cause science, consisting as they do in 449 2, 94 | useless for the acquisition of science. For since it is ~not intended 450 2, 94 | means of this art to acquire science in a manner ~connatural 451 2, 94 | have received wisdom and science infused into ~them by God, 452 2, 98 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, science is no less spiritual than 453 2, 98 | receive money for the use of science: thus a lawyer may sell ~ 454 2, 98 | He that is possessed of science, without having ~taken upon 455 2, 98 | not a sale of truth or science, but a hiring of labor. 456 2, 100 | due to those who excel in science ~and virtue. But there is 457 2, 100 | worship to those who excel in science and virtue. Therefore observance, ~ 458 2, 100 | a man has perfection of science and virtue does not ~give 459 2, 100 | dignity. ~Yet, forasmuch as science, virtue and all like things 460 2, 107 | manifestation of truths ~relating to science wherefore neither does this 461 2, 107 | Nevertheless ~since truths of science, as known by us, are something 462 2, 107 | is in him, for instance science, holiness and so forth. 463 2, 108 | pertain to ~the perfection of science or to moral conduct, a lie 464 2, 111 | on, "and I have known the science of the saints" [*Vulg.: ~' 465 2, 111 | and I have not known the science of the saints'].~Aquin.: 466 2, 120 | we instruct a man in some science, we begin by ~putting before 467 2, 121 | this is owing to a certain science and art, as in ~the case 468 2, 122 | some other speculative science, which seems ridiculous. 469 2, 127 | any ~other good, such as science or external fortune. On 470 2, 131 | natural disposition, or from science, or from external ~fortune, 471 2, 132 | magnificent man is like the man of science." Now science has more in ~ 472 2, 132 | the man of science." Now science has more in ~common with 473 2, 160 | their pride of heart, men of science were ~delivered "to a reprobate 474 2, 165 | the student of natural science whose gaze pierces the heavens, 475 2, 169 | which is the cause of human science. Now ~a man who has acquired 476 2, 169 | a man who has acquired a science knows whatever pertains 477 2, 169 | whatever pertains to that science; ~thus a grammarian knows 478 2, 169 | Reply OBJ 3: He who has a science knows the principles of 479 2, 169 | knows the principles of that science, ~whence whatever is pertinent 480 2, 169 | whatever is pertinent to that science depends; wherefore to have ~ 481 2, 169 | to have ~the habit of a science perfectly, is to know whatever 482 2, 169 | whatever is pertinent to ~that science. But God Who is the principle 483 2, 169 | reason. Now he that has ~science, by the light of natural 484 2, 170 | than those ~of acquired science. Now natural indisposition 485 2, 170 | considerations ~of acquired science, since many are prevented 486 2, 170 | grasp the speculations of science. Much more therefore ~is 487 2, 170 | 2: The considerations of science proceed from a natural cause, ~ 488 2, 171 | Now one who possesses a science by his natural light, is 489 2, 172 | degrees of knowledge: ~thus science based on direct [*"Propter 490 2, 172 | is more excellent ~than science based on indirect [*"Quia"] 491 2, 174 | things known by acquired science, for instance the conclusions 492 2, 186 | established for the study of ~science?~(6) Whether a religious 493 2, 186 | Rust. Monach.): ~"Love the science of the Scriptures and thou 494 3, 9 | syllogisms, disposes ~towards science, which results from demonstrative 495 3, 11 | Poster. i, 42) that "one science is of one class of object." 496 3, 54 | is tempered, as medical science bears witness. But whatever 497 3, 60 | intelligible effects; thus science is the effect of a ~demonstration. 498 Suppl, 3 | who delights in learning a science, ~learns the better, and, 499 Suppl, 18| own will, ~but his medical science, so the satisfactory punishments 500 Suppl, 38| lower Orders, as political science, which seeks the common ~


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