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Alphabetical    [«  »]
sigh 3
sighing 1
sighs 4
sight 472
sight-giving 1
sight-seeing 2
sightliness 1
Frequency    [«  »]
474 47
473 denotes
473 mother
472 sight
471 assumed
470 committed
470 derived
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

sight

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | is the formal object of sight. Therefore, because ~Sacred 2 1, 1 | and ~understanding in the sight of nations."~Aquin.: SMT 3 1, 1 | referred to the faculty of sight ~in that they are colored. 4 1, 1 | are the proper objects of ~sight. But in sacred science, 5 1, 5 | us of that being which is sight; yet it ~does not destroy 6 1, 5 | follow ~upon the being of sight.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[5] A[5] 7 1, 8 | to another, when in its ~sight, though the thing may be 8 1, 8 | space of the heavens in its sight. Therefore the soul is ~ 9 1, 11 | of ~special forms, as of sight, or of whiteness and the 10 1, 12 | intellectual vision - viz. power of sight, and union of the thing 11 1, 12 | the thing seen ~with the sight. For vision is made actual 12 1, 12 | have a greater power of sight, not ~so much to see more 13 1, 12 | keenly, as some report of the sight of serpents or of ~eagles ( 14 1, 12 | be seen by the sense of ~sight, or by any other sense, 15 1, 12 | intellect immediately on the sight of, ~and through, corporeal 16 1, 12 | corporeal or intellectual sight. But the angelic ~intellect 17 1, 12 | Reply OBJ 3: The sense of sight, as being altogether material, 18 1, 12 | grace. The proof is, that ~sight cannot in any way know abstractedly 19 1, 12 | necessary as regards external sight, inasmuch as it makes the 20 1, 14 | creature invisible in His sight" (Heb. 4:12,13).~Aquin.: 21 1, 14 | instance to the sense of sight, as when ~I see that Socrates 22 1, 14 | are subject to the ~divine sight in their presentiality; 23 1, 16 | know this. For although sight has ~the likeness of a visible 24 1, 17 | of its own ~nature, as in sight there is the likeness of 25 1, 17 | though not ~primarily; as in sight there is the likeness of 26 1, 17 | but accidentally, as in sight, there is ~the likeness 27 1, 17 | has been said ~(A[2]) that sight is not deceived in its proper 28 1, 19 | object, for instance the sight to ~color, since it tends 29 1, 25 | impossible in itself, as ~to give sight to the blind, or to raise 30 1, 34 | knowledge and ~thought, and sight, are essential terms in 31 1, 48 | blindness there is no return to sight, although blindness is an 32 1, 48 | instance, the privation of sight is called blindness.~Aquin.: 33 1, 48 | subject of blindness is not "sight," but ~"animal." Yet, it 34 1, 48 | destroyed ~by darkness, and sight by blindness. Another kind 35 1, 48 | naturally due. For the want ~of sight is not an evil in a stone, 36 1, 48 | either ~something created, as sight, destroyed by blindness, 37 1, 54 | all sensible ~things; as sight does to all things visible. 38 1, 54 | intellect as colors to the sight; but to the active intellect 39 1, 54 | sundry parts of the body, as sight of the eye, and hearing 40 1, 56 | the formal principle of sight to the eye.~Aquin.: SMT 41 1, 59 | faculties; for the same power of sight perceives color ~and whiteness. 42 1, 59 | proper object of the power of sight be color as such, then ~ 43 1, 59 | are not several powers of sight distinguished according 44 1, 66 | their different acts, as sight is by color, hearing ~by 45 1, 67 | clearly shown in the word "sight," originally applied to 46 1, 67 | the ~sense, and then, as sight is the noblest and most 47 1, 67 | or ~"burns. "Further, sight is applied to knowledge 48 1, 67 | manifest to the sense of ~sight; afterwards it was extended 49 1, 70 | service to man, in regard to sight, which directs him in his ~ 50 1, 75 | intellect what color is to the sight. Neither does such a ~dependence 51 1, 76 | colors to the sense of sight, as he says De Anima iii, 52 1, 76 | species of colors are in the sight, so are the species of phantasms ~ 53 1, 76 | images of which are in the sight, are on a wall, the action 54 1, 76 | several seers, but one sight. But if there is one intellect, 55 1, 76 | of the body, such as the sight to the ~pupil of the eye, 56 1, 76 | part of the body; ~thus the sight will be in the ear, and 57 1, 76 | whole ~surface moves the sight more than the whiteness 58 1, 76 | powers; but with regard to sight, it ~is in the eye; and 59 1, 77 | sound and color belong ~to sight and hearing, which are different 60 1, 77 | inasmuch as it moves the sight. On the other hand, to the 61 1, 77 | regard to color, ~namely, the sight, and another with regard 62 1, 77 | aspect of both contraries; as sight does not regard ~white as 63 1, 77 | on that of another; for sight can ~act independently of 64 1, 77 | among ~themselves, namely, sight, hearing, and smelling. 65 1, 77 | of corporeal organs; as sight by the eye, and hearing ~ 66 1, 49 | blindness there is no return to sight, although blindness is an 67 1, 49 | instance, the privation of sight is called blindness.~Aquin.: 68 1, 49 | subject of blindness is not "sight," but ~"animal." Yet, it 69 1, 49 | destroyed ~by darkness, and sight by blindness. Another kind 70 1, 49 | naturally due. For the want ~of sight is not an evil in a stone, 71 1, 49 | either ~something created, as sight, destroyed by blindness, 72 1, 55 | all sensible ~things; as sight does to all things visible. 73 1, 55 | intellect as colors to the sight; but to the active intellect 74 1, 55 | sundry parts of ~the body, as sight of the eye, and hearing 75 1, 57 | the formal principle of sight to the eye.~Aquin.: SMT 76 1, 60 | faculties; for the same power of sight perceives color ~and whiteness. 77 1, 60 | proper object of the power of sight be color as such, then ~ 78 1, 60 | are not several powers of sight distinguished according 79 1, 67 | their different acts, as sight is by color, hearing ~by 80 1, 68 | clearly shown in the word "sight," originally applied to 81 1, 68 | the ~sense, and then, as sight is the noblest and most 82 1, 68 | or ~"burns. "Further, sight is applied to knowledge 83 1, 68 | manifest to the sense of ~sight; afterwards it was extended 84 1, 71 | service to man, in regard to sight, which directs him in his ~ 85 1, 74 | intellect what color is to the sight. Neither does such a ~dependence 86 1, 75 | colors to the sense of sight, as he says De Anima iii, 87 1, 75 | species of colors are in the sight, so are the species of phantasms ~ 88 1, 75 | images of which are in the sight, are on a wall, the action 89 1, 75 | several seers, but one sight. But if there is one intellect, 90 1, 75 | of the body, such as the sight to the ~pupil of the eye, 91 1, 75 | part of the body; ~thus the sight will be in the ear, and 92 1, 75 | whole ~surface moves the sight more than the whiteness 93 1, 75 | powers; but with regard to sight, it ~is in the eye; and 94 1, 76 | sound and color belong ~to sight and hearing, which are different 95 1, 76 | inasmuch as it moves the sight. On the other hand, to the 96 1, 76 | regard to color, ~namely, the sight, and another with regard 97 1, 76 | aspect of both contraries; as sight does not regard ~white as 98 1, 76 | on that of another; for sight can ~act independently of 99 1, 76 | among ~themselves, namely, sight, hearing, and smelling. 100 1, 76 | of corporeal organs; as sight by the eye, and hearing ~ 101 1, 77 | power of the soul. For sight desires an appropriate visible 102 1, 77 | Whence it is clear that sight desires ~naturally a visible 103 1, 77 | regards one contrariety; as sight regards ~white and black. 104 1, 77 | immutation only, as in "sight" ~while in others we find 105 1, 77 | Body Para. 5/5~Now, the sight, which is without natural 106 1, 77 | its object, it seems that sight ~must be much more able 107 1, 77 | black or green. But neither sight nor ~taste can discern white 108 1, 77 | immutation the action of sight ~is completed, and from 109 1, 78 | contrary, light is required for sight, ~inasmuch as it makes the 110 1, 78 | that light is required for sight, in order to make colors 111 1, 78 | light is required for ~sight; not for the colors to become 112 1, 78 | the visible ~in act to the sight; it would follow that we 113 1, 78 | object: just as the power ~of sight, which regards its object 114 1, 78 | apprehended by ~the same power of sight. Now, to a thing apprehended 115 1, 79 | or that power, ~such as sight for seeing, or sound for 116 1, 80 | from its act; for instance, sight from seeing. ~Now the sensual 117 1, 80 | sides of a contrariety, as sight regards both black and ~ 118 1, 81 | is relatively nobler than sight, inasmuch as something in 119 1, 81 | suitable good ~proper to it, as sight is directed to the perception 120 1, 81 | For instance, ~because sight regards the visible thing 121 1, 83 | Moreover, among the senses, sight has ~the most perfect knowledge, 122 1, 84 | soul what color is to the sight. But seeing is not ~caused 123 1, 84 | impressing ~itself on the sight. Therefore neither does 124 1, 84 | existence as the power of sight: therefore they can impress ~ 125 1, 84 | Hence that by which the sight sees ~is the likeness of 126 1, 84 | is in the senses. For the sight sees the ~color of the apple 127 1, 84 | smell, this is owing to the sight, forasmuch as the ~faculty 128 1, 84 | forasmuch as the ~faculty of sight receives the likeness of 129 1, 84 | in its proper object, as ~sight in regard to color; has 130 1, 84 | thing better with his bodily sight, whose power is greater, 131 1, 84 | power is greater, and ~whose sight is more perfect. The same 132 1, 84 | for the object: otherwise sight would perceive ~hearing 133 1, 87 | the ~intelligible. But our sight can see all things corporeal, 134 1, 90 | raising the dead, or giving sight to ~the blind: and by this 135 1, 90 | some ~animals have a keener sight, and a more acute hearing 136 1, 90 | the senses, and chiefly by sight, which is ~more subtle and 137 1, 92 | by the impression on the sight of a certain ~likeness of 138 1, 92 | of the will applying ~the sight to see, and to rest on what 139 1, 104 | of the dead, ~and giving sight to the blind, and the like; 140 1, 105 | might say ~that corporeal sight is cleansed by the removal 141 2, 1 | end, just as the object of sight is color: wherefore just 142 2, 3 | the first object of the sight, vision, but a visible thing. 143 2, 4 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: The very sight of God causes delight. Consequently, 144 2, 4 | walk by faith and ~not by sight." Now from this it is clear 145 2, 4 | walk by faith ~and not by sight, bereft of the vision of 146 2, 4 | from their bodies, "walk by sight," seeing the Essence ~of 147 2, 5 | dead to life, restoring sight to ~the blind, and such 148 2, 8 | opposites; for instance, sight regards white and black. 149 2, 8 | way ~whatever: thus the sight extends to all things whatsoever 150 2, 8 | are referred hearing and sight. But the ~useful and the 151 2, 8 | instance, the power of ~sight perceives both color and 152 2, 9 | or that action. Thus the sight sometimes ~sees actually, 153 2, 10 | For the visible moves the sight, under ~the aspect of color 154 2, 10 | color be offered to ~the sight, it moves the sight necessarily: 155 2, 10 | the sight, it moves the sight necessarily: unless one 156 2, 10 | exercise of the act. But if the sight were ~confronted with something 157 2, 10 | other respects not, the sight would not of ~necessity 158 2, 10 | colored is the object of sight, so is good the ~object 159 2, 11 | perfection: ~thus the end of sight is to know the visible; 160 2, 12 | the eye is ~the organ of sight, it signifies the apprehensive 161 2, 12 | of the will unites the sight to the object seen; and 162 2, 12 | thus it ~is the same act of sight that perceives color and 163 2, 17 | depends on the power of sight, ~and on the condition of 164 2, 18 | evil, inasmuch as he lacks sight. ~That, however, which has 165 2, 18 | inasmuch as he is deprived of ~sight he suffers a defect in walking 166 2, 18 | thus ~blindness takes away sight altogether; darkness, light; 167 2, 19 | be meritorious in God's ~sight.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[19] A[ 168 2, 21 | or demeritorious in the sight of God. Because, as stated ~ 169 2, 21 | or ~demeritorious in the sight of God.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[ 170 2, 21 | merit or demerit in the sight ~of him that uses it; because 171 2, 21 | demerits nothing in God's sight, by good or evil deeds.~ 172 2, 21 | merit or demerit in ~God's sight.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[21] A[ 173 2, 21 | merit ~or demerit in God's sight.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[21] A[ 174 2, 21 | merit or demerit, in the sight of God. On the part ~of 175 2, 21 | merit or ~demerit in God's sight.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[21] A[ 176 2, 21 | merit or demerit in the ~sight of God, as far as the action 177 2, 27 | the most cognitive, viz. sight ~and hearing, as ministering 178 2, 27 | 5,12) says ~that bodily sight is the beginning of sensitive 179 2, 29 | we say that the object of sight ~is color considered generically; 180 2, 29 | generically; not that the sight is cognizant of ~universal 181 2, 29 | color is cognizant by the ~sight, is attributed to color, 182 2, 30 | thing of itself dilates the sight, ~that which is more white 183 2, 31 | would not forfeit his bodily sight ~rather than his intellectual 184 2, 31 | pleasure afforded by the sight, according to the words 185 2, 31 | pleasure afforded by the sight is the ~greatest of sensible 186 2, 31 | But "of all the senses the sight is loved ~most" [*Metaph. 187 2, 31 | seems to be ~afforded by sight.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[31] A[ 188 2, 31 | pleasant is principally sight. But pleasure is the cause 189 2, 31 | seems to be afforded by sight.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[31] A[ 190 2, 31 | it is evident that the sight affords greater pleasure 191 2, 31 | the pleasure afforded by sight the greatest in respect 192 2, 31 | greater than the pleasure of ~sight, so far as the latter remains 193 2, 31 | consider the pleasures of sight, ~inasmuch sight is the 194 2, 31 | pleasures of sight, ~inasmuch sight is the handmaid of the mind, 195 2, 31 | mind, then the pleasures of sight ~are greater, forasmuch 196 2, 31 | belongs principally to the sight. But natural pleasure belongs ~ 197 2, 31 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The sight is loved most, "on account 198 2, 31 | carnal love in one way; the sight, in ~another. For pleasure, 199 2, 31 | the pleasant: ~whereas the sight is a cause like that from 200 2, 40 | come under the ~object of sight; nevertheless through seeing 201 2, 47 | But anger ceases ~at the sight of death. Therefore defect 202 2, 47 | why anger ceases at the sight of ~death. One is because 203 2, 50 | apprehensive powers, as sight, hearing ~and the like, 204 2, 53 | through not affecting ~the sight, nor heat through ceasing 205 2, 56 | intellective soul, as colors to sight (De Anima iii, text. 18). 206 2, 57 | belongs ~to the same power of sight to see both color, and light, 207 2, 67 | walk by faith and not by ~sight." But those who are in glory 208 2, 77 | perceived not only by the ~sight, but also by the other senses. 209 2, 77 | taken as referring to the sight itself, of which the eyes 210 2, 77 | Reply OBJ 3: The sense of sight is the most excellent of 211 2, 78 | as being wicked, in open sight, who, as it were, on purpose, ~ 212 2, 79 | service to the intellect, viz. sight and hearing, of which the ~ 213 2, 79 | blindness" corresponds to sight, "heaviness of the ears" 214 2, 83 | Further, of all the senses the sight is the most spiritual and ~ 215 2, 83 | the ~reason. Therefore the sight is more infected than touch.~ 216 2, 83 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Sight is not related to the act 217 2, 83 | species is ~seen through the sight. But the delectation is 218 2, 83 | touch rather than to ~the sight.~~ 219 2, 85 | more than the blind ~can to sight. Therefore sin can take 220 2, 85 | animal naturally endowed with sight: yet ~this aptitude is not 221 2, 85 | the organ requisite for sight.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[85] A[ 222 2, 87 | instance, if the ~principle of sight be destroyed, sight cannot 223 2, 87 | principle of sight be destroyed, sight cannot be restored except 224 2, 87 | whereas, if the principle of sight be preserved, while ~there 225 2, 87 | impediments to the use of sight, these can be ~remedied 226 2, 100 | and ~understanding in the sight of nations." Now it belongs 227 2, 102 | and understanding in the sight of ~nations." Consequently 228 2, 102 | and consequently the very sight of ~this sign reminded them 229 2, 102 | anathematized as hateful in God's sight. This is clear from the 230 2, 105 | They are ~cursed in the sight of the Lord, who have case 231 2, 105 | should be horrified at the sight thereof.~Aquin.: SMT FS 232 2, 105 | be horror-stricken at the sight of their misfortune: these ~ 233 2, 109 | reason is in the mind as sight is ~in the eye. And the 234 2, 110 | Douay: ~'favor'] in the sight of the chief keeper of the 235 2, 113 | miraculous work, as ~when He gave sight to the blind or raised the 236 2, 1 | Every sense is a kind of sight," as Augustine states ~( 237 2, 1 | themselves belong, the sight of which we shall enjoy 238 2, 2 | comes with the certitude of ~sight. In this sense Augustine 239 2, 2 | yet perfected by the clear sight of truth. ~Since, however, 240 2, 2 | the perfection of ~clear sight, wherein it agrees with 241 2, 4 | Para. 1/2~OBJ 2: Further, sight is more certain than hearing. 242 2, 4 | some kind of intellectual sight. Therefore science and ~ 243 2, 4 | Other things being equal sight is more certain than ~hearing; 244 2, 4 | surpasses that of the seer's sight, hearing is more certain 245 2, 4 | hearing is more certain than sight: ~thus a man of little science 246 2, 5 | is the First Truth, the sight of which gives the ~happiness 247 2, 8 | state of life. But the sight of God does not belong to 248 2, 8 | beatitude which comprises the sight ~of God, does not respond 249 2, 8 | way of reward, viz. the sight of God, as stated above ( 250 2, 8 | kind ~of complement to the sight of God; such is the cleanness 251 2, 8 | Body Para. 3/4~Again, the sight of God is twofold. One is 252 2, 14 | the ~principle of bodily sight, so blindness of mind is 253 2, 14 | of mental or intellectual sight. Now this has a threefold ~ 254 2, 14 | principle of intellectual sight is a certain habitual light ~ 255 2, 14 | principle of intellectual sight is an intelligible principle, ~ 256 2, 14 | denotes a principle ~of sight. Therefore dulness of sense 257 2, 14 | sensible object from ~afar, by sight, hearing, or scent, while 258 2, 15 | hold in our hands, or ~by sight, as those things which are 259 2, 15 | and ~understanding in the sight of the nations." By this 260 2, 17 | Now the blessed enjoy the sight of God. Therefore hope ~ 261 2, 26 | not meritorious in God's sight when ~we love them merely 262 2, 27 | some by the vision of "sight"; wherefore the Apostle 263 2, 27 | walk by faith and not by sight." Nevertheless, even in ~ 264 2, 30 | another asks you must not lose sight of the claims of justice, 265 2, 31 | comprised in the object of sight. Since, however, a virtuous ~ 266 2, 44 | makes us ~foolish in God's sight, as is evident from the 267 2, 45 | were from afar, for his sight is keen, and he foresees 268 2, 45 | of ~uncertainties." Now sight belongs not to the appetitive 269 2, 62 | are they free from sin ~in sight of Divine providence, who 270 2, 65 | not judge according to the sight of the ~eyes, nor reprove 271 2, 81 | directed ~as incense in Thy sight": and a gloss on the passage 272 2, 82 | have found favor in thy sight," etc. The triple genuflection 273 2, 86 | will pay ~my vows in the sight of them that fear Him," 274 2, 93 | offer themselves to ~human sight and hearing by mock apparitions 275 2, 98 | 1~Reply OBJ 6: In God's sight the mere will makes a man 276 2, 105 | according to the difference of sight and hearing. Therefore just 277 2, 115 | much to others as to ~lose sight of himself and those belonging 278 2, 122 | chastity. Wherefore in the sight of men her ~testimony is 279 2, 122 | properly speaking. In the sight of God, however, Who searcheth ~ 280 2, 127 | man (Ps. 14:4): "In his ~sight a vile person is contemned [* 281 2, 130 | good things not only in the sight of God, but also in the ~ 282 2, 130 | of God, but also in the ~sight of all men." Therefore the 283 2, 130 | its seeming comely in the sight of men, whether it be a 284 2, 130 | provide good things in the sight of ~God and men": but not 285 2, 130 | glory ~which is in God's sight man acquires honor in Divine 286 2, 130 | the glory which is in the sight of man he acquires excellence 287 2, 139 | of ~the taste, smell, or sight, inasmuch as the sensible 288 2, 159 | is one exalted in God's ~sight. Hence Augustine says (De 289 2, 159 | himself at your feet in ~the sight of God." On the other hand, 290 2, 162 | has ~been deprived of his sight for a sin he has committed, 291 2, 165 | are known by the sense of sight, so ~too are some things 292 2, 165 | about ~things known by the sight.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[167] A[ 293 2, 165 | the eyes" because "the ~sight is the sense chiefly used 294 2, 169 | was called a seer." Now sight pertains to ~knowledge. 295 2, 169 | manifestation of the ~material sight takes place through material 296 2, 169 | manifestation of intellectual sight takes place through intellectual ~ 297 2, 169 | light: thus the ~body's sight extends to all colors, and 298 2, 172 | it shall do evil in ~My sight . . . I will repent of the 299 2, 172 | offered externally to the ~sight, such as "a cloud," which 300 2, 173 | walk by faith, and ~not by sight" [*'Per speciem,' i.e. by 301 2, 173 | cannot be an ~object of sight save through the body. Therefore 302 2, 175 | I was an only son in the sight of my ~mother, and she taught 303 2, 175 | and as ~an only son in the sight of my mother. And he taught 304 2, 182 | or deacon; while in God's sight there is no ~greater blessing, 305 2, 183 | Pastor. i, 6): "In God's sight humility is genuine when 306 2, 183 | for instance the act of sight ceases through an ~affliction 307 2, 186 | up for many days from the sight of men, and apply their ~ 308 2, 187 | would not be bound in the sight of God.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 309 2, 187 | they are bound in God's sight, ~if they have the use of 310 2, 187 | they are not bound in the sight of ~the Church before reaching 311 3, 4 | to show Himself in men's sight, ~according to Baruch 3: 312 3, 7 | the faith of things and sight." Therefore it would seem ~ 313 3, 8 | walk by faith" but ~"by sight," otherwise they would be " 314 3, 8 | guidance, inasmuch as by sight and the senses, which are 315 3, 11 | human intellect as colors to sight, ~as is said De Anima iii, 316 3, 11 | intellective soul as ~colors to sight. But Christ's power of seeing 317 3, 11 | thing. Hence, although the sight knows nothing without color; ~ 318 3, 14 | Hence, Thomas, by the ~sight of His wounds, was recalled 319 3, 28 | refer this to knowledge by sight. For as, while Moses was ~ 320 3, 31 | suddenly produced him to sight . . . would He not ~have 321 3, 33 | too, the blind man to whom sight has been ~restored sees 322 3, 33 | restored sees naturally by sight miraculously received.~Aquin.: 323 3, 36 | appearance at the strange sight of a virgin in ~childbirth."~ 324 3, 36 | luster ~of our wisdom in His sight." We offer God incense, " 325 3, 37 | and as ~an only son in the sight of my mother," the gloss 326 3, 37 | himself an only son in the sight of his mother, when Scripture ~ 327 3, 43 | the ~blind man, after his sight had been restored, said ( 328 3, 44 | were drawn to Him at first ~sight." And on Mt. 21:12, "(Jesus) 329 3, 46 | sickened and dissolved in the sight of all men, it was not ~ 330 3, 46 | unless He endured it in the sight of all men, and so proved 331 3, 46 | blasphemers and scorners; in sight, by beholding the tears 332 3, 46 | its proper object; thus, sight may suffer from ~superabundance 333 3, 46 | on which it is based; as sight suffers when the ~sense 334 3, 46 | upon which the sense of sight ~rests, as, for instance, 335 3, 50 | to disappear from men's sight, as though ~shunning death, 336 3, 54 | vanish from the beholder's sight ~unless perchance it be 337 3, 54 | body "vanished out of the ~sight" of the disciples as they 338 3, 54 | visible object upon the sight, as the Philosopher shows ( 339 3, 55 | ought to have risen ~in sight of the disciples.~Aquin.: 340 3, 55 | Lord raised up Lazarus in sight of the disciples. ~Consequently, 341 3, 55 | Christ ought to have risen in sight of the ~disciples.~Aquin.: 342 3, 55 | the Resurrection even ~by sight, because from the testimony 343 3, 55 | so did men come to the sight of ~the risen Christ through 344 3, 55 | been brought ~back from the sight of a strange shape to that 345 3, 55 | He ~vanished out of their sight," and entered in among them " 346 3, 55 | seen: and this is because sight specially ~judges of the 347 3, 57 | be taken away from the ~sight of men."~Aquin.: SMT TP 348 3, 57 | received Him out of their ~sight." But what is taken up, 349 3, 57 | received Him out ~of their sight." But clouds cannot be uplifted 350 3, 59 | walk by faith" but "by sight," as ~appears from the context. 351 3, 68 | action ~of God, in Whose sight they live, so as, by a kind 352 3, 70 | an only son in the sight of my mother," a gloss says, 353 3, 76 | object is present to the sight, according ~as it is white, 354 3, 76 | hence sweetness is in the sight after ~the manner of whiteness, 355 3, 76 | our Lord "vanished out of sight" of the disciples. But that 356 3, 77 | and ~in the restoring of sight to the blind: even thus 357 3, 77 | as a blind man, to ~whom sight is given miraculously, sees 358 3, 80 | touch, so ~also is it by sight. Consequently, if the sinner 359 3, 80 | its ~sacrament, because sight does not penetrate to the 360 3, 81 | itself was visible. For as sight requires that the body seen 361 3, 81 | with the adjacent medium of sight, so does passion require ~ 362 3, 82 | example, if he lose his ~sight, or his fingers, or the 363 3, 84 | that our Lord restored the sight to any blind ~man twice, 364 3, 84 | unknown], "Our Lord gave sight to many blind men ~at various 365 3, 86 | first of all to imperfect sight, wherefore he ~said (Mk. 366 3, 86 | is ~restored to spiritual sight, there still remain in him 367 3, 86 | man who was restored to ~sight (Mt. 8). And so too, He 368 3, 89 | secondary dignity in the ~sight of God.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 369 Suppl, 8 | might know their sheep by sight. But sometimes a rector 370 Suppl, 8 | reasons to know the sheep by ~sight. First, in order to register 371 Suppl, 8 | and ~to know the sheep by sight thus belongs to the pastoral 372 Suppl, 8 | and to know ~the sheep by sight thus belongs to the man, 373 Suppl, 13| because the fulness of the sight of God will be according 374 Suppl, 20| according to God, in Whose sight a man is lessened by ~sinning, 375 Suppl, 22| relation to God only, in Whose sight a man from being above another ~ 376 Suppl, 24| bind a man not only in the ~sight of God, but also in the 377 Suppl, 26| debt of ~punishment in the sight of God, yet he is not freed 378 Suppl, 29| thou hast committed, by sight," etc. ~Therefore the form 379 Suppl, 32| they have not sinned by sight and hearing; as expressed ~ 380 Suppl, 32| wit, ~on account of the sight, the ears on account of 381 Suppl, 32| blind does not sin by his sight. Yet in the ~anointing of 382 Suppl, 32| mention is made of sins by sight. Therefore this ~anointing 383 Suppl, 45| vow is binding in God's sight, even ~though it be not 384 Suppl, 47| conscience and in God's sight, but not in the eyes ~of 385 Suppl, 53| vel vovent.) "in God's sight a simple vow is no less 386 Suppl, 53| no less binding in God's sight ~than a solemn vow, in matters 387 Suppl, 62| been taken away ~in the sight of God, there still remains 388 Suppl, 67| four crimes: for in ~God's sight he is a murderer," in so 389 Suppl, 70| the body, for instance the sight to the eye. But if it were 390 Suppl, 70| its very action on the sight so as to be seen, there 391 Suppl, 70| something corruptive of the sight, in so far as it destroys 392 Suppl, 71| more, if they have keener sight. They also gave the instance ~ 393 Suppl, 72| and is withdrawn from our sight . ~. . and again rises anew, 394 Suppl, 72| above ~nature (as in giving sight to a blind man, for sight 395 Suppl, 72| sight to a blind man, for sight is natural, but the ~principle 396 Suppl, 73| after being restored to sight, saw naturally. ~Therefore 397 Suppl, 76| to a part of the body, as sight to ~the pupil" (De Anima 398 Suppl, 79| not have actual sense of sight. The minor is ~proved thus. 399 Suppl, 79| would seem that the sense of sight will not be actual in ~glorified 400 Suppl, 79| in act, namely touch and sight; nor will ~this be owing 401 Suppl, 79| in the others. For in the sight the medium is the air, and ~ 402 Suppl, 79| it can be the medium of sight, and the more it is illumined, ~ 403 Suppl, 79| fault ~through defective sight. The fact that the image 404 Suppl, 79| in the pupil renders ~the sight keen rather than defective.~ 405 Suppl, 79| the angle at ~which the sight is affected by the visible 406 Suppl, 79| Hence it is that a stronger sight can see from a distance 407 Suppl, 79| distance more ~than a weaker sight; because the greater the 408 Suppl, 79| thing is seen. And since the sight of a glorified body ~will 409 Suppl, 80| person is said to have subtle sight, because he ~is able to 410 Suppl, 80| is able to perceive by sight things of the smallest size: 411 Suppl, 80| seen because it acts on the sight: but that it ~does or does 412 Suppl, 80| does or does not act on the sight causes no change in the 413 Suppl, 80| incorruptible, are sensible to the ~sight but not tangible, and therefore 414 Suppl, 82| be evident to ~the bodily sight." Therefore those bodies 415 Suppl, 82| be proportionate ~to the sight. But a non-glorified eye 416 Suppl, 82| natural tendency to move the sight, ~and sight by its essence 417 Suppl, 82| to move the sight, ~and sight by its essence has a natural 418 Suppl, 82| Wherefore if there were a sight altogether incapable of ~ 419 Suppl, 82| perceiving a light, either this sight is so named equivocally, 420 Suppl, 82| species, proportionate to ~the sight, so too will the clarity 421 Suppl, 82| clarity does not disturb the sight, in so far as it acts by 422 Suppl, 82| destroying ~the organ of sight, and by scattering the spirits* 423 Suppl, 82| its nature disturb the ~sight but soothes it: wherefore 424 Suppl, 82| necessarily perceived by the sight, from the very fact that 425 Suppl, 82| fact it vanished from the ~sight of the disciples at Emmaus ( 426 Suppl, 82| inasmuch as it acts on the ~sight. Now there is no change 427 Suppl, 82| so far as it affects the sight, because the sight cannot 428 Suppl, 82| affects the sight, because the sight cannot be ~affected by two 429 Suppl, 82| thereby act or not act on the sight. ~Hence it will be in its 430 Suppl, 83| variety of ~colors to the sight. Wherefore in respect of 431 Suppl, 86| signified (Job 40:28): "In the sight of all he shall be cast ~ 432 Suppl, 86| then be cast down in the sight of all ~because they will 433 Suppl, 87| displeasing to us. Hence as the sight of ~the glory of Christ' 434 Suppl, 88| subtle of our ~senses is the sight. Consequently all the lower 435 Suppl, 89| the visible object and the sight. But there is no ~possible 436 Suppl, 89| can nowise attain to the ~sight of a spiritual creature. 437 Suppl, 89| just as a person in whose sight the image of a white thing 438 Suppl, 89| essence. Now in order that the sight know whiteness, it is ~necessary 439 Suppl, 89| thus he who has stronger sight sees more clearly. Consequently 440 Suppl, 89| natural being; thus also the sight apprehends red ~honey and 441 Suppl, 89| something perfecting the sight so as to see in general, ~ 442 Suppl, 89| without determining the sight to any particular object. 443 Suppl, 89| visible form whereby either sight is determined to a special ~ 444 Suppl, 89| by gazing on ~which the sight is led to something else: 445 Suppl, 89| into ~conjunction with the sight is in conjunction therewith. 446 Suppl, 89| in conjunction with the sight of their essence on ~account 447 Suppl, 89| in conjunction with the sight. But God is able to be united 448 Suppl, 89| object is received into the sight according to ~the same ratio 449 Suppl, 89| Augustine, speaking of the sight of the glorified eyes, ~ 450 Suppl, 89| body, nor ~surveyed by the sight, nor clasped by the touch." 451 Suppl, 89| seen with the corporeal ~sight." Now the angelic life is 452 Suppl, 89| color in relation to the sight, and sound in relation to 453 Suppl, 89| if that ~which belongs to sight as sight be removed therefrom, 454 Suppl, 89| which belongs to sight as sight be removed therefrom, there 455 Suppl, 89| therefrom, there will be no ~sight. Accordingly seeing that 456 Suppl, 89| perceives magnitude, and ~sight as such a sense perceives 457 Suppl, 89| it is impossible for the sight to ~perceive that which 458 Suppl, 89| equivocally. Since then sight and sense will be specifically 459 Suppl, 89| the one hand the bodily sight will see so great a glory 460 Suppl, 89| like manner whatever the sight apprehends it must always 461 Suppl, 89| intellect: thus sometimes the sight sees not a stone, through 462 Suppl, 91| operation of the sense of sight is when the sense is most ~ 463 Suppl, 91| objects which fall ~under the sight." Therefore, on the other 464 Suppl, 91| the imperfection of the sight. But there will ~be no imperfection 465 Suppl, 91| They ~shall be a loathsome sight to all flesh.'] the sight 466 Suppl, 91| sight to all flesh.'] the sight of all flesh." Now ~satiety 467 Suppl, 93| further from the possession of sight.~ 468 Suppl, 94| damned will have the power of sight after ~being reunited to 469 Suppl, 94| Metaph. i, "the sense of sight is most esteemed, because ~ 470 Suppl, 95| goods. Consequently the sight of the happiness of the ~ 471 Suppl, 95| the ~damned in hell as the sight of the glory of the saints; 472 Suppl, 96| wicked, "shall be a loathsome sight* to all flesh," namely to


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