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Alphabetical    [«  »]
volunt 3
voluntarily 77
voluntariness 37
voluntary 459
voluntas 6
voluptuous 1
voluptuousness 1
Frequency    [«  »]
461 signify
460 actual
460 grievous
459 voluntary
457 40
456 etc
455 49
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

voluntary

    Part, Question
1 1, 2 | which is nature; and all voluntary things can be reduced to 2 1, 17 | perhaps ~in the case of voluntary agents only, who have it 3 1, 19 | contrary to His nature, but voluntary.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[19] A[ 4 1, 19 | that exists." But every voluntary ~agent acts by reason and 5 1, 19 | Hence the ~intellectual and voluntary agent must precede the agent 6 1, 19 | irrationally?" But to a voluntary agent, what is the reason 7 1, 41 | these acts are necessary, or voluntary?~(3) Whether as regards 8 1, 41 | Whether the notional acts are voluntary?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 9 1, 41 | that the notional acts are voluntary. For Hilary ~says (De Synod.): " 10 1, 41 | Further, nothing is more voluntary than love. But the Holy 11 1, 41 | 5: Further, what is not voluntary is necessary. Therefore 12 1, 46 | mover is either natural or voluntary. But neither ~begins to 13 1, 46 | 6: The first agent is a voluntary agent. And although He had ~ 14 1, 46 | likewise it follows from the ~voluntary agent, according to the 15 1, 47 | effect is one ~only. But the voluntary agent, such as God is, as 16 1, 48 | of the due operation in voluntary things has the nature of 17 1, 48 | Therefore every evil ~in voluntary things is to be looked upon 18 1, 48 | but evil that is found in voluntary things.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 19 1, 49 | has a deficient cause in voluntary things otherwise ~than in 20 1, 49 | as was said above. But in voluntary things the defect of the ~ 21 1, 49 | both natural things and ~voluntary things. For it was said ( 22 1, 70 | principle; just as we say that voluntary movement is natural ~to 23 1, 41 | these acts are necessary, or voluntary?~(3) Whether as regards 24 1, 41 | Whether the notional acts are voluntary?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[41] A[ 25 1, 41 | that the notional acts are voluntary. For Hilary ~says (De Synod.): " 26 1, 41 | Further, nothing is more voluntary than love. But the Holy 27 1, 41 | 5: Further, what is not voluntary is necessary. Therefore 28 1, 47 | mover is either natural or voluntary. But neither begins to move 29 1, 47 | 6: The first agent is a voluntary agent. And although He had ~ 30 1, 47 | likewise it follows from the ~voluntary agent, according to the 31 1, 48 | effect is one ~only. But the voluntary agent, such as God is, as 32 1, 49 | of the due operation in voluntary things has the nature of 33 1, 49 | Therefore every evil ~in voluntary things is to be looked upon 34 1, 49 | but evil that is found in voluntary things.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[ 35 1, 50 | has a deficient cause in voluntary things otherwise ~than in 36 1, 50 | as was said above. But in voluntary things the defect of the ~ 37 1, 50 | both natural things and ~voluntary things. For it was said ( 38 1, 71 | principle; just as we say that voluntary movement is natural ~to 39 1, 80 | member is naturally moved by voluntary movement, are ~moved at 40 1, 81 | is necessary, it is not voluntary. ~But whatever the will 41 1, 81 | whatever the will desires is voluntary. Therefore nothing that 42 1, 81 | nature, so a thing is called voluntary because it is according 43 1, 81 | coerced or violent, and voluntary. ~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[82] A[ 44 1, 82 | causes both natural and ~voluntary. And just as by moving natural 45 1, 82 | being natural, so by moving voluntary causes He does not deprive ~ 46 1, 82 | their actions of being voluntary: but rather is He the cause 47 1, 102 | anything, whether natural or voluntary, is nothing but a ~kind 48 1, 104 | the will, it follows that voluntary ~actions are not imputed 49 1, 105 | this turning to another is voluntary, ~the highest angel can 50 1, 112 | 1) that is called simply voluntary, which a man wills in a ~ 51 1, 112 | such a thing would not be ~voluntary: thus the sailor does not 52 1, 112 | wills it. Wherefore this is voluntary ~rather than involuntary, 53 1, 117 | however, this union be neither voluntary nor natural on the part 54 2, 1 | the last end, it must be voluntary, ~else it would not be human, 55 2, 1 | above. Now an action is voluntary ~in one of two ways: first, 56 2, 1 | reason is because, since voluntary actions receive their ~species 57 2, 6 | TO MAN (QQ[6]-21)~OF THE VOLUNTARY AND THE INVOLUNTARY (EIGHT 58 2, 6 | properly called human which are voluntary, ~because the will is the 59 2, 6 | acts in so far as they are voluntary.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] Out. 60 2, 6 | then, we must consider the voluntary and involuntary in general; ~ 61 2, 6 | secondly, those acts which are voluntary, as being elicited by the 62 2, 6 | thirdly, those acts which are ~voluntary, as being commanded by the 63 2, 6 | Out. Para. 5/5~And because voluntary acts have certain circumstances, 64 2, 6 | must first consider the ~voluntary and the involuntary, and 65 2, 6 | acts which are found to be voluntary or involuntary. Under the 66 2, 6 | Whether there is anything voluntary in human acts?~(2) Whether 67 2, 6 | Whether there is anything voluntary in human acts?~Aquin.: SMT 68 2, 6 | seem that there is nothing voluntary in human acts. For ~that 69 2, 6 | human acts. For ~that is voluntary "which has its principle 70 2, 6 | Therefore there is nothing voluntary ~in human acts. ~Aquin.: 71 2, 6 | therefore there is ~nothing voluntary in them.~Aquin.: SMT FS 72 2, 6 | Therefore there is nothing voluntary in human acts.~Aquin.: SMT 73 2, 6 | Fide Orth. ii) that "the voluntary ~is an act consisting in 74 2, 6 | Therefore there is something voluntary in human acts.~Aquin.: SMT 75 2, 6 | must needs be something voluntary in human acts. In ~order 76 2, 6 | such things are ~said to be voluntary: for the word "voluntary" 77 2, 6 | voluntary: for the word "voluntary" implies that their ~movements 78 2, 6 | See Objection 1], the voluntary is defined not only as having ~" 79 2, 6 | his acts especially is the voluntary to be found.~Aquin.: SMT 80 2, 6 | although it is essential to the voluntary act that its principle be ~ 81 2, 6 | contrary to the nature of the ~voluntary act that this intrinsic 82 2, 6 | is not essential to the voluntary act ~that its intrinsic 83 2, 6 | intrinsic principle of the voluntary act, i.e. ~the cognitive 84 2, 6 | contrary to the essence of a voluntary act, that it proceed from 85 2, 6 | Nevertheless both natural and ~voluntary movements have this in common, 86 2, 6 | Whether there is anything voluntary in irrational animals?~Aquin.: 87 2, 6 | seem that there is nothing voluntary in irrational ~animals. 88 2, 6 | For a thing is called "voluntary" from "voluntas" [will]. 89 2, 6 | neither is there anything voluntary in them.~Aquin.: SMT FS 90 2, 6 | according as human acts are voluntary, man is said to be master 91 2, 6 | there is no such thing as a ~voluntary act in irrational animals.~ 92 2, 6 | De Fide Orth. 24) that "voluntary acts ~lead to praise and 93 2, 6 | Therefore such acts are not voluntary.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] A[2] 94 2, 6 | animals participate in the voluntary." The same ~is said by Damascene ( 95 2, 6 | it is essential to the voluntary ~act that its principle 96 2, 6 | end leads to the perfect ~voluntary; inasmuch as, having apprehended 97 2, 6 | leads to the imperfect ~voluntary; inasmuch as the agent apprehends 98 2, 6 | end at once. Wherefore the voluntary in ~its perfection belongs 99 2, 6 | whereas the ~imperfect voluntary is within the competency 100 2, 6 | of reason. But the word ~"voluntary" is derived from "voluntas" [ 101 2, 6 | thereto. It is thus that voluntary action is attributed to ~ 102 2, 6 | blame are the result of the voluntary act, ~wherein is the perfect 103 2, 6 | wherein is the perfect voluntary; such as is not to be found 104 2, 6 | without any act. For ~that is voluntary which proceeds from the 105 2, 6 | Therefore ~there can be nothing voluntary when the act of the will 106 2, 6 | knowledge is essential to the voluntary, as stated above ~(AA[1], 107 2, 6 | the contrary, The word "voluntary" is applied to that of which 108 2, 6 | as to act and to will are voluntary, so ~also are not to act 109 2, 6 | Para. 1/2~I answer that, Voluntary is what proceeds from the 110 2, 6 | is that we can have the voluntary without an act; sometimes 111 2, 6 | OBJ 1: We apply the word "voluntary" not only to that which ~ 112 2, 6 | time to wish and to act, is voluntary, so is it ~voluntary not 113 2, 6 | is voluntary, so is it ~voluntary not to consider.~Aquin.: 114 2, 6 | movement ~is not violent but voluntary.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[6] A[4] 115 2, 6 | directly opposed to the voluntary, as ~likewise to the natural. 116 2, 6 | to the natural. For the voluntary and the natural have this 117 2, 6 | involuntary is opposed to the voluntary. Now it has ~been said ( 118 2, 6 | from ~the will, is called voluntary, but also the act commanded 119 2, 6 | nature; so that is said to be voluntary, which is ~according to 120 2, 6 | cause ~of that movement is a voluntary agent. In like manner an 121 2, 6 | manner an act is said to ~be voluntary in two ways. First, in regard 122 2, 6 | involuntary; and is not ~voluntary, save under a condition, 123 2, 6 | done through fear ~are "voluntary rather than involuntary."~ 124 2, 6 | character," being partly voluntary and ~partly involuntary. 125 2, 6 | considered in ~itself, is not voluntary; but it becomes voluntary 126 2, 6 | voluntary; but it becomes voluntary in this particular ~case, 127 2, 6 | aright, such things are voluntary ~rather than involuntary; 128 2, 6 | involuntary; for they are voluntary simply, but involuntary ~ 129 2, 6 | is done through fear is voluntary, inasmuch ~as it is here 130 2, 6 | cargo into the sea becomes voluntary during the storm, ~through 131 2, 6 | wherefore it is clear that it is voluntary ~simply. And hence it is 132 2, 6 | of fear is essentially ~voluntary, because its principle is 133 2, 6 | done through fear, becomes voluntary, ~because the will is moved 134 2, 6 | For the conditions of a voluntary act are satisfied, if it 135 2, 6 | account of something else voluntary: since the voluntary is 136 2, 6 | else voluntary: since the voluntary is not ~only what we wish, 137 2, 6 | Now a thing is said to be voluntary, not only ~for its own sake, 138 2, 6 | prevents a ~thing which was not voluntary in comparison with one thing, 139 2, 6 | one thing, from becoming ~voluntary when compared with another.~ 140 2, 6 | is done through fear, is voluntary without any ~condition, 141 2, 6 | contrary makes something to be voluntary. For a thing is said to 142 2, 6 | For a thing is said to be ~voluntary, from the fact that the 143 2, 6 | to make something to be voluntary rather than ~involuntary.~ 144 2, 6 | reason, there is neither voluntary nor involuntary. But ~sometimes 145 2, 6 | Nevertheless, this itself is voluntary, according as by ~voluntary 146 2, 6 | voluntary, according as by ~voluntary we mean that which is in 147 2, 6 | Augustine, that "every sin is voluntary" (De ~Vera Relig. xiv).~ 148 2, 6 | far as ignorance itself is voluntary: and this happens in two 149 2, 6 | the two aforesaid modes of voluntary (A[3]). First, ~because 150 2, 6 | ignorance is said to be voluntary, when it regards that which ~ 151 2, 6 | to ~will" are said to be voluntary, as stated above (A[3]). 152 2, 6 | which one to know, is ~voluntary, as being due to negligence. 153 2, 6 | these ~ways, ignorance is voluntary, it cannot cause involuntariness 154 2, 6 | the will, when it is not voluntary, and yet is the cause of 155 2, 6 | ignorance of choice, which is voluntary to a certain extent, ~as 156 2, 7 | requisite that ~they be voluntary. Now a human act is deemed 157 2, 7 | human act is deemed to be voluntary or ~involuntary, according 158 2, 7 | human, inasmuch as they are voluntary. Now, the motive and object 159 2, 8 | thing; so the animal or voluntary appetite tends to a good 160 2, 9 | movement of the will is voluntary. But it is essential to 161 2, 9 | it is essential to the ~voluntary act that it be from an intrinsic 162 2, 9 | It is essential to the voluntary act that its principle be ~ 163 2, 9 | another. Wherefore though the voluntary ~act has an inward proximate 164 2, 9 | his ~cause; but that his voluntary movement be from an exterior 165 2, 10 | agent is condivided with the voluntary agent, as stated ~at the 166 2, 10 | manner the principle of voluntary movements must be ~something 167 2, 15 | we consent is said to be voluntary. But ~it belongs to many 168 2, 15 | to many powers to produce voluntary acts. Therefore the higher ~ 169 2, 15 | Since actions are called voluntary from the fact that we ~consent 170 2, 15 | 1), and ~from which the voluntary act is named.~Aquin.: SMT 171 2, 16 | both the ~natural and the voluntary appetite tend to have the 172 2, 17 | power, in so far as they are voluntary. ~Therefore the acts of 173 2, 18 | human, inasmuch as they are ~voluntary, as stated above (Q[1], 174 2, 18 | Q[1], A[1]). Now, in a voluntary action, ~there is a twofold 175 2, 18 | save in so far as they are voluntary. Consequently the species ~ 176 2, 19 | action in so ~far as it is voluntary, as was stated above (A[ 177 2, 19 | that ignorance "directly" ~voluntary, to which the act of the 178 2, 19 | and that, "indirectly" ~voluntary, which is due to negligence, 179 2, 19 | ignorance is vincible and voluntary.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[19] A[ 180 2, 20 | act is moral from being voluntary, it seems that goodness ~ 181 2, 20 | in so far as ~they are voluntary. And therefore in so far 182 2, 20 | therefore in so far as they are voluntary in ~respect of wills that 183 2, 21 | 19], AA[3],4) that every voluntary action that turns ~aside 184 2, 21 | end intended, because no voluntary evil action can be ~ordained 185 2, 21 | follows that good or evil, in voluntary actions ~alone, renders 186 2, 21 | Weakness that occurs in voluntary evils, is subject to ~man' 187 2, 24 | evil, inasmuch as they are voluntary. Much more, ~therefore, 188 2, 24 | passions, in so far as they are voluntary, be called ~morally good 189 2, 24 | And they are said to be voluntary, either from ~being commanded 190 2, 24 | genus, inasmuch as it is voluntary and ~controlled by reason. 191 2, 39 | good: just as that which is voluntary on some ~supposition, is 192 2, 39 | supposition, is judged to be voluntary, as stated in Ethic. iii, 193 2, 42 | proper nature, ~i.e. as a voluntary act; for considered in this 194 2, 46 | although evil," yet, being voluntary, "do not ~grieve those in 195 2, 56 | virtues are ordained, are ~voluntary. If therefore there be a 196 2, 71 | natural things, even as in voluntary ~matters (Phys. ii, text. 197 2, 71 | Therefore no sin occurs in voluntary matters, except through 198 2, 71 | is it that every sin is voluntary, that, unless ~it be voluntary, 199 2, 71 | voluntary, that, unless ~it be voluntary, it is no sin at all." Now 200 2, 71 | all." Now nothing can be voluntary, save ~through an act of 201 2, 71 | cause, in so far as it is ~voluntary, must needs always include 202 2, 71 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: The term "voluntary" is applied not only to 203 2, 71 | not ~to will may be called voluntary, in so far as man has it 204 2, 71 | act is due to its being voluntary, ~as stated above (Q[1], 205 2, 71 | 1], A[1]), whether it be voluntary, as being elicited ~by the 206 2, 71 | will, which commands all ~voluntary acts, in which alone is 207 2, 72 | nature of sin, viz. the voluntary act, and its inordinateness, 208 2, 72 | specifically on the part of the ~voluntary acts rather than of the 209 2, 72 | inordinateness inherent to sin. Now ~voluntary acts differ in species according 210 2, 72 | the active ~principles in voluntary acts, such as the acts of 211 2, 72 | The active principles in voluntary acts, not being ~determined 212 2, 74 | moral acts that they are voluntary, as stated above (Q[1], 213 2, 74 | which is the principle of ~voluntary acts, both of good acts, 214 2, 74 | Further, every sin is a voluntary act, because, as Augustine ~ 215 2, 74 | is it ~that every sin is voluntary, that unless it be voluntary, 216 2, 74 | voluntary, that unless it be voluntary, it is no sin at ~all." 217 2, 74 | the other powers are not voluntary, except in so ~far as those 218 2, 74 | is the a principle of ~a voluntary act is a subject of sin. 219 2, 74 | is a subject of sin. Now voluntary acts are not only ~those 220 2, 74 | power ~whose act can be voluntary and inordinate, wherein 221 2, 74 | can be the principle of a voluntary ~action, and, consequently, 222 2, 74 | for the conditions of a voluntary ~sin, that he be able to 223 2, 74 | the act of the ~reason, voluntary. Accordingly sin is found 224 2, 74 | either through ~being a voluntary defect of the reason, or 225 2, 75 | no sin, for every ~sin is voluntary. Therefore sin has no cause.~ 226 2, 75 | man is either natural or voluntary. ~Now that which is natural 227 2, 75 | 21); while that ~which is voluntary, if it be inordinate, is 228 2, 75 | the completeness of the voluntary sinful act ~appertains to 229 2, 75 | external cause. For sin is a ~voluntary act. Now voluntary acts 230 2, 75 | is a ~voluntary act. Now voluntary acts belong to principles 231 2, 75 | depends on the act being voluntary and in ~our power.~Aquin.: 232 2, 76 | only be in so far as it ~is voluntary. But if ignorance is a sin, 233 2, 76 | is a sin, through being voluntary, it ~seems that the sin 234 2, 76 | like ignorance, not being voluntary, since it is not in our 235 2, 76 | far as it is in some way ~voluntary; and accordingly, the neglect 236 2, 76 | Retract. i, 9), every sin is voluntary. Now ignorance ~causes involuntariness, 237 2, 76 | to wit, this ignorance is voluntary, either ~directly, as when 238 2, 76 | renders the ignorance itself voluntary and sinful, provided it 239 2, 76 | that, Since every sin is voluntary, ignorance can diminish 240 2, 76 | does not render ~it less voluntary, it nowise alleviates the 241 2, 76 | directly and essentially voluntary, as when a man is purposely 242 2, 76 | rather to ~make the act more voluntary and more sinful, since it 243 2, 76 | committed, is not directly voluntary, ~but indirectly or accidentally, 244 2, 77 | sin in so far as it is ~voluntary, and under our control. 245 2, 77 | passion, the more is it voluntary and under our control. In 246 2, 77 | first, that a thing may be voluntary either "in itself," as when 247 2, 77 | that a ~thing is said to be voluntary "directly" or "indirectly"; 248 2, 77 | if such a ~passion were voluntary from the beginning, the 249 2, 77 | reckoned a sin, ~because it is voluntary in its cause, as we have 250 2, 77 | however, the cause be not voluntary but natural, for ~instance, 251 2, 77 | comparison, ~however, if it were voluntary, as we have stated about 252 2, 80 | will, since ~every sin is voluntary. Consequently nothing can 253 2, 81 | is ~essentially something voluntary. Wherefore granted that 254 2, 81 | the hand for ~instance, is voluntary not by the will of that 255 2, 81 | this man born of Adam, is voluntary, not ~by his will, but by 256 2, 82 | in so far as it is more voluntary. Now the habit of actual 257 2, 84 | must ~take note that, in voluntary actions, such as sins, there 258 2, 85 | nature exists before the voluntary action. Therefore, ~when 259 2, 85 | has caused a disorder in a voluntary act, nature is not changed ~ 260 2, 85 | Although nature precedes the voluntary action, it has an ~inclination 261 2, 85 | inclination to a certain voluntary action. Wherefore nature 262 2, 85 | through a change in the voluntary action: it is the ~inclination 263 2, 85 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: A voluntary action proceeds from various 264 2, 85 | The result is that through voluntary actions something is caused ~ 265 2, 87 | particular purpose, it is voluntary. ~Consequently it is voluntary 266 2, 87 | voluntary. ~Consequently it is voluntary simply, but involuntary 267 2, 87 | explained when speaking of the voluntary and the ~involuntary (Q[ 268 2, 87 | punishment ~is, in a way, voluntary. And since those who differ 269 2, 104 | litigious matters, but also voluntary contracts ~which are concluded 270 2, 109 | hence they are sinful and voluntary), but not all, ~because 271 2, 114 | creatures, has the power of voluntary ~acts by acting by himself. 272 2, 1 | belief." Now belief is a voluntary act, since, as Augustine ~ 273 2, 1 | coercion, since belief is a voluntary act, yet ~it is exacted 274 2, 4 | A[3]; ~FS, Q[18], A[6]), voluntary acts take their species 275 2, 4 | Wherefore the form of any ~voluntary act is, in a manner, the 276 2, 10 | avoid, since every sin ~is voluntary. Now it is not in a man' 277 2, 10 | will, because every sin is ~voluntary. The other principle of 278 2, 14 | 3: Further, every sin is voluntary, according to Augustine ( 279 2, 14 | blindness of mind is not voluntary, since, as Augustine ~says ( 280 2, 14 | that blindness of mind is voluntary, as stated above (A[1]), 281 2, 14 | is, in so far as it is ~voluntary, as evidenced in one who, 282 2, 22 | contrary to the nature of a voluntary act, whose principle needs ~ 283 2, 22 | follow that to love is not a voluntary act, which involves a ~contradiction, 284 2, 22 | the act would cease to ~be voluntary and meritorious, whereas 285 2, 28 | essential to fault that it be voluntary; and in this ~respect it 286 2, 32 | character of guilt, were it not voluntary. Hence the nature of guilt ~ 287 2, 32 | of guilt ~consists in a voluntary aversion from God.~Aquin.: 288 2, 32 | Body Para. 2/2~Now this voluntary aversion from God is directly 289 2, 32 | not sinful unless it be voluntary: ~wherefore the more voluntary 290 2, 32 | voluntary: ~wherefore the more voluntary it is, the more it is sinful. 291 2, 32 | sinful. Now it becomes ~voluntary by the fact that a man hates 292 2, 41 | necessity, since all sin is voluntary, as stated above (FS, Q[ 293 2, 44 | Further, "Every sin is voluntary," according to Augustine ( 294 2, 44 | xiv). But folly is not voluntary. Therefore it is not a sin.~ 295 2, 45 | reason, in so far as it is voluntary, is a matter of choice ~ 296 2, 51 | a sin. For every sin is ~voluntary, according to Augustine [* 297 2, 51 | whereas ~imprudence is not voluntary, since no man wishes to 298 2, 56 | virtuous, ~it requires to be voluntary, stable, and firm, because 299 2, 56 | act of justice must be ~voluntary; and mention is made afterwards 300 2, 56 | more commonly exercised in voluntary ~interchanges of things, 301 2, 59 | some are involuntary, some voluntary. They are involuntary when 302 2, 59 | chattel, is referred to theft. Voluntary commutations are ~when a 303 2, 59 | justice but of liberality. A voluntary ~transfer belongs to justice 304 2, 59 | all these actions, whether voluntary ~or involuntary, the mean 305 2, 59 | difference between the voluntary and the involuntary; for 306 2, 59 | less severely punished. Now voluntary and ~involuntary taken in 307 2, 59 | retaliation is transferred to voluntary commutations, where ~action 308 2, 59 | equality of ~passion in voluntary commutations, were one always 309 2, 59 | the injurious action is voluntary, the injury is ~aggravated 310 2, 62 | committed with regard to voluntary commutations. Sins are committed 311 2, 62 | are neither intended nor voluntary. And since every ~sin is 312 2, 62 | And since every ~sin is voluntary, according to Augustine ( 313 2, 62 | not actually and directly voluntary ~and intended, is voluntary 314 2, 62 | voluntary ~and intended, is voluntary and intended accidentally, 315 2, 62 | is in a sense guilty of voluntary homicide. This happens in ~ 316 2, 63 | so that something may be voluntary for him ~and yet against 317 2, 66 | another voluntarily or not. Voluntary injury deserves ~punishment, 318 2, 75 | those sins which relate to voluntary commutations. ~First, we 319 2, 75 | connection with the other voluntary commutations no special 320 2, 77 | 2: Further, every sin is voluntary. Now omission sometimes 321 2, 77 | omission sometimes is not ~voluntary but necessary, as when a 322 2, 77 | subsequent omission becomes voluntary.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[79] A[ 323 2, 78 | wherefore he says that ~it is a "voluntary justification," because 324 2, 78 | kindliness is a habit of voluntary beneficence." "Liberality" 325 2, 79 | described as an "elective" or voluntary "habit" [*Ethic. ii, 6]. ~ 326 2, 84 | however, the oblation remains ~voluntary, as regards, to wit, the 327 2, 84 | which is that it should be voluntary.~ 328 2, 86 | But as a vow denotes a ~voluntary promise, while necessity 329 2, 86 | of an end, is ~altogether voluntary, and therefore is most properly 330 2, 98 | Further, there are many other voluntary commutations besides ~buying 331 2, 98 | is due for sin which is ~voluntary, as was shown above (FS, 332 2, 104 | iii) in treating of the ~voluntary and the involuntary.~Aquin.: 333 2, 106 | OBJ 2: Further, nothing is voluntary except what is in a man' 334 2, 106 | vengeance is ~taken not only for voluntary sins.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[108] 335 2, 106 | to sin. But every sin is voluntary ~according to Augustine ( 336 2, 106 | Wherefore, since every ~sin is voluntary, not excluding original 337 2, 108 | proximate object of the voluntary act, and stands in ~relation 338 2, 108 | moral act, it must needs be voluntary, and dependent on ~the intention 339 2, 108 | yet inasmuch as this is a voluntary and ~moral act, it contains 340 2, 116 | while, in so far as ~it is voluntary, it consists in the desire 341 2, 122 | all acts of ~virtue are voluntary. But martyrdom is sometimes 342 2, 122 | martyrdom is sometimes not voluntary, as in the ~case of the 343 2, 122 | after death, but in the ~voluntary endurance of death, namely 344 2, 123 | done ~through fear is less voluntary, because when fear lays 345 2, 123 | through ~fear are not simply voluntary, but a mixture of voluntary 346 2, 123 | voluntary, but a mixture of voluntary and involuntary.~Aquin.: 347 2, 126 | which ~he describes as "the voluntary and prolonged endurance 348 2, 134 | says ~that "patience is the voluntary and prolonged endurance 349 2, 140 | essential to sin that it be voluntary. Now ~cowardice is more 350 2, 140 | Now ~cowardice is more voluntary than intemperance, since 351 2, 140 | intemperance seems more akin to voluntary action than cowardice." ~ 352 2, 140 | Secondly, because the more voluntary a sin the graver it is. 353 2, 140 | intemperance has more of the voluntary in it than cowardice has, 354 2, 140 | that they are not ~simply voluntary but mixed, as stated in 355 2, 140 | sake of pleasure are simply voluntary. The second reason is ~because 356 2, 140 | intemperate man are more voluntary individually ~and less voluntary 357 2, 140 | voluntary individually ~and less voluntary generically. For no one 358 2, 140 | itself on a man is less voluntary, for instance to cast aside 359 2, 140 | general purpose is more voluntary, for ~instance to save himself 360 2, 140 | Now that which is more voluntary in ~the particular circumstances 361 2, 140 | takes place, is simply more ~voluntary. Wherefore intemperance, 362 2, 140 | intemperance, being simply more voluntary than ~cowardice, is a greater 363 2, 140 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The voluntary, in cowardice, depends rather 364 2, 140 | such cases we have the ~voluntary not simply but in a restricted 365 2, 142 | consists in the deformity of a ~voluntary act: and this, properly 366 2, 142 | as due to sin ~which is a voluntary defect. Hence the Philosopher 367 2, 148 | 2: Further, every sin is voluntary [*Augustine, De Vera Relig. 368 2, 148 | immoderate use of wine is voluntary, and it is in ~this that 369 2, 148 | because the latter is rendered voluntary through the ~voluntariness 370 2, 149 | 2: Further, virtue is "a voluntary habit," as stated in Ethic. 371 2, 149 | chastity, apparently, is not voluntary, since it can be taken away ~ 372 2, 173 | proper inclination, whether voluntary or natural. Wherefore he 373 2, 183 | would seem to follow that voluntary ~poverty is requisite for 374 2, 183 | not essentially consist in voluntary poverty, but ~voluntary 375 2, 183 | voluntary poverty, but ~voluntary poverty conduces instrumentally 376 2, 184 | the counsels?~(3) Whether voluntary poverty is required for 377 2, 184 | Therefore it seems that voluntary poverty is not ~requisite 378 2, 184 | all he has and embraces voluntary poverty exposes himself 379 2, 184 | Therefore it would seem that voluntary poverty is not ~requisite 380 2, 184 | he who renounces all by voluntary poverty seems to go to the 381 2, 184 | to ~happiness." Therefore voluntary poverty is not requisite 382 2, 184 | abandon all outward things ~by voluntary poverty.~Aquin.: SMT SS 383 2, 184 | the ~first foundation is voluntary poverty, whereby a man lives 384 2, 184 | poverty when the latter is not voluntary; ~because those who are 385 2, 184 | away by those who embrace voluntary poverty, but ~it gathers 386 2, 184 | happiness by charity; and since voluntary poverty is an efficient 387 2, 184 | perpetual continence, as well as voluntary poverty, is ~requisite for 388 2, 184 | offers to God by the vow of voluntary poverty: ~secondly, the 389 2, 184 | to ~observe, even by vow, voluntary poverty and continence, 390 3, 1 | has more of the ~nature of voluntary, as has been shown (FS, 391 3, 13 | all ~natural things were voluntary to Christ; He willed to 392 3, 14 | is seen in Christ: all is voluntary." Now what is voluntary 393 3, 14 | voluntary." Now what is voluntary is ~not necessary. Therefore 394 3, 15 | sorrow, although they were voluntary ~as ordained to the end, 395 3, 18 | necessity; whereas what is voluntary is not of necessity. ~Therefore 396 3, 23 | whereas He is our Father ~by a voluntary operation, which is common 397 3, 40 | theft ~and perjury. But voluntary poverty is not open to this 398 3, 46 | necessary is opposed to what is voluntary. But ~Christ suffered of 399 3, 47 | because violent is opposed to voluntary. But Augustine ~says (De 400 3, 47 | showed the proceeding to be a voluntary one, and ~destroyed suspicion 401 3, 48 | in the Passion": and this voluntary enduring of the Passion 402 3, 49 | in like fashion Christ's voluntary suffering ~was such a good 403 3, 50 | death might be shown to be a voluntary one.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[50] 404 3, 51 | might not be believed to be ~voluntary: and therefore He willed 405 3, 68 | passiveness is not ~violent but voluntary: wherefore it is necessary 406 Suppl, 1 | expressed: "Contrition ~is voluntary sorrow for sin whereby man 407 Suppl, 1 | sins, when committed, were voluntary, yet when we ~are contrite 408 Suppl, 1 | them, they are no longer voluntary, so that they occur ~against 409 Suppl, 2 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, by voluntary contrition those sins are 410 Suppl, 9 | undisguised, discreet, voluntary,~shamefaced,~Entire, secret, 411 Suppl, 9 | acts of virtue should be voluntary, and in this respect ~confession 412 Suppl, 9 | confession is said to be "voluntary." The third condition is 413 Suppl, 12| every act of virtue is voluntary. But sometimes a man ~has 414 Suppl, 12| that satisfaction should be voluntary not in him ~but in the judge 415 Suppl, 24| within us, since all sin is voluntary, whereas the ~origin of 416 Suppl, 24| punishment does not need ~to be voluntary, in fact the nature of punishment 417 Suppl, 39| in ~man this is something voluntary. Hence he who by mishap 418 Suppl, 39| slaying ~becomes somewhat voluntary). But this is not because 419 Suppl, 47| although the thing done is not voluntary in itself, yet taking ~into 420 Suppl, 47| of place and time it is voluntary. ~And since actions are 421 Suppl, 47| particulars, it follows that it is voluntary ~simply, and involuntary 422 Suppl, 47| of mixed violence is more voluntary than involuntary. ~Now consent 423 Suppl, 47| it ~must be completely voluntary, because it has to be perpetual; 424 Suppl, 50| marriage contract is ~made by voluntary consent, and this is incompatible 425 Suppl, 51| hindered in the same way as the voluntary. Now the ~voluntary, according 426 Suppl, 51| the voluntary. Now the ~voluntary, according to the Philosopher ( 427 Suppl, 51| consent denotes something voluntary. Now error is an obstacle ~ 428 Suppl, 51| error is an obstacle ~to the voluntary, since "the voluntary," 429 Suppl, 51| the voluntary, since "the voluntary," according to the Philosopher ~( 430 Suppl, 51| being an impediment to the voluntary, it differs not whether 431 Suppl, 51| be an impediment to ~the voluntary, unless it have error in 432 Suppl, 58| because the devil is a voluntary ~cause not acting from natural 433 Suppl, 64| answer that, A vow is a voluntary act, as its very name implies: 434 Suppl, 66| necessary for bigamy ~to be voluntary in order to cause irregularity. 435 Suppl, 71| namely inasmuch as it is voluntary. Now one man is not ~praised 436 Suppl, 86| judicial power corresponds to voluntary poverty?~(3) Whether the 437 Suppl, 86| judicial power corresponds to voluntary poverty?~Aquin.: SMT XP 438 Suppl, 86| does not correspond to ~voluntary poverty. For it was promised 439 Suppl, 86| reason of congruity, since voluntary poverty belongs to ~those 440 Suppl, 93| martyrdom, it would be due to voluntary rather than ~external martyrdom, 441 Suppl, 95| because every sin needs to ~be voluntary: but it does not excuse, 442 Appen1, 1| because it is the ~least voluntary; for it is voluntary not 443 Appen1, 1| least voluntary; for it is voluntary not by the will of the person, 444 Appen1, 1| actual sin, even ~venial, is voluntary by the will of the person 445 Appen1, 1| except in so far ~as it is voluntary: for which reason that which 446 Appen1, 1| reason that which is less voluntary is less ~sinful. Again it 447 Appen1, 2| Whether that punishment is voluntary?~(3) Whether the souls in 448 Appen1, 2| Whether this punishment is voluntary?~Aquin.: SMT XP App. 1 Q[ 449 Appen1, 2| that this punishment is voluntary. For those who ~are in Purgatory 450 Appen1, 2| that, A thing is said to be voluntary in two ways. First, by an ~ 451 Appen1, 2| and thus no punishment is voluntary, because ~the very notion 452 Appen1, 2| Secondly, a thing is said to be voluntary by a conditional act of 453 Appen1, 2| the ~will: thus cautery is voluntary for the sake of regaining 454 Appen1, 2| Hence a ~punishment may be voluntary in two ways. First, because 455 Appen1, 2| punishment is said to be ~voluntary. In this latter sense the 456 Appen1, 2| Purgatory is said to be ~voluntary.~Aquin.: SMT XP App. 1 Q[ 457 Appen1, 2| however, say that it is not voluntary in any way, because the ~ 458 Appen1, 2| pleases for as much as it is voluntary), but only that complacency ~ 459 Appen1, 2| punishment so far as it is voluntary, will have the power, ~by


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