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Alphabetical    [«  »]
heartlessness 1
hearts 153
hearty 1
heat 386
heated 23
heater 2
heathen 12
Frequency    [«  »]
389 kinds
388 67
388 none
386 heat
386 within
385 contemplation
385 increase
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

heat

    Part, Question
1 1, 2 | fire, which is the maximum heat, is the cause of ~all hot 2 1, 3 | some exterior agent - as heat is caused in water ~by fire. 3 1, 3 | Thus it is proved ~that heat cannot be the substantial 4 1, 3 | something extraneous to heat added to it, as whiteness, 5 1, 3 | nevertheless ~absolute heat can have nothing else than 6 1, 3 | can have nothing else than heat. Thirdly, because what is ~ 7 1, 3 | and, fire ~warms by its heat. Hence God cannot be part 8 1, 4 | the whole perfection of heat, this is because heat is 9 1, 4 | of heat, this is because heat is not ~participated in 10 1, 4 | perfection; but if this heat were ~self-subsisting, nothing 11 1, 4 | nothing of the virtue of heat would be wanting to it. ~ 12 1, 4 | things generated by the sun's heat may be in some ~sort spoken 13 1, 5 | form of fire; though the heat in the fire ~follows from 14 1, 6 | others, as e.g. supreme heat is used ~in comparison with 15 1, 6 | found more excellently, as, heat is in the sun ~more excellently 16 1, 6 | secondary perfection consists in heat, lightness and dryness, 17 1, 10 | to the ~words "To extreme heat they will pass from snowy 18 1, 13 | as the sun which causes heat, although the ~sun is hot 19 1, 13 | us in themselves, such as heat, ~cold, whiteness and the 20 1, 14 | operation; as heating by heat. Hence the intellectual ~ 21 1, 14 | if it knew the nature of heat, and all things else in 22 1, 14 | principle of action; as heat is the principle of heating. 23 1, 14 | far as it ~participates in heat. So, things in potentiality 24 1, 18 | to external matter, as to heat or to cut; whilst ~actions 25 1, 19 | For fire is the cause ~of heat, as being itself hot; whereas 26 1, 25 | the power ~has it to give heat; and it would have infinite 27 1, 25 | have infinite power to give heat, were ~its own heat infinite. 28 1, 25 | give heat, were ~its own heat infinite. Whence, since 29 1, 27 | as, for ~instance, like heat from the agent to the thing 30 1, 32 | reflected upon itself its own heat." By which words the ~generation 31 1, 36 | instance, ~fire heats through heat. So if we consider in the 32 1, 37 | although heating is not the heat which is the form of ~the 33 1, 39 | as all things which give heat; but only those things can 34 1, 42 | more or less, perfect in heat. Now this ~virtual quantity 35 1, 42 | just as we speak of great heat on account of its intensity 36 1, 42 | said to be like fire in heat; but they cannot be said 37 1, 44 | whatever is the greatest in heat is the cause of all heat.~ 38 1, 44 | heat is the cause of all heat.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[44] A[ 39 1, 45 | power of another; as air can heat and ignite by the power 40 1, 45 | being made; ~for a greater heat heats not only more, but 41 1, 49 | instance, ~that it fails to heat - this comes either by defect 42 1, 49 | concentration of the inward heat.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[49] A[ 43 1, 50 | produces the effect; as heat makes heat. Now, God ~produces 44 1, 50 | the effect; as heat makes heat. Now, God ~produces the 45 1, 50 | what is tepid compared to heat seems to be cold; and thus 46 1, 56 | heated is from what gave it heat, and the building from the ~ 47 1, 56 | in other ~agents: for, as heat is the formal principle 48 1, 56 | self-subsisting; because ~heat would give forth heat none 49 1, 56 | because ~heat would give forth heat none the less if it were 50 1, 61 | is not so styled from its heat, but from its splendor; ~ 51 1, 62 | tendency to give forth heat, and to generate fire; whereas 52 1, 63 | Seraphim is derived from the heat of charity, which is ~incompatible 53 1, 65 | serpents, in the ~sun's heat, and other things. Now a 54 1, 65 | that are hot ~receive their heat from fire. But being is 55 1, 66 | i.e. fiery, not from its heat, ~but from its brightness. 56 1, 67 | same way be attributed to heat. For because movement ~from 57 1, 67 | quality be ~removed, as heat remains in water removed 58 1, 67 | as cold is ~opposed to heat, blackness to whiteness. 59 1, 67 | must say, then, that as heat is an active quality consequent 60 1, 67 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: As heat acts towards perfecting 61 1, 68 | set there to temper the heat of the ~celestial bodies, 62 1, 75 | is not hot does not give heat. ~Secondly, because if there 63 1, 75 | the act of a body; thus heat, ~which is the principle 64 1, 75 | reason we do not say that heat imparts ~heat, but that 65 1, 75 | not say that heat imparts ~heat, but that what is hot gives 66 1, 75 | but that what is hot gives heat. We must conclude, therefore, 67 1, 75 | that what is hot ~gives heat by its heat; for heat, strictly 68 1, 75 | is hot ~gives heat by its heat; for heat, strictly speaking, 69 1, 75 | gives heat by its heat; for heat, strictly speaking, does 70 1, 75 | speaking, does not give heat. ~We may therefore say that 71 1, 76 | an active form, such as ~heat is, which is clearly false. 72 1, 76 | according to the ~mode of the heat; so knowledge is according 73 1, 76 | simply," but to be "such," as heat does not ~make a thing to 74 1, 76 | included; as when we say that heat is the act of what is hot, 75 1, 77 | the agent (for instance, heat compared to the form of ~ 76 1, 77 | the active principle, to heat; the latter from something 77 1, 37 | although heating is not the heat which is the form of ~the 78 1, 39 | as all things which give heat; but ~only those things 79 1, 42 | more or less, perfect in heat. Now this ~virtual quantity 80 1, 42 | just as we speak of great heat on account of its intensity 81 1, 42 | said to be like fire in heat; but they cannot be said 82 1, 45 | whatever is the greatest in heat is the cause of all heat.~ 83 1, 45 | heat is the cause of all heat.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[44] A[ 84 1, 46 | power of another; as air can heat and ignite by the power 85 1, 46 | being made; ~for a greater heat heats not only more, but 86 1, 50 | instance, ~that it fails to heat - this comes either by defect 87 1, 50 | concentration of the inward heat.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[49] A[ 88 1, 51 | produces the effect; as heat makes heat. Now, God ~produces 89 1, 51 | the effect; as heat makes heat. Now, God ~produces the 90 1, 51 | what is tepid compared to heat seems to be cold; and thus 91 1, 57 | heated is from what gave it heat, and the building from the ~ 92 1, 57 | in other ~agents: for, as heat is the formal principle 93 1, 57 | self-subsisting; because ~heat would give forth heat none 94 1, 57 | because ~heat would give forth heat none the less if it were 95 1, 62 | is not so styled from its heat, but from its splendor; ~ 96 1, 63 | tendency to give forth heat, and to generate fire; whereas 97 1, 64 | Seraphim is derived from the heat of charity, which is ~incompatible 98 1, 66 | serpents, in the ~sun's heat, and other things. Now a 99 1, 66 | that are hot ~receive their heat from fire. But being is 100 1, 67 | i.e. fiery, not from its heat, ~but from its brightness. 101 1, 68 | same way be attributed to heat. For because movement ~from 102 1, 68 | quality be ~removed, as heat remains in water removed 103 1, 68 | as cold is ~opposed to heat, blackness to whiteness. 104 1, 68 | must say, then, that as heat is an active quality consequent 105 1, 68 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: As heat acts towards perfecting 106 1, 69 | set there to temper the heat of the ~celestial bodies, 107 1, 74 | is not hot does not give heat. ~Secondly, because if there 108 1, 74 | the act of a body; thus heat, ~which is the principle 109 1, 74 | reason we do not say that heat imparts ~heat, but that 110 1, 74 | not say that heat imparts ~heat, but that what is hot gives 111 1, 74 | but that what is hot gives heat. We must conclude, therefore, 112 1, 74 | that what is hot ~gives heat by its heat; for heat, strictly 113 1, 74 | is hot ~gives heat by its heat; for heat, strictly speaking, 114 1, 74 | gives heat by its heat; for heat, strictly speaking, does 115 1, 74 | speaking, does not give heat. ~We may therefore say that 116 1, 75 | an active form, such as ~heat is, which is clearly false. 117 1, 75 | according to the ~mode of the heat; so knowledge is according 118 1, 75 | simply," but to be "such," as heat does not ~make a thing to 119 1, 75 | included; as when we say that heat is the act of what is hot, 120 1, 76 | the agent (for instance, heat compared to the form of ~ 121 1, 76 | the active principle, to heat; the latter from something 122 1, 77 | instrumentally by the action of heat, as the Philosopher says ( 123 1, 77 | is performed by means of heat, the property of which ~ 124 1, 77 | into the thing immuted, as heat is ~received into the thing 125 1, 77 | in a measure affected by heat. On the part ~of an organ, 126 1, 84 | object; for instance, to heat and to cut; and ~each of 127 1, 84 | object of the action, as heat in the heater is a likeness 128 1, 87 | its subject, as heating to heat and fire. In both ~these 129 1, 88 | corrupted by its contrary, ~as heat, by cold; and secondly, 130 1, 90 | mostly found where there is heat, which is from fire; and 131 1, 90 | man is not generated where heat and cold ~are extreme, but 132 1, 90 | the brain may modify the heat of the heart, which has ~ 133 1, 96 | so that by the action of heat, the body might lose part 134 1, 96 | by the action of natural heat, which acts as the soul' 135 1, 101 | a situation of ~extreme heat, since twice in the year 136 1, 101 | uninhabitable on account of the heat. This ~seems to be more 137 1, 103 | the fire ~has ceased to heat. Much more, therefore, can 138 1, 103 | is why hot water retains heat after the cessation of the ~ 139 1, 103 | susceptive of the fire's heat in the same way as it ~exists 140 1, 103 | imperfectly and inchoately, the heat will remain for a time ~ 141 1, 103 | participation of the principle of heat. ~On the other hand, air 142 1, 104 | heating tends to the form of heat. Now it ~belongs to the 143 1, 104 | is not ~fire that gives heat, but God in the fire, and 144 1, 105 | because they "kindle" or "give heat": and this is by love which 145 1, 107 | thing which can ~communicate heat is more perfect that what 146 1, 107 | that what is unable to give heat. And ~the more perfectly 147 1, 107 | containing an excess of heat. Now in fire we may ~consider 148 1, 107 | the active force which is "heat," which is not found in 149 1, 107 | cleansing them wholly by their heat. Thirdly we ~consider in 150 1, 109 | conception of the soul as regards heat and cold, and ~sometimes 151 1, 109 | to the force of natural heat, which is the instrument 152 1, 114 | active quality, such as heat, although itself ~an accident, 153 1, 114 | substantial form; ~thus natural heat, as the instrument of the 154 1, 114 | there are ~contrary agents - heat and cold, and the like. 155 1, 114 | produced through the ~action of heat and cold, moisture and dryness, 156 1, 114 | not ~the same effect in heat in Dacia as in Ethiopia); 157 1, 116 | active quality ~just as heat is.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[117] 158 1, 116 | human body is changed to heat ~and cold, as appears when 159 1, 117 | the distance to which its heat ~carries. Therefore bodies 160 1, 117 | moreover, there is a certain heat derived from the power of ~ 161 1, 117 | man." Moreover, elemental heat is employed instrumentally 162 1, 118 | resist the action of natural heat, and ~prevent the consumption 163 1, 118 | by the ~action of natural heat. But there would be no renewal, 164 1, 118 | be dissolved by natural heat, and be cast aside through 165 1, 118 | is destroyed by natural heat, while the other remains.~ 166 1, 118 | was consumed by natural heat.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[119] A[ 167 2, 1 | movement ~proceeding from heat, while heating as a passion 168 2, 1 | than a ~movement towards heat: and it is the definition 169 2, 4 | thus we might say that heat is necessary for fire. And 170 2, 4 | cold hinders the action of heat: and such a hindrance ~to 171 2, 5 | hot ~thing heats through heat. But if a form exist in 172 2, 5 | enlightened or ~heated give heat or light to something else; 173 2, 6 | as in the case of cold or heat; and ~through the body being 174 2, 6 | instance, heating from heat. Secondly, indirectly; in 175 2, 6 | natural for fire to produce heat. Secondly, ~according to 176 2, 9 | specified, as heating by heat. Now the first formal principle 177 2, 10 | always in them actually, as heat is in fire. ~But that which 178 2, 12 | as a proper measure of heat and cold conduce to ~health; 179 2, 15 | hardening is the effect of heat and ~of cold (since bricks 180 2, 15 | cold), then by removing heat it does not follow that ~ 181 2, 17 | the body, consisting in heat or ~cold. Therefore the 182 2, 17 | certain natural change of heat and cold, ~which change 183 2, 20 | a ~hot thing heats, the heat of the heater is distinct 184 2, 20 | heater is distinct from the heat of the ~thing heated, although 185 2, 28 | denotes a certain excess of heat; which excess ~has a corruptive 186 2, 29 | unsuitable to ~another: thus heat is becoming to fire and 187 2, 29 | receiving it. Hence the heat of a hectic fever, though 188 2, 29 | not felt so much as the heat of tertian fever; because ~ 189 2, 29 | tertian fever; because ~the heat of the hectic fever is habitual 190 2, 31 | to this hot water to give heat. ~Consequently it happens 191 2, 32 | is cold sometimes causes heat," as stated in ~Phys. viii, 192 2, 35 | object: thus pleasure in heat is contrary to ~sorrow caused 193 2, 40 | youths, on ~account of the heat of their nature, are full 194 2, 40 | who are in drink - viz. heat ~and high spirits, on account 195 2, 44 | contraction takes place, the heat and vital spirits are withdrawn ~ 196 2, 44 | inwardly. But accumulation of heat and vital spirits in the 197 2, 44 | the vital spirits and ~heat are accumulated in the interior 198 2, 44 | similar contraction ~of heat and vital spirits towards 199 2, 44 | angry, by reason ~of the heat and subtlety of the vital 200 2, 44 | wherefore the vital spirits and heat concentrate around the heart: 201 2, 44 | power. Consequently the heat and vital spirits abandon ~ 202 2, 44 | purposes, in animals, is heat and vital spirits: wherefore 203 2, 44 | their nature stores up the heat and vital spirits within 204 2, 44 | when the vital spirits and heat ~are concentrated together 205 2, 44 | are afraid, the internal ~heat and vital spirits move from 206 2, 44 | experiences a ~contraction of heat towards the inner parts 207 2, 44 | set the vital spirits and heat in movement, so that they 208 2, 44 | rather to cause a ~parching heat: a sign whereof is that 209 2, 44 | evacuation is occasioned by heat; hence laxative ~medicines 210 2, 44 | Therefore fear apparently causes heat; and consequently does not ~ 211 2, 44 | 3: Further, in fear, the heat is withdrawn from the outer 212 2, 44 | outward ~parts, through the heat being withdrawn thus; it 213 2, 44 | power is due to the want of ~heat, which is the instrument 214 2, 44 | 2~Reply OBJ 1: When the heat withdraws from the outer 215 2, 44 | inner parts, ~the inward heat increases, especially in 216 2, 44 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: In fear, heat abandons the heart, with 217 2, 44 | through fear, of their heat. But on the part of ~the 218 2, 45 | timid; because the natural ~heat is unable to give the same 219 2, 45 | just as a fire does not heat a large house as well as 220 2, 45 | more daring, through the heat in the ~heart that results 221 2, 45 | daring, on account of the heat of the wine": ~hence it 222 2, 45 | conduces to ~hope, since the heat in the heart banishes fear 223 2, 45 | daring, on account of the ~heat being withdrawn from the 224 2, 45 | But in men of daring the heat ~withdraws to the heart; 225 2, 48 | Whether above all it causes heat in the heart?~(3) Whether 226 2, 48 | OBJ 1: It would seem that heat is not above all the effect 227 2, 48 | corresponds to the action of heat, ~the result is that the 228 2, 48 | heart is moved with ~greater heat to remove the hindrance 229 2, 48 | the fervor arising from heat differs according as it 230 2, 48 | whence it is likened to the heat of fire and of the bile, 231 2, 48 | of the commotion of the ~heat urging to instant action, 232 2, 49 | like manner, in regard to ~heat and cold, and in regard 233 2, 49 | Predicaments ~(Categor. vi), that heat and cold are dispositions 234 2, 49 | So in regard to shape, or heat, or cold, ~a man is not 235 2, 49 | thing, concern beauty; while heat ~and cold, according to 236 2, 49 | health. And in this way heat and cold are put, by the ~ 237 2, 50 | in the third species, and heat in the ~first species of 238 2, 50 | whereas Aristotle puts heat in the third.~Aquin.: SMT 239 2, 50 | For when a thing receives heat in ~this only that it is 240 2, 50 | so as to be able to give heat, ~then we have passion, 241 2, 50 | point that it is able ~to heat something else, then it 242 2, 50 | passion-like qualities, which are heat ~and cold, moisture and 243 2, 52 | more nor less. Such are heat, whiteness or ~other like 244 2, 52 | that ~which heats, causes heat in that which is heated. 245 2, 53 | affecting ~the sight, nor heat through ceasing to make 246 2, 53 | proper form; thus fire causes heat. Secondly, ~indirectly; 247 2, 53 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Even heat would be destroyed through 248 2, 53 | through ceasing to give heat, ~if, for this same reason, 249 2, 53 | which is destructive of heat were to ~increase.~Aquin.: 250 2, 66 | cause. For otherwise the heat of fire would be more noble 251 2, 66 | the soul, to which the heat disposes the matter. It 252 2, 71 | of a contrary form: thus heat is incompatible ~with the 253 2, 72 | head, that fire gives forth heat, and that it does not ~give 254 2, 74 | not the same thing; thus heat ~is a disposition to the 255 2, 75 | negation: thus fire by causing heat ~in virtue of its principal 256 2, 80 | them, even as ~external heat cooperates with the functions 257 2, 82 | causes, e.g. from ~excessive heat or cold, or from a lesion 258 2, 83 | than in its effect: thus ~heat is in the heating fire more 259 2, 85 | by the action of natural heat, as stated in De ~Anima 260 2, 89 | disposes to ~fever, but not as heat disposes to the form of 261 2, 90 | things, is the cause of heat ~in mixed bodies, and these 262 2, 94 | fire is inclined to give heat. Wherefore, since the rational 263 2, 109 | matter how perfectly fire has heat, it would not bring about ~ 264 2, 109 | form, ~as water can only heat when heated by the fire. 265 2, 111 | operation"; thus the work of heat is to make ~its subject 266 2, 111 | subject hot, and to give heat outwardly. And thus habitual 267 2, 111 | excellent, even as in fire, the heat, ~which manifests its species 268 2, 111 | species whereby it produces heat in other things, is ~not 269 2, 113 | implies a movement towards ~heat. But since justice, by its 270 2, 113 | as nothing save fire can heat water. Hence the justification 271 2, 2 | of action, even as the ~heat of fire acts by virtue of 272 2, 12 | were scorched with ~great heat, and they blasphemed the 273 2, 23 | all, ~even as neither can heat cool, nor unrighteousness 274 2, 26 | according as it throws its heat to more ~distant objects. 275 2, 33 | be parched by the sun's heat.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[35] A[ 276 2, 53 | injustice be just, ~nor heat cold, although that which 277 2, 56 | with his hand, ~nor that heat makes a thing hot, but fire 278 2, 56 | a thing hot, but fire by heat, although such ~expressions 279 2, 80 | produced by the natural heat in the ~process of digestion, 280 2, 80 | the same time the natural heat thrives, as ~it were, on 281 2, 102 | subject to the action of heat, as ~regards being heated, 282 2, 121 | introduce ~the likeness of its heat into some passive matter, 283 2, 134 | thirst, neither shall the heat nor ~the sun strike them." 284 2, 145 | creature, by ~reason of heat, cold, wet and dry. Thus 285 2, 145 | seemingly finished (the natural heat being withdrawn ~inwardly 286 2, 145 | limbs (to which result the heat of ~the day conduces until 287 2, 145 | assistance ~against the external heat that is in the air, lest 288 2, 145 | of procreation, namely, ~heat, spirit [*Cf. P. I., Q. 289 2, 145 | Wine and other ~things that heat the body conduce especially 290 2, 145 | body conduce especially to heat: flatulent foods ~seemingly 291 2, 145 | alteration occasioned ~by heat, and the increase in vital 292 2, 146 | sometimes we sin by the very heat of an immoderate ~appetite" - 293 2, 147 | young on ~account of the heat of youth, while in women 294 2, 150 | not parched by excessive heat, so too, ~virginity denotes 295 2, 150 | thereof is unseared by the ~heat of concupiscence which is 296 2, 156 | his stomach with ~burning heat?" And thus we have "swelling 297 2, 162 | account of the ~extreme heat in the middle zone by reason 298 2, 162 | movement that causes ~this heat. And since the movements 299 2, 162 | by, for instance, extreme heat or cold. Secondly, to ~hide 300 2, 162 | to entertain the natural heat, and to sustain ~the body.~ 301 2, 185 | that ~arises from excessive heat is most efficaciously healed 302 2, 186 | i.e. giving him spiritual heat (Eccles. 4:10,11). But ~ 303 3, 7 | fire which is the cause of heat in other ~hot things, is 304 3, 7 | are not all the ~modes of heat which are defective by the 305 3, 7 | belongs to the perfection of heat.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[7] A[9] 306 3, 7 | that air cannot increase in heat, when it has reached the ~ 307 3, 7 | reached the ~utmost limit of heat which can exist in the nature 308 3, 7 | although there ~may be greater heat in actual existence, viz. 309 3, 7 | actual existence, viz. the heat of fire. But on ~the part 310 3, 7 | nature, ~e.g. if we say the heat of fire cannot be increased 311 3, 7 | a more perfect grade of heat than that to which fire 312 3, 7 | has already ~obtained; as heat, which was a disposition 313 3, 8 | acts, as it ~is the same heat whereby fire is hot and 314 3, 9 | thus matter is disposed by heat to receive the form of fire, ~ 315 3, 9 | and, when this comes, the heat does not cease, but remains 316 3, 12 | bodies, for ~He felt the heat in summer and the cold in 317 3, 13 | to; as what is hot gives ~heat. Therefore since the soul 318 3, 13 | water or ~iron heats, by heat borrowed from fire. Hence 319 3, 13 | an inferior manner; for heat ~is not received by water 320 3, 13 | as regards alteration in heat and cold, and ~their consequences; 321 3, 14 | is necessary for fire to heat), or ~the matter (as it 322 3, 19 | thing for his work: thus ~to heat is the proper operation 323 3, 19 | namely, to illuminate and ~to heat, from the difference of 324 3, 19 | difference of light and heat, and yet the illumination ~ 325 3, 22 | gives but does not receive ~heat. Now Christ is the fountain-head 326 3, 27 | more ~excellent, for the heat that proceeds from the form 327 3, 30 | also, when the ~natural heat is drawn within a body, 328 3, 31 | derived from him, not ~the heat of the wound, but the matter 329 3, 34 | generated, begins to ~give heat and light. The action of 330 3, 40 | of its being subject to heat, moisture, cold, and ~dryness. 331 3, 46 | pricked, or is disaffected by ~heat.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[46] A[ 332 3, 50 | which is the principle of heat, can never become ~cold. 333 3, 50 | is the indirect cause of ~heat: and in this way Christ 334 3, 51 | because when the natural heat departs, ~there supervenes 335 3, 51 | departs, ~there supervenes heat from without which causes 336 3, 54 | follow weight and lightness, heat and cold, and similar ~contraries, 337 3, 62 | just as fire by its own heat ~makes something hot. In 338 3, 66 | coolness it tempers superfluous heat: wherefore it ~fittingly 339 3, 69 | same fire, he receives more heat who approaches nearest ~ 340 3, 69 | concerned, sends forth its heat ~equally to all.~Aquin.: 341 3, 74 | the result of its natural heat" (Meteor. iv); consequently 342 3, 74 | to refresh us ~from the heat of concupiscence. And therefore 343 3, 79 | by the action of natural heat. But something is also lost ~ 344 3, 79 | our spirituality from the heat of concupiscence through 345 3, 80 | until digested by natural heat: ~hence Christ's body remains 346 Suppl, 17| the cause of the other, as heat, in fire, is directed to 347 Suppl, 42| good, just as the same heat expels cold and gives heat.~ 348 Suppl, 42| heat expels cold and gives heat.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[42] A[ 349 Suppl, 62| man there is abundance of heat ~which excites concupiscence. 350 Suppl, 70| their proper operations, as ~heat is the act of fire by perfecting 351 Suppl, 70| although ~another individual heat were in it (even so the 352 Suppl, 70| soul, just as we say that heat ~heats. That which is added, 353 Suppl, 72| shall melt with the burning heat." Therefore ~this cleansing 354 Suppl, 72| virtue whereby hot ~water can heat is no indication of the 355 Suppl, 72| of its being receptive of heat. Consequently nothing prevents 356 Suppl, 72| absolute quality, such as ~heat in hot water, or a kind 357 Suppl, 72| shall melt with the burning heat of ~fire." Now the heavens 358 Suppl, 72| active qualities, ~namely heat and cold, which are the 359 Suppl, 72| The third is ~because the heat will gain in intensity what 360 Suppl, 72| fire contains of burning heat and gross matter will go 361 Suppl, 73| the effect is produced, as heat in the ~fire that heats: 362 Suppl, 73| sufficient it may be: thus heat, ~however intense it be, 363 Suppl, 73| intense it be, does not cause heat at once in the first instant, ~ 364 Suppl, 73| set up a movement towards heat, because heat is ~its effect 365 Suppl, 73| movement towards heat, because heat is ~its effect by means 366 Suppl, 76| principles of action, as heat in ~fire.~Aquin.: SMT XP 367 Suppl, 77| from the action of natural heat, as lead is ~added to silver 368 Suppl, 77| perfection, ~nor does the natural heat tend to destroy the natural 369 Suppl, 78| according to the ~proportion of heat as expanding, and of humidity 370 Suppl, 79| text. 38, seqq., for the heat of fire in an ~animal's 371 Suppl, 80| 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, as heat and cold are simple qualities 372 Suppl, 80| elements, so is subtlety. But heat and other qualities of the ~ 373 Suppl, 80| natural ~accidents, namely heat, cold, and so forth. Hence 374 Suppl, 83| just as the air ~receives heat from fire materially; and 375 Suppl, 88| the earth . . . cold and heat, summer and winter, night 376 Suppl, 88| implies an ~increase of heat. If therefore at this renewal 377 Suppl, 88| greater than it is now, their heat will likewise be greater; ~ 378 Suppl, 88| bodies, in which it causes no heat, because these bodies ~will 379 Suppl, 89| in ~that object, even as heat is the principle of heating. 380 Suppl, 94| as when one ~passes from heat to cold. But we can admit 381 Suppl, 94| snow waters ~to excessive heat."~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[97] A[ 382 Suppl, 94| pass from the most intense heat to the most ~intense cold 383 Suppl, 94| of the blessed, and the heat of the flame to the ~torment 384 Suppl, 94| kindling, and lacks not heat." Therefore it is not of 385 Suppl, 94| be ~of the very greatest heat, because its heat will be 386 Suppl, 94| greatest heat, because its heat will be all gathered together ~


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