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Alphabetical    [«  »]
fondling 5
fondness 4
font 32
food 475
foods 22
fool 38
foolhardiness 2
Frequency    [«  »]
477 free-will
476 43
476 observed
475 food
474 47
473 denotes
473 mother
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

food

    Part, Question
1 1, 19 | them; ~as, we will to take food to preserve life, or to 2 1, 19 | kills a ~stag, his object is food, to obtain which the killing 3 1, 51 | and ~Abraham offered them food, after having previously 4 1, 51 | eating involves the taking of food convertible into the substance ~ 5 1, 51 | Although after the Resurrection food was not converted into the ~ 6 1, 51 | such a true nature that food could be ~changed into it; 7 1, 51 | was a true eating. But the food taken by angels ~was neither 8 1, 51 | body of such a ~nature that food could be changed into it; 9 1, 51 | 3/3~Abraham offered them food, deeming them to be men, 10 1, 63 | thus the fox in seeking its food has a natural inclination 11 1, 69 | which he tilled to gain his ~food, produced unfruitful and 12 1, 70 | provide for the necessities of food; all of which ~things could 13 1, 52 | and ~Abraham offered them food, after having previously 14 1, 52 | eating involves the taking of food convertible into the substance ~ 15 1, 52 | Although after the Resurrection food was not converted into the ~ 16 1, 52 | such a true nature that food could be ~changed into it; 17 1, 52 | was a true eating. But the food taken by angels ~was neither 18 1, 52 | body of such a ~nature that food could be changed into it; 19 1, 52 | 3/3~Abraham offered them food, deeming them to be men, 20 1, 64 | thus the fox in seeking its food has a natural inclination 21 1, 70 | which he tilled to gain his ~food, produced unfruitful and 22 1, 71 | provide for the necessities of food; all of which ~things could 23 1, 77 | generation, the use of food," and (cf. De ~Anima iii, 24 1, 77 | is required, whereby the food is changed into ~the substance 25 1, 80 | concupiscible - namely, food and ~sex, as the Philosopher 26 1, 81 | attained: for instance, food is said to be necessary 27 1, 90 | senses only as ordered to food ~and sex, man alone takes 28 1, 90 | the ~purpose of seeking food and procuring a livelihood; 29 1, 90 | obliged to take hold of his food with his mouth. Thus he 30 1, 90 | is that by which it takes food, and the ~inferior part 31 1, 95 | and herbs were given as food to all animals and ~birds, 32 1, 95 | fowls are given ~by men as food to the trained falcon.~Aquin.: 33 1, 95 | concupiscence - nor for ~food, since they fed on the trees 34 1, 95 | indeed it was ~dependent on food wherewith to sustain life.~ 35 1, 96 | Whether he stood in need of food?~(4) Whether he would have 36 1, 96 | innocence man had need of food?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[97] A[ 37 1, 96 | innocence man did not require ~food. For food is necessary for 38 1, 96 | did not require ~food. For food is necessary for man to 39 1, 96 | Therefore he had no ~need of food.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[97] A[ 40 1, 96 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, food is needed for nourishment. 41 1, 96 | it does not appear ~how food could be needful to him.~ 42 1, 96 | OBJ 3: Further, we need food for the preservation of 43 1, 96 | Therefore he did not require food.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[97] A[ 44 1, 96 | Further, the consumption of food involves voiding of the 45 1, 96 | seems that ~man did not take food in the primitive state.~ 46 1, 96 | an animal life ~requiring food; but after the resurrection 47 1, 96 | spiritual life ~needing no food. In order to make this clear, 48 1, 96 | of which are the use of food, generation, and ~growth. 49 1, 96 | resurrection, man will not require food; whereas he required it 50 1, 96 | which was sustained by food? Since ~an immortal being 51 1, 96 | immortal being needs neither food nor drink." For we have 52 1, 96 | man ~was obliged to take food.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[97] A[ 53 1, 96 | nutriment, on the ~part of the food changed into the substance 54 1, 96 | was passible, but that the food ~taken was passible; although 55 1, 96 | 3: If man had not taken food he would have sinned; as 56 1, 96 | taken more than necessary food, so that there would have 57 1, 96 | it could not be taken as food; since food is changed into 58 1, 96 | be taken as food; since food is changed into the ~substance 59 1, 96 | gods, by eating a certain food, became immortal; which 60 1, 96 | loss man was provided with food, ~taken from the other trees 61 1, 96 | we are provided with the ~food, which we take for the same 62 1, 96 | transform so much of the food as is required to ~replace 63 1, 96 | however, the assimilated food does not suffice for growth, 64 1, 96 | Dei xiv, 26): "Man had food ~to appease his hunger, 65 1, 97 | not take less pleasure in food taken in moderation than 66 1, 98 | life, ~as to the use of food and generation. Hence it 67 1, 101 | ward off such corruption by food. Among those things which ~ 68 1, 102 | as the coarseness of the food, which again is to be ascribed ~ 69 1, 103 | Thus ~a cook dresses the food by applying the natural 70 1, 113 | would ~have the desire for food and love and such like pleasures; 71 1, 114 | an animal is enticed by food, but as a spirit by signs"; ~ 72 1, 116 | strengthens nature, and ~employs food and medicine, of which nature 73 1, 118 | Whether any part of the food is changed into true human 74 1, 118 | produced from the surplus food?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[119] A[ 75 1, 118 | Whether some part of the food is changed into true human 76 1, 118 | would seem that none of the food is changed into true human ~ 77 1, 118 | Therefore none ~of the food is changed into true human 78 1, 118 | Now what is formed from food comes and ~goes. Therefore 79 1, 118 | Therefore what is produced from food is flesh belonging to matter, ~ 80 1, 118 | species. Therefore the food is not changed into true 81 1, 118 | could be recovered if the food were changed into the ~humor. 82 1, 118 | into the ~humor. Therefore food is not changed into true 83 1, 118 | 1~OBJ 4: Further, if the food were changed into true human 84 1, 118 | would be able by taking food to ~insure himself against 85 1, 118 | 1~OBJ 5: Further, if the food is changed into true human 86 1, 118 | generated ~in a man from his food can both recede and be repaired. 87 1, 118 | incongruous. Therefore the food is not changed into true 88 1, 118 | Relig. xi): "The bodily food ~when corrupted, that is, 89 1, 118 | human nature. Therefore the food is changed into the reality 90 1, 118 | According to ~these, the food is not changed into true 91 1, 118 | true human nature; we take food, they ~stated, in order 92 1, 118 | only be the result of the food being changed into the true 93 1, 118 | added, through the change of food into the substance of ~the 94 1, 118 | further is produced from the food, this does not belong to 95 1, 118 | nutritive power, if ~their food were not changed into their 96 1, 118 | form of human nature on the food which is assimilated. Thirdly, 97 1, 118 | assimilated. Thirdly, because ~food is needed not only for growth, 98 1, 118 | else at the term of growth, food ~would be needful no longer; 99 1, 118 | what is ~formed from the food, took the place of what 100 1, 118 | which is formed from the food.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[119] A[ 101 1, 118 | it must be said that the food is really ~changed into 102 1, 118 | says (De Anima ii, 4): "Food nourishes inasmuch as it 103 1, 118 | something from every kind of food is cast ~out into the privy. 104 1, 118 | whatever is generated from ~food, can be dissolved by natural 105 1, 118 | understand what is generated from food: and ~this, they say, does 106 1, 118 | since what is generated from food is united to, by ~mixing 107 1, 118 | is produced from surplus food?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[119] A[ 108 1, 118 | produced from the surplus ~food, but from the substance 109 1, 118 | produced from the surplus food, a man would receive nothing 110 1, 118 | his ancestors in whom the food never existed. Therefore 111 1, 118 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, the food of the generator is sometimes 112 1, 118 | were produced from ~surplus food, the man begotten of such 113 1, 118 | were produced from surplus food. ~Therefore the semen is 114 1, 118 | that "the semen is surplus food."~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[119] 115 1, 118 | subject; it is clear that the food which at first is ~dissimilar, 116 1, 118 | the horse. So therefore food ~first of all receives a 117 1, 118 | which is ~generated from the food, before it is transformed 118 1, 118 | size, which require much food, have little semen in proportion 119 2, 2 | his natural wants: such as food, drink, clothing, cars, ~ 120 2, 4 | the saints; for instance, food ~and drink, wealth and a 121 2, 4 | Hom. xi in Evang.). Thus food and drink signify the ~delight 122 2, 11 | even beasts enjoy their food and any bodily pleasure."~ 123 2, 12 | is moved either to seek food, or to ~do something of 124 2, 13 | side with two portions of food ~equally appetizing and 125 2, 17 | pleasure in the act of taking food or in the act ~of generation, 126 2, 18 | already transformed: thus ~food when transformed is the 127 2, 18 | nutritive power; whereas food ~before being transformed 128 2, 30 | the animal; for example, food, drink, and ~the like: and 129 2, 30 | animal concupiscence of food, drink, and the ~like, which 130 2, 30 | instance, after getting food, a man ~may desire food 131 2, 30 | food, a man ~may desire food yet again; and so of anything 132 2, 31 | concupiscences, such as those of food, sexual union, and the ~ 133 2, 31 | regards the individual, as food, drink, sleep, and the ~ 134 2, 32 | when one is satiated with food. ~Therefore likeness is 135 2, 33 | instance, the ~memory of food in respect of a man who 136 2, 34 | goodness and malice; since food is universally pleasurable 137 2, 35 | life is loved more than food and sexual ~pleasure. But 138 2, 36 | pleasures connected with food." ~But not every pleasure 139 2, 52 | For not every morsel of ~food actually increases the animal' 140 2, 52 | but the multiplication of food results at ~last in an increase 141 2, 63 | in the consumption ~of food, the mean fixed by human 142 2, 63 | by human reason, is that food should not harm the ~health 143 2, 63 | 9:27), by abstinence in food, drink and the like. It ~ 144 2, 66 | species, viz. in matters of food and of sex. ~And so these 145 2, 67 | pleasures in matters of food and sex; ~nor fear and daring 146 2, 69 | even in this life, of that food of ~which Our Lord said ( 147 2, 69 | off as to his body, ~in food and drink, and so forth; 148 2, 72 | brook the delay in taking food, on account of ~a rapid 149 2, 72 | that he desire too much ~food, may be due to a naturally 150 2, 72 | desire for pleasure in taking food. Hence in such ~matters, 151 2, 75 | sins through ~appetite for food. Yet sin results in being 152 2, 77 | the individual, such as ~food, drink, and the like, or 153 2, 80 | will: thus ~we say that food arouses man's desire to 154 2, 80 | the vegetal soul, that ~food may be more easily digested.~ 155 2, 80 | still have the desire for food, sexual ~pleasures and the 156 2, 83 | gluttony, ~concupiscence of food accrues to the concupiscible 157 2, 83 | faculty, and partaking ~of food accrues to the hand and 158 2, 94 | natural concupiscences of food, ~drink and sexual matters, 159 2, 95 | necessities, for instance, in food and ~clothing. Certain beginnings 160 2, 95 | sufficiency of clothing and food. Now it is ~difficult to 161 2, 101 | precepts about abstinence from food ~(Lev. 11); and about refraining 162 2, 101 | regard the clothing and food of God's worshippers, and 163 2, 101 | instance, in matters of food, clothing, and so forth.~ 164 2, 102 | partake of a most clean food: whereas other animals are 165 2, 102 | tame, ~they have unclean food, as pigs and geese: and 166 2, 102 | God gave them to man for food. Wherefore also they were 167 2, 102 | useful to man, either as ~food, and of these bread was 168 2, 102 | temple should take their ~food in the temple: wherefore, 169 2, 102 | because ~He is our spiritual food, according to Jn. 6:41,51: " 170 2, 102 | animals are given to man for food, so also are ~herbs: wherefore 171 2, 102 | uncleanness, no kind of food is unclean, or can defile 172 2, 102 | prevent excessive care about food: ~wherefore they were allowed 173 2, 102 | screech-owl, which ~seeks its food by night but hides by day, 174 2, 102 | its long neck extracts its food from deep places on land 175 2, 102 | follicules, wherein it stores its food at first, ~after a time 176 2, 102 | bites, since it dips all its food in water: it is a figure ~ 177 2, 104 | observances in matter of food and apparel, ~of which we 178 2, 105 | once, lest they should lack food. But they who ~offer other 179 2, 105 | sacrifice, for ploughing, for ~food, for milk, and its hide 180 2, 105 | he provides ~himself with food and clothing and other such 181 2, 108 | to eat of this or ~that food, are not part of the kingdom 182 2, 108 | summer, and gathereth her food in the harvest." But every 183 2, 108 | forbade solicitude about food and raiment.~Aquin.: SMT 184 2, 108 | sake of ~the necessities of food and raiment. Wherefore He 185 2, 13 | or causes loathing for food and medicine, although God ~ 186 2, 14 | of touch in matters of food and sex; and these are the 187 2, 23 | charity is born it takes food," which refers to beginners, " 188 2, 23 | beginners, "after ~taking food, it waxes strong," which 189 2, 30 | which is relieved by solid food, viz. hunger, in respect 190 2, 30 | other is relieved by liquid food, ~viz. thirst, and in respect 191 2, 30 | nurtured, and need finer food and ~clothing. Hence Ambrose 192 2, 33 | begin to ~feel the want of food, and to be parched by the 193 2, 41 | partaking of ~unsuitable food might say that such a man 194 2, 41 | good is more necessary than food. But we ~ought to forego 195 2, 41 | ought to forego taking food on account of scandal, according 196 2, 41 | counselling total ~abstinence from food on account of scandal, because 197 2, 41 | requires ~that we should take food: but he intended to counsel 198 2, 41 | from a ~particular kind of food, in order to avoid scandal, 199 2, 53 | is careful about one's food in order to sustain one' 200 2, 53 | summer, and gathereth her food in ~the harvest." Now this 201 2, 62 | Who giveth to beasts their food." Therefore it ~seems unlawful 202 2, 62 | and men use animals, for food, and this cannot be ~done 203 2, 64 | hunger or ~nakedness, steal food, clothing or beast, he shall 204 2, 67 | not sin if he ~partakes of food brought to him secretly, 205 2, 69 | contrary, He that lacks food is no less in need than 206 2, 69 | he that is able to give food is not always bound ~to 207 2, 75 | one, rotten or poisonous food for wholesome. ~Wherefore 208 2, 76 | wheat when we use it for food. Wherefore in such like 209 2, 76 | maiden with a libertine, ~or food with a glutton. Neither 210 2, 81 | denotes all ~sufficiency of food, as Augustine says (ad Probam, 211 2, 81 | and bread is the chief food: thus ~in the Gospel of 212 2, 81 | giveth to beasts ~their food and to the young ravens 213 2, 86 | person is said to ~dispense food to a household.~Aquin.: 214 2, 86 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Food is directly ordered to the 215 2, 86 | therefore abstinence from food may be a direct source of 216 2, 120 | on ~which men cook their food, travel, fish, and do many 217 2, 120 | such as the cooking of food and ~so forth. And again 218 2, 134 | abstinence from pleasures of food and sex: whereas patience ~ 219 2, 135 | life: such are the lack of ~food and the like, which at times 220 2, 139 | voice, in relation to his ~food. On the other hand man derives 221 2, 139 | of the taste result from food and drink, which are ~more 222 2, 139 | the touch is the ~sense of food," as regards the very substance 223 2, 139 | the very substance of the food, whereas ~"savor" which 224 2, 139 | pleasing quality ~of the food." Therefore temperance is 225 2, 139 | preservation of the species, or of food and drink which are ~necessary 226 2, 139 | savor and likewise odor in food. Hence temperance is chiefly 227 2, 139 | Reply OBJ 1: The use of food and the pleasure that essentially 228 2, 139 | that "touch is the sense of food, for food is hot or cold, 229 2, 139 | is the sense of food, for food is hot or cold, wet or ~ 230 2, 139 | of savors, which make the food ~pleasant to eat, in so 231 2, 139 | essentially from the use of ~food and drink.~Aquin.: SMT SS 232 2, 139 | principally the substance of the food, but ~secondarily it regards 233 2, 139 | thing cannot be at all; thus food is necessary to an ~animal. 234 2, 140 | who took pulse for their food ~(Dan. 1:12), "God gave 235 2, 140 | they are about desires of food and sex, which are ~directed 236 2, 140 | curiosa] preparation of food, or the adornment ~of women. 237 2, 140 | cowardice, since pleasures of food and ~sex, which are the 238 2, 140 | any pleasures whatever of ~food and sex which are directed 239 2, 140 | of pleasure in matters of food and sex: although the latter 240 2, 144 | which are about pleasures of food; secondly, those which are 241 2, 144 | should set myself to take food as ~physic." Now it belongs 242 2, 144 | manner, to regulate one's food, which ~belongs to abstinence, 243 2, 144 | denotes retrenchment of food. ~Hence the term abstinence 244 2, 144 | denoting ~retrenchment of food absolutely, and in this 245 2, 144 | that in abstaining from food a man should act with due 246 2, 144 | use of and abstinence from food, considered in ~themselves, 247 2, 144 | OBJ 2: The regulation of food, in the point of quantity 248 2, 144 | virtue what or how much food ~a man takes, so long as 249 2, 144 | uncomplainingly he does without ~food when bound by duty or necessity 250 2, 144 | to 1 Tim. 6:8, "Having ~food, and wherewith to be covered, 251 2, 144 | abstinence which moderates food.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[146] A[ 252 2, 144 | are so great, and because food is necessary to man who 253 2, 144 | art, whereas the use of ~food is from nature. Hence it 254 2, 144 | virtue ~for the moderation of food than for the moderation 255 2, 145 | for a man to take ~less food than would be becoming to 256 2, 145 | retrench so much from one's food as to refuse nature its ~ 257 2, 145 | retrench so much from a man's food as to render him ~incapable 258 2, 145 | fasting until he partakes of food, consists in a pure negation, ~ 259 2, 145 | abstains in some measure from food for a reasonable purpose. ~ 260 2, 145 | to abstain not only from food but also from all manner 261 2, 145 | fare and abstinence from food."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[147] 262 2, 145 | fasting is concerned with food, ~wherein the mean is appointed 263 2, 145 | consists in abstaining from food, ~but speaking metaphorically 264 2, 145 | necessity, owing to lack of food. Much more therefore ought 265 2, 145 | which they need to ~take food frequently, and not much 266 2, 145 | be exempt who beg ~their food piecemeal, since they are 267 2, 145 | to have a ~sufficiency of food.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[147] A[ 268 2, 145 | observes due quantity of food not less than the number ~ 269 2, 145 | meals. Now the quantity of food is not limited for those 270 2, 145 | digestives are a kind of food: and yet many take them 271 2, 145 | fix the same quantity of food for ~all, on account of 272 2, 145 | needs more, and another less food: whereas, for the most part, ~ 273 2, 145 | refreshment, and digestion of the food consumed, ~although it nourishes 274 2, 145 | quantity and by way of ~food.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[147] A[ 275 2, 145 | touch in connection with food and sex. Wherefore the Church ~ 276 2, 145 | afford greater pleasure as food, and ~greater nourishment 277 2, 146 | Now ~gluttony regards food which goes into a man. Therefore, 278 2, 146 | gluttony is immoderation in food; and man cannot avoid this, ~ 279 2, 146 | first movement in taking food is not a sin, else hunger 280 2, 146 | goes into man by way of food, by reason of its ~substance 281 2, 146 | the ~inordinate desire of food that defiles a man spiritually.~ 282 2, 146 | regard the ~substance of food, but in the desire thereof 283 2, 146 | man exceed in quantity of food, not from desire of ~food, 284 2, 146 | food, not from desire of ~food, but through deeming it 285 2, 146 | the necessity of taking food, and on account of the difficulty ~ 286 2, 146 | through taking too much food.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[148] A[ 287 2, 146 | sometimes it requires the food to be ~daintily cooked; 288 2, 146 | considered in eating, ~namely the food we eat, and the eating thereof. 289 2, 146 | First, with ~regard to the food consumed: and thus, as regards 290 2, 146 | substance or ~species of food a man seeks "sumptuous" - 291 2, 146 | sumptuous" - i.e. costly food; as regards ~its quality, 292 2, 146 | regards ~its quality, he seeks food prepared too nicely - i.e. " 293 2, 146 | as to the ~consumption of food: either because one forestalls 294 2, 146 | him that ~seeks sumptuous food, concupiscence is aroused 295 2, 146 | the very species of the ~food; in him that forestalls 296 2, 146 | other vices ~originate. Now food, which is the matter of 297 2, 146 | from a man forsaking the food of virtue on ~account of 298 2, 146 | Reply OBJ 1: It is true that food itself is directed to something 299 2, 146 | cannot be sustained without food, it follows that food ~too 300 2, 146 | without food, it follows that food ~too is most desirable: 301 2, 146 | to be about pleasures of food rather than ~about food 302 2, 146 | food rather than ~about food itself; wherefore, as Augustine 303 2, 146 | Relig. liii), ~"with such food as is good for the worthless 304 2, 146 | account of the fumes of food disturbing the brain. ~Even 305 2, 147 | of touch as ~sensitive to food. Now meat and drink combine 306 2, 147 | combine together to make food, ~since an animal needs 307 2, 147 | drink, ~considered, not as food but as a hindrance to reason. 308 2, 147 | correspond to different kinds of food.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[149] A[ 309 2, 149 | connected with the use of food whereby the nature of the ~ 310 2, 150 | sin ~to abstain from all food, as this would be to act 311 2, 150 | Bono Conjug. xvi): "What food is ~to a man's wellbeing, 312 2, 151 | And just as the use of ~food is directed to the preservation 313 2, 151 | Bono Conjug. xvi): "What food is to a ~man's well being, 314 2, 151 | Wherefore just as the use of food can be without sin, if it ~ 315 2, 151 | which is the surplus ~from food, according to the Philosopher ( 316 2, 152 | Conjug. xvi) that "what food is ~to the well-being of 317 2, 152 | But inordinate use of food is not always a mortal ~ 318 2, 152 | knowingly to partake of a food which would ~alter the whole 319 2, 152 | gluttonously of sacred food. Nevertheless, sacrilege 320 2, 153 | bestial, ~both as regards food - for instance, the pleasure 321 2, 153 | the individual, such as food, or for the maintenance 322 2, 153 | rather than in reference to food; although ~according to 323 2, 160 | case with the appetite for food which man desires naturally. 324 2, 162 | are necessary to man, like food, according to 1 ~Tim. 6: 325 2, 162 | to 1 ~Tim. 6:8, "Having food, and wherewith to be covered, 326 2, 162 | content." Therefore just as food was appointed to our first 327 2, 162 | his original state, namely food (lest he should take of ~ 328 2, 162 | and ~thistles to be the food of animals, but not to punish 329 2, 162 | means of that beneficial food ~he might have prolonged 330 2, 162 | same cannot be said of ~food, which is necessary to entertain 331 2, 164 | desires the pleasures of food and sex, ~so, in respect 332 2, 167 | Apostle, 1 Tim. 6:8): ~"Having food and wherewith to be covered, 333 2, 184 | on 1 Tim. 6:8, ~"Having food, and wherewith to be covered," 334 2, 185 | and ~principally to obtain food; wherefore it was said to 335 2, 185 | is directed to obtaining food, it ~comes under a necessity 336 2, 185 | while ~there lived on the food brought to him by a monk 337 2, 186 | chastised by abstinence in food, in another by the practice 338 2, 186 | wherewithal to procure themselves food ~for one day, have been 339 3, 1 | cannot be without it; as food is necessary for ~the preservation 340 3, 15 | flesh ~naturally sought food, drink, and sleep, and all 341 3, 15 | Or when He took drink or ~food, He acceded, not to the 342 3, 40 | austere life as regards food, drink, ~and clothing? Or 343 3, 40 | he did ~not take the same food as the Jews. Therefore, 344 3, 40 | ordained to bodily use as to food and ~raiment. But Christ 345 3, 40 | lived, in the matter of food and raiment. Therefore it 346 3, 40 | provide their instructors with food and clothing. ~But as this 347 3, 41 | that time He ~partook of no food whatever." It seems, therefore, 348 3, 41 | was ~overcome by want of food, but because He abandoned 349 3, 41 | the corporeal nature by food. Secondly, he ~advanced 350 3, 41 | command to seek to ~obtain food miraculously for mere bodily 351 3, 41 | was no means of obtaining food otherwise. And in like fashion ~ 352 3, 41 | provided the crowds with food in the desert, when ~there 353 3, 41 | no other means of getting food. But in order to assuage 354 3, 41 | thus ~from the desire of food he tried to lead Him to 355 3, 46 | fourteenth day, but the Paschal food - that ~is, the unleavened 356 3, 54 | disciples, not from need of food, but because it lay in His ~ 357 3, 54 | He ate, "not as ~needing food, but in order thus to show 358 3, 54 | that stands in need of ~food.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[54] A[ 359 3, 54 | to eat, without need of food."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[54] A[ 360 3, 55 | true eating, although the food was really masticated and 361 3, 64 | an animal is enticed by food, but as a ~spirit is drawn 362 3, 65 | Eucharist is a spiritual food; while Confirmation is ~ 363 3, 65 | compared to growth. But food causes, and consequently 364 3, 65 | cannot be ~attained; thus food is necessary for human life. 365 3, 67 | from ~his father, "being, food, and education." If, therefore, 366 3, 72 | eat the same spiritual ~food, and all drank the same 367 3, 73 | to maturity: so ~likewise food is required for the preservation 368 3, 73 | Eucharist, which is spiritual ~food.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[73] A[ 369 3, 73 | man from the addition of food, or ~clothing, or something 370 3, 73 | corporeal refreshment, ~namely, food, which is dry sustenance, 371 3, 73 | sacrament, to wit, spiritual food and spiritual drink, according 372 3, 73 | sacrament is a kind of spiritual food. But bodily ~food is requisite 373 3, 73 | spiritual food. But bodily ~food is requisite for bodily 374 3, 73 | explaining Jn. 6:54, "This food and this ~drink," namely, 375 3, 73 | corporeal and spiritual food lies in ~this, that the 376 3, 73 | partaken of; but spiritual food changes man into itself, 377 3, 73 | change Me into thyself, ~as food of thy flesh, but thou shalt 378 3, 75 | faith His flesh is truly food, and His ~blood is truly 379 3, 75 | body of Christ after bodily food, ~while it is nevertheless 380 3, 75 | and in like manner when food ~is converted into non-pre-existing 381 3, 75 | anew in the matter of the food. Therefore, if bread be 382 3, 76 | faithful, which consists in food and drink, as ~stated above ( 383 3, 76 | apart to the faithful as food, and the blood as ~drink. 384 3, 77 | says (De Anima ii) that "food nourishes ~according as 385 3, 77 | as stated in De Anima ii, food ~nourishes by being converted 386 3, 78 | two things, that is, of ~food and drink, each of which 387 3, 79 | for it is given by way of food and drink. ~And therefore 388 3, 79 | life all that ~material food does for the bodily life, 389 3, 79 | refreshment of spiritual food and the unity denoted ~by 390 3, 79 | in the strength of that food forty days and forty ~nights 391 3, 79 | under the form of nourishing food. Now ~nourishment from food 392 3, 79 | food. Now ~nourishment from food is requisite for the body 393 3, 79 | decay, and ~so by means of food and medicine he is preserved 394 3, 79 | spiritual life, as spiritual food and spiritual medicine, 395 3, 80 | sacrament is spiritual ~food: hence our Lord, speaking 396 3, 80 | did eat . . . spiritual food, and . . . drank . . . spiritual ~ 397 3, 80 | Christ, ~Who i's truly the food of angels." But it would 398 3, 80 | sacrament, but as simple food. ~Unless perchance the unbeliever 399 3, 80 | distinguishing it from other food: and this is ~what he does 400 3, 80 | it is due ~to excess of food or drink. And this also 401 3, 80 | case ~of consumption of food and drink. Hence Gregory, 402 3, 80 | it arises ~from excess of food or drink, especially if 403 3, 80 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether food or drink taken beforehand 404 3, 80 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that food or drink taken beforehand 405 3, 80 | sacrament after ~receiving other food.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[80] A[ 406 3, 80 | after partaking of other food.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[80] A[ 407 3, 80 | medicine, or of any other food or ~drink in very slight 408 3, 80 | quantity, or of the remains of food continuing in ~the mouth, 409 3, 80 | in the morning ~when the food it not digested. But it 410 3, 80 | seems that such taking of food ~beforehand does not keep 411 3, 80 | before. But one may take food and drink after ~receiving 412 3, 80 | sacrament after receiving food or drink, for three reasons. ~ 413 3, 80 | yet contaminated ~by any food or drink. Secondly, because 414 3, 80 | from over-indulging in food, as the Apostle says (1 415 3, 80 | Communion at once, even after food, should there be any ~doubt 416 3, 80 | this sacrament after taking food is no reason why the brethren ~ 417 3, 80 | let him partake of his food at ~home, that is, let him 418 3, 80 | taken before-hand by way of food or drink: and such fast 419 3, 80 | after taking water, or other food ~or drink, or even medicine, 420 3, 80 | provided it be taken by way of food or drink. But the ~remains 421 3, 80 | drink. But the ~remains of food left in the mouth, if swallowed 422 3, 80 | swallowed not by way of ~food but by way of saliva. The 423 3, 80 | Christian before any other food must not be understood absolutely 424 3, 80 | takes anything by way of food or drink after ~midnight, 425 3, 80 | but he can do so ~if the food was taken before midnight. 426 3, 80 | he has slept after taking food or drink, or ~whether he 427 3, 80 | sacrament and taking other food. Consequently, both the 428 3, 80 | sacrament is spiritual food; hence, just as bodily food 429 3, 80 | food; hence, just as bodily food is taken every ~day, so 430 3, 80 | Passion is given by way of food which ~is partaken of daily; 431 3, 81 | Himself in His hands,~The food Himself now eats."~Aquin.: 432 3, 82 | which are unsuited for food and drink: hence, as was 433 3, 83 | body is set before ~us as food, so is His blood, as drink. 434 3, 83 | s body no ~other bodily food is added in the celebration 435 3, 84 | Eucharist which is the spiritual food; whereas Penance is ordained 436 3, 84 | life, birth, growth, and food are, ~of themselves, necessary 437 Suppl, 41| offspring are able to seek food immediately after birth, 438 Suppl, 49| to entice a man to take food which supplies a ~defect 439 Suppl, 49| is no mortal sin to take food for mere pleasure. Therefore ~ 440 Suppl, 54| effected from the surplus food [*Cf. FP, Q[119], ~A[2]]. 441 Suppl, 54| was cut. ~In like manner food already transformed by the 442 Suppl, 65| is the principal end of food, ~and aptitude for conducting 443 Suppl, 75| although it has ~become the food and flesh of any animals 444 Suppl, 77| result from the surplus of food, ~so do urine, sweat and 445 Suppl, 77| superfluities that are produced from food, ~seed comes nearest to 446 Suppl, 77| all rise again in it. For food is changed into ~the truth 447 Suppl, 77| other ~animals is taken as food. Therefore if whatever belonged 448 Suppl, 77| seed is from the surplus of food, as the Philosopher proves ( 449 Suppl, 77| parents. If then the ~surplus food be changed into seed, that 450 Suppl, 77| natural transformation of the food into the human body, if 451 Suppl, 77| that ~which is added by food belongs to the truth of 452 Suppl, 77| that what is changed from food into true flesh ~and blood 453 Suppl, 77| seed is ~the surplus from food, either mingled with something 454 Suppl, 77| nutrimental when produced by the food), but rather on ~the part 455 Suppl, 77| which is produced ~from food; for this is not added except 456 Suppl, 77| anything resulting from food to rise again in man, but ~ 457 Suppl, 77| that what is produced from food ~is needed for the perfection 458 Suppl, 77| something of this product from food shall rise again: not all, 459 Suppl, 77| is secondly changed from food into flesh ~does not so 460 Suppl, 77| produced afterwards from food, in which point also these 461 Suppl, 77| was the product from other food, or if he never partook 462 Suppl, 77| never partook of any ~other food than human flesh, the substitution 463 Suppl, 77| is not from the surplus ~food: so that the flesh eaten 464 Suppl, 77| seed is distilled from ~the food, since seed is the ultimate 465 Suppl, 77| the ultimate surplus of food. That part of the ~eaten 466 Suppl, 77| substance from the substance of food, since the child is ~nourished 467 Suppl, 77| that a ~man partook of such food, and that some one were 468 Suppl, 77| seed to be from the surplus food: ~but there are many other 469 Suppl, 77| which was engendered from food, ~whereas the second holds 470 Suppl, 78| though human nature needed food after the ~resurrection, 471 Suppl, 78| namely not to ~partake of food) for the aforesaid motive. 472 Suppl, 79| affected by the taking of food or drink, as appears ~from 473 Suppl, 79| it is the perception of food, will not ~be in act; but 474 Suppl, 93| to exceed the measure in food ~which is necessary for 475 Suppl, 94| nothing is restored to them by food; for everything finite ~


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