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Alphabetical    [«  »]
heiresses 1
heirs 18
helcesaitae 1
held 464
heli 13
heliod 4
hell 487
Frequency    [«  »]
469 save
466 merely
465 happen
464 held
464 ignorance
461 hold
461 signify
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

held

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | clear. ~Hence a reward is held out to those who manifest 2 1, 6 | opinions ~differ. Plato held the existence of separate 3 1, 10 | Whatever is possessed, is held firmly and quietly; ~therefore 4 1, 12 | some who considered this, held that no created intellect 5 1, 12 | scientific demonstration is ~held only by an opinion resting 6 1, 12 | according to the words, "I held him, and I ~will not let 7 1, 12 | ourselves not everything seen is held or ~possessed, forasmuch 8 1, 13 | substance, as is universally held. Hence also Ambrose (De 9 1, 14 | from Himself, and as if it held and ~included Himself; for 10 1, 14 | be infinite, it must be held that He knows infinite things. ~ 11 1, 14 | as some of the ancients held; yet it is manifest that ~ 12 1, 15 | the opinion ~of Plato, who held that ideas existed of themselves, 13 1, 15 | It must necessarily be held that ideas are many. In 14 1, 15 | which, as some say, he held to be ~uncreated and the 15 1, 16 | The ancient philosophers held that the species of natural ~ 16 1, 18 | as ~some in fact have held, in that case movement would 17 1, 18 | way, so far are they are held together and preserved by 18 1, 18 | reason, in ~fact, Plato held that the "separate" man 19 1, 23 | Accordingly there were some who held that the effect of predestination ~ 20 1, 24 | anyone when ~it is firmly held in the memory, according 21 1, 29 | given to signify those who ~held high dignity. Hence, those 22 1, 29 | dignity. Hence, those who held high rank in the Church 23 1, 32 | heresy, especially if it ~be held obstinately. A thing is 24 1, 36 | his opinion is not to be held. ~Although, too, it has 25 1, 37 | this difficulty some have held that it is false, that " 26 1, 39 | differ, forasmuch as they held the relations to be "adjacent"; ~ 27 1, 40 | Different opinions have been held on this point. Some ~have 28 1, 43 | grace, since they can be held without the gift of charity, 29 1, 46 | Aristotle (De ~Coelo i), who held that heaven was ungenerated. 30 1, 50 | Nevertheless Aristotle held (Metaph. xi, text 43) that ~ 31 1, 50 | bring both into harmony, held ~that the angels, in so 32 1, 50 | or bodies, as ~Aristotle held (Metaph. xi, text 43); while 33 1, 51 | so much so that some even held that God was the soul of 34 1, 53 | the angel's movement is held to be continuous, it can 35 1, 61 | If the contrary view be held, then in the text of Gn. 36 1, 63 | the reason why Porphyry held that they are ~naturally 37 1, 63 | must be maintained if it be held that he elicited an act ~ 38 1, 64 | Catholic Faith, it must be held firmly both ~that the will 39 1, 65 | has been stated. For Plato held that the forms ~of corporeal 40 1, 65 | of participation. Thus he held that there exists an ~immaterial 41 1, 65 | type, as the Platonists held, but ~either to intelligible 42 1, 66 | heaven is meant fire, for he held ~heaven to be composed of 43 1, 66 | all who preceded Aristotle held that all bodies are ~of 44 1, 66 | OBJ 3: Further, if it is held that the empyrean heaven 45 1, 66 | Porphyry, as a Platonist, held the heaven, known ~as sidereal, 46 1, 67 | duration, matter must be held ~to have been created at 47 1, 67 | 2/2 ~Others, therefore, held that this luminous nebula 48 1, 67 | vain. On this account it is held by some ~that the sun's 49 1, 67 | time, the darkness must be held to mean ~the spiritual darkness 50 1, 68 | Empedocles, who, however, held further that the body of 51 1, 68 | but in harmony. Others held the firmament to be ~of 52 1, 68 | the opinion of Plato, who ~held that element to be fire. 53 1, 68 | fire. Others, again, have held that the heaven is ~not 54 1, 68 | Again, if the ~firmament is held to be of other nature than 55 1, 68 | a theory similar to that held by certain philosophers ~ 56 1, 68 | solid reasons, it ~cannot be held to be the sense of Holy 57 1, 68 | OBJ 2: If the waters are held to differ in species, the 58 1, 70 | corporeal, then it must be held to have been produced on ~ 59 1, 70 | other hand, the ~Platonists held that the heavenly bodies 60 1, 71 | themselves, as Avicenna held, but in the power originally 61 1, 75 | potentiality; and so they held that the ~soul must be a 62 1, 75 | subsistent. But ~Aristotle held that of the operations of 63 1, 75 | this, ~forasmuch as some held that the form alone belongs 64 1, 75 | man; and ~this could be held if it were supposed that 65 1, 75 | Origen (Peri Archon iii, 5) held that human souls and ~angels 66 1, 76 | Para. 3/8~The Commentator held that this union is through 67 1, 76 | 1/6~I answer that, Plato held that there were several 68 1, 76 | be maintained if, as he held, the soul was ~supposed 69 1, 76 | natural philosophers, who held that primary matter was 70 1, 76 | 3~Reply OBJ 4: Avicenna held that the substantial forms 71 1, 37 | this difficulty some have held that it is false, that " 72 1, 39 | differ, forasmuch as they held the relations to be "adjacent"; ~ 73 1, 40 | Different opinions have been held on this point. Some ~have 74 1, 43 | grace, since they can be held ~without the gift of charity, 75 1, 47 | Aristotle (De ~Coelo i), who held that heaven was ungenerated. 76 1, 51 | Nevertheless Aristotle held (Metaph. xi, text 43) that ~ 77 1, 51 | bring both into harmony, held ~that the angels, in so 78 1, 51 | or bodies, as ~Aristotle held (Metaph. xi, text 43); while 79 1, 52 | so much so that some even held that God was the soul of 80 1, 54 | the angel's movement is held to be continuous, it can 81 1, 62 | If the contrary view be held, then in the text of Gn. 82 1, 64 | the reason why Porphyry held that they are ~naturally 83 1, 64 | must be maintained if it be held that he elicited an act ~ 84 1, 65 | Catholic Faith, it must be held firmly both ~that the will 85 1, 66 | has been stated. For Plato held that the forms ~of corporeal 86 1, 66 | of participation. Thus he held that there exists an ~immaterial 87 1, 66 | type, as the Platonists held, but ~either to intelligible 88 1, 67 | heaven is meant fire, for he held ~heaven to be composed of 89 1, 67 | all who preceded Aristotle held that all bodies are ~of 90 1, 67 | OBJ 3: Further, if it is held that the empyrean heaven 91 1, 67 | Porphyry, as a Platonist, held the heaven, known ~as sidereal, 92 1, 68 | duration, matter must be held ~to have been created at 93 1, 68 | 2/2 ~Others, therefore, held that this luminous nebula 94 1, 68 | vain. On this account it is held by some ~that the sun's 95 1, 68 | time, the darkness must be held to mean ~the spiritual darkness 96 1, 69 | Empedocles, who, however, held further that the body of 97 1, 69 | but in harmony. Others held the firmament to be ~of 98 1, 69 | the opinion of Plato, who ~held that element to be fire. 99 1, 69 | fire. Others, again, have held that the heaven is ~not 100 1, 69 | Again, if the ~firmament is held to be of other nature than 101 1, 69 | a theory similar to that held by certain philosophers ~ 102 1, 69 | solid reasons, it ~cannot be held to be the sense of Holy 103 1, 69 | OBJ 2: If the waters are held to differ in species, the 104 1, 71 | corporeal, then it must be held to have been produced on ~ 105 1, 71 | other hand, the ~Platonists held that the heavenly bodies 106 1, 71 | themselves, as Avicenna held, but in the power originally 107 1, 74 | potentiality; and so they held that the ~soul must be a 108 1, 74 | subsistent. But ~Aristotle held that of the operations of 109 1, 74 | this, ~forasmuch as some held that the form alone belongs 110 1, 74 | man; and ~this could be held if it were supposed that 111 1, 74 | Origen (Peri Archon iii, 5) held that human souls and ~angels 112 1, 75 | Para. 3/8~The Commentator held that this union is through 113 1, 75 | 1/6~I answer that, Plato held that there were several 114 1, 75 | be maintained if, as he held, the soul was ~supposed 115 1, 75 | natural philosophers, who held that primary matter was 116 1, 75 | 3~Reply OBJ 4: Avicenna held that the substantial forms 117 1, 78 | Para. 2/2~Wherefore some held that this intellect, substantially 118 1, 78 | intellect: because Avicenna held that this was impossible. 119 1, 78 | active intellect, which he held to be a separate ~substance, 120 1, 78 | but a habit; though some held ~that it is a power higher 121 1, 83 | The ancient philosophers held that the soul knows bodies ~ 122 1, 83 | immaterial mode of ~knowledge, held that the forms of things 123 1, 83 | corporeal and material, held that things known must exist 124 1, 83 | knowledge of all things, they held that it has the same nature 125 1, 83 | be the principle of all, held that the soul had ~the nature 126 1, 83 | Lastly, ~Empedocles, who held the existence of our four 127 1, 83 | Consequently, since they held that things exist in the 128 1, 83 | thus the early philosophers held that ~the essence of the 129 1, 83 | Aristotle (De Anima iii, ~4) held that the intellect by which 130 1, 83 | I answer that, Some have held that the intelligible species 131 1, 83 | as we have said (A[1]), held that the forms of ~sensible 132 1, 83 | by a copy. So just ~as he held that the sensible forms, 133 1, 83 | certain images thereof: so he held that the ~intelligible species 134 1, 83 | setting this opinion aside, held that ~the intelligible species 135 1, 83 | separate forms; but these Plato held ~to subsist of themselves, 136 1, 83 | this respect, that Avicenna held that ~the intelligible species 137 1, 83 | knowledge, as Plato, who held that the ~participated ideas 138 1, 83 | faith he amended. Now Plato held, as we ~have said above ( 139 1, 83 | matter, as the Platonists held, ~asserting that "per se" 140 1, 83 | types, as the Platonists ~held, maintaining that the mere 141 1, 83 | this point the philosophers held three opinions. For ~Democritus 142 1, 83 | opinions. For ~Democritus held that "all knowledge is caused 143 1, 83 | Vigil.) ~that Democritus held that knowledge is cause 144 1, 83 | Which ~impression Democritus held to be caused by a discharge 145 1, 83 | Plato, on the other hand, held that the intellect is distinct 146 1, 83 | affected by the ~corporeal, he held that intellectual knowledge 147 1, 83 | AA[4]~,5). Moreover he held that sense is a power operating 148 1, 83 | sense are different. But he held that the sense has not its 149 1, 83 | the "composite." And he held the same in ~regard to all 150 1, 83 | Gener. i, 8. But Aristotle held that the intellect has an 151 1, 83 | superior beings, as Plato held; but that the higher ~and 152 1, 84 | way united to the body, held that the objects of ~the 153 1, 84 | existing in matter, ~as Plato held. But it is not so, if the 154 1, 84 | above explained (ad 1), he held that all those things which 155 1, 84 | about ideas, ~which they held to be actually understood [* 156 1, 84 | according to Plato, who held that universals are ~subsistent, 157 1, 86 | intellect, as the Platonists held, ~became actual by participating 158 1, 88 | I answer that, Some have held that the separated soul 159 1, 89 | other bodies. And since they held that the soul ~was of the 160 1, 89 | God was corporeal light, held that the soul ~was part 161 1, 89 | I answer that, Some have held that angels, acting by the 162 1, 89 | Origen (Peri Archon i, 7,8) held that not only the soul ~ 163 1, 92 | individually, but severally. They held ~that "the man represents 164 1, 93 | belief. This opinion was held with the idea ~that it is 165 1, 94 | the opinion of those ~who held that man was not created 166 1, 102 | be rejected, because he held that God ~did not govern 167 1, 103 | I answer that, Some have held that God, in giving existence 168 1, 105 | excellent gifts, yet nothing is held individually." And Dionysius ~ 169 1, 107 | some things, however, being held more excellently by some 170 1, 109 | OBJ 3: Philosophers have held different opinions about 171 1, 109 | than ~others; and so he held that immaterial substances 172 1, 109 | different bodies. But ~Aristotle held that immaterial substances 173 1, 109 | as Plato also said, he held that the forms of these ~ 174 1, 109 | Para. 2/2~The holy doctors held with the Platonists that 175 1, 112 | For even the ~demons are held off by the good angels, 176 1, 112 | this matter. For some have held that the angel guardian 177 1, 114 | that of Plato. For Plato held ~that all forms existing 178 1, 114 | by quantity, Avicebron held that the corporeal form 179 1, 114 | that the corporeal form is held back and ~imprisoned by 180 1, 114 | that of Plato. For Plato ~held only substantial forms to 181 1, 114 | him to a certain extent, held that corporeal agents act 182 1, 114 | that of Democritus, who held that action takes ~place 183 1, 114 | movement, as Democritus held: but by something ~being 184 1, 114 | was affirmed by those who held that the heavenly ~bodies 185 1, 114 | early natural philosophers held to be the "rare" and the " 186 1, 114 | existence of demons; and held ~that what is ascribed to 187 1, 114 | relates as having been held by Porphyry, namely, that " 188 1, 115 | ordered. Some, therefore, have held that ~the series itself 189 1, 115 | Others, on the other hand, held that fate is changeable, 190 1, 116 | all men. ~Consequently he held that one man does not cause 191 1, 116 | opinion of the Platonists, who held that our ~souls are possessed 192 1, 116 | remember. In the same way they held that natural agents only ~ 193 1, 117 | I answer that, Some have held that the sensitive souls 194 1, 117 | the opinion of those who held the existence of several 195 1, 117 | according to those who held that all ~men have but one 196 1, 117 | the opinion of Origen, who held that souls were embodies 197 2, 1 | Dei xix, 1) that some held man's last end to consist 198 2, 4 | result of which is that it is held back, so to ~speak, from 199 2, 5 | error of certain Platonists, held that man can become unhappy 200 2, 9 | 3) ascribed to those who held ~that intellect differs 201 2, 14 | properly implies a conference held between ~several; the very 202 2, 24 | Peripatetics: for the Stoics held that all passions are evil, ~ 203 2, 24 | answer that, As the Stoics held that every passion of the 204 2, 24 | evil, they consequently held that every passion of the 205 2, 26 | that "some holy men have ~held that love means something 206 2, 26 | that which is loved is ~held to be of great price, as 207 2, 26 | OBJ 4: The reason why some held that, even when applied 208 2, 34 | Anima iii, 3). And they held that all bodily ~pleasures 209 2, 34 | are evil, the Epicureans held that pleasure is good in 210 2, 34 | 1/2~I answer that, Plato held neither with the Stoics, 211 2, 36 | that "this opinion," which ~held repletion to be the cause 212 2, 36 | wherefore the Platonists held that "one" ~is a principle, 213 2, 50 | species are in the body: and held that the first species of ~ 214 2, 50 | to the soul alone. And he held that Aristotle mentions ~ 215 2, 52 | and the other ~Platonists held that qualities and habits 216 2, 52 | Others, on ~the contrary, held that qualities and habits 217 2, 52 | preceding opinions. For they held that some habits are of ~ 218 2, 52 | The fourth opinion was held by some who ~said that qualities 219 2, 53 | for which reason it is held that ~habits are not lost 220 2, 58 | rebel. Accordingly some held that all the ~active principles 221 2, 58 | right reason, as Socrates ~held, yet not only is it "according 222 2, 59 | Dei ix, 4). For the Stoics held that the ~soul's passions 223 2, 59 | Dei xiv, 8), the Stoics held ~that in the mind of the 224 2, 59 | already present. Now they ~held that no evil can happen 225 2, 62 | supernatural principles, which are held by means of a Divine light: ~ 226 2, 63 | Q[65], ~A[4]]. Others held that forms are entirely 227 2, 63 | sciences and virtues, some held that they ~are wholly from 228 2, 64 | heresy of Eutyches, who held to one ~person and one nature. 229 2, 66 | Stoics erred, for they ~held that no man should be deemed 230 2, 67 | De Trin. xiv, 9), Cicero held that the ~cardinal virtues 231 2, 67 | FP, Q[79], A[6] some have held that the ~intelligible species 232 2, 67 | I answer that, Some have held that hope is taken away 233 2, 68 | Consequently some have held that the gifts are not to 234 2, 68 | that the gifts should be held as being ~distinct from 235 2, 68 | fortitude, ~piety and fear; they held that the gifts perfect the 236 2, 69 | that beatitude has been held to consist ~in one of three 237 2, 72 | viii, 1) ~that "those who held that there are no different 238 2, 73 | admits of more or less, they held ~that all sins are equal. 239 2, 73 | grievous as the sinner is held to be a more excellent ~ 240 2, 74 | this point, for some ~have held that consent to delectation 241 2, 74 | venial sin, while others have held it to be a mortal sin, and 242 2, 77 | by passion; wherefore ~he held every virtue to be a kind 243 2, 80 | because, to him who is held by a passion, whatever the 244 2, 81 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: It is held with greater probability 245 2, 82 | even as original justice held all ~the soul's parts together 246 2, 82 | justice being broken, which ~held together all the powers 247 2, 85 | lower powers of the soul held together under the control 248 2, 85 | also the whole body was held ~together in subjection 249 2, 87 | Therefore pride hath held them fast."~Aquin.: SMT 250 2, 89 | though she refused to be held in check by the precept.~ 251 2, 94 | that the natural law is held ~habitually; and this is 252 2, 94 | unreasonable, to restore ~goods held in trust; for instance, 253 2, 94 | were ~to say that goods held in trust should be restored 254 2, 95 | human audacity might be held in check, that innocence 255 2, 96 | man's audacity might be held in check." But it would 256 2, 96 | check." But it would not be ~held in check sufficiently, unless 257 2, 98 | were a dispenser of goods held in common, and were not 258 2, 99 | consequently should not ~be held as distinct from them.~Aquin.: 259 2, 102 | unclean animals are wont to be held in ~contempt among men, 260 2, 102 | cherubim, as though it were held up by them; and appearing, 261 2, 102 | high-priest. And so it was held up, so to speak, by ~the 262 2, 102 | superstition of the ~Gentiles, who held that uncleanness was contracted 263 2, 102 | the idols, to whom they held ~the blood to be most acceptable. 264 2, 102 | first-fruits, which ~they held to bring them good luck: 265 2, 102 | idolatry. For ~the Egyptians held it to be wicked to allow 266 2, 102 | children: also because it was held to be a good omen to find 267 2, 103 | 3~Reply OBJ 3: Some have held that this prohibition of 268 2, 103 | murder ~and rapine were held to be unlawful even by the 269 2, 104 | precepts of the decalogue held the first place in the ~ 270 2, 105 | nevertheless the first place is held by the ~"kingdom," where 271 2, 105 | in order that it might be held in greater ~respect, if 272 2, 105 | than of restoring goods held in deposit. Because the 273 2, 105 | for instance if an animal held in deposit were to die or ~ 274 2, 105 | stated above (ad 4), he ~who held an animal on loan, was bound 275 2, 105 | or died: because he was held responsible for ~less negligence 276 2, 105 | depositary, who was only held responsible in case ~of 277 2, 105 | ignorance: and then he was held ~to be guilty to a certain 278 2, 105 | kindred with them, were to ~be held as foes in perpetuity: for 279 2, 106 | fulfilled in Manes whom they held to be ~the Paraclete. Hence 280 2, 108 | internal desire. And they held this opinion about murder 281 2, 108 | bearing false witness. They held a false opinion about ~perjury, 282 2, 110 | 1/3~I answer that, Some held that grace and virtue were 283 2, 1 | both opinions have been held with a certain amount of ~ 284 2, 1 | first principles, which are held by the ~habit of understanding), 285 2, 1 | of conclusions which are held by the habit of science). 286 2, 1 | finally, so that ~they may be held by all with unshaken faith. 287 2, 6 | Para. 3/3~The Pelagians held that this cause was nothing 288 2, 10 | reason the ~Pythagoreans held evil to be infinite.~Aquin.: 289 2, 10 | gloss on Gal. 5:1, "Be not held again under the yoke of 290 2, 23 | to charity, as some have held to be the case.~Aquin.: 291 2, 25 | the outward effect. ~They held that the order of love is 292 2, 41 | such ~things (as of things held in deposit) devolves of 293 2, 45 | Ethic. vi, 8) some have ~held that prudence does not extend 294 2, 73 | us not one whit, ~but is held as an object of derision. 295 2, 81 | concerning ~prayer. Some held that human affairs are not 296 2, 81 | serveth God." Another opinion held that all things, even in ~ 297 2, 81 | third ~opinion of those who held that human affairs are indeed 298 2, 86 | jurists have ignorantly held the contrary.~Aquin.: SMT 299 2, 86 | 2~Reply OBJ 2: Some have held that prelates can dispense 300 2, 87 | that swearing is not to be held as a good thing," i.e. desirable 301 2, 92 | believed to be God, for they held God to ~be nothing else 302 2, 92 | The last two opinions were held to belong to "natural theology" 303 2, 92 | relating ~to images was held to belong to "civil theology," 304 2, 92 | uncleanness, as the Jews held.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[94] A[ 305 2, 92 | good in itself, since they held that divine honor ~should 306 2, 92 | 2] Body Para. 3/4~Others held that the outward worship 307 2, 93 | Anima iii, 3) those who held that "such is the will of ~ 308 2, 94 | is false, what Porphyry ~held, according to Augustine ( 309 2, 98 | Lateran Council, A.D. 1215, held by Innocent III], they must 310 2, 101 | in order that he may ~be held in reverence by others.~ 311 2, 102 | bondage, whereby they are held bound to earthly ~masters, 312 2, 104 | he ~has shown should be held in memory, as the Philosopher 313 2, 108 | instance a ~heavy body which is held up aloft by force, lest 314 2, 109 | heaven, He was, so to speak, held back on earth by their hospitality."~ 315 2, 116 | sin, in so far as it is held ~in check by the rule taken 316 2, 117 | contrary, The prodigal son is held to blame for his prodigality.~ 317 2, 121 | action more ~prompt, they held that virtuous persons should 318 2, 122 | men her ~testimony is not held to be sufficient, and consequently 319 2, 123 | the opinion of Stoics, who held temporal goods ~not to be 320 2, 129 | bravest men, cowards are held in dishonor, and the brave 321 2, 145 | apostles were not to be ~held back by the old observances, 322 2, 151 | because through being held back by carnal pleasures 323 2, 158 | clemency also from modesty, and held ~modesty to be about the 324 2, 160 | among the capital vices, but held it to ~be the "queen and 325 2, 162 | to this life, ~as Origen held [*Peri Archon ii, 9]: for 326 2, 166 | an excuse for sin is not held to be sinful. Now play is ~ 327 2, 170 | xxvii; Civit. vi], who held that our ~souls have knowledge 328 2, 181 | the various members are held ~together in unity by the 329 2, 181 | from justice is not to be held back from evil for the love 330 2, 185 | Constantinople [*Pseudosynod held by Photius in the year 879]: ~" 331 2, 186 | in religious orders ~is held by those which are directed 332 2, 186 | 3: Further, possessions held in common belong in some 333 2, 186 | safeguarding of his poverty, held firmly to his ~opinion, 334 2, 186 | this refers to possessions held in common, and which were 335 2, 186 | that is given to ~things held in common pertains to the 336 2, 186 | those poor His disciples held a ~foremost place, and the 337 3, 2 | but one person in Christ, held, ~nevertheless, that there 338 3, 2 | both in the Fifth Council held at ~Constantinople, saying: " 339 3, 2 | Eutyches and ~Dioscorus, who held that from the two natures 340 3, 2 | separated the persons. For they held the ~Person of the Son of 341 3, 2 | keeping the unity of person, held that ~the soul of Christ 342 3, 2 | members. Hence Nestorius held that the human nature was 343 3, 2 | made ~man. But Damascene held that the human nature in 344 3, 2 | Son of God, as ~Photinus held; but we hold that from the 345 3, 3 | human nature, as Arius, who held an inequality ~of Persons, 346 3, 4 | matter, as the Platonists held; ~secondly, as existing 347 3, 4 | singular, as the Platonists held, ~although some say Plato 348 3, 8 | beginning" (1 Jnn 3:8), is ~held out to all to be followed, 349 3, 10 | knowledge of the Son, Whom ~they held to be less than the Father 350 3, 12 | that, Acquired knowledge is held to be in Christ's soul, 351 3, 12 | or infused knowledge is held to be in Christ's soul for 352 3, 14 | flesh, as the Manicheans held. And so, as is said, Phil. 353 3, 14 | contraries. ~But this cause was held in check by original justice. 354 3, 15 | joy, and fear - the Stoics held three {eupatheias} ~i.e. 355 3, 16 | man. So, too, those who held that Christ's body and soul 356 3, 16 | was thus that ~Nestorius held God to be man - nothing 357 3, 16 | this would follow, if we held that "Man" stands for a 358 3, 16 | the error of Manes, who held that Christ had not a true 359 3, 18 | too, Eutyches and all who held one composite nature in 360 3, 18 | one of affection and will, held only one ~will in Christ. 361 3, 18 | some of their followers, ~held that there is one will in 362 3, 18 | in Christ, although they held that in Christ ~there are 363 3, 18 | hence in the sixth Council held at Constantinople [*Act. 364 3, 20 | the error of Arius, who held the Son to ~be less than 365 3, 26 | sanctified. But if ~St. Thomas held for a posteriority of time, 366 3, 27 | opinions. For some have ~held that the fomes was entirely 367 3, 28 | Ebionites and Cerinthus, who held Christ to be a mere man, 368 3, 28 | 2~Reply OBJ 3: Some have held that Christ, in His Birth, 369 3, 31 | was formed; as some indeed held. For this is ~quite impossible. 370 3, 35 | man, just as the soul is held to be born together with 371 3, 39 | waters of the Jordan were held back, so now, when Christ 372 3, 39 | the torrent of sin was held back." Or else this may 373 3, 46 | deceived by guile, and whom he held subject in servitude by 374 3, 46 | much so that the ~Stoics held there was no sadness in 375 3, 46 | reason. And since the Stoics held all sadness to be unprofitable, 376 3, 46 | body ~and blood, and being held and bound by the Jews, He 377 3, 47 | OBJ 3: Further, Judas is held to be guilty because he 378 3, 47 | and these accordingly are held guilty.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 379 3, 48 | was not to the devil, who held us in bondage, that Christ ~ 380 3, 48 | 2~I answer that, Man was held captive on account of sin 381 3, 48 | payment of which man was ~held fast by God's justice: and 382 3, 48 | devil, so far as in him lay, held him unjustly ~in bondage 383 3, 49 | that the debtors whom he held captive should be set at ~ 384 3, 50 | was a man, ~because he held that the soul is a man: 385 3, 50 | Sentences (iii, D, 22) ~held Christ to be a man during 386 3, 52 | power, whereby ~hitherto you held men fast in hell"; and so " 387 3, 52 | free all the just who were held in the ~bonds of original 388 3, 52 | impossible that He should be ~held by it." Therefore it seems 389 3, 52 | all the righteous who were held ~fast through original sin."~ 390 3, 52 | AA[1],3). Now men were held ~fast by the debt of punishment 391 3, 52 | delivered them who were held bound in prisons, ~where 392 3, 52 | Fathers, although still held bound by the debt of ~original 393 3, 53 | impossible for ~Christ to be held fast by hell" and death. 394 3, 53 | compulsion. But Christ was not ~held fast by any necessity of 395 3, 53 | while in death, not as one held fast, but of His own ~will, 396 3, 55 | 16) that "their eyes were held, that they should not ~know 397 3, 55 | that their eyes should be held ~fast in the aforesaid way, " 398 3, 57 | heaven those who had been held captives by the devil - 399 3, 59 | Reply OBJ 1: Some men have held the opinion that the souls 400 3, 60 | sense of the words which is held by faith. And this sense 401 3, 63 | quality, although some ~have held this to be the case.~Aquin.: 402 3, 63 | relation" as some have held.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[63] A[ 403 3, 66 | reason certain philosophers held that water is the ~first 404 3, 66 | that solemn ~Baptism is held in the Church, both on Easter 405 3, 67 | the sacred font, should be held ~up by another. Therefore 406 3, 68 | he cannot subsequently be held by the ~bonds of another' 407 3, 69 | Some of the early writers held that children do not ~receive 408 3, 72 | Tarentaise, ~Sent. iv, D, 7) held that it was instituted by 409 3, 72 | imposition of the hand should be held in great ~veneration, and 410 3, 73 | order that it might be held in the greater veneration. 411 3, 75 | I answer that, Some have held that the substance of the 412 3, 76 | above (A[1]), it must be held ~most certainly that the 413 3, 76 | have convinced those ~who held that Christ's body does 414 3, 77 | aforesaid position might be held.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[77] A[ 415 3, 77 | old on this matter. Some held ~that in this sacrament 416 3, 77 | 1~Reply OBJ 4: Some have held that however slight be the 417 3, 78 | 2~Accordingly it must be held that if the priest were 418 3, 80 | second degree of gravity is held by those sins which ~are 419 3, 81 | commenting on Mt. 26:17, held that Christ did ~not give 420 3, 81 | already stated what should be held (Q[28], A[2], ad 3; ~Q[45], 421 3, 83 | provided that the consecrators held faith in the Holy ~Trinity": 422 Suppl, 11| notwithstanding, it must be held ~secret; nor does the seal 423 Suppl, 14| I answer that, Some have held that it is possible to make 424 Suppl, 19| I answer that, Some have held that, under the Old Law, 425 Suppl, 25| as the second opinion held; but according to the cause 426 Suppl, 25| according to which a person is held deserving ~of obtaining 427 Suppl, 29| I answer that, Some have held that no farm is essential 428 Suppl, 42| the latter run riot ~when held in too strict restraint.~ 429 Suppl, 67| former is ~more generally held: wherefore we must reply 430 Suppl, 67| her ~first marriage still held good. For "the woman . . . 431 Suppl, 69| wherefore also the philosophers held that the order of ~separate 432 Suppl, 69| to heaven, unless it be held back by some ~debt, for 433 Suppl, 70| the opinion of Plato, who ~held that the soul is united 434 Suppl, 70| transmigration which he held. ~And since according to 435 Suppl, 70| corporeal ~fire, through being held thereby, even as now it 436 Suppl, 70| thereby, even as now it is held by the body ~while living 437 Suppl, 70| while living in the ~body is held by the body in so far as 438 Suppl, 70| Therefore it cannot be held by the fire in ~the manner 439 Suppl, 70| spirit of a ~living man is held by the body, why shall it 440 Suppl, 70| body, why shall it not be held after death by a ~corporeal 441 Suppl, 72| is happiness. Some have ~held that man is able to attain 442 Suppl, 72| the soul only, and they held that ~such a life sufficed 443 Suppl, 74| certain ~philosophers, who held that the movement of the 444 Suppl, 76| mode of reunion, for some held the separated soul to be ~ 445 Suppl, 76| it was reunited, for they held that this second union ~ 446 Suppl, 76| The second is that they held intellect not to differ 447 Suppl, 76| philosophers: while others held ~that souls are reunited 448 Suppl, 76| proof against those who ~held a distinction between the 449 Suppl, 77| 4] Body Para. 2/8~Others held that something new is added 450 Suppl, 79| quintessence, of which ~they held heavenly bodies to be formed]: 451 Suppl, 80| a place. Hence some who held the ~possibility of a vacuum, 452 Suppl, 80| subject to a lesser. Some have held this ~to be the case with 453 Suppl, 80| may become. And some have held this to be the case, ~saying 454 Suppl, 83| movement; and consequently they held that a body composed of 455 Suppl, 88| the higher bodies might be held to be perpetual, so far ~ 456 Suppl, 89| opinion. For some philosophers held that our passive intellect 457 Suppl, 89| manner certain theologians held that the human intellect 458 Suppl, 89| that his happiness must be held to consist ~in that operation 459 Suppl, 89| Alfarabius and Avempace, held that from the very fact 460 Suppl, 89| for this reason ~those who held the Divine essence to be 461 Suppl, 89| also certain philosophers ~held, namely Alexander and Averroes ( 462 Suppl, 90| the body's desire it ~is held back from tending with all 463 Suppl, 94| Body Para. 2/2~Pythagoras held the place of punishment 464 Appen1, 2| because their longing is not held back by the weight of ~the


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