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monastery 45
monastic 38
monens 2
money 377
money-getting 1
money-making 1
moneys 1
Frequency    [«  »]
377 aforesaid
377 fault
377 glorified
377 money
376 gen
375 impediment
374 becomes
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

money

    Part, Question
1 1, 21 | another two hundred pieces of money, though owing him only one 2 1, 26 | Thus to a miser the end is money, and its acquisition. ~Accordingly 3 1, 63 | be estimated in value of money; to these demons are ~not 4 1, 64 | be estimated in value of money; to these demons are ~not 5 2, 1 | the end of the miser is money as "thing," or possession 6 2, 1 | thing," or possession of money as ~"use."~Aquin.: SMT FS 7 2, 2 | 10:19): "All things obey money." Therefore man's happiness ~ 8 2, 2 | of all good things." Now ~money seems to be the means of 9 2, 2 | Philosopher says (Ethic. v, 5), money was invented, that it might 10 2, 2 | direct help to nature, as money, but is invented by the 11 2, 2 | All material things obey money, so far as the multitude 12 2, 2 | which can be ~obtained for money. But we should take our 13 2, 2 | things salable can be had for money: not so spiritual ~things, 14 2, 2 | friend for whom we desire ~money, more than we love money. 15 2, 2 | money, more than we love money. But whatever good a man 16 2, 3 | for the miser, the end is money. Secondly there is the attainment 17 2, 3 | miser is the possession of money; and the end of the ~intemperate 18 2, 3 | For if the ~acquisition of money were through an act of the 19 2, 3 | then he delights in the money got. And so it ~is with 20 2, 13 | end; thus for the miser, money or the possession of ~money 21 2, 13 | money or the possession of ~money is the end. The same is 22 2, 16 | the miser's end is either money or the possession of it); 23 2, 16 | for the ~possession of money is good only inasmuch as 24 2, 16 | as there is some good in money. ~But in regard to the individual, 25 2, 16 | individual, the obtaining of money is the last end; ~for the 26 2, 16 | miser would not seek for money, save that he might have 27 2, 16 | properly speaking, a man enjoys money, because he ~places his 28 2, 27 | pleasure, for instance, or money, or such like.~Aquin.: SMT 29 2, 27 | we love those ~who bestow money and health on us; and also 30 2, 27 | loved; ~thus he that desires money, for this reason loves him 31 2, 34 | the miser's end is either money or the possession ~of money. 32 2, 34 | money or the possession ~of money. Accordingly, man's last 33 2, 37 | thou shalt seek wisdom as money, and shall dig for her ~ 34 2, 49 | as "having" quantity and money and ~other like things. 35 2, 54 | different ends; thus to give money to anyone, if it be done ~ 36 2, 60 | man in himself, is like money and honor; the ~former, 37 2, 60 | Accordingly in reference to money considered as a good ~absolutely, 38 2, 65 | come in for a large sum of money, he would ~acquire the habit 39 2, 67 | difficult. ~Hence he that has money is not, properly speaking, 40 2, 67 | though he have lost his money: yet he cannot exercise 41 2, 67 | OBJ 3: He that loses his money does not therefore lose 42 2, 67 | the ~possibility of having money, and therefore it is reasonable 43 2, 72 | 10) that ~"the desire of money is the root of all evils." 44 2, 72 | covetous man, in order to hoard money, both robs, and omits to 45 2, 72 | inordinate desire of ~hoarding money: and in such cases the corruption 46 2, 77 | is said to love wine or money) admits, ~as its cause, 47 2, 77 | Douay: ~'The desire of money'] is the root of all evils." 48 2, 77 | of perception; such are money, apparel, and the like; 49 2, 84 | sins; as when a man desires money through ~ambition, or in 50 2, 84 | Tim. 6:10): "The desire of money is ~the root of all evil."~ 51 2, 84 | any sin whatever, since money helps man to obtain all 52 2, 84 | 10:19: "All things obey money": ~so that in this desire 53 2, 84 | Reply OBJ 2: The desire of money is said to be the root of 54 2, 84 | be procured by means of money.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[84] A[ 55 2, 87 | when he suffers loss of money for the ~sake of bodily 56 2, 100 | not lend to thy brother money to ~usury"; and the prohibition 57 2, 105 | not lend to thy brother money to usury": and (Dt. 24:6): ~" 58 2, 105 | Ex. 22:25): "If thou lend money to any of ~my people that 59 2, 105 | them (Dt. 23:19,20) to lend money to the stranger ~for usury.~ 60 2, 105 | punishment, because it is his ~money."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[105] 61 2, 105 | being "because it is his money."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[105] 62 2, 108 | possess gold, nor ~silver, nor money in your purses," nor other 63 2, 11 | the soul, than to forge money, which supports temporal 64 2, 11 | Wherefore if ~forgers of money and other evil-doers are 65 2, 24 | regain virtue than to recover money, ~had they lost it, for 66 2, 24 | virtue is more akin than money to ~friendship. When, however, 67 2, 29 | another's ~goods, whether in money or in kind, either because 68 2, 30 | iii, 2), for a needy man "money is better than ~philosophy," 69 2, 30 | Ecclus. ~29:13, 14: "Lose thy money for thy brother . . . place 70 2, 30 | you have left to rot, the money of the needy ~that you have 71 2, 30 | unlawfully in taking the money. ~Consequently it is lawful 72 2, 30 | with the desire of making money out of ~another man, entices 73 2, 31 | the payment of a sum of money, he must not be ~content 74 2, 31 | Wherefore just as he that owes money to a creditor should seek 75 2, 56 | adultery, and overmuch love of money leads to theft. ~Therefore 76 2, 59 | that bear no fruit, such as money, pottery, etc.; but if not 77 2, 59 | commensuration, for which purpose money was invented. Hence ~retaliation 78 2, 60 | make compensation either in money or in honor, ~the condition 79 2, 60 | who retains his creditor's money beyond the stated ~time, 80 2, 60 | possible profits from ~that money, and yet he does not really 81 2, 60 | like manner he that has money has the profit not yet ~ 82 2, 64 | that you store away, the money ~that you bury in the earth 83 2, 69 | advocate to take payment in money ~for pleading.~Aquin.: SMT 84 2, 69 | hence it is ~lawful to take money in payment of that use, 85 2, 75 | for it, ~for which purpose money was invented, as stated 86 2, 75 | exchanged for another, or money taken in exchange for a ~ 87 2, 75 | exchange is either ~that of money for money, or of any commodity 88 2, 75 | either ~that of money for money, or of any commodity for 89 2, 75 | or of any commodity for money, not on account of ~the 90 2, 76 | Whether it is a sin to take money as a price for money lent, 91 2, 76 | take money as a price for money lent, which ~is to receive 92 2, 76 | Whether it is lawful to lend money for any other kind of ~consideration, 93 2, 76 | just gains derived from money ~taken in usury?~(4) Whether 94 2, 76 | Whether it is lawful to borrow money under a condition of usury?~ 95 2, 76 | a sin to take usury for money lent?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[78] 96 2, 76 | a sin to take usury for money lent. ~For no man sins through 97 2, 76 | have exacted it," i.e. ~the money lent, "with usury." Therefore 98 2, 76 | take usury for ~lending money.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[78] A[ 99 2, 76 | fenerate to thy brother money, nor corn, nor any other 100 2, 76 | bound to do. But one who has money is not ~bound in every case 101 2, 76 | Ex. 22:25): "If thou lend money to any ~of thy people that 102 2, 76 | that, To take usury for money lent is unjust in itself, 103 2, 76 | A[1] Body Para. 3/3~Now money, according to the Philosopher ( 104 2, 76 | proper ~and principal use of money is its consumption or alienation 105 2, 76 | payment ~for the use of money lent, which payment is known 106 2, 76 | he bound to restore ~the money which he has taken in usury.~ 107 2, 76 | that hath not put out his money to usury," and (Ezech. 18: 108 2, 76 | hath not lent upon money, nor ~taken any increase . . . 109 2, 76 | Polit. i, ~3) that "to make money by usury is exceedingly 110 2, 76 | principal use of silver money is ~sinking it in exchange, 111 2, 76 | secondary use of silver money; for instance, a man might 112 2, 76 | far as he needs to borrow money which ~the owner is unwilling 113 2, 76 | kind of consideration for money ~lent?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 114 2, 76 | kind of ~consideration for money lent. For everyone may lawfully 115 2, 76 | suffers loss through lending money. ~Therefore he may lawfully 116 2, 76 | something else besides ~the money lent.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[78] 117 2, 76 | us a favor. Now to lend ~money to one who is in straits 118 2, 76 | not unlawful, in ~lending money to anyone, to demand some 119 2, 76 | one to whom one has lent money. Therefore in like manner 120 2, 76 | But it is lawful to accept money for money given. Therefore ~ 121 2, 76 | lawful to accept money for money given. Therefore ~it is 122 2, 76 | his ownership of a sum of ~money removes the money further 123 2, 76 | sum of ~money removes the money further from himself than 124 2, 76 | to receive interest for money ~entrusted to a merchant 125 2, 76 | to ~receive interest for money lent.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[78] 126 2, 76 | may accept a pledge for money lent, the use of ~which 127 2, 76 | to receive ~interest for money lent.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[78] 128 2, 76 | be ~payment for a loan of money: nor does it appear to be 129 2, 76 | some consideration for ~money lent.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[78] 130 2, 76 | a thing is ~reckoned as money "if its value can be measured 131 2, 76 | value can be measured by money." Consequently, ~just as 132 2, 76 | against justice, to take money, by tacit or express ~agreement, 133 2, 76 | agreement, in return for lending money or anything else that is 134 2, 76 | price can be measured by money. Yet there would be ~no 135 2, 76 | even before lending the money, one could accept a ~gratuity, 136 2, 76 | appreciated by a measure of money, for ~instance, benevolence, 137 2, 76 | is not to sell the use of money but to avoid a loss. It ~ 138 2, 76 | makes no profit out of his money: because he ~must not sell 139 2, 76 | Wherefore the borrower of money or any such thing the use 140 2, 76 | man were, in return for money lent, as though there ~had 141 2, 76 | both can be ~priced at a money value, as may be seen in 142 2, 76 | not to be appreciated at a money ~value, it is lawful to 143 2, 76 | 4 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: Money cannot be sold for a greater 144 2, 76 | Reply OBJ 5: He who lends money transfers the ownership 145 2, 76 | transfers the ownership of the money to ~the borrower. Hence 146 2, 76 | Hence the borrower holds the money at his own risk and is ~ 147 2, 76 | hand he that entrusts his money to a merchant or craftsman 148 2, 76 | transfer the ownership of his ~money to them, for it remains 149 2, 76 | profits derived from his money.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[78] A[ 150 2, 76 | If a man in return for money lent to him pledges something ~ 151 2, 76 | the same as if he took ~money for lending, and that is 152 2, 76 | this anticipated payment of money has the character of a loan, 153 2, 76 | order that he ~may have his money sooner, he is not guilty 154 2, 76 | profits he has made out of ~money gotten by usury?~Aquin.: 155 2, 76 | profits he ~has made out of money gotten by usury. For the 156 2, 76 | is acquired from usurious money must be restored.~Aquin.: 157 2, 76 | to him by reason of the money he paid for it. Therefore 158 2, 76 | thing purchased than to the money he paid. But he was bound ~ 159 2, 76 | was bound ~to restore the money gained through usury. Therefore 160 2, 76 | of usury, for instance money, wheat, wine and so forth, 161 2, 76 | character of matter, as money ~made by usury has; but 162 2, 76 | Reply OBJ 3: The proceeds of money taken in usury are due to 163 2, 76 | by reason of the usurious money as instrumental ~cause, 164 2, 76 | goods acquired with usurious money than to the ~usurious money 165 2, 76 | money than to the ~usurious money itself.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[ 166 2, 76 | Whether it is lawful to borrow money under a condition of usury?~ 167 2, 76 | is not lawful to borrow money under a ~condition of usury. 168 2, 76 | them." Now he that borrows money under a ~condition of usury 169 2, 76 | sometimes to deposit one's ~money with a usurer than to borrow 170 2, 76 | unlawful to deposit one's money with a usurer, even as it 171 2, 76 | one were to entrust one's money to a usurer lacking ~other 172 2, 76 | greater profit from his money by reason of the usury, 173 2, 76 | whom one entrusts one's money ~has other means of practising 174 2, 83 | thus we speak of offering money or bread at the altar, and 175 2, 86 | man vows to give a sum of money, and ~afterwards loses it. 176 2, 87 | man swore ~to pay a sum of money, which is subsequently taken 177 2, 87 | serve him, or to give him money: and from such a promise 178 2, 97 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: If money were exacted without a reasonable 179 2, 98 | Whether it is lawful to accept money for the sacraments?~(3) 180 2, 98 | Whether it is lawful to accept money for spiritual actions?~( 181 2, 98 | he offered the apostles money" that he might ~buy a spiritual 182 2, 98 | said (Acts 8:20): "Keep thy money to thyself to perish ~with 183 2, 98 | God may be ~purchased with money." ~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[100] 184 2, 98 | grace of the Holy ~Ghost for money, said that the world was 185 2, 98 | order that he might make money by selling the signs to 186 2, 98 | 20-24) that he received ~money from the leper who was healed: 187 2, 98 | Therefore, were ~he to accept money from the income of any church 188 2, 98 | always unlawful to give money for the sacraments?~Aquin.: 189 2, 98 | always unlawful to give money for ~the sacraments. Baptism 190 2, 98 | in ~certain cases to give money for Baptism, for instance 191 2, 98 | priests receive a prebend or money ~for singing masses. Much 192 2, 98 | But some persons demand money when ~absolving from excommunication. 193 2, 98 | in such a case to give money for a bishopric or a like 194 2, 98 | sacrament. But sometimes money is given ~for marriage. 195 2, 98 | shall consecrate anyone for money, let him be cut off from 196 2, 98 | must answer that to receive money for the spiritual grace ~ 197 2, 98 | FS, Q[97], A[3]]. Now by money ~we are to understand anything 198 2, 98 | OBJ 2: The priest receives money, not as the price for ~consecrating 199 2, 98 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The money exacted of the person absolved 200 2, 98 | since this would be to ~use money as a means of obtaining 201 2, 98 | But it is lawful to ~use money as a means of removing unjust 202 2, 98 | that it is lawful to give money for Matrimony because no 203 2, 98 | Consequently it is lawful to give money for Matrimony ~considered 204 2, 98 | lawful to give and receive money for spiritual actions?~Aquin.: 205 2, 98 | lawful to give and receive money for ~spiritual actions. 206 2, 98 | lawful to give and receive money for a spiritual action.~ 207 2, 98 | spiritual ~actions. Now money is given to holy persons 208 2, 98 | it is ~lawful to receive money for the use of science: 209 2, 98 | unless a certain sum of money were paid, because such 210 2, 98 | it is lawful to receive money for things annexed to spiritual ~ 211 2, 98 | would seem lawful to receive money for things annexed to ~spiritual 212 2, 98 | equivalent in service rendered or money ~received, is guilty of 213 2, 98 | above (A[2]), the term "money" denotes ~"anything that 214 2, 98 | servants are hired for a money wage. Therefore ~to grant 215 2, 98 | same as to grant it for the money, received or promised, at 216 2, 98 | guilt of simony by accepting money or any eternal thing which 217 2, 98 | he has acquired with his money."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[100] 218 2, 98 | Nor may he reclaim the money which he basely gave, ~although 219 2, 98 | 4 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: Money, property, or fruits simoniacally 220 2, 104 | want should be repaid with money": and ~Seneca writes (De 221 2, 108 | profits /someone in saving his money"; the seventh ~"injures 222 2, 108 | profits someone in saving his money"; or his body, and this 223 2, 108 | and life of the body than money, and virtue than the ~life 224 2, 110 | sometimes for the sake of money." Thus it ~is evident that 225 2, 115 | neither to receive nor to keep money, but to give it ~away."~ 226 2, 115 | Whether liberality is about money?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[117] A[ 227 2, 115 | liberality is not about money. For every moral ~virtue 228 2, 115 | passions and not ~about money.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[117] A[ 229 2, 115 | liberality is not ~chiefly about money.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[117] A[ 230 2, 115 | a mean in the matter of money."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[117] 231 2, 115 | are ~denoted by the term "money." Therefore the proper matter 232 2, 115 | matter of liberality is ~money.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[117] A[ 233 2, 115 | liberality, while ~exterior money is the object of those same 234 2, 115 | the name of "'pecunia' [money], because in olden times ~ 235 2, 115 | 1): "We give the name of money to anything ~that can be 236 2, 115 | internal ~passions: wherefore money is in one way the matter 237 2, 115 | Para. 1/1~Whether using money is the act of liberality?~ 238 2, 115 | OBJ 1: It seems that using money is not the act of liberality. 239 2, 115 | different acts. But using money is becoming to ~other virtues, 240 2, 115 | connected with the use of money. Therefore using money seems 241 2, 115 | of money. Therefore using money seems to be ~unsuitably 242 2, 115 | OBJ 3: Further, the use of money consists not only in giving 243 2, 115 | it. But the spending of money refers to the spender, and ~ 244 2, 115 | Therefore not every use of ~money belongs to liberality.~Aquin.: 245 2, 115 | the virtue with regard to money will make the best ~use 246 2, 115 | Therefore the good use of ~money is the act of liberality.~ 247 2, 115 | matter of liberality is money ~and whatever has a money 248 2, 115 | money ~and whatever has a money value, as stated in the 249 2, 115 | its act is consistent with money. Now ~money comes under 250 2, 115 | consistent with money. Now ~money comes under the head of 251 2, 115 | liberality is making use ~of money or riches.~Aquin.: SMT SS 252 2, 115 | liberality not only to use money, but also to ~keep it in 253 2, 115 | man ~is affected towards money are the proximate matter 254 2, 115 | from making any due use of money through an inordinate affection 255 2, 115 | there is a twofold use of money: one consists in applying 256 2, 115 | by an immoderate love of money, either from ~spending it 257 2, 115 | those who have not earned money, but have received the money 258 2, 115 | money, but have received the money earned by ~others, spend 259 2, 115 | to a liberal man to use money. Now the use ~of money consists 260 2, 115 | use money. Now the use ~of money consists in parting with 261 2, 115 | For the acquisition of money is ~like generation rather 262 2, 115 | use: while the keeping of money, in so far as ~it is directed 263 2, 115 | to facilitate the use of money, is like a habit. Now in ~ 264 2, 115 | employed. Hence ~parting with money by giving it to others proceeds 265 2, 115 | belongs to prudence to keep money, lest it be stolen or ~spent 266 2, 115 | have to be considered in ~money's use, which is likened 267 2, 115 | those who, having received money that others have ~earned, 268 2, 115 | those who have acquired money from using it up by acting 269 2, 115 | liberality to make fitting use of money, and consequently to give 270 2, 115 | since this is a use of money. Again, every virtue is ~ 271 2, 115 | nature; hence to ~spend money on others belongs properly 272 2, 115 | the love and ~desire of money, which are passions. Therefore 273 2, 115 | concupiscence and delight in money is not referable to the 274 2, 115 | in a certain way towards ~money, in that he desires it not 275 2, 115 | the possession and use of ~money. In this way temperance, 276 2, 115 | his not ~being a lover of money, it follows that a man readily 277 2, 115 | virtues are better than money ~which liberality gives 278 2, 116 | consists in a desire for money, under which all external 279 2, 116 | signifies literally "love ~of money": and it is to this that 280 2, 116 | applies not only to silver or money, but also to anything ~that 281 2, 116 | brass [avidus aeris]," i.e. ~money: wherefore in Greek covetousness 282 2, 116 | silver, which stands for money, signifies all ~external 283 2, 116 | which can be measured by money, as stated ~above (Q[117], 284 2, 116 | comprised under the name of money, whence covetousness [avaritia] 285 2, 116 | is a desire not only for money, ~but also for knowledge 286 2, 116 | comprised under the term "money," inasmuch as they have ~ 287 2, 116 | that can ~be obtained by money, such as pleasures, honors, 288 2, 116 | shall not ~be satisfied with money, and he that loveth riches 289 2, 116 | not to be satisfied with money and to love it ~inordinately 290 2, 116 | In this way a man obtains money beyond his due, by stealing 291 2, 116 | exterior taking and keeping of money, ~and in the spending of 292 2, 116 | hoardest, the needy man's money ~that thou possessest, hence 293 2, 116 | Chrysostom], "Lust for money brings darkness on the soul." 294 2, 116 | covetousness, which is lust for money, is a mortal sin.~Aquin.: 295 2, 116 | wicked thing than to love ~money: for such a one setteth 296 2, 116 | little minded as to love money." ~But this pertains to 297 2, 116 | danger for ~the sake of money. Hence the text continues: " 298 2, 116 | bowels," in order to make ~money. Tully also adds that it 299 2, 116 | willing to be subject to money.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 300 2, 116 | v, 5), is that we ~"use money in token of taking possession 301 2, 116 | 10:19): "All things obey money." Therefore covetousness, ~ 302 2, 116 | covetousness, ~which is desire for money, is a capital vice.~Aquin.: 303 2, 116 | vice, because it regards money, which ~occupies a principal 304 2, 116 | Reply OBJ 2: It is true that money is directed to something 305 2, 116 | shall not be satisfied with money" (Eccles. ~5:9). Secondly, 306 2, 116 | one way, through ~making money by disgraceful means, whether 307 2, 116 | In another way, in making money by ~unjust means, whether 308 2, 116 | is about moderate sums of money, so is ~illiberality. Wherefore 309 2, 117 | man is ~affected towards money: whereas prodigality does 310 2, 117 | is not affected towards money, or to ~anything else of 311 2, 117 | regards passions in respect of money, not as ~exceeding, but 312 2, 117 | Covetousness [Douay: 'desire of money'] is the root of all ~evils." 313 2, 121 | which moderates the love of money, as a ~consequence, moderates 314 2, 123 | covetous man fears the loss of money, the intemperate man the ~ 315 2, 123 | things, such as loss of money; or if one were to endure 316 2, 123 | in order to avoid loss of money, one would not be wholly 317 2, 126 | both are concerned ~about money, and "a magnificent man 318 2, 127 | are the love or desire of money or of honor. And for these 319 2, 127 | regard to the desire of money there ~are two virtues, 320 2, 127 | ordinary or little sums of money, namely ~liberality, and 321 2, 127 | another about large sums of money, namely "magnificence."~ 322 2, 131 | buried in the earth ~the money he had received from his 323 2, 131 | refused to make use of the money. Moreover the ~Philosopher 324 2, 132 | to all transactions in money, but only ~to expensive 325 2, 132 | is the outlay of a sum of money; and a man ~may be hindered 326 2, 132 | making that outlay if he love money too much. Hence ~the matter 327 2, 132 | work, and also ~the very money which he employs in going 328 2, 132 | as well as ~the love of money, which love the magnificent 329 2, 132 | virtues, concerned about money and its use; ~namely, liberality, 330 2, 132 | which regards the use of money in general, and ~magnificence, 331 2, 132 | which is great in the use of money.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[134] A[ 332 2, 132 | Reply OBJ 2: The use of money regards the liberal man 333 2, 132 | affection in respect of money; wherefore all ~due use 334 2, 132 | wherefore all ~due use of money (such as gifts and expenditure), 335 2, 132 | removed by a moderate love of money, belongs to liberality. 336 2, 132 | liberality. But the ~use of money regards the magnificent 337 2, 132 | the ~love and desire of money, which are passions of the 338 2, 133 | mean man is ~loth to spend money." But this belongs to covetousness 339 2, 133 | man, that he spends his money readily and with pleasure, 340 2, 134 | patiently ~that they may amass money, according to Eccles. 5: 341 2, 139 | philargyria} renders 'desire of money'] is the root of all evils." ~ 342 2, 143 | and utility": and "that is money." Now riches ~come under 343 2, 150 | which is about all uses of money in general. Now to keep 344 2, 152 | her to him, he ~shall give money according to the dowry, 345 2, 153 | Douay: 'The ~desire of money'] ({philargyria}), is the 346 2, 155 | immoderate love or desire of money, which is restrained by ~ 347 2, 183 | possess ~gold, nor silver, nor money in your purses"; wherefore 348 2, 184 | wisdom is a defense, so ~money is a defense," and the Philosopher 349 2, 185 | bread or some small sum of money. Nevertheless since these 350 2, 186 | possess gold, nor silver, nor ~money in your purses, nor script 351 2, 186 | object that Judas carried money in the purse, we answer 352 2, 186 | foremost place, and the money in Christ's purse was spent 353 2, 186 | is evident that to keep money by, or ~any other common 354 2, 186 | purse, wherein He kept the money that was collected? Why, 355 2, 186 | are natural riches, while money is artificial riches. Hence 356 2, 186 | declined to make use of money, and employed ~other things, 357 2, 186 | comes to the same to ~have money and to possess other things 358 2, 187 | to those to ~whom he owes money. Now persons who owe money 359 2, 187 | money. Now persons who owe money to anyone cannot enter ~ 360 2, 187 | however, he owes a sum of money, and has not wherewithal 361 2, 187 | de Oblig. et Action, ~12] money lays an obligation not on 362 3, 15 | over the loss of grace or ~money. Now Christ's soul could 363 3, 46 | shall be ~redeemed without money." But the devil possessed 364 3, 48 | satisfaction, not by giving money or anything of the sort, 365 3, 62 | to be given that sum of money; this being the effect of 366 3, 62 | this man should receive money. In like manner the ~book 367 3, 83 | either for the sake of money, ~or to gain flattery from 368 3, 86 | regards external things, e.g. money, is not opposed ~to friendship 369 Suppl, 43| under a condition even of money to be received. ~Therefore 370 Suppl, 43| betrothal pledges, such as money and the ~like; thirdly, 371 Suppl, 43| the ~payment of a sum of money by way of penalty, and then, 372 Suppl, 47| the payment of a ~sum of money, or the consent of the parents, 373 Suppl, 51| Reply OBJ 7: In contracts money is regarded as the measure 374 Suppl, 67| they were allowed to lend money for usury to strangers, 375 Suppl, 93| martyrs, or ~doctors: even as money receives the name of debt 376 Suppl, 93| to ~some one, though the money and the debt are altogether 377 Suppl, 93| is not about pleasures of money, honors, ~and the like,


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