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Alphabetical    [«  »]
ignoble 2
ignominious 2
ignominy 10
ignorance 464
ignorant 100
ignorantly 8
ignore 5
Frequency    [«  »]
466 merely
465 happen
464 held
464 ignorance
461 hold
461 signify
460 actual
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

ignorance

    Part, Question
1 1, 12 | angels ~are cleansed from ignorance by the superior angels." 2 1, 36 | which seems to ~come from ignorance or obstinacy. For a just 3 1, 45 | latent. This ~arose from ignorance concerning matter, and from 4 1, 45 | this opinion arose from ignorance ~concerning form. For they 5 1, 48 | called a ~being. Through ignorance of this distinction some, 6 1, 58 | day in ~comparison with ignorance or error; yet it is dark 7 1, 63 | Such sin always comes of ignorance or error; ~otherwise what 8 1, 63 | sin ~does not presuppose ignorance, but merely absence of consideration 9 1, 70 | condescension to popular ~ignorance, as we have already said ( 10 1, 75 | virtue; and it changes from ignorance to knowledge and from vice 11 1, 75 | knowledge, and is changed from ~ignorance to knowledge, by reason 12 1, 46 | latent. This ~arose from ignorance concerning matter, and from 13 1, 46 | this opinion arose from ignorance ~concerning form. For they 14 1, 49 | called a ~being. Through ignorance of this distinction some, 15 1, 59 | day in ~comparison with ignorance or error; yet it is dark 16 1, 64 | Such sin always comes of ignorance or error; ~otherwise what 17 1, 64 | sin ~does not presuppose ignorance, but merely absence of consideration 18 1, 71 | condescension to popular ~ignorance, as we have already said ( 19 1, 74 | virtue; and it changes from ignorance to knowledge and from vice 20 1, 74 | knowledge, and is changed from ~ignorance to knowledge, by reason 21 1, 88 | Reply OBJ 3: This kind of ignorance does not proceed from the 22 1, 100 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, ignorance is a result of sin, as Bede 23 1, 100 | FS, ~Q[85], A[3]). But ignorance is privation of knowledge. 24 1, 100 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Ignorance is privation of knowledge 25 1, 100 | at that time. Hence, no ~ignorance would have been in them, 26 1, 105 | inquiring, as it were, in ignorance: "Who ~is this King of glory?" 27 1, 113 | Further, to tempt is a sign of ignorance. But the demons know ~what 28 2, 5 | many unavoidable evils; to ignorance on the part of ~the intellect; 29 2, 6 | involuntariness?~(8) Whether ignorance causes involuntariness?~ 30 2, 6 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether ignorance causes involuntariness?~ 31 2, 6 | OBJ 1: It would seem that ignorance does not cause involuntariness. 32 2, 6 | that which is done through ignorance does not ~deserve pardon, 33 2, 6 | not be known." Therefore ignorance does not cause involuntariness.~ 34 2, 6 | Further, every sin implies ignorance; according to Prov. 14: 35 2, 6 | work evil." If, therefore, ignorance causes ~involuntariness, 36 2, 6 | some things are done out of ignorance, ~but without sadness: for 37 2, 6 | killing a stag. Therefore ~ignorance does not cause involuntariness.~ 38 2, 6 | that "what is done through ignorance is involuntary."~Aquin.: 39 2, 6 | Para. 1/2~I answer that, If ignorance causes involuntariness, 40 2, 6 | But it is not every ~ignorance that deprives one of this 41 2, 6 | we must take ~note that ignorance has a threefold relationship 42 2, 6 | Concomitantly," when there is ignorance of what is done; ~but, so 43 2, 6 | would be done. For then, ignorance ~does not induce one to 44 2, 6 | foe, but killed him in ~ignorance, thinking to kill a stag. 45 2, 6 | thinking to kill a stag. And ignorance of this kind, as the Philosopher 46 2, 6 | cannot be ~actually willed. Ignorance is "consequent" to the act 47 2, 6 | the will, in so ~far as ignorance itself is voluntary: and 48 2, 6 | is brought to bear on the ignorance: as when ~a man wishes not 49 2, 6 | this is called "affected ignorance." ~Secondly, ignorance is 50 2, 6 | affected ignorance." ~Secondly, ignorance is said to be voluntary, 51 2, 6 | stated above (A[3]). And ignorance of ~this kind happens, either 52 2, 6 | consider; this is called "ignorance of evil choice," and ~arises 53 2, 6 | to have; in which sense, ~ignorance of the general principles 54 2, 6 | in either of these ~ways, ignorance is voluntary, it cannot 55 2, 6 | if there were knowledge. Ignorance is "antecedent" to the ~ 56 2, 6 | slays a passer-by. Such ignorance causes involuntariness simply.~ 57 2, 6 | first ~objection deals with ignorance of what a man is bound to 58 2, 6 | know. The ~second, with ignorance of choice, which is voluntary 59 2, 6 | above. The third, with that ignorance which is concomitant with ~ 60 2, 7 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Ignorance of circumstances causes 61 2, 7 | according to knowledge or ignorance of circumstances, as ~stated 62 2, 13 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, ignorance does not belong to the will 63 2, 13 | power. Now there is an "ignorance of choice," as is stated 64 2, 13 | Reply OBJ 3: In speaking "of ignorance of choice," we do not mean 65 2, 13 | knowledge, but that there is ignorance of what ought ~to be chosen.~ 66 2, 19 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, ignorance of circumstances excuses 67 2, 19 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Ignorance of circumstances excuses 68 2, 19 | has been said above about ignorance. For it was said ~(Q[6], 69 2, 19 | said ~(Q[6], A[8]) that ignorance sometimes causes an act 70 2, 19 | it is evident that ~when ignorance causes an act to be involuntary, 71 2, 19 | Q[6], A[8]) that when ~ignorance is in any way willed, either 72 2, 19 | involuntary. And I call that ignorance "directly" ~voluntary, to 73 2, 19 | if the error arise from ignorance of some circumstance, and ~ 74 2, 19 | since this error arises from ignorance of the ~Divine Law, which 75 2, 19 | this error ~arises from ignorance of a circumstance, which 76 2, 19 | of a circumstance, which ignorance excuses, and ~causes the 77 2, 19 | err through inexcusable ignorance, then evil must needs result 78 2, 19 | aside his error, ~since his ignorance is vincible and voluntary.~ 79 2, 28 | choice, and some ~things from ignorance, as stated in Ethic. v, 80 2, 32 | But knowledge, rather than ignorance, is a cause of ~pleasure. 81 2, 32 | not because it implies ignorance, ~but in so far as it includes 82 2, 32 | we are conscious of our ignorance. This is why man takes the 83 2, 36 | Enchiridion xxiv): "When ignorance of ~things necessary to 84 2, 36 | entrance in their company." But ignorance ~is the cause of error. 85 2, 42 | to be courageous through ~ignorance, but as soon as they discover 86 2, 47 | three ways: namely, through ~ignorance, through passion, and through 87 2, 47 | done us an injury through ignorance or ~through passion, either 88 2, 47 | since to do anything through ignorance or through passion takes ~ 89 2, 47 | through contempt but through ignorance, or some other ~like cause.~ 90 2, 53 | virtue, whether through ignorance, passion or deliberate choice.~ 91 2, 58 | who sins, does so through ~ignorance.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[58] A[ 92 2, 68 | fears, knowledge against ignorance, piety ~against hardness 93 2, 68 | safeguards us from all folly, ignorance, dullness of mind and ~hardness 94 2, 68 | she overcomes the void of ignorance," ~which refers to the present 95 2, 68 | fear, fortitude; ~against ignorance, knowledge; against hardness 96 2, 73 | and ~he who sins through ignorance, sins less grievously. Therefore 97 2, 73 | judgment of reason (e.g. ~ignorance), or which weaken the free 98 2, 73 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Ignorance of a circumstance diminishes 99 2, 73 | for he who ~sins through ignorance of a circumstance, deserves 100 2, 74 | the case of those whose ignorance is ~invincible. It remains 101 2, 74 | from sin on account ~of ignorance. Therefore sin cannot be 102 2, 74 | as a sin, when it is in ignorance or error about what it is ~ 103 2, 76 | place we ~shall treat of ignorance, which is the cause of sin 104 2, 76 | of inquiry:~(1) Whether ignorance is a cause of sin?~(2) Whether 105 2, 76 | cause of sin?~(2) Whether ignorance is a sin?~(3) Whether it 106 2, 76 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether ignorance can be a cause of sin?~Aquin.: 107 2, 76 | OBJ 1: It would seem that ignorance cannot be a cause of sin: 108 2, 76 | the cause of anything. Now ignorance is a non-being, ~since it 109 2, 76 | of knowledge. Therefore ignorance is not a cause ~of sin.~ 110 2, 76 | above (Q[75], A[1]). Now ~ignorance seems to savor of "turning 111 2, 76 | apprehended. Therefore ignorance cannot be a cause of sin.~ 112 2, 76 | that some sin ~through ignorance."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[76] A[ 113 2, 76 | and it is in this way that ignorance ~can be the cause of a sinful 114 2, 76 | man is his ~father. Hence ignorance about either of these two 115 2, 76 | that not ~every kind of ignorance is the cause of a sin, but 116 2, 76 | recognized his father, his ignorance about ~his father is not 117 2, 76 | a man sins, not "through ignorance" but "in ~ignorance," as 118 2, 76 | through ignorance" but "in ~ignorance," as the Philosopher states ( 119 2, 76 | knowledge, which is removed by ignorance, regards sin as ~turning 120 2, 76 | towards something, so too, ignorance of this respect of a sin 121 2, 76 | will it. It is thus that ignorance is the cause of sin: for ~ 122 2, 76 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether ignorance is a sin?~Aquin.: SMT FS 123 2, 76 | OBJ 1: It would seem that ignorance is not a sin. For sin is " 124 2, 76 | above (Q[71], A[5]). Now ~ignorance does not denote an act, 125 2, 76 | or external. Therefore ~ignorance is not a sin. ~Aquin.: SMT 126 2, 76 | resulting from sin. ~Therefore ignorance which is privation of knowledge 127 2, 76 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, if ignorance is a sin, this can only 128 2, 76 | it ~is voluntary. But if ignorance is a sin, through being 129 2, 76 | will, rather ~than in the ignorance. Therefore the ignorance 130 2, 76 | ignorance. Therefore the ignorance will not be a sin, but ~ 131 2, 76 | yet remain in act. Now ~ignorance is not removed by repentance, 132 2, 76 | by repentance. Therefore ignorance is not a sin, unless ~perchance 133 2, 76 | 1/1~OBJ 5: Further, if ignorance be a sin, then a man will 134 2, 76 | as ~long as he remains in ignorance. But ignorance is continual 135 2, 76 | remains in ignorance. But ignorance is continual in the one ~ 136 2, 76 | ignorant. Therefore a person in ignorance would be continually ~sinning, 137 2, 76 | which is clearly false, else ignorance would be a most grievous ~ 138 2, 76 | grievous ~sin. Therefore ignorance is not a sin.~Aquin.: SMT 139 2, 76 | deserves punishment. But ignorance ~deserves punishment, according 140 2, 76 | not be known." Therefore ignorance is a sin.~Aquin.: SMT FS 141 2, 76 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, Ignorance differs from nescience, 142 2, 76 | vii). On the other ~hand, ignorance denotes privation of knowledge, 143 2, 76 | Wherefore ~through negligence, ignorance of what one is bound to 144 2, 76 | unable to know. Consequently ignorance of such like things is called ~" 145 2, 76 | For this reason ~such like ignorance, not being voluntary, since 146 2, 76 | evident that no invincible ~ignorance is a sin. On the other hand, 147 2, 76 | the other hand, vincible ignorance is a sin, if it be about 148 2, 76 | negligence, in as ~much as ignorance is a sin, is comprised in 149 2, 76 | character of sin, even as ignorance; nevertheless even here 150 2, 76 | through repentance, ~the ignorance remains, according as it 151 2, 76 | by reason of which the ~ignorance is said to be a sin.~Aquin.: 152 2, 76 | so is it with ~the sin of ignorance. For the ignorant man sins 153 2, 76 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether ignorance excuses from sin altogether?~ 154 2, 76 | OBJ 1: It would seem that ignorance excuses from sin altogether. 155 2, 76 | every sin is voluntary. Now ignorance ~causes involuntariness, 156 2, 76 | Q[6], A[8]). Therefore ignorance ~excuses from sin altogether.~ 157 2, 76 | what a man does through ignorance is accidental in human acts. ~ 158 2, 76 | nothing that ~is done through ignorance in human acts, should be 159 2, 76 | partaker of reason. Now ignorance excludes knowledge which 160 2, 76 | perfects the ~reason. Therefore ignorance excuses from sin altogether.~ 161 2, 76 | some things ~done through ignorance are rightly reproved." Now 162 2, 76 | some things done through ~ignorance are sins. Therefore ignorance 163 2, 76 | ignorance are sins. Therefore ignorance does not altogether excuse 164 2, 76 | Para. 1/2~I answer that, Ignorance, by its very nature, renders 165 2, 76 | been stated (AA[1],2) that ~ignorance is said to cause the act 166 2, 76 | knowledge, which is removed by ignorance, would not have ~prevented 167 2, 76 | Ethic. iii, 1: and such like ignorance which is not the ~cause 168 2, 76 | The same applies to any ~ignorance that does not cause, but 169 2, 76 | 2/2~On the other hand, ignorance which is the cause of the 170 2, 76 | which is not known. For ignorance excuses from sin, in so 171 2, 76 | though this man sins through ~ignorance, yet he is not altogether 172 2, 76 | happen on the part of the ~ignorance itself, because, to wit, 173 2, 76 | itself, because, to wit, this ignorance is voluntary, either ~directly, 174 2, 76 | negligence ~renders the ignorance itself voluntary and sinful, 175 2, 76 | know. Consequently this ignorance does ~not altogether excuse 176 2, 76 | from sin. If, however, the ignorance be such as to ~be entirely 177 2, 76 | to know, then such like ignorance ~excuses from sin altogether.~ 178 2, 76 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Not every ignorance causes involuntariness, 179 2, 76 | A[8]). Hence not every ignorance excuses from sin altogether.~ 180 2, 76 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: If the ignorance be such as to exclude the 181 2, 76 | but such is not always the ignorance that causes the sin; and ~ 182 2, 76 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether ignorance diminishes a sin?~Aquin.: 183 2, 76 | OBJ 1: It would seem that ignorance does not diminish a sin. 184 2, 76 | does not diminish sin. Now ignorance is ~common to all sins, 185 2, 76 | is ignorant." Therefore ignorance does not diminish sin.~Aquin.: 186 2, 76 | makes a greater sin. But ~ignorance is itself a sin, as stated 187 2, 76 | aggravate and diminish sin. ~Now ignorance aggravates sin; for Ambrose 188 2, 76 | knowest not." Therefore ignorance does not ~diminish sin.~ 189 2, 76 | Further, if any kind of ignorance diminishes a sin, this would ~ 190 2, 76 | the case as regards the ignorance which removes the ~use of 191 2, 76 | altogether. Now this kind of ignorance does not diminish ~sin, 192 2, 76 | drunken man." Therefore ignorance does not ~diminish sin.~ 193 2, 76 | diminishes ~sin. Now such is ignorance, as is clear from 1 Tim. 194 2, 76 | it ignorantly." Therefore ignorance ~diminishes or alleviates 195 2, 76 | every sin is voluntary, ignorance can diminish sin, ~in so 196 2, 76 | it is evident that ~the ignorance which excuses from sin altogether ( 197 2, 76 | altogether. On the other hand, ignorance which is not the cause of 198 2, 76 | cannot be alleviated by any ignorance, but only by such as ~is 199 2, 76 | sometimes that such like ignorance is ~directly and essentially 200 2, 76 | may sin more freely, and ignorance of this kind seems rather 201 2, 76 | willing to bear the hurt of ignorance, ~for the sake of freedom 202 2, 76 | Sometimes, however, the ignorance ~which is the cause of a 203 2, 76 | and indiscreet, and this ignorance diminishes voluntariness 204 2, 76 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: The ignorance whereby "every evil man 205 2, 76 | referring to ~simply affected ignorance; or they may have reference 206 2, 76 | may be an allusion to the ~ignorance of unbelief, which undermines 207 2, 76 | drunkenness, on account of the ignorance ~connected therewith, diminishes 208 2, 77 | and every sin a kind of ~ignorance. In this he was somewhat 209 2, 77 | evil, unless there were ignorance ~or error in the reason. 210 2, 77 | passion causes a certain ignorance of a particular ~matter, 211 2, 77 | A[2]; Q[76], A[3]). But ignorance of a ~particular matter 212 2, 77 | Reply OBJ 2: The particular ignorance which excuses altogether, 213 2, 77 | excuses altogether, is ~ignorance of a circumstance, which 214 2, 77 | precautions. But passion causes ignorance of law in a ~particular 215 2, 77 | committed through weakness or ignorance is said ~to be venial. Secondly, 216 2, 78 | certain ~malice. Because ignorance is opposed to purpose or 217 2, 78 | when anyone sins through ~ignorance, and sometimes through a 218 2, 78 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Ignorance sometimes excludes the simple 219 2, 78 | man is said to sin through ignorance: ~sometimes it excludes 220 2, 78 | passion, or again through ignorance. But whenever he uses the 221 2, 78 | when anyone sins through ~ignorance; and sometimes this arises 222 2, 78 | through passion. Because ignorance excuses from sin either ~ 223 2, 78 | altogether or in part. Now ignorance is greater in one who sins 224 2, 78 | suffers from the worst form of ignorance, which ~according to the 225 2, 78 | Philosopher (Ethic. vii, 8) is ignorance of principle, ~for he has 226 2, 78 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Ignorance of choice, to which the 227 2, 78 | neither does a greater ignorance of the kind make a sin to 228 2, 82 | Therefore original sin is ignorance rather than concupiscence.~ 229 2, 82 | concupiscence rather ~than ignorance, although ignorance is comprised 230 2, 82 | than ignorance, although ignorance is comprised among the material ~ 231 2, 84 | instance, when one sins through ignorance, or when ~one commits a 232 2, 84 | the sins ~which are due to ignorance, can be reduced to sloth, 233 2, 84 | attendant labor; for the ignorance that can cause sin, is ~ 234 2, 84 | intention, seems to point to ignorance, in so far as he knows ~ 235 2, 85 | Para. 1/1~Whether weakness, ignorance, malice and concupiscence 236 2, 85 | would seem that weakness, ignorance, malice and concupiscence ~ 237 2, 85 | soul of the sinner, viz. ~ignorance and difficulty," from which 238 2, 85 | there is the ~wound of ignorance; in so far as the will is 239 2, 88 | committed through weakness or ignorance, which are remissible. Therefore ~ 240 2, 88 | committed through weakness or ignorance. But, in this respect, sins ~ 241 2, 88 | committed through weakness or ~ignorance: and this is called venial " 242 2, 88 | sin, is due some sort of ignorance or weakness, as ~when a 243 2, 88 | gets drunk frequently, this ignorance no longer ~avails as an 244 2, 88 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: If the ignorance be such as to excuse sin 245 2, 88 | sin altogether, as ~the ignorance of a madman or an imbecile, 246 2, 88 | fornication in a state of such ignorance, commits no sin either mortal 247 2, 88 | mortal or ~venial. But if the ignorance be not invincible, then 248 2, 88 | not invincible, then the ignorance itself ~is a sin, and contains 249 2, 89 | forgiveness, ~on account of their ignorance, according to 1 Tim. 1:13: " 250 2, 94 | for instance, to shun ~ignorance, to avoid offending those 251 2, 98 | given as a remedy for human ~ignorance: because "by the Law is 252 2, 100 | because what a man does in ~ignorance, he does accidentally. Hence 253 2, 100 | are judged in respect of ignorance to be punishable ~or pardonable.~ 254 2, 102 | offered for a ~priest's ignorance, and a ram for the negligence 255 2, 102 | uncleannesses; or, through ignorance, failed to offer this expiation; 256 2, 105 | when a man sins through ignorance: and then he was held ~to 257 2, 105 | soul that ~sinneth through ignorance," etc. This is, however, 258 2, 105 | be taken as ~applying to ignorance of fact; and not to ignorance 259 2, 105 | ignorance of fact; and not to ignorance of the Divine ~precept, 260 2, 109 | there seems the darkness of ignorance, ~whereby, as is written ( 261 2, 1 | science is lacking there is ignorance, since ~ignorance is the 262 2, 1 | there is ignorance, since ~ignorance is the opposite of science. 263 2, 1 | science. Now we are not in ignorance of ~those things we have 264 2, 1 | we have to believe, since ignorance of such things savors of ~ 265 2, 1 | OBJ 1: Unbelievers are in ignorance of things that are of faith, ~ 266 2, 1 | stray from the truth through ignorance ~of the faith. It is from 267 2, 2 | even the angels were in ignorance of the mystery of the Incarnation: ~ 268 2, 2 | OBJ 2: It was not through ignorance that John the Baptist inquired ~ 269 2, 2 | this question, being in ignorance as to whether Christ would 270 2, 2 | inquiry, not from doubt or ignorance but from ~devotion: or again, 271 2, 8 | knowledge is contrary to ignorance," as Gregory states (Moral. 272 2, 8 | between folly, dulness, ~ignorance and rashness. Therefore 273 2, 8 | about the universal cause. Ignorance implies a ~defect in the 274 2, 9 | she overcomes the fast of ignorance in the ~mind." Now ignorance 275 2, 9 | ignorance in the ~mind." Now ignorance is not entirely removed, 276 2, 10 | confession of faith; thirdly, ignorance and dulness of mind, which 277 2, 10 | punishment, because such like ignorance of Divine things is a ~result 278 2, 10 | Unbelief includes both ignorance, as an accessory thereto, ~ 279 2, 10 | respect, however, of this ignorance, it has a certain ~reason 280 2, 12 | knowledge, and it is the same ignorance which errs in either way, 281 2, 13 | with sin committed through ignorance, and sin committed through 282 2, 13 | that when he sins through ignorance, it is a sin ~"against the 283 2, 13 | which is committed through ignorance, or ~through weakness.~Aquin.: 284 2, 13 | since he that sins through ~ignorance or weakness, deserves less 285 2, 14 | however, we have treated of ignorance which is opposed to ~knowledge, 286 2, 20 | possible. Now it is owing to ignorance ~that one deems an impossible 287 2, 20 | presumption ~arises from ignorance rather than from vainglory.~ 288 2, 28 | lived in a great war of ignorance, they call so many and so 289 2, 30 | is without the defect of ignorance in some matter or other. ~ 290 2, 32 | to kill a man, through ~ignorance or out of zeal for justice: 291 2, 41 | proceeds from weakness or ignorance, and such ~is the "scandal 292 2, 41 | arise therefrom through the ignorance or weakness of others (in 293 2, 51 | than knowledge is. ~But ignorance which is opposed to knowledge, 294 2, 51 | natures, it follows ~that ignorance has the nature of mortal 295 2, 53 | Divine ~providence, through ignorance of which the gentiles are 296 2, 56 | since "what is done through ignorance is ~involuntary" (Ethic. 297 2, 57 | instance if he do it through ignorance, being unaware that it ~ 298 2, 57 | Whatever they do not merely in ~ignorance but through ignorance is 299 2, 57 | in ~ignorance but through ignorance is a venial matter." Therefore 300 2, 57 | understood as ~referring to ignorance of fact, which he calls " 301 2, 57 | of fact, which he calls "ignorance of particular ~circumstances" [* 302 2, 57 | deserves pardon, and not to ~ignorance of the law which does not 303 2, 57 | does an injustice ~through ignorance, does no injustice except 304 2, 64 | through violence and through ignorance, ~as stated in Ethic. iii, 305 2, 64 | involuntariness is due to ~ignorance, whereas in robbery it is 306 2, 64 | through violence than through ignorance, because violence is ~more 307 2, 64 | opposed to the will than ignorance. Therefore robbery is a ~ 308 2, 66 | another of a crime through ignorance of fact which excuses him. ~ 309 2, 66 | quite certain about, wherein ignorance of fact has no place. Yet 310 2, 66 | but involuntarily through ignorance or a just error, he does 311 2, 68 | false evidence, through ~ignorance of fact. Now such ignorance 312 2, 68 | ignorance of fact. Now such ignorance excuses from mortal sin. 313 2, 69 | to the measure in which ignorance ~is excusable.~Aquin.: SMT 314 2, 71 | diversified by violence and by ~ignorance, as stated above (Q[65], 315 2, 75 | book to a man who ~through ignorance asked a low price for it. 316 2, 75 | frightened to buy, ~through ignorance of other qualities that 317 2, 76 | arises not from weakness or ignorance but from malice.~Aquin.: 318 2, 92 | of one that sins through ignorance: and in this way ~nothing 319 2, 92 | idolaters who sin ~through ignorance. Furthermore other sins 320 2, 92 | Thirdly, on account of their ignorance of the ~true God, inasmuch 321 2, 92 | of nature, either through ignorance in his intellect, or ~disorder 322 2, 93 | Lord ~inquired, not through ignorance, but in order that the disease, 323 2, 95 | temptation proceeds from some ignorance or doubt, either in the ~ 324 2, 97 | of sacrilege who through ignorance sin ~against the sanctity 325 2, 105 | favor should remain in ignorance of it, both in order to 326 2, 106 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, ignorance makes an act involuntary. 327 2, 106 | they were in invincible ignorance, perished with their ~parents ( 328 2, 121 | seem to be brave ~through ignorance; or through experience, 329 2, 121 | sometimes this is ~owing to ignorance, through not perceiving 330 2, 131 | if ~he knew himself." Now ignorance of self seems opposed to 331 2, 131 | part of the intellect ~is ignorance of one's own qualification, 332 2, 131 | respect of its cause: because ignorance of this kind ~does not proceed 333 2, 148 | the drink offered. But if ignorance be lacking neither is ~excused 334 2, 148 | be ~involuntary through ignorance. But on the part of the 335 2, 154 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Ignorance in the intellect sometimes 336 2, 154 | and then the greater the ~ignorance, the more does it diminish 337 2, 154 | involuntary. On the other hand, ignorance in the ~reason sometimes 338 2, 154 | appetite, and then such ~like ignorance, the greater it is, the 339 2, 154 | and the intemperate man, ignorance arises from the ~appetite 340 2, 154 | intemperate. Nevertheless greater ~ignorance results thus in the intemperate 341 2, 154 | the incontinent man this ignorance ~lasts only while the passion 342 2, 154 | is disturbed: whereas the ignorance of ~the intemperate man 343 2, 154 | In another respect the ignorance ~of the intemperate man 344 2, 154 | thing ignored. For the ~ignorance of the incontinent man regards 345 2, 154 | whereas the intemperate man's ignorance is about the end itself, 346 2, 160 | contempt, but sometimes through ignorance. ~and sometimes through 347 2, 160 | but ~sometimes through ignorance, sometimes through weakness, 348 2, 160 | affectively; thus he who, in ignorance, slays his father, is a 349 2, 160 | from God, either through ignorance or through weakness, or ~ 350 2, 160 | if ~it be the outcome of ignorance or weakness. The same applies 351 2, 160 | that are committed through ignorance or ~weakness. But among 352 2, 161 | the woman ~sinned through ignorance, but the man through assured 353 2, 161 | with pride. Wherefore her ignorance did not excuse, but aggravated 354 2, 169 | the veil of darkness and ignorance is removed, according to 355 2, 183 | infirmity, removal ~of his ignorance by sufficient instruction. 356 2, 183 | simony of which he was in ignorance, and resigning his ~episcopate 357 2, 184 | but out of ~weakness or ignorance, commit a sin that is not 358 2, 184 | done through weakness or ~ignorance, but not to those that are 359 2, 184 | fall into a sin through ignorance or weakness from which they 360 3, 2 | these heresies, through ~ignorance fell into them. For some 361 3, 14 | knowledge and grace, as ~ignorance, a proneness towards evil, 362 3, 15 | Him?~(3) Whether there was ignorance?~(4) Whether His soul was 363 3, 15 | Whether in Christ there was ignorance?~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[15] A[ 364 3, 15 | would seem that there was ignorance in Christ. For that is ~ 365 3, 15 | suffering and death. But ~ignorance belongs to Christ in His 366 3, 15 | enslaved nature." ~Therefore ignorance was truly in Christ.~Aquin.: 367 3, 15 | sin." Therefore ~there was ignorance in Christ.~Aquin.: SMT TP 368 3, 15 | Therefore in Christ there was ignorance of certain things.~Aquin.: 369 3, 15 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Ignorance is not taken away by ignorance. 370 3, 15 | Ignorance is not taken away by ignorance. But Christ ~came to take 371 3, 15 | Christ ~came to take away our ignorance; for "He came to enlighten 372 3, 15 | Therefore there was ~no ignorance in Christ.~Aquin.: SMT TP 373 3, 15 | fulness of knowledge ~excluded ignorance, which is opposed to knowledge. 374 3, 15 | Christ, neither was there ignorance in Him.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 375 3, 15 | Christ was not affected with ignorance.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[15] A[ 376 3, 15 | ignorant. ~Now there was no ignorance in Christ, as was said A[ 377 3, 21 | people, who cannot allege ignorance as an ~excuse for putting 378 3, 35 | is foolish and a ~mark of ignorance to say that He who is from 379 3, 47 | the Son of God, not from ignorance, but out of ~envy: for they 380 3, 47 | Son of God, because their ignorance would have ~excused them. 381 3, 47 | that you did it through ignorance, as ~did also your rulers." 382 3, 47 | be understood that their ignorance did not excuse them from ~ 383 3, 47 | was, as it were, affected ignorance. For they saw ~manifest 384 3, 47 | that you did ~it through ignorance, as did also your rulers" - 385 3, 47 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: Affected ignorance does not excuse from guilt, 386 3, 47 | that he wishes to incur ignorance lest he avoid sinning. The 387 3, 47 | Christ: and if there was any ignorance in them, it was ~affected 388 3, 47 | in them, it was ~affected ignorance, which could not excuse 389 3, 47 | lessened by reason of their ignorance. Hence Bede, commenting 390 3, 64 | would not have been in ~ignorance of this, if such a power 391 3, 64 | of the ~sacrament, unless ignorance excuses him.~Aquin.: SMT 392 3, 65 | through negligence or through ignorance; order, against ~divisions 393 3, 65 | being ordained against ~ignorance; Penance to Justice, being 394 3, 66 | Ghost, to cast off error and ignorance, and to ~acknowledge the 395 3, 74 | our predecessors, ~out of ignorance or simplicity, has not kept 396 3, 80 | to ~have arisen, through ignorance of the distinction between 397 3, 80 | either because ~through ignorance of the law (which ignorance 398 3, 80 | ignorance of the law (which ignorance does not excuse him), he ~ 399 3, 80 | thereof, because the very ignorance is a sin on his part.~Aquin.: 400 3, 80 | was a ~sinful act, through ignorance of the fact, which excuses, 401 3, 80 | sin which is the result of ignorance or of weakness is ~lighter 402 3, 83 | the threefold misery of ignorance, sin, and ~punishment; or 403 3, 84 | If anyone sin through ignorance . . . he shall offer of ~ 404 Suppl, 2 | committed voluntarily. But ignorance takes away voluntariness, 405 Suppl, 2 | which have occurred through ignorance.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[2] A[3] 406 Suppl, 2 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: If ignorance were to remove altogether 407 Suppl, 2 | a ~sin committed through ignorance.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[2] A[3] 408 Suppl, 9 | fall into one sin through ignorance or ~weakness, but a number 409 Suppl, 10| out sins committed through ignorance, else ~heretics, who are 410 Suppl, 10| because he suffers from ignorance of fact, which ~excuses 411 Suppl, 10| 4 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: Ignorance of the law does not excuse, 412 Suppl, 10| is a sin ~by itself: but ignorance of fact does excuse. Therefore 413 Suppl, 10| it to be a sin, through ignorance ~of the Divine law, he is 414 Suppl, 10| comes under the head of ignorance of fact, wherefore it ~excuses 415 Suppl, 23| Utility, law, lowliness, ignorance of fact, necessity," ~where " 416 Suppl, 35| counteract the defect of ignorance. Now not sanctifying ~grace 417 Suppl, 35| grace is given to counteract ignorance, for ~sanctifying grace 418 Suppl, 35| in order to ~counteract ignorance, it does not mean that by 419 Suppl, 35| receiving Orders a man has ~his ignorance driven out of him, but that 420 Suppl, 35| set ~in authority to expel ignorance from among the people.~Aquin.: 421 Suppl, 39| But if his master be in ~ignorance, the bishop and he who presented 422 Suppl, 45| excused from sin on account of ignorance.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[45] A[ 423 Suppl, 49| as so grave a sin. thus ignorance is said ~to excuse a sin 424 Suppl, 50| incompatible with either ignorance ~or violence, there will 425 Suppl, 50| error" in reference to ignorance. Wherefore the ~Master pronounced 426 Suppl, 51| 1), may be hindered ~by ignorance. But ignorance is not the 427 Suppl, 51| hindered ~by ignorance. But ignorance is not the same as error, 428 Suppl, 51| the same as error, because ignorance ~excludes knowledge altogether, 429 Suppl, 51| Trin. ix, 11). Therefore ignorance rather than error should 430 Suppl, 51| OBJ 1: Speaking simply, ignorance differs from error, because ~ 431 Suppl, 51| differs from error, because ~ignorance does not of its very nature 432 Suppl, 51| not whether we ~call it ignorance or error, since no ignorance 433 Suppl, 51| ignorance or error, since no ignorance can be an impediment to ~ 434 Suppl, 51| will. Wherefore if there be ignorance there must needs ~be error; 435 Suppl, 51| removing ~voluntariness. Now ignorance about any circumstance takes 436 Suppl, 51| Reply OBJ 3: It is not any ignorance of a circumstance that causes 437 Suppl, 51| return to ~the first; and ignorance of the fact excuses her 438 Suppl, 52| unable to pay the debt, ignorance of this inability, on the ~ 439 Suppl, 52| freely. Therefore, just as ignorance or impotence in respect 440 Suppl, 52| is not affected either by ignorance (such as ~destroys voluntariness) 441 Suppl, 52| marriage, but only when ignorance of them ~destroys voluntariness. 442 Suppl, 52| marriage act, wherefore ~ignorance of freedom is no impediment 443 Suppl, 55| Church sometimes through ignorance joins such persons ~together, 444 Suppl, 55| just as it happens through ignorance of ~fact that a guilty man 445 Suppl, 55| so it happens through ~ignorance of a circumstance that a 446 Suppl, 55| denounced, when through ignorance of an impediment it is deemed ~ 447 Suppl, 56| any necessity and through ignorance, in which case if ~the person 448 Suppl, 64| demand it, either through ignorance or some ~other cause, the 449 Suppl, 64| either knowingly or in ~ignorance. If knowingly, she ought 450 Suppl, 64| inclined. If however, he ask in ignorance, the wife may put forward ~ 451 Suppl, 68| 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Ignorance, unless it be affected, 452 Suppl, 68| secretly, ~because such ignorance would appear to be affected.~ 453 Suppl, 72| Para. 1/1 ~OBJ 2: Further, ignorance is the cause of wonder ( 454 Suppl, 72| wonder (Metaph. i, 2). Now ~ignorance, like fear, is far from 455 Suppl, 72| and this does not imply ignorance in the ~angels, but removes 456 Suppl, 85| for ~judgment, being in ignorance of the appointed time. Yet 457 Suppl, 89| Para. 1/1 ~OBJ 8: Further, ignorance is one of the penalties 458 Suppl, 89| by glory. Therefore all ignorance will be removed: and consequently 459 Suppl, 89| cleanse the lower angels from ignorance." Now the lower angels see 460 Suppl, 89| 8 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 8: Ignorance properly so called denotes 461 Suppl, 89| punishment: for in this way ignorance is nescience of things, 462 Suppl, 89| things. Sometimes, however, ~ignorance is taken in a broad sense 463 Suppl, 89| be cleansed from ~their ignorance." In this sense ignorance 464 Suppl, 89| ignorance." In this sense ignorance is not a penalty but a defect. ~


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