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move 327
moved 1206
movement 2338
movements 445
mover 312
movers 18
moves 428
Frequency    [«  »]
446 put
446 understands
445 manifest
445 movements
444 greatest
444 whence
443 55
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

movements

    Part, Question
1 1, 9 | and loving, are called ~movements. Therefore because God understands 2 1, 10 | measured ~by time, as are all movements, and also the being of all 3 1, 10 | most simple, ~all other movements are measured. Therefore 4 1, 10 | from it. Whereas to ~other movements it is compared only as the 5 1, 14 | knows all the universal movements of the heavens, and ~can 6 1, 18 | regard only to executing the movements of growth and decay.~Aquin.: 7 1, 20 | reason all the other appetite movements presuppose love, as ~their 8 1, 32 | appearances of the heavenly movements can be explained; not, ~ 9 1, 50 | substances seems to be ~the movements of the heavenly bodies. 10 1, 50 | heavenly bodies. But the movements of the heavenly ~bodies 11 1, 50 | greater number than the movements of the ~heavenly bodies.~ 12 1, 50 | the number of the first movements.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 13 1, 50 | to the number of heavenly movements or bodies, as ~Aristotle 14 1, 51 | walking agrees with other movements, in so far as it ~is movement. 15 1, 53 | are called instantaneous movements.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[53] A[ 16 1, 57 | the dispositions of the movements of the heavens. This opinion 17 1, 57 | computation of the ~heavenly movements that an eclipse is about 18 1, 57 | according ~to which corporeal movements are reckoned, yet there 19 1, 58 | understanding and feeling are termed movements, as stated in De Anima ~ 20 1, 59 | to understand are termed movements of a kind; and there is ~ 21 1, 63 | holds good only in such ~movements as are measured by time, 22 1, 63 | spiritual instantaneous ~movements are represented by corporeal 23 1, 63 | represented by corporeal movements which are measured by ~time. 24 1, 65 | results from the different movements of free-will. Now, corporeal ~ 25 1, 65 | were ~made on account of movements of free-will, and not on 26 1, 66 | disproves by the natural movements of bodies. For since, he 27 1, 66 | contraries, whereas the movements of the ~elements are mutually 28 1, 67 | heavens ~is twofold. Of these movements, one is common to the entire 29 1, 67 | years" is due to proper movements.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[67] A[ 30 1, 69 | movement and ~by these natural movements they are said to "fulfill 31 1, 70 | adorn the heaven by their movements; on the second day, ~which 32 1, 70 | of ~production by their movements, as the husbandman cooperates 33 1, 70 | due to certain particular movements of the stars: which ~movements 34 1, 70 | movements of the stars: which ~movements may have had their beginning 35 1, 70 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: The movements of the heavenly bodies are 36 1, 77 | imperfect goodness, by few movements; and those which ~belong 37 1, 77 | perfect goodness by many movements; and ~those yet higher acquire 38 1, 77 | perfect goodness by few movements; and the ~highest perfection 39 1, 51 | substances seems to be ~the movements of the heavenly bodies. 40 1, 51 | heavenly bodies. But the movements of the heavenly ~bodies 41 1, 51 | greater number than the movements of the ~heavenly bodies.~ 42 1, 51 | the number of the first movements.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 43 1, 51 | to the number of heavenly movements or bodies, as ~Aristotle 44 1, 52 | walking agrees with other movements, in so far as it ~is movement. 45 1, 54 | are called instantaneous movements.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[53] A[ 46 1, 58 | the dispositions of the movements of the heavens. This opinion 47 1, 58 | computation of the ~heavenly movements that an eclipse is about 48 1, 58 | according ~to which corporeal movements are reckoned, yet there 49 1, 59 | understanding and feeling are termed movements, as stated in De Anima ~ 50 1, 60 | to understand are termed movements of a kind; and there is ~ 51 1, 64 | holds good only in such ~movements as are measured by time, 52 1, 64 | spiritual instantaneous ~movements are represented by corporeal 53 1, 64 | represented by corporeal movements which are measured by ~time. 54 1, 66 | results from the different movements of free-will. Now, corporeal ~ 55 1, 66 | were ~made on account of movements of free-will, and not on 56 1, 67 | disproves by the natural movements of ~bodies. For since, he 57 1, 67 | contraries, whereas the movements of the ~elements are mutually 58 1, 68 | heavens ~is twofold. Of these movements, one is common to the entire 59 1, 68 | years" is due to proper movements.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[67] A[ 60 1, 70 | movement and ~by these natural movements they are said to "fulfill 61 1, 71 | adorn the heaven by their movements; on the second day, ~which 62 1, 71 | of ~production by their movements, as the husbandman cooperates 63 1, 71 | due to certain particular movements of the stars: which ~movements 64 1, 71 | movements of the stars: which ~movements may have had their beginning 65 1, 71 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: The movements of the heavenly bodies are 66 1, 76 | imperfect goodness, by few movements; and those which ~belong 67 1, 76 | perfect goodness by many movements; and ~those yet higher acquire 68 1, 76 | perfect goodness by few movements; and the ~highest perfection 69 1, 77 | corporeal nature; because the movements of bodies are caused by 70 1, 85 | sleep, when slight internal movements are felt ~more than in wakefulness, 71 1, 85 | in wakefulness, and such movements produce in the imagination ~ 72 1, 85 | Thus from such ~animals' movements some future things, such 73 1, 85 | known rather from human movements directed by reason. Hence 74 1, 92 | imprints which are left by the movements of animals are called "traces": ~ 75 1, 102 | particular in their actions and movements. ~Therefore the world does 76 1, 102 | Wherefore dissimilarity of movements is caused by diversity of ~ 77 1, 104 | among which is included the movements of bodies, as is clear from 78 1, 104 | results from a form, as the movements of ~things heavy and light 79 1, 108 | bodies, their actions and movements are subject to the ~actions 80 1, 108 | subject to the ~actions and movements of the heavenly bodies. 81 1, 109 | actions, for which ~the movements of the heavenly bodies are 82 1, 109 | motion ~is the first of all movements. But the angels cannot cause 83 1, 109 | angels cannot cause other ~movements by a formal change of the 84 1, 109 | But among all corporeal movements the most perfect is local 85 1, 109 | are in bodies other local movements besides those ~which result 86 1, 109 | and much more can local movements result from the ~power of 87 1, 109 | can thereby cause other movements; that is, by employing corporeal 88 1, 110 | sensitive principle, and movements descend with it," ~that 89 1, 110 | impressions left from the movements are preserved in the ~animal 90 1, 114 | locally. Therefore the ~movements of bodies here below, which 91 1, 114 | reducible to the uniform movements of heavenly bodies, as to 92 1, 114 | multiformity of corporeal movements is ~reducible to the uniformity 93 1, 114 | their passions, which are ~movements of the sensitive appetite, 94 1, 114 | sensitive appetite, in which movements of the heavenly ~bodies 95 1, 114 | heavenly bodies, with their movements and ~dispositions, are necessary 96 1, 115 | whether by ~the heavenly movements of the stars, whether by 97 2, 1 | to be observed in proper movements. For since movements are, ~ 98 2, 1 | proper movements. For since movements are, ~in a way, divided 99 2, 1 | the first mover in other movements. ~Now it is clear that secondary 100 2, 5 | whereas man obtains it by many movements of works ~which are called 101 2, 6 | principle of some ~acts or movements is within the agent, or 102 2, 6 | whereas ~the principle of some movements or acts is outside. For 103 2, 6 | they act for an end, the movements of such things are ~said 104 2, 6 | voluntary" implies that their ~movements and acts are from their 105 2, 6 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: New movements in animals are indeed preceded 106 2, 6 | above (ad 1), for such ~movements caused by an extrinsic principle 107 2, 6 | both natural and ~voluntary movements have this in common, that 108 2, 7 | to designate all other ~movements, because bodies which are 109 2, 9 | all various and multiform movements are reduced, as to their 110 2, 9 | Phys. ~viii, 9. But human movements are various and multiform, 111 2, 9 | by the higher." But the movements of the human body, ~which 112 2, 9 | powers, are ~subject to the movements of the heavenly bodies.~ 113 2, 9 | sensitive appetite, the movements of the ~heavenly bodies 114 2, 9 | Reply OBJ 1: The multiform movements of the human will are reduced 115 2, 9 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The movements of the human body are reduced, 116 2, 9 | which result the natural movements of natural bodies.~Aquin.: 117 2, 10 | the principle of voluntary movements must be ~something naturally 118 2, 12 | of the means are distinct movements of the will.~Aquin.: SMT 119 2, 12 | of the means are distinct movements of the will.~Aquin.: SMT 120 2, 12 | thus there are really two ~movements of the will to them. Secondly, 121 2, 13 | same may be seen in the movements ~of clocks and all engines 122 2, 17 | heart, which has various movements according to the ~various 123 2, 17 | remains cold." Therefore the movements of the members ~are not 124 2, 17 | powers are not; therefore all movements of ~members, that are moved 125 2, 17 | of reason; whereas those movements of members, that arise from ~ 126 2, 17 | means. So also in bodily ~movements the principle is according 127 2, 17 | the principle of ~bodily movements begins with the movement 128 2, 17 | Animal.) who says ~that "the movements of the heart and of the 129 2, 17 | of which passions these movements are a consequence. But they ~ 130 2, 17 | intellect, because these ~movements are conditioned by a certain 131 2, 17 | they have their proper ~movements naturally: because principles 132 2, 22 | the definitions ~of the movements of the appetitive part, 133 2, 23 | since the passions are movements of the ~sensitive appetite, 134 2, 23 | their objects; just as ~movements differ according to their 135 2, 23 | no other ~contrariety of movements, except that of the termini, 136 2, 23 | based on contrariety of movements or ~changes. Now there is 137 2, 23 | contrariety in changes and movements, as ~stated in Phys. v, 138 2, 23 | and belongs properly to movements: ~thus whitening, which 139 2, 23 | Body Para. 2/6~Now, in the movements of the appetitive faculty, 140 2, 24 | themselves, to ~wit, as movements of the irrational appetite, 141 2, 24 | reason and ~will; and yet the movements and actions of the outward 142 2, 24 | nature is ~passion." But in movements of the soul, what is against 143 2, 24 | passions of the soul from the ~movements of the will, in so far as 144 2, 24 | appetite, while the simple movements of the will are in the ~ 145 2, 24 | of "passions" to all ~the movements of the sensitive appetite. 146 2, 24 | none but the inordinate movements of the sensitive ~appetite, 147 2, 24 | of passions to all the movements of the sensitive appetite, 148 2, 26 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, the movements of the appetite differ by 149 2, 29 | of ~numbers, figures and movements. Sometimes they are not 150 2, 31 | 1/2~I answer that, The movements of the sensitive appetite, 151 2, 34 | measure and rule of all ~movements (Metaph. x, 1). But pleasures 152 2, 35 | extrinsic, e.g. passions and movements, which ~derive their species 153 2, 35 | confirmation of this in natural movements. For every natural movement ~ 154 2, 35 | because of all the external movements the voice is the best ~expression 155 2, 36 | found by considering natural movements. For if, in ~natural movements, 156 2, 36 | movements. For if, in ~natural movements, we observe those of approach 157 2, 36 | the cause of both these movements, viz. ~gravity, then gravity 158 2, 36 | Accordingly, since, in the movements of the appetite, sorrow 159 2, 36 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: When many movements arise from one cause, it 160 2, 36 | it is that the appetitive movements that regard good, are ~reckoned 161 2, 36 | as causing the appetitive movements that regard evil.~Aquin.: 162 2, 36 | soul are the causes of ~the movements of appetite. But a greater 163 2, 36 | the causes of appetitive movements, ~in so far as they cause 164 2, 37 | for the reason that ~the movements of the animal appetite are 165 2, 37 | or ~external; but certain movements are sometimes caused by 166 2, 38 | appetite. Consequently in ~movements of the appetite pleasure 167 2, 38 | causes inclining to contrary movements, ~each hinders the other; 168 2, 38 | causes producing contrary movements. For the ~thought of the 169 2, 38 | since joy and sorrow ~are movements of the soul, it seems that 170 2, 38 | beginning and end of bodily movements, as stated in ~De Causa 171 2, 40 | in the appetite various ~movements according to various aspects 172 2, 40 | in like manner ~various movements arise from the apprehension 173 2, 40 | gathered from ~their outward movements: from which it is clear 174 2, 40 | twofold ~contrariety of movements. One is in respect of approach 175 2, 41 | again, most ~properly those movements are called passions, which 176 2, 41 | so far ~as the interior movements of the appetitive faculty 177 2, 41 | above (Q[10], A[1]), ~the movements of the cognitive and appetitive 178 2, 41 | remembering, as ~well as the movements of the animal appetite, 179 2, 41 | the soul denote certain movements, whereto the natural ~inclination 180 2, 41 | it is because ~such like movements are contrary to the very 181 2, 45 | as denoting absolutely movements of the ~sensitive appetite 182 2, 46 | anger; but because all its ~movements terminate in anger; and 183 2, 46 | and because, of all these movements, anger ~is the most patent.~ 184 2, 46 | recoils from evil: and such movements are desire, hope, ~pleasure, 185 2, 46 | which they are gifted with movements, ~both internal and external, 186 2, 46 | external, like unto rational movements, as stated above ~(Q[40], 187 2, 48 | to ~the extend that the movements of the outward members are 188 2, 49 | of good or evil: because ~movements and passions have not the 189 2, 50 | powers which command their movements.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[50] A[ 190 2, 56 | they have their ~own proper movements, by which, at times, they 191 2, 59 | will is ~perverse, these movements," viz. the passions, "are 192 2, 59 | the point of their being movements of ~the sensitive appetite, 193 2, 59 | which ~are not passions, are movements of the intellective appetite 194 2, 59 | passions be taken for any movements of ~the sensitive appetite, 195 2, 59 | to its proper regulated movements.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[59] A[ 196 2, 60 | external operation. Now movements of the sensitive appetite 197 2, 60 | virtues, because their movements follow one another in a 198 2, 60 | the passions are acts or movements of the sensitive ~appetite. 199 2, 66 | moderates the appetitive movements pertaining to the moral 200 2, 69 | peacemakers" of their ~own movements, approach to likeness to 201 2, 70 | and downward are contrary ~movements in the physical order, so 202 2, 72 | and operation: wherefore movements and operations differ ~specifically 203 2, 72 | terms of movement ~specify movements, in so far as term has the 204 2, 74 | check individual inordinate ~movements, if he be presentient to 205 2, 74 | man, in order to avoid the movements of concupiscence, turns 206 2, 74 | man cannot avoid all such movements, on account of the ~aforesaid 207 2, 74 | commands the inordinate ~movements of the lower powers, or 208 2, 74 | sin. Therefore, in sudden movements, the higher reason may ~ 209 2, 75 | cause. But the internal movements ~of a man are sins. Therefore 210 2, 75 | actual by the ~preceding movements, both of the sensitive part, 211 2, 75 | sin. Since therefore the movements that precede it ~are not 212 2, 77 | A[1]). Now vehemence of movements is ~evidence of strength 213 2, 77 | consequently, in so far as ~the movements of the higher powers redound 214 2, 77 | which is the case in sudden movements. Now when anyone ~proceeds 215 2, 80 | principle of all inward movements of ~man; but that the human 216 2, 80 | instigations. Because the internal movements of the soul are ~vital functions. 217 2, 80 | evil through his internal movements.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[80] A[ 218 2, 80 | Further, all the internal movements arise from the external ~ 219 2, 80 | anything in man's internal ~movements, except in respect of things 220 2, 80 | cannot through man's internal movements induce him to ~sin.~Aquin.: 221 2, 80 | sensitive principle, and ~the movements descend with it, viz. the 222 2, 80 | according to certain fixed movements of the heart and the vital 223 2, 82 | which hindered inordinate movements: just as an ~inclination 224 2, 82 | inclination to inordinate bodily movements results indirectly from 225 2, 83 | is most apparent in the movements of the ~members of generation, 226 2, 85 | does not follow that the movements of ~the stones resting on 227 2, 88 | ad 3; A[10]) that ~sudden movements both of the sensuality and 228 2, 88 | venial ~sins. But sudden movements occur in every kind of sin. 229 2, 88 | above in reference to sudden movements of ~unbelief.~Aquin.: SMT 230 2, 89 | venially?~(5) Whether the movements of unbelievers are venial 231 2, 89 | as in the case of sudden movements, in a ~genus of mortal sin 232 2, 89 | Para. 1/1~Whether the first movements of the sensuality in unbelievers 233 2, 89 | would seem that the first movements of the sensuality in ~unbelievers 234 2, 89 | condemnation. Therefore the ~first movements of unbelievers are mortal 235 2, 89 | the flesh in the first movements of the concupiscence, it 236 2, 89 | it seems that the ~first movements of concupiscence in unbelievers 237 2, 89 | he does not impute first movements to ~believers, unto condemnation. 238 2, 89 | unreasonable to say that the first movements of ~unbelievers are mortal 239 2, 89 | not possible for the mere movements of the sensuality in ~unbelievers, 240 2, 90 | movement in the genus of movements. Consequently it follows ~ 241 2, 91 | competent to judge of interior ~movements, that are hidden, but only 242 2, 93 | governs all the acts and movements that are to be found in 243 2, 93 | directing all actions and movements.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[93] A[ 244 2, 93 | And thus all actions ~and movements of the whole of nature are 245 2, 100 | to judge of ~the inward movements of wills, according to Ps. 246 2, 102 | saw, to signify that all movements ~of disturbance will be 247 2, 102 | brought about by man; and movements ~of lust are aroused by 248 2, 107 | Thus it is clear that ~movements differ in species through 249 2, 107 | prohibits certain interior ~movements of the soul, which were 250 2, 107 | deliberate curbing of interior movements.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[107] A[ 251 2, 108 | the mind from inordinate ~movements, must needs also restrain 252 2, 108 | which ~ensue from inward movements.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[108] A[ 253 2, 108 | Therein man's interior movements are ordered. Because after 254 2, 108 | He orders man's interior movements, first in regard to man 255 2, 108 | corresponding to ~man's two interior movements in respect of any prospective 256 2, 108 | necessary. They thought that movements ~of covetousness were lawful 257 2, 109 | call thinking and willing movements, as is clear from the Philosopher ~( 258 2, 109 | clear ~that as all corporeal movements are reduced to the motion 259 2, 109 | corporeal mover, so all movements, both corporeal ~and spiritual, 260 2, 109 | can of himself make some movements, yet he ~cannot be perfectly 261 2, 109 | perfectly moved with the movements of one in health, unless 262 2, 109 | indeed, repress each of ~its movements (and hence they are sinful 263 2, 109 | always alert to avoid these movements, as was said above ~(Q[74], 264 2, 109 | judgment of the reason that the movements of the lower appetite should 265 2, 109 | thus, even as inordinate movements of the sensitive ~appetite 266 2, 110 | themselves be inclined to ~these movements, and thus the movements 267 2, 110 | movements, and thus the movements whereby they are moved by 268 2, 113 | of the ungodly, than the movements of the ~aforesaid virtues.~ 269 2, 113 | Our emotions are the movements ~of our soul; joy is the 270 2, 113 | is moved, there are ~two movements - of departure from the 271 2, 113 | will and not to will - the movements of the ~free-will - are 272 2, 113 | the condition of ~temporal movements, i.e. we must say that there 273 2, 113 | Philosopher says (Phys. ii, 9), in movements of the ~soul the movement 274 2, 113 | very first, but in exterior movements the removal of the ~impediment 275 2, 114 | things by their proper movements and operations obtain that 276 2, 2 | planets have their proper movements from west to east, while ~ 277 2, 7 | principle of all appetitive movements is ~the good or evil apprehended: 278 2, 12 | not mortal: ~hence first movements are not mortal sins, because 279 2, 15 | asleep, in so far as our ~movements pass from the state of vigil 280 2, 16 | fact that hope and all ~movements of the appetite flow from 281 2, 17 | the FP, Q[82], A[5], those movements which occur in the lower ~ 282 2, 17 | there is no ~reason why both movements should not belong at the 283 2, 18 | fear, since also natural movements differ ~specifically according 284 2, 28 | needs be a clashing of ~the movements of the appetite. Now the 285 2, 28 | appetite. Now the union of such movements is ~essential to peace, 286 2, 28 | consists in all the appetitive movements in one man being set at 287 2, 28 | time all his appetitive movements be in agreement.~Aquin.: 288 2, 28 | to human virtue that the movements ~of the soul should be regulated 289 2, 33 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: Imperfect movements of sloth are to be found 290 2, 33 | mind, by the inordinate ~movements of members of his body; 291 2, 34 | s good, but by contrary movements, ~since charity rejoices 292 2, 34 | we find certain imperfect movements in the ~sensuality, which 293 2, 34 | perfect men certain first movements, which are venial sins.~ 294 2, 35 | accidentally. Now, human acts and ~movements are said to be direct when 295 2, 35 | charity, although the ~first movements of such discord are venial 296 2, 35 | in a divergence in the movements of wills, which arises from 297 2, 41 | consist chiefly in sudden ~movements, which being hidden cannot 298 2, 42 | the principle of all ~the movements of the body, so too the 299 2, 42 | the ~principle of all the movements of the soul. Now there are 300 2, 56 | i.e. from the will, ~whose movements or acts are not passions, 301 2, 56 | sensitive appetite whose ~movements are called passions. Hence 302 2, 80 | found ~virtually in the movements of the things moved.~Aquin.: 303 2, 81 | especially the interior movements of ~the heart. Nevertheless, 304 2, 81 | as ~regards the interior movements of the heart, is made known 305 2, 88 | to God, Who ~disposes the movements of all things. It is also 306 2, 93 | observing the ~position and movements of the stars, this belongs 307 2, 93 | born. If one observe the movements and cries of birds or ~of 308 2, 93 | sneezing of men, or the sudden movements of limbs, ~this belongs 309 2, 93 | that ~the dispositions and movements of the heavenly bodies are 310 2, 93 | the appointment of the ~movements and positions of the heavenly 311 2, 93 | 1/3~I answer that, The movements or cries of birds, and whatever ~ 312 2, 93 | can be foreknown ~from the movements of heavenly bodies, as stated 313 2, 93 | observe their cries and movements: thus from the frequent ~ 314 2, 94 | devices, or again ~by certain movements of the stars observed in 315 2, 98 | inflicted for ~the internal movements of the heart, whereof God 316 2, 120 | decalogue, otherwise ~first movements would be mortal sins, as 317 2, 120 | the ~prohibition of first movements of concupiscence, that do 318 2, 121 | is consistent with sudden movements; ~and it is more difficult 319 2, 121 | of ~passions to all the movements of the sensitive appetite, 320 2, 127 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The movements of the body are differentiated 321 2, 127 | accidents by way of bodily ~movements. For quickness of movement 322 2, 127 | these dispositions of bodily movements ~are competent to the magnanimous 323 2, 139 | 2/4~The first of these movements of the sensitive appetite 324 2, 141 | ways: first, in the inward movements of the soul; ~secondly, 325 2, 141 | secondly, in the outward movements and actions of the body; 326 2, 141 | we find in the soul three movements ~towards a particular object. 327 2, 141 | 6~With regard to bodily movements and actions, moderation 328 2, 141 | the ~moderation of bodily movements and external things, as 329 2, 145 | to drift to inordinate ~movements be wrecked by vice." And 330 2, 149 | command of ~reason, as are the movements of the other external members. 331 2, 152 | that "in so far as ~certain movements in some degree pass" from 332 2, 156 | passions of the soul are movements of the ~sensitive appetite, 333 2, 156 | reason, wherefore as to the movements that forestall that judgment, 334 2, 156 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, inward movements are judged according to 335 2, 156 | of anger, like all other movements of the ~sensitive appetite, 336 2, 158 | actions. For the ~inward movements of the passions cannot be 337 2, 158 | The third ~regards bodily movements and actions, which require 338 2, 159 | that for those appetitive movements which are a kind of impulse 339 2, 161 | 1/1~I answer that, Many movements may concur towards one sin, 340 2, 161 | Also, among the inward ~movements, the appetite is moved towards 341 2, 162 | this heat. And since the movements of corporal creatures are 342 2, 166 | CONSISTING IN THE OUTWARD MOVEMENTS OF THE BODY (FOUR ARTICLES)~ 343 2, 166 | consisting in the outward movements of ~the body, and under 344 2, 166 | and vice in the outward movements of the ~body that are done 345 2, 166 | virtue regards the outward movements of the body?~Aquin.: SMT 346 2, 166 | virtue regards the outward movements of the ~body. For every 347 2, 166 | the conscience." Now the movements of the ~body are not within, 348 2, 166 | 1). But outward bodily movements are in man by nature, ~since 349 2, 166 | other differences of outward movements. Therefore ~there is no 350 2, 166 | there is no virtue about movements of this kind.~Aquin.: SMT 351 2, 166 | fortitude. Now outward bodily movements are not directed to another ~ 352 2, 166 | ordering of one's outward movements: for Ambrose says ~(De Offic. 353 2, 166 | about the style ~of outward movements.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[168] A[ 354 2, 166 | Now the style of outward movements pertains to the beauty of ~ 355 2, 166 | manifest that the outward ~movements of man are dirigible by 356 2, 166 | with the direction of these movements.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[168] A[ 357 2, 166 | Now the direction of these movements may be considered from a 358 2, 166 | things to these outward ~movements: namely "taste" [ornatus] 359 2, 166 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Outward movements are signs of the inward 360 2, 166 | As stated (ad 1) outward movements are indications of the ~ 361 2, 166 | things," i.e. ~the outward movements, "the man that lies hidden 362 2, 166 | moreover from ~our outward movements that other men form their 363 2, 166 | Hence moderation of ~outward movements is directed somewhat to 364 2, 166 | Ep. ccxi), "In all your movements, let ~nothing be done to 365 2, 166 | the moderation of ~outward movements may be reduced to two virtues, 366 2, 166 | in so far as by outward movements we are ~directed to other 367 2, 166 | moderation of our outward movements ~belongs to "friendliness 368 2, 166 | And, in so far as outward ~movements are signs of our inward 369 2, 166 | style of one's outward ~movements, by having recourse to pretense 370 2, 168 | inordinateness of outward movements, which is contrary to ~modesty, 371 2, 168 | Ep. ccxii): "In all your movements let nothing be done to offend ~ 372 2, 170 | be gathered from their ~movements in avoiding places exposed 373 2, 177 | enjoys rest from external ~movements. Nevertheless to contemplate 374 2, 177 | sensation and ~understanding are movements of a kind, in so far as 375 2, 177 | Nom. iv) ~ascribes three movements to the soul in contemplation, 376 2, 178 | vision of God?~(6) Of the movements of contemplation assigned 377 2, 178 | should not be described as movements.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[180] A[ 378 2, 178 | Dionysius describes these ~movements as being different in the 379 2, 178 | their respective straight movements. For he says ~that the straight 380 2, 178 | mentions many ~other different movements in likeness to the birds 381 2, 178 | that there are ~only three movements of contemplation.~Aquin.: 382 2, 178 | operations are described as movements, ~and are differentiated 383 2, 178 | differentiated in likeness to various movements. Now of bodily ~movements, 384 2, 178 | movements. Now of bodily ~movements, local movements are the 385 2, 178 | bodily ~movements, local movements are the most perfect and 386 2, 178 | being likened to them. These movements are of three ~kinds; for 387 2, 178 | Reply OBJ 1: External bodily movements are opposed to the quiet 388 2, 178 | outward occupations: but the ~movements of intellectual operations 389 2, 178 | man. Consequently ~these movements must be ascribed to souls 390 2, 178 | the straight and circular ~movements, inasmuch as their care 391 3, 15 | reason; but in Christ all movements ~of the sensitive appetite 392 3, 15 | that "Christ assumed these ~movements, in His human soul, by an 393 3, 15 | effect, because in us these movements, at times, do not remain 394 3, 15 | by His disposition the movements that are naturally becoming 395 3, 15 | only to the ~disorderly movements of the sensitive appetite. 396 3, 15 | The "passions of sins" are movements of the sensitive ~appetite 397 3, 18 | objects, as contrariety of ~movements springs from contrariety 398 3, 18 | was moved by its proper movements, as ~Damascene says (De 399 3, 19 | And thus the actions and movements of the ~inferior principle 400 3, 21 | understand and to feel are called movements; and in this sense the ~ 401 3, 25 | else. And between these movements there is ~this difference; 402 3, 34 | will, and to feel, are not movements that may be ~described as " 403 3, 44 | not work any change in the movements ~of the heavenly bodies.~ 404 3, 75 | is not taken according to movements of any sort, ~but according 405 3, 75 | heavens. But there are some movements ~which are not dependent 406 3, 75 | 53], A[3] concerning the movements of the ~angels. Hence between 407 3, 75 | instants responding to those movements there is ~no mid-time. But 408 3, 75 | intrinsic measure of particular movements, as a line and point are 409 3, 80 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, these movements of the flesh seem to bring 410 3, 80 | seems that neither do these ~movements of the flesh hinder a man 411 3, 80 | regarding the ~aforesaid movements: one on account of which 412 3, 80 | sacrament: and although these movements during sleep, considered 413 3, 80 | apparition of which, these movements ~occasionally follow. Sometimes 414 3, 80 | follows after the ~aforesaid movements, especially when they take 415 3, 80 | other reason than do those movements in question which happen 416 3, 80 | uncleanness of the aforesaid movements, then from a ~sense of fittingness 417 3, 85 | Reply OBJ 2: In successive movements withdrawal from one extreme ~ 418 Suppl, 2 | addition to ~their proper movements, follow the movement of 419 Suppl, 3 | lower powers follow the movements of ~the higher, or from 420 Suppl, 16| need that there should be movements of virtue in ~them either 421 Suppl, 41| 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: First movements in so far as they are venial 422 Suppl, 41| they are venial sins are ~movements of the appetite to some 423 Suppl, 62| which prevails over all ~movements of bodily passions. But 424 Suppl, 65| in natural things certain movements are called natural, not ~ 425 Suppl, 65| moving principle - thus the movements that are caused in the ~ 426 Suppl, 65| lust, because the first movements of lust ~and the like are 427 Suppl, 65| mortal sins, while some movements of ~pride are venial: since 428 Suppl, 70| that ~such operations are movements of the composite only. We 429 Suppl, 72| to those who observe the movements of the stars ~and this is 430 Suppl, 72| else than the successive ~movements whereby they are subject 431 Suppl, 72| on account of the various movements of these ~two elements, 432 Suppl, 72| these ~two elements, which movements they derive from the movement 433 Suppl, 72| bodies. And since these movements will cease (such as the 434 Suppl, 81| obey the spirit in all the movements and ~actions of the soul.~ 435 Suppl, 81| no labor in the saints' movements, and thus it may be said ~ 436 Suppl, 81| plenum, since the ratio of movements in point of ~velocity is 437 Suppl, 81| the ~velocities of any two movements that take place in time 438 Suppl, 81| retardations attending the movements on account of the resistance 439 Suppl, 81| movement, as appears in violent movements, or at least because it 440 Suppl, 81| both, as may be seen in the movements ~of animals.~Aquin.: SMT 441 Suppl, 81| the other ~hand, in those movements where there is resistance 442 Suppl, 81| resists. But in those other movements ~where resistance is offered 443 Suppl, 88| Hence also it is that ~the movements of the higher bodies might 444 Suppl, 90| movement precedes all other movements, terms ~of movement, distance 445 Suppl, 90| local movement to all ~other movements according to the Philosopher (


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