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Alphabetical    [«  »]
name 1221
named 111
namely 1373
names 348
namesake 1
naming 4
narrated 9
Frequency    [«  »]
350 lust
350 pertain
348 damned
348 names
348 rest
347 trinity
346 observe
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

names

    Part, Question
1 1, 2 | its ~existence. Now the names given to God are derived 2 1, 5 | prior in idea to being. For names are ~arranged according 3 1, 5 | things signified by the ~names. But Dionysius (Div. Nom. 4 1, 5 | place, amongst ~the other names of God, to His goodness 5 1, 5 | Dionysius discusses the Divine Names (Div. Nom. i, iii) as ~implying 6 1, 5 | form. Therefore among the names signifying the divine ~causality, 7 1, 10 | metaphorically by corporeal names, so eternity though simultaneously ~ 8 1, 10 | simultaneously ~whole, is called by names implying time and succession.~ 9 1, 13 | 13] Out. Para. 1/2 - THE NAMES OF GOD (TWELVE ARTICLES)~ 10 1, 13 | consideration of the divine names. For ~everything is named 11 1, 13 | named by us?~(2) Whether any names applied to God are predicated 12 1, 13 | substantially?~(3) Whether any names applied to God are said 13 1, 13 | metaphorically?~(4) Whether any names applied to God are synonymous?~( 14 1, 13 | synonymous?~(5) Whether some names are applied to God and to 15 1, 13 | creatures?~(7) Whether any names are applicable to God from 16 1, 13 | concrete. But concrete ~names do not belong to God, since 17 1, 13 | simple, nor do abstract names ~belong to Him, forasmuch 18 1, 13 | God from creatures, the names we ~attribute to God signify 19 1, 13 | hence it follows ~that all names used by us to signify a 20 1, 13 | compound things; whereas names ~given to signify simple 21 1, 13 | attribute to Him abstract names to signify His simplicity, 22 1, 13 | simplicity, and concrete ~names to signify His substance 23 1, 13 | although both these kinds ~of names fail to express His mode 24 1, 13 | denomination of God." Thus ~the names applied by the holy doctors 25 1, 13 | its essence. Therefore the names ~applied to God are not 26 1, 13 | signified." Therefore all names of ~this kind signify the 27 1, 13 | I answer that, Negative names applied to God, or signifying 28 1, 13 | absolute and affirmative names of God, as "good," "wise," ~ 29 1, 13 | have ~said that all such names, although they are applied 30 1, 13 | manner applies to other ~names; and this was taught by 31 1, 13 | Moses. Others say that these names ~applied to God signify 32 1, 13 | same rule applies to other names.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[13] A[ 33 1, 13 | reason be assigned why some names ~more than others are applied 34 1, 13 | it would follow that all names applied to God would be ~ 35 1, 13 | doctrine - viz. that these names ~signify the divine substance, 36 1, 13 | proved ~thus. For these names express God, so far as our 37 1, 13 | Therefore the aforesaid names signify the ~divine substance, 38 1, 13 | Damascene says that these names do not signify what God 39 1, 13 | forasmuch as by none of these names is perfectly expressed what 40 1, 13 | In the significance of names, that from which the name 41 1, 13 | that these kinds of divine names are imposed ~from the divine 42 1, 13 | our intellect knows and names God ~according to each kind 43 1, 13 | but nevertheless these names are ~not imposed to signify 44 1, 13 | creatures; and thus the names imposed by us signify ~Him 45 1, 13 | literally to God. For all names ~which we apply to God are 46 1, 13 | explained above ~(A[1]). But the names of creatures are applied 47 1, 13 | or the like. Therefore names are ~applied to God in a 48 1, 13 | given to it. But all such names as ~"good," "wise," and 49 1, 13 | Therefore none ~of these names belong to God in their literal 50 1, 13 | OBJ 3: Further, corporeal names are applied to God in a 51 1, 13 | incorporeal. But all such names imply some kind ~of corporeal 52 1, 13 | conditions. Therefore all these names are ~applied to God in a 53 1, 13 | says (De Fide ii), "Some names there are which ~express 54 1, 13 | similitude." Therefore not all ~names are applied to God in a 55 1, 13 | them it signifies them by names. Therefore as to the names 56 1, 13 | names. Therefore as to the names applied to ~God - viz. the 57 1, 13 | what is signified ~by these names, they belong properly to 58 1, 13 | Reply OBJ 1: There are some names which signify these perfections ~ 59 1, 13 | signifies a material being, ~and names of this kind can be applied 60 1, 13 | metaphorical ~sense. Other names, however, express these 61 1, 13 | and the like, and such names can be literally applied 62 1, 13 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Such names as these, as Dionysius shows, 63 1, 13 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: These names which are applied to God 64 1, 13 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether names applied to God are synonymous?~ 65 1, 13 | OBJ 1: It seems that these names applied to God are synonymous 66 1, 13 | applied to God are synonymous names. ~For synonymous names are 67 1, 13 | synonymous names. ~For synonymous names are those which mean exactly 68 1, 13 | exactly the same. But these ~names applied to God mean entirely 69 1, 13 | wisdom. Therefore ~these names are entirely synonymous.~ 70 1, 13 | Further, if it be said these names signify one and the same 71 1, 13 | many in idea; and ~thus the names applied to God do not signify 72 1, 13 | clothing." Therefore if all names applied to God ~are synonymous, 73 1, 13 | 1/2~I answer that, These names spoken of God are not synonymous. 74 1, 13 | understand, if we said that these names are used to remove, or ~ 75 1, 13 | above (A[2]), that these names signify the divine substance, ~ 76 1, 13 | Therefore although the names applied to God ~signify 77 1, 13 | The many aspects of these names are not empty and vain, 78 1, 13 | on the other hand, are names applied to God and creatures 79 1, 13 | must be said that these names are said of ~God and creatures 80 1, 13 | A[5] Body Para. 3/3~Now names are thus used in two ways: 81 1, 13 | prove indeed that these ~names are not predicated univocally 82 1, 13 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether names predicated of God are predicated 83 1, 13 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that names are predicated primarily 84 1, 13 | accordingly as we know it, since ~"names", as the Philosopher says, " 85 1, 13 | know God. Therefore the names imposed by us are ~predicated 86 1, 13 | God from ~creatures." But names transferred from creatures 87 1, 13 | the ~like. Therefore all names applied to God and creatures 88 1, 13 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, all names equally applied to God and 89 1, 13 | health. Therefore ~these names are said primarily of creatures 90 1, 13 | same applies to the other names applied to God ~and creatures. 91 1, 13 | creatures. Therefore these names are applied primarily to 92 1, 13 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, In names predicated of many in an 93 1, 13 | animal's health. Thus all names applied metaphorically to 94 1, 13 | God the signification of names can be defined only from 95 1, 13 | creatures. But to other names not applied to God in a ~ 96 1, 13 | shown above (A[2]), these names ~are applied to God not 97 1, 13 | the name signifies, these names are applied ~primarily to 98 1, 13 | regards the imposition of the names, they ~are primarily applied 99 1, 13 | metaphorical and to other ~names, as said above.~Aquin.: 100 1, 13 | would be valid if these names were applied ~to God only 101 1, 13 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether names which imply relation to 102 1, 13 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that names which imply relation to 103 1, 13 | temporally. For all such names signify the divine ~substance, 104 1, 13 | eternal. Therefore these names are ~not applied to God 105 1, 13 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, if any names are applied to God temporally 106 1, 13 | relation to creatures. But some names are spoken of God implying 107 1, 13 | 3). Therefore also other names implying ~relation to creatures, 108 1, 13 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, names of this kind signify relation. 109 1, 13 | above time. Therefore these names are not applied to God temporally.~ 110 1, 13 | creature; and thus these names "Lord" ~and "Creator" are 111 1, 13 | 1/5~I answer that, The names which import relation to 112 1, 13 | nothing to prevent these ~names which import relation to 113 1, 13 | Reply OBJ 1: Some relative names are imposed to signify the 114 1, 13 | two-fold difference in divine ~names. For some signify the habitude 115 1, 13 | is His essence. Yet both names are said of God temporarily 116 1, 13 | the ~operator, therefore names signifying relations following 117 1, 13 | Relations signified by these names which are applied to God ~ 118 1, 13 | things." But all these ~names belong to operation. Therefore 119 1, 13 | 2: Further, only proper names are not communicable. Now 120 1, 13 | as explained. But ~other names given to God from His operations 121 1, 13 | To know, however, what names are properly communicable, 122 1, 13 | article, we give them concrete names signifying a nature ~existing 123 1, 13 | the same ~rules apply to names we impose to signify the 124 1, 13 | of compound things ~as to names given to us to signify simple 125 1, 13 | universal nor particular. For names do not ~follow upon the 126 1, 13 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: These names "good," "wise," and the 127 1, 13 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, names are called univocal because 128 1, 13 | 1: The multiplication of names does not depend on the ~ 129 1, 13 | Philosopher takes equivocal names in a ~large sense, including 130 1, 13 | sense, including analogous names; because also being, which 131 1, 13 | unless, perhaps, ~as we use names the meaning of which we 132 1, 13 | clear that ~among other names this one specially denominates 133 1, 13 | universality. For all other names are either ~less universal, 134 1, 13 | the less determinate the names are, and the more ~universal 135 1, 13 | is the ~principal of all names applied to God; for comprehending 136 1, 13 | necessary that all the divine names should import ~relation 137 1, 14 | can ~be named by all these names; in such a way, however, 138 1, 18 | from external properties names are often ~imposed to signify 139 1, 18 | signify essences. Hence such names are sometimes taken ~strictly 140 1, 20 | name that is above ~all names," in so far as He was true 141 1, 24 | whether it contains the names inscribed of ~those chosen 142 1, 27 | uses, in relation to God, names which ~signify procession. 143 1, 28 | treating of the divine ~names, that more is contained 144 1, 28 | but only in the ~various names imposed by us.~Aquin.: SMT 145 1, 28 | is signified ~by relative names, it would follow that it 146 1, 28 | procession: although these two names belong to the processions ~ 147 1, 29 | Therefore all the aforesaid names seem ~to have the same meaning.~ 148 1, 29 | is also called by three names ~signifying a reality - 149 1, 29 | substance." What these three names signify in common to ~the 150 1, 29 | excellent way; as other names also, which, while giving 151 1, 29 | above when treating of the names of God (Q[13], A[2]).~Aquin.: 152 1, 29 | contrast to the nature of the names belonging to the essence; ~ 153 1, 30 | very signification of such names adds a negation of division, 154 1, 30 | vague individual ~thing. The names of genera and species, as 155 1, 32 | of concrete and abstract ~names in God is not in any way 156 1, 32 | intellect apprehends and ~names divine things, according 157 1, 32 | above stated, by abstract names, to express their ~simplicity; 158 1, 32 | completeness, we ~use concrete names.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[32] A[ 159 1, 32 | not only must essential names be signified in the abstract 160 1, 32 | applies to the personal names, so that we may say paternity 161 1, 34 | person of the Son. Three names are attributed to ~the Son - 162 1, 34 | personal name. For ~personal names are applied to God in a 163 1, 34 | signified by different names, which are attributed to 164 1, 34 | result from actions, some names import ~the relation of 165 1, 34 | Nor is it true that all names which import the relation ~ 166 1, 34 | in time; but only those names are ~applied in time which 167 1, 36 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, the names of the divine persons are 168 1, 36 | proper name. But as some names are accommodated ~by the 169 1, 36 | relations, as when ~we use the names of procession and spiration, 170 1, 37 | able to apply more suitable names to express our various ~ 171 1, 38 | God in time. But personal names are said of God from ~eternity; 172 1, 39 | essence?~(3) Whether essential names should be predicated of 173 1, 39 | predicated of the essential names taken in a concrete sense?~( 174 1, 39 | predicated of essential names taken in the ~abstract?~( 175 1, 39 | abstract?~(6) Whether the names of the persons can be predicated 176 1, 39 | predicated of concrete ~essential names?~(7) Whether essential attributes 177 1, 39 | Para. 1/1~Whether essential names should be predicated in 178 1, 39 | would seem that essential names, as the name "God," should 179 1, 39 | Therefore other essential names can be predicated in the 180 1, 39 | answer that, Some essential names signify the essence after 181 1, 39 | ordered multitude. So if the ~names signifying such a form are 182 1, 39 | A[7]; Q[11], A[4]). So, names which signify ~the divine 183 1, 39 | On the other hand, the names which signify essence in 184 1, 39 | Whether the concrete essential names can stand for the person?~ 185 1, 39 | the concrete, essential names cannot stand for ~the person, 186 1, 39 | Whether abstract essential names can stand for the person?~ 187 1, 39 | that abstract essential names can stand for the ~person, 188 1, 39 | for instance, abstract ~names should be explained by concrete 189 1, 39 | be explained by concrete names, or even by personal names; ~ 190 1, 39 | names, or even by personal names; ~as when we find "essence 191 1, 39 | regards these ~abstract names a certain order should be 192 1, 39 | substantive and adjectival names ~consist in this, that the 193 1, 39 | the ~concrete essential names; so that we can say for 194 1, 39 | Therefore it seems that the names of the persons ~cannot be 195 1, 39 | 1~Whether the essential names should be appropriated to 196 1, 39 | seem that the essential names should not be appropriated ~ 197 1, 39 | appropriate to any one person the names which are common to the 198 1, 39 | words he designates three names proper to the ~persons: 199 1, 41 | to the relations, by the names ~of the persons, or by the 200 1, 41 | of the persons, or by the names of the properties. Therefore, 201 1, 43 | are signified by diverse ~names, so also can They each one 202 1, 45 | in treating of the divine names.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[45] A[ 203 1, 54 | wishes to call these by the names of active ~and passive intellect, 204 1, 54 | equivocally; and it is ~not about names that we need trouble.~Aquin.: 205 1, 61 | or else designated by the names of corporeal things, because ~ 206 1, 63 | Scripture, however, the ~names of some orders, as of Seraphim 207 1, 63 | with mortal sin. Yet the names of ~Cherubim, Powers, and 208 1, 63 | to them; because ~these names are derived from knowledge 209 1, 67 | among the ~intellectual names of God. But such names are 210 1, 67 | intellectual names of God. But such names are used in their proper 211 1, 37 | able to apply more suitable names to express our various ~ 212 1, 38 | God in time. But personal names are said of God from ~eternity; 213 1, 39 | essence?~(3) Whether essential names should be predicated of 214 1, 39 | predicated of the essential names taken in a concrete sense?~( 215 1, 39 | predicated of essential names taken in the ~abstract?~( 216 1, 39 | abstract?~(6) Whether the names of the persons can be predicated 217 1, 39 | predicated of concrete ~essential names?~(7) Whether essential attributes 218 1, 39 | Para. 1/1~Whether essential names should be predicated in 219 1, 39 | would seem that essential names, as the name "God," should 220 1, 39 | Therefore other essential names can be predicated in the 221 1, 39 | answer that, Some essential names signify the essence after 222 1, 39 | ordered multitude. So if the ~names signifying such a form are 223 1, 39 | A[7]; Q[11], A[4]). So, names which signify ~the divine 224 1, 39 | On the other hand, the names which signify essence in 225 1, 39 | Whether the concrete essential names can stand for the person?~ 226 1, 39 | the concrete, essential names cannot stand for ~the person, 227 1, 39 | Whether abstract essential names can stand for the person?~ 228 1, 39 | that abstract essential names can stand for the ~person, 229 1, 39 | for instance, abstract ~names should be explained by concrete 230 1, 39 | be explained by concrete names, or even by personal names; ~ 231 1, 39 | names, or even by personal names; ~as when we find "essence 232 1, 39 | regards these ~abstract names a certain order should be 233 1, 39 | substantive and adjectival names ~consist in this, that the 234 1, 39 | the ~concrete essential names; so that we can say for 235 1, 39 | Therefore it seems that the names of the persons ~cannot be 236 1, 39 | 1~Whether the essential names should be appropriated to 237 1, 39 | seem that the essential names should not be appropriated ~ 238 1, 39 | appropriate to any one person the names which are common to the 239 1, 39 | words he designates three names proper to the ~persons: 240 1, 41 | to the relations, by the names ~of the persons, or by the 241 1, 41 | of the persons, or by the names of the properties. Therefore, 242 1, 43 | are signified by diverse ~names, so also can They each one 243 1, 46 | in treating of the divine names.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[45] A[ 244 1, 55 | wishes to call these by the names of active ~and passive intellect, 245 1, 55 | equivocally; and it is ~not about names that we need trouble.~Aquin.: 246 1, 62 | or else designated by the names of corporeal things, because ~ 247 1, 64 | Scripture, however, the ~names of some orders, as of Seraphim 248 1, 64 | with mortal sin. Yet the names of ~Cherubim, Powers, and 249 1, 64 | to them; because ~these names are derived from knowledge 250 1, 68 | among the ~intellectual names of God. But such names are 251 1, 68 | intellectual names of God. But such names are used in their proper 252 1, 93 | animals (Gn. 2:20). But names should be ~adapted to the 253 1, 95 | angels, ~to receive their names from him. But the angels 254 1, 95 | that he might give them ~names expressive of their respective 255 1, 105 | Coel. Hier. vii): "The names of the ~angels designate 256 1, 107 | orders is natural?~(5) Of the names and properties of each order.~( 257 1, 107 | heavenly ~virtues. But common names should not be appropriated 258 1, 107 | government and ~likewise the names "Principalities" and "Powers." 259 1, 107 | Therefore these three ~names do not seem to be properly 260 1, 107 | Therefore they ought ~not to be names of any particular orders.~ 261 1, 107 | Coel. Hier. vii), in the names of the ~angelic orders it 262 1, 107 | 2]) ~concerning all the names which are attributed to 263 1, 107 | Hier. vii) explains the names of the ~orders accordingly 264 1, 107 | hand, in expounding these names (Hom. xxxiv in ~Evang.) 265 1, 107 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The names "Domination," "Power," and " 266 1, 107 | is the highest. But the names of ~"Dominations," "Principalities," 267 1, 107 | orders as derived from their names, ~places in the first hierarchy 268 1, 107 | hierarchy those orders the names of which are taken ~from 269 1, 107 | hierarchy those orders whose names denote a ~certain kind of 270 1, 107 | hierarchy the orders ~whose names denote the execution of 271 1, 108 | necessary to give them ~the names of each of those orders. 272 1, 108 | sin; and therefore ~these names are not given to the angels 273 1, 111 | are manifested by their ~names, as Dionysius says (Coel. 274 1, 111 | external ministry whose names signify some kind ~of administration. 275 1, 111 | On the ~other hand, the names of the inferior orders imply 276 2, 7 | known. ~Accordingly with us, names of more obvious things are 277 2, 25 | therefore, "things are names from their chief characteristic" ( 278 2, 31 | Reply OBJ 3: These other names pertaining to delight are 279 2, 31 | gladness. Yet all these names seem to belong to joy; for 280 2, 45 | Anger, daring and all the names of the passions can be ~ 281 2, 45 | bad: and thus they ~are names of passions. Secondly, as 282 2, 45 | reason: and thus they are names of vices. It ~is in this 283 2, 57 | like. But the ~three first names are, in a fashion, potential 284 2, 68 | Sovereign Good: wherefore the names of these passions are ~transferred 285 2, 70 | Reply OBJ 3: Sometimes the names of the virtues are applied 286 2, 70 | neighbor." It is thus that the ~names of the virtues are used 287 2, 95 | divide laws according to the names of ~lawgivers, so that one 288 2, 102 | on which were graven the names of the children of Israel. ~ 289 2, 102 | which also were graven the names of the children of Israel, 290 2, 102 | people, since he bore their names ~on his shoulders; and that 291 2, 48 | Reply OBJ 3: The Philosopher names regnative prudence after 292 2, 81 | we invoke them under the names by which they were known 293 2, 89 | forth and praising the names of God."~Aquin.: SMT SS 294 2, 90 | thief - so too sometimes the names of ~the virtues are employed 295 2, 92 | these they referred the names of their gods, as Varro ~ 296 2, 92 | incommunicable name [Vulg.: 'names']," i.e. of the ~Godhead, " 297 2, 93 | wont to be called by the names of those things."~Aquin.: 298 2, 94 | invent and write Hebrew names of angels, and fasten them 299 2, 120 | 1~OBJ 5: Further, God's names are many. Therefore it should 300 2, 120 | Reverence is due to the Divine names on the part of the ~thing 301 2, 120 | matters not in ~which of God's names perjury is committed.~Aquin.: 302 2, 125 | passion is sinful. Again, the names of the passions are ~sometimes 303 2, 125 | 7; iv, 4,5,6). Hence the names of ~certain passions have 304 2, 125 | we employ especially the names of those passions ~the object 305 2, 131 | littleness of soul, as their very names denote. Now great and little 306 2, 134 | in Ethic. i, 8. Now the names of the virtues are wont 307 2, 157 | and "brutality" take their names from a ~likeness to wild 308 2, 166 | wittiness. Nevertheless he ~names and defines it thus in respect 309 3, 2 | i.e. communication of names, ~inasmuch as we say that 310 3, 8 | 5:2); but by the other names ~above-mentioned there may 311 3, 20 | and 'domination' are not names ~of the nature, but of relations, 312 3, 23 | the case with the ~other names which are said of God in 313 3, 26 | something of it, ~but the names of its promoters would have 314 3, 31 | same, but under different names, as though they each had 315 3, 37 | thing. This is ~clear in the names of genera and species, as 316 3, 37 | Body Para. 2/3~Now, the names of individual men are always 317 3, 37 | A[2] Body Para. 3/3~But names given to men by God always 318 3, 37 | 4~Reply OBJ 1: All these names in some way mean the same 319 3, 37 | also children receive their names in ~Baptism. Wherefore on 320 3, 49 | adoption of sons," whereby our names are written ~down for the 321 3, 49 | name ~which is above all names" - that is to say, so that 322 3, 60 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Names are given to things considered 323 3, 60 | omit one of the aforesaid names," ~i.e. of the Father, Son, 324 3, 64 | the invocation of their names, the sacraments would be ~ 325 3, 66 | in the name," but "in the names of ~the Father, and of the 326 3, 66 | valid if conferred in these names.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[66] A[ 327 3, 66 | there are three personal names of the three ~Persons, there 328 3, 66 | name," and not, "in the names."~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[66] A[ 329 3, 66 | the form of Baptism, those names are chosen, which are ~generally 330 3, 66 | if conferred in any other names.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[66] A[ 331 3, 66 | omitting one of the aforesaid names," viz. of the three Persons, ~" 332 3, 67 | are gathered from their names, as Dionysius says (Coel. 333 3, 67 | can ~we gather, from the names of the ecclesiastical orders, 334 3, 73 | necessary for salvation?~(4) Its names;~(5) Its institution;~(6) 335 3, 73 | suitably called by various names?~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[73] A[ 336 3, 73 | suitably called by various ~names. For names should correspond 337 3, 73 | called by various ~names. For names should correspond with things. 338 3, 73 | to be called by ~various names.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[73] A[ 339 3, 73 | express. Therefore, these names are not suitably adapted 340 3, 73 | being called ~by several names, according to its various 341 3, 77 | sacramental species are the names of those ~things which were 342 3, 83 | things are called by the names of the things whereof they ~ 343 3, 83 | Apocalypse (13:8): "Whose names ~are not written in the 344 Suppl, 55| after the publication of the names of the ~witnesses." All 345 Suppl, 76| not retain their former names in the same sense, which 346 Suppl, 86| of the angels take their names from the ~offices which 347 Appen2, 1| hell is called by various names, as in Ps. ~10:7, "Fire 348 Appen2, 1| wherefore it is called by the names of things that are wont


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