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Alphabetical    [«  »]
privari 1
private 147
privately 20
privation 338
privations 16
privative 9
privatively 3
Frequency    [«  »]
339 52
338 85
338 bishop
338 privation
337 appear
337 connected
337 existing
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

privation

    Part, Question
1 1, 5 | distinguishing primary matter from privation, said that ~matter was non-being, 2 1, 5 | non-being on account of the privation attaching to ~it, nevertheless, 3 1, 5 | 3: Further, evil is the privation of mode, species and order. 4 1, 9 | their matter can exist with ~privation of their substantial form, 5 1, 9 | subject to coexist with privation of accident; as, ~for example, 6 1, 9 | of the subject, then ~the privation of such an accident cannot 7 1, 9 | is ~not consistent with privation of form, because the form 8 1, 9 | subject is ~consistent with privation of this or that place. On 9 1, 9 | not ~consistent with the privation of this act; forasmuch as 10 1, 11 | is thus opposed to it as privation is to ~habit. But this appears 11 1, 11 | to "multitude" by way of privation; as the undivided is to 12 1, 11 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: No privation entirely takes away the 13 1, 11 | of a thing, ~inasmuch as privation means "negation in the subject," 14 1, 11 | viii). Nevertheless every privation takes away some ~being; 15 1, 11 | of its universality, the privation of ~being has its foundation 16 1, 11 | convertible ~with being, for the privation of good is founded in some 17 1, 11 | God, because it ~imports privation, and every privation is 18 1, 11 | imports privation, and every privation is an imperfection, which 19 1, 11 | another. And if this were a privation, one of them would ~not 20 1, 11 | although in God there is no privation, still, according to the ~ 21 1, 11 | known to us by way only of privation and ~remotion. Thus there 22 1, 11 | reason why a certain kind of privation should ~not be predicated 23 1, 11 | is so called ~from the privation of division. But privation 24 1, 11 | privation of division. But privation cannot be greater or less. ~ 25 1, 11 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Although privation considered in itself is 26 1, 11 | subject to more or less, privation also can be considered itself 27 1, 12 | defect be taken ~to mean privation, as if it were without anything 28 1, 14 | potentiality does ~not know privation. But "evil is the privation 29 1, 14 | privation. But "evil is the privation of good," as Augustine ~ 30 1, 14 | of evil that ~it is the privation of good, by the fact that 31 1, 14 | potentiality, does not know privation ~by privation existing in 32 1, 14 | does not know privation ~by privation existing in it; and this 33 1, 14 | indivisible thing are known by ~privation of division. This is because 34 1, 14 | they would not be known by privation. It is ~thus that simple 35 1, 14 | therefore ~knows evil, not by privation existing in Himself, but 36 1, 14 | nature of evil means the ~privation of good; therefore evil 37 1, 16 | Reply OBJ 3: Not-being and privation have no truth of themselves, 38 1, 17 | not-seeing or not-sitting. But privation asserts nothing, whereas 39 1, 17 | being. Hence, as every ~privation is founded in a subject, 40 1, 17 | and opposites by way of privation, are ~by nature about one 41 1, 19 | natural ~agent intends not privation or corruption, but the form 42 1, 19 | to which is ~annexed the privation of some other form, and 43 1, 19 | accompanies one good, is the privation of another good. Never ~ 44 1, 19 | of which ~the evil is the privation. Now God wills no good more 45 1, 19 | evil of sin, which is the privation of right order towards the ~ 46 1, 33 | privative ~sense, as every privation signifies imperfection in 47 1, 33 | which is ~the subject of privation, it follows that the Person 48 1, 33 | may be taken in a kind of ~privation sense, but not as implying 49 1, 33 | implying any imperfection. For privation can ~be taken in many ways; 50 1, 33 | things. In another sense, privation ~is so called when something 51 1, 33 | blind. In a ~third sense privation means the absence of what 52 1, 33 | to have; ~in which sense, privation imports an imperfection. 53 1, 33 | attributed to the Father as a privation, but it may ~be so attributed 54 1, 45 | accidental form; and yet the privation of the substantial form, ~ 55 1, 46 | non-existence, which results from privation of form. If therefore the ~ 56 1, 48 | good are not opposed as privation and habit, but as contraries, 57 1, 48 | contrariety is habit and privation," as being verified in all ~ 58 1, 48 | nature of good, so ~every privation, as such, has the nature 59 1, 48 | just as we do not find the privation of ~the substantial form 60 1, 48 | certain good joined to the privation of another good; as the ~ 61 1, 48 | intemperate man is not the privation of the good of ~reason, 62 1, 48 | evil considered even as a privation is said to corrupt good, 63 1, 48 | is itself a corruption or privation of good. In another sense 64 1, 48 | of itself, that is, as a privation, but by virtue of ~the good 65 1, 48 | is either something, or a privation of something, that ~is a " 66 1, 48 | a pure negation, but a ~privation.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[48] A[ 67 1, 48 | with thing, and thus no privation is a being, and neither ~ 68 1, 48 | the eye; or of any other privation. In this way even evil can 69 1, 48 | as, for ~instance, the privation of sight is called blindness.~ 70 1, 48 | 2/2~Now, the subject of privation and of form is one and the 71 1, 48 | substantial form, and of ~privation of the opposite form; or 72 1, 48 | require a ~subject; but privation is negation in a subject, 73 1, 48 | good can coexist with the privation of another good.~Aquin.: 74 1, 48 | said above (A[3]) is the privation of good, ~which chiefly 75 1, 48 | will, evil, which is the privation of ~good, is found in a 76 1, 48 | OBJ 1: Because evil is the privation of good, and not a mere ~ 77 1, 48 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, the privation of the end is a pain consisting 78 1, 48 | whereas the evil of fault is privation of ~the order to the end. 79 1, 48 | sense, consisting in the privation of corporeal goods, ~which 80 1, 48 | meaning, so as to include ~privation of grace or glory.~Aquin.: 81 1, 48 | the pain consists in the privation of ~something used by the 82 1, 48 | fault, inasmuch as this privation ~belongs to the action which 83 1, 49 | formal cause, rather is it a privation ~of form; likewise, neither 84 1, 49 | cause, but rather is it a ~privation of order to the proper end; 85 1, 49 | intended by the agent the privation of ~another form; as, for 86 1, 49 | fire there follows ~the privation of the form of air or of 87 1, 49 | fire does not ~aim at the privation of the form of water, but 88 1, 49 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Privation and habit belong naturally 89 1, 49 | subject. ~Now the subject of privation is a being in potentiality, 90 1, 49 | Hence, since evil is privation of good, as appears ~from 91 1, 49 | form is a perfection, so privation removes a ~perfection. Hence 92 1, 49 | to the perfect term; but privation and evil by receding from ~ 93 1, 49 | by participation, but by privation ~of participation. Hence 94 1, 53 | the matter ~was under the privation of the form of fire: but 95 1, 62 | away by the form, but the privation which is opposed to the 96 1, 63 | because the subject of ~privation is a being in potentiality. 97 1, 64 | intellect is darkened by privation of the knowledge ~of all 98 1, 64 | although they are darkened by privation of ~the light of grace, 99 1, 66 | it ~has both form and the privation of form; for want of a form 100 1, 66 | potentiality thereto is privation. But this condition implies ~ 101 1, 66 | darkness is no creature, but a ~privation of light, it is a proof 102 1, 67 | since darkness is merely a privation of light. Light therefore 103 1, 75 | contrariety is habit, and privation thereof," as is written ~ 104 1, 46 | accidental form; and yet the privation of the substantial form, ~ 105 1, 47 | non-existence, which results from privation of form. If therefore the ~ 106 1, 49 | good are not opposed as privation and habit, but as contraries, 107 1, 49 | contrariety is habit and privation," as being verified in all ~ 108 1, 49 | nature of good, so ~every privation, as such, has the nature 109 1, 49 | just as we do not find the privation of ~the substantial form 110 1, 49 | certain good joined to the privation of another good; as the ~ 111 1, 49 | intemperate man is not the privation of the good of ~reason, 112 1, 49 | evil considered even as a privation is said to corrupt good, 113 1, 49 | is itself a corruption or privation of good. In another sense 114 1, 49 | of itself, that is, as a privation, but by virtue of ~the good 115 1, 49 | is either something, or a privation of something, that ~is a " 116 1, 49 | a pure negation, but a ~privation.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[48] A[ 117 1, 49 | with thing, and thus no privation is a being, and neither ~ 118 1, 49 | the eye; or of any other privation. In this way even evil can 119 1, 49 | as, for ~instance, the privation of sight is called blindness.~ 120 1, 49 | 2/2~Now, the subject of privation and of form is one and the 121 1, 49 | substantial form, and of ~privation of the opposite form; or 122 1, 49 | require a ~subject; but privation is negation in a subject, 123 1, 49 | good ~can coexist with the privation of another good.~Aquin.: 124 1, 49 | said above (A[3]) is the privation of good, ~which chiefly 125 1, 49 | will, evil, which is the privation of ~good, is found in a 126 1, 49 | OBJ 1: Because evil is the privation of good, and not a mere ~ 127 1, 49 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, the privation of the end is a pain consisting 128 1, 49 | whereas the evil of fault is privation of ~the order to the end. 129 1, 49 | sense, consisting in the privation of corporeal goods, ~which 130 1, 49 | meaning, so as to include ~privation of grace or glory.~Aquin.: 131 1, 49 | the pain consists in the privation of ~something used by the 132 1, 49 | fault, inasmuch as this privation ~belongs to the action which 133 1, 50 | formal cause, rather is it a privation ~of form; likewise, neither 134 1, 50 | cause, but rather is it a ~privation of order to the proper end; 135 1, 50 | intended by the agent the privation of ~another form; as, for 136 1, 50 | fire there follows ~the privation of the form of air or of 137 1, 50 | fire does not ~aim at the privation of the form of water, but 138 1, 50 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Privation and habit belong naturally 139 1, 50 | subject. ~Now the subject of privation is a being in potentiality, 140 1, 50 | Hence, since evil is privation of good, as appears ~from 141 1, 50 | form is a perfection, so privation removes a ~perfection. Hence 142 1, 50 | to the perfect term; but privation and evil by receding from ~ 143 1, 50 | by participation, but by privation ~of participation. Hence 144 1, 54 | the matter ~was under the privation of the form of fire: but 145 1, 63 | away by the form, but the privation which is opposed to the 146 1, 64 | because the subject of ~privation is a being in potentiality. 147 1, 65 | intellect is darkened by privation of the knowledge ~of all 148 1, 65 | although they are darkened by privation of ~the light of grace, 149 1, 67 | it ~has both form and the privation of form; for want of a form 150 1, 67 | potentiality thereto is privation. But this condition implies ~ 151 1, 67 | darkness is no creature, but a ~privation of light, it is a proof 152 1, 68 | since darkness is merely a privation of light. Light therefore 153 1, 74 | contrariety is habit, and privation thereof," as is written ~ 154 1, 84 | indivisible is ~expressed as a privation." But privation is known 155 1, 84 | expressed as a privation." But privation is known secondarily. Therefore ~ 156 1, 84 | secondarily, ~through the privation of divisibility. Wherefore 157 1, 84 | point is defined by ~way of privation "as that which has no parts"; 158 1, 100 | A[3]). But ignorance is privation of knowledge. Therefore 159 1, 100 | Reply OBJ 2: Ignorance is privation of knowledge due at some 160 2, 18 | Further, since evil is a privation, it is a non-being. But ~ 161 2, 18 | Reply OBJ 2: Evil implies privation, not absolute, but affecting 162 2, 18 | species. For ~evil is the privation of good, according to Augustine ( 163 2, 18 | Augustine (Enchiridion xi). ~But privation and habit are immediate 164 2, 18 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Privation is twofold. One is privation " 165 2, 18 | Privation is twofold. One is privation "as a result" ~[privatum 166 2, 18 | death, life. ~Between this privation and the contrary habit, 167 2, 18 | proper subject. The other is privation "in process" ~[privari]: 168 2, 18 | privari]: thus sickness is privation of health; not that it takes 169 2, 18 | And since this sort of privation leaves ~something, it is 170 2, 18 | In this way evil is a privation of good, as Simplicius says 171 2, 21 | good than ~right. For every privation of good, in whatever subject, 172 2, 22 | consists the very notion of privation and defect. Wherefore the 173 2, 23 | contrariety but of negation or privation.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[23] A[ 174 2, 25 | precedes evil; since evil is privation of ~good. Wherefore all 175 2, 35 | to be shunned as ~being a privation of good: and that which 176 2, 36 | Q[48], A[3], evil is the privation ~of good: and privation 177 2, 36 | privation ~of good: and privation is in reality nothing else 178 2, 36 | apprehension: and even a ~privation, as apprehended, has the 179 2, 36 | in this way evil, being a privation, is ~regarded as a "contrary." 180 2, 36 | one contrary includes the privation of the other, as stated ~ 181 2, 40 | opposition to movement as a privation thereof. But despair seems 182 2, 40 | Despair implies not only privation of hope, but also a ~recoil 183 2, 42 | inasmuch as an evil causes privation of ~good. Now a thing is 184 2, 42 | the very fact that it is a privation of ~some good. Wherefore, 185 2, 42 | not merely from ~being a privation of the good of nature, but 186 2, 45 | is opposed to fear, as a privation: while daring is ~opposed 187 2, 45 | And as contrariety implies privation, so ~daring implies safety.~ 188 2, 45 | it comes after good, as privation comes after habit; consequently ~ 189 2, 54 | Again, evil, since it is a privation ~and a non-being, cannot 190 2, 54 | of habits ~is not a pure privation, but something determinate 191 2, 72 | Further, evil, being a privation, differs specifically according ~ 192 2, 72 | OBJ 2: Sin is not a pure privation but an act deprived of its 193 2, 72 | so far as negation and ~privation may have a species. But 194 2, 72 | respect it is a negation or privation, but by that to ~which it 195 2, 72 | OBJ 1: Evil, as such, is a privation, and so it has different ~ 196 2, 72 | take its species from the privation or ~aversion, as stated 197 2, 73 | at sin on the side of the privation ~only, in so far, to wit, 198 2, 73 | considering simply that no privation admits of more or less, 199 2, 73 | that there are two kinds of privation. For there is a simple ~ 200 2, 73 | there is a simple ~and pure privation, which consists, so to speak, 201 2, 73 | corrupted; ~thus death is privation of life, and darkness is 202 2, 73 | of life, and darkness is privation of light. Such ~like privations 203 2, 73 | There is, however, another ~privation which is not simple, but 204 2, 73 | like sickness which is a privation of the due commensuration ~ 205 2, 73 | sins: because in them the ~privation of the due commensuration 206 2, 73 | as though it were a pure ~privation.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[73] A[ 207 2, 75 | same way as a negation or ~privation can have a cause. Now two 208 2, 75 | tendency, consequently causes a privation of ~cold. The first of these 209 2, 75 | simple negation, but ~the privation of that which something 210 2, 75 | which consists in a certain privation, has a deficient cause, 211 2, 75 | Sin signifies not only the privation of good, which ~privation 212 2, 75 | privation of good, which ~privation is its inordinateness, but 213 2, 75 | which is the subject of that privation, which has the nature of 214 2, 76 | non-being, ~since it is a privation of knowledge. Therefore 215 2, 76 | sinful act; because it is a privation of knowledge ~perfecting 216 2, 76 | than to knowledge. ~Now privation of grace is not a sin, but 217 2, 76 | Therefore ignorance which is privation of knowledge is not a sin.~ 218 2, 76 | hand, ignorance denotes privation of knowledge, i.e. lack 219 2, 76 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: Although privation of grace is not a sin in 220 2, 76 | remains, according as it is a privation of knowledge, ~nevertheless 221 2, 78 | Now evil is merely the privation of some good; and so a ~ 222 2, 79 | their species from the privation itself, wherein consists 223 2, 79 | some object, to which that privation is united: and so ~this 224 2, 81 | remained subject to God. Now privation of original justice is ~ 225 2, 82 | so that original sin is a privation. But privation is ~opposed 226 2, 82 | sin is a privation. But privation is ~opposed to habit. Therefore 227 2, 82 | bodily sickness is partly a privation, in so far as it ~denotes 228 2, 82 | original sin denotes the privation of original justice, and ~ 229 2, 82 | Consequently it is not a pure privation, but a corrupt habit.~Aquin.: 230 2, 82 | is one only, viz. the ~privation of original justice, removing 231 2, 82 | inordinate. Accordingly the privation of original ~justice, whereby 232 2, 82 | concupiscence, materially, but privation of original justice, formally.~ 233 2, 82 | original sin: one is the ~privation of original justice; the 234 2, 82 | is the relation of this ~privation to the sin of our first 235 2, 84 | the head. But ~sin implies privation of order. Therefore sin 236 2, 84 | Natura ~Boni iv), is "the privation of mode, species and order." 237 2, 85 | consequence of sin.~(4) Whether privation of mode, species and order 238 2, 85 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether privation of mode, species and order 239 2, 85 | OBJ 1: It would seem that privation of mode, species and order 240 2, 85 | But sin itself is the ~"privation of mode, species and order," 241 2, 85 | Natura ~Boni iv). Therefore privation of mode, species and order 242 2, 85 | different sins. ~Therefore privation of mode, species and order 243 2, 85 | species and order, the privation of ~which is essentially 244 2, 85 | is clear both how sin is privation of ~mode, species and order, 245 2, 86 | something ~positive, or a pure privation. If it be something positive, 246 2, 86 | Again, neither is it ~a pure privation. Because all sins agree 247 2, 86 | the part of aversion and ~privation of grace: and so it would 248 2, 86 | nor ~does it denote a pure privation: it denotes a privation 249 2, 86 | privation: it denotes a privation of the soul's ~brightness 250 2, 86 | like a shadow, which is the privation of ~light through the interposition 251 2, 86 | something private, ~viz. the privation of union with the Divine 252 2, 87 | Q[48], A[5]. Now evil is privation of good. And since man's 253 2, 88 | deserve to be punished by the privation of seeing God, to which 254 2, 113 | generation, which is from privation to form; and thus ~justification 255 2, 6 | that, Lifelessness is a privation. Now it must be noted that ~ 256 2, 6 | Now it must be noted that ~privation is sometimes essential to 257 2, 6 | its proper species: ~thus privation of the due equilibrium of 258 2, 6 | what is not the cause of privation, ~cannot be assigned as 259 2, 6 | the thing to which that privation ~belongs as being essential 260 2, 6 | deformity denotes not only privation of a due ~form, but also 261 2, 10 | of ~view, in fact it is a privation. We must therefore reply 262 2, 14 | bodily blindness is the privation of the ~principle of bodily 263 2, 14 | blindness of mind is the privation of the ~principle of mental 264 2, 14 | forfeit from the soul. This privation is blindness, and is a punishment, ~ 265 2, 14 | punishment, ~in so far as the privation of the light of grace is 266 2, 14 | mind implies the complete privation of the knowledge ~of such 267 2, 18 | in so far as it is the ~privation of some particular good, 268 2, 44 | fatuity denotes ~entire privation of the spiritual sense. 269 2, 51 | in two ways, first, as a ~privation, secondly, as a contrary. 270 2, 51 | without any sin. Taken as a privation, imprudence denotes lack 271 2, 105 | Now every deficiency or privation takes its ~species from 272 2, 116 | consists in the corruption or privation of some good: while, in 273 2, 116 | however, corruption or privation of good is the formal ~element 274 2, 134 | loved than the good the privation of which causes the ~sorrow 275 2, 136 | lack of pleasure is a pure privation. Wherefore, ~according to 276 2, 145 | hardships resulting from privation of pleasure of touch, ~belongs 277 2, 152 | takes ~its name from being a privation of chastity. But all kinds 278 2, 162 | favor bestowed on him the privation of that favor is a punishment 279 2, 162 | two ways. First, as the ~privation of life, and thus death 280 2, 162 | be felt, since it is the ~privation of sense and life. In this 281 2, 162 | which ends in the aforesaid privation. Now we may speak of ~corruption 282 2, 184 | watchings, bodily toil, privation, ~reading, and other acts 283 2, 184 | to give as not to suffer privation." Hence in like manner ~ 284 2, 186 | and thirst, than by the privation of clothing, which pertains 285 2, 186 | Scriptures, poverty, and privation of all one's possessions 286 2, 186 | Body Para. 2/6~Now the privation of one's possessions, or 287 2, 186 | attempted to practice the privation of all means of ~livelihood, 288 3, 10 | as it were, matter with privation of form as ~is said Phys. 289 3, 26 | and are the results of the privation ~of original justice (Q[ 290 3, 26 | of ~original sin, because privation of grace can only be in 291 3, 34 | either by negation or by privation: thus white is made either 292 3, 34 | not-holy as man, not indeed by privation, as though He ~were at some 293 3, 50 | For death is a sort of privation, since it is the ~privation 294 3, 50 | privation, since it is the ~privation of life. But privation has 295 3, 50 | privation of life. But privation has not any power of activity, 296 3, 50 | since death is a kind of ~privation of one's own life, the effect 297 3, 52 | be taken as implying the ~privation of longed-for glory: in 298 3, 52 | delivered by Christ from their privation of glory, but ~not from 299 3, 56 | Further, since death is the privation of life, then to destroy ~ 300 3, 62 | a form does not ~exclude privation save by informing the subject.~ 301 3, 70 | precede those that denote privation, although ~it is the reverse 302 3, 70 | form does ~not remove a privation save by informing the subject.~ 303 3, 71 | that darkness consists in privation of the ~vision of God, which 304 3, 80 | natural fast, which implies privation ~of everything taken before-hand 305 3, 87 | one consisting ~in the privation of something required for 306 3, 87 | soul, in one way, by the privation of the beauty of grace through 307 3, 88 | stain resulting from the privation of grace, ~and the debt 308 Suppl, 1 | receives perfection when privation is removed. ~Now sorrow 309 Suppl, 1 | 2~Reply OBJ 2: When the privation is removed from matter, 310 Suppl, 2 | himself of virtue. ~But privation of virtue is a punishment. 311 Suppl, 3 | inasmuch as it consists in privation of the greatest good, the 312 Suppl, 12| the cause of evil or of privation (according as it ~has a 313 Suppl, 12| to ~uproot the causes of privation and of evil than to remove 314 Suppl, 21| third, consisting in the privation of communion with the ~faithful, 315 Suppl, 21| above ~definition includes privation of the sacraments in the 316 Suppl, 21| given which expresses the privation of both kinds ~of acts, 317 Suppl, 21| Excommunication is the privation of all ~lawful communion 318 Suppl, 21| of excommunication is the privation of a spiritual good, which ~ 319 Suppl, 22| of an excommunication is ~privation of the sacraments of the 320 Suppl, 22| Further, excommunication is privation of divine things and of 321 Suppl, 22| 1~Reply OBJ 2: Although privation does not receive more or 322 Suppl, 72| is no natural return from privation to habit. But ~death is 323 Suppl, 72| to habit. But ~death is privation of life. Therefore the resurrection 324 Suppl, 79| impassibility is a negation or privation of passibility. Therefore 325 Suppl, 79| denotes a mere negation or privation, it is not subject to be 326 Suppl, 81| the other ~being a pure privation, since between affirmation 327 Suppl, 81| affirmation and negation or ~privation there is no fixed distance: 328 Suppl, 83| too death, which is the privation of life, is painful simply, 329 Suppl, 89| same as matter subject to privation, as stated in Phys. iii. 330 Suppl, 89| properly so called denotes a privation and thus ~it is a punishment: 331 Suppl, 93| since it ~denotes a kind of privation; and privations are not 332 Suppl, 95| aspect of ~good, but is pure privation of good. Secondly, it may 333 Suppl, 96| A[1]]: and consequently privation ~of being cannot be the 334 Appen1, 1| to aversion, namely ~the privation of original justice, and 335 Appen1, 1| due to him, besides the privation of that end to which the ~ 336 Appen1, 1| pain of loss, which is the privation of the divine ~vision, even 337 Appen1, 1| incompatible with grace; because privation of ~grace has the character, 338 Appen1, 1| and the reason for this privation, and ~that nevertheless


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