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Alphabetical    [«  »]
nyssa 53
o 143
o.p. 3
oath 305
oaths 31
ob 2
obedience 270
Frequency    [«  »]
309 qu
308 danger
306 inordinate
305 oath
304 division
304 perfected
303 contemplative
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

oath

    Part, Question
1 2, 98 | word, which He ~promised by oath to thy fathers Abraham, 2 2, 100 | than themselves; and an oath for confirmation is the 3 2, 105 | owner is to stand by the oath of the depositary. ~Therefore 4 2, 105 | restitution; but only to take an oath in order to clear himself 5 2, 108 | Hence Our Lord shows that an oath ~is not desirable as a good 6 2, 12 | authority, ~absolve from their oath those who through loyalty 7 2, 12 | through the sacred ~bond of an oath owe allegiance to excommunicated 8 2, 12 | authority and from the ~oath of allegiance whereby they 9 2, 31 | ecclesiastical, can bind a ~man under oath to tell the truth.~Aquin.: 10 2, 67 | contrary, In criminal cases an oath has to be taken against ~ 11 2, 68 | witness is required to take an oath in order that he ~may fear 12 2, 68 | witnesses are admitted only on oath and on this ~count it is 13 2, 68 | but only by reason of the ~oath violated.~Aquin.: SMT SS 14 2, 68 | witness is required to take a oath.~ 15 2, 76 | lawful to make use of an oath taken by a man swearing 16 2, 76 | for a good ~purpose, the oath of a man that swears by 17 2, 87 | three ways. First, by way of oath in ~order to confirm one' 18 2, 87 | inquiry:~(1) What is an oath?~(2) Whether it is lawful?~( 19 2, 87 | accompanying conditions of an oath?~(4) Of what virtue is it 20 2, 87 | creature?~(7) Whether an oath is binding?~(8) Which is 21 2, 87 | Which is more binding, an oath or a vow?~(9) Whether an 22 2, 87 | or a vow?~(9) Whether an oath is subject to dispensation?~( 23 2, 87 | is ~termed a "declaratory oath"; while sometimes God is 24 2, 87 | is termed a "promissory oath." ~But oaths are not employed 25 2, 87 | prove one's point by an oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[89] A[ 26 2, 87 | to bear witness, as in an oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[89] A[ 27 2, 87 | must be stated that an ~oath is in itself lawful and 28 2, 87 | Body Para. 2/2 ~Yet an oath becomes a source of evil 29 2, 87 | adds, "nor by any other oath." Wherefore we must reply 30 2, 87 | when the Apostle employs an oath in his epistles, he shows ~ 31 2, 87 | accompanying conditions of an oath are suitably assigned, ~ 32 2, 87 | conditions accompanying an oath. Things should not be ~enumerated 33 2, 87 | accompanying conditions ~of an oath are unsuitably assigned. ~ 34 2, 87 | things are required for an oath, namely, ~devotion, and 35 2, 87 | accompanying conditions of an oath are ~insufficiently enumerated.~ 36 2, 87 | not ~be associated with an oath any more than with other 37 2, 87 | saying: "Observe that an oath must be accompanied by ~ 38 2, 87 | stated above (A[2]), an oath is not good except for ~ 39 2, 87 | for the ~good use of an oath. First, that one swear, 40 2, 87 | point to be confirmed by oath, that it be neither false, 41 2, 87 | truth, so that one employ an oath in order to ~confirm what 42 2, 87 | what is lawful. A ~rash oath lacks judgment, a false 43 2, 87 | lacks judgment, a false oath lacks truth, and a wicked 44 2, 87 | and a wicked or ~unlawful oath lacks justice.~Aquin.: SMT 45 2, 87 | which are confirmed by ~oath. Hence these conditions 46 2, 87 | are more requisite for an oath than for ~other human actions.~ 47 2, 87 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether an oath is an act of religion or 48 2, 87 | 1: It would seem that an oath is not an act of religion, 49 2, 87 | God. But the end of an oath is not this, but rather 50 2, 87 | wherefore it is evident ~that an oath is an act of religion or 51 2, 87 | things may be observed in an oath. The witness adduced, ~and 52 2, 87 | is human. Accordingly an oath ~belongs to religion by 53 2, 87 | as witness by way of ~an oath, he acknowledges Him to 54 2, 87 | act of religion, so is ~an oath. Now it is commendable and 55 2, 87 | do or say a thing with an oath is more ~commendable, and 56 2, 87 | assertion. ~Therefore an oath is desirable as a good thing.~ 57 2, 87 | remedy for sickness. Now an oath ~is required as a remedy 58 2, 87 | another man. Wherefore an oath is not to be reckoned among 59 2, 87 | parity between a vow and an oath: because by a ~vow we direct 60 2, 87 | On the other hand, in an oath reverence for ~the name 61 2, 87 | Hence what is ~confirmed by oath does not, for this reason, 62 2, 87 | not, however, direct his oath ~to the reverence or love 63 2, 87 | taken unduly, so too an ~oath is useful indeed as a means 64 2, 87 | 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, an oath is an act of religion, as 65 2, 87 | there are two kinds of ~oath. One is uttered a simple 66 2, 87 | witness: and ~this kind of oath, like faith, is based on 67 2, 87 | A[1]). In like manner an oath is chiefly referred to God 68 2, 87 | secondarily an appeal by oath is made to certain ~creatures 69 2, 87 | cursing and in this kind of oath a ~creature is adduced that 70 2, 87 | Para. 3/3~As to Joseph's oath by the health of Pharaoh 71 2, 87 | testimony is ~invoked by oath: hence the prohibition ( 72 2, 87 | creatures employed in an oath in the ways mentioned above.~ 73 2, 87 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether an oath has a binding force?~Aquin.: 74 2, 87 | 1: It would seem that an oath has no binding force. An 75 2, 87 | has no binding force. An oath is ~employed in order to 76 2, 87 | Therefore it seems ~that an oath is not binding.~Aquin.: 77 2, 87 | Categ. viii, 22). Now ~an oath is an act of virtue, as 78 2, 87 | virtuous action. Therefore an oath ~is not always binding.~ 79 2, 87 | promise ~something under oath. Now, "such a person is 80 2, 87 | Pontiffs ~from the bond of his oath" (Extra, De Jurejur., cap. 81 2, 87 | quaest., ~etc.). Therefore an oath is not always binding.~Aquin.: 82 2, 87 | intentions. Therefore an oath cannot always be binding.~ 83 2, 87 | neither the declaratory oath (which is about ~something 84 2, 87 | Now just as a declaratory oath, which is about the future 85 2, 87 | truth, so too ought the oath which is about ~something 86 2, 87 | difference: ~since, in the oath that is about the past or 87 2, 87 | on the contrary, in the oath that is made about something 88 2, 87 | the thing guaranteed by oath. For a ~man is bound to 89 2, 87 | what he has sworn, else his oath lacks truth.~Aquin.: SMT 90 2, 87 | to be in his power, his oath is lacking ~in judgment 91 2, 87 | excused from fulfilling his oath, ~although he is bound to 92 2, 87 | hindrance to a good, ~then his oath is lacking in justice: wherefore 93 2, 87 | in justice: wherefore an oath must not be kept ~when it 94 2, 87 | assertion, and with an ~oath wherein God is called to 95 2, 87 | purpose of the doer. But an oath ~should not be employed, 96 2, 87 | consequently, if a man employ an oath, he is bound, as far ~as 97 2, 87 | Para. 1/2~Reply OBJ 2: An oath may lead to an evil result 98 2, 87 | and sins in keeping his oath: whereas if a man swear 99 2, 87 | does not sin in keeping his oath, ~though he does much better 100 2, 87 | 2 Para. 2/2~Secondly, an oath leads to an evil result 101 2, 87 | emergency. An instance is the oath of Herod, who swore to the ~ 102 2, 87 | would ask ~of him. For this oath could be lawful from the 103 2, 87 | but the fulfilment of the oath was unlawful. Hence ~Ambrose 104 2, 87 | promise, and to keep an oath; as Herod, who granted the 105 2, 87 | twofold obligation in the oath which a man takes ~under 106 2, 87 | loss, than violate his ~oath. He can, however, seek in 107 2, 87 | contrary, because such an oath would lead to evil results 108 2, 87 | guile, he must keep his oath in accordance with the sound ~ 109 2, 87 | of the person to whom the oath is made. Hence Isidore says ~( 110 2, 87 | man may be in wording his oath, ~God Who witnesses his 111 2, 87 | his conscience accepts his oath as understood by the ~person 112 2, 87 | refers to the deceitful oath is ~clear from what follows: " 113 2, 87 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether an oath is more binding than a vow?~ 114 2, 87 | 1: It would seem that an oath is more binding than a vow. 115 2, 87 | simple promise: whereas an oath includes, besides a promise, 116 2, 87 | as witness. Therefore an oath is more binding than a vow.~ 117 2, 87 | sometimes confirmed by an oath. Therefore an oath is stronger ~ 118 2, 87 | by an oath. Therefore an oath is stronger ~than a vow.~ 119 2, 87 | while the obligation of an oath ~results from the truth 120 2, 87 | that ~the obligation of an oath is greater than that of 121 2, 87 | binds one to God while an oath sometimes binds one to man. 122 2, 87 | is ~more binding than an oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[89] A[ 123 2, 87 | obligation both of vow and of an oath arises from ~something Divine; 124 2, 87 | hand, the obligation of an oath arises from ~the reverence 125 2, 87 | is more ~binding than an oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[89] A[ 126 2, 87 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: An oath is added to a vow not because 127 2, 87 | anyone can dispense from an oath?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[89] A[ 128 2, 87 | one can dispense from an oath. Just as ~truth is required 129 2, 87 | required for a declaratory oath, which is about the past 130 2, 87 | required for a promissory oath, which is about the ~future. 131 2, 87 | which he has promised by oath to do in the future.~Aquin.: 132 2, 87 | 2: Further, a promissory oath is used for the benefit 133 2, 87 | release the other ~from his oath, since it would be contrary 134 2, 87 | a dispensation from this oath be granted by anyone.~Aquin.: 135 2, 87 | Therefore in like manner, if an oath admits of dispensation, 136 2, 87 | bishop can dispense from an oath. And yet seemingly this 137 2, 87 | Therefore it would seem that an oath does not admit of ~dispensation.~ 138 2, 87 | is more binding than an oath, as stated above ~(A[8]). 139 2, 87 | dispensation and therefore an oath does also.~Aquin.: SMT SS 140 2, 87 | incompatible with the matter of an oath: for ~if it be morally evil 141 2, 87 | to judgment. Therefore an oath likewise admits of ~dispensation.~ 142 2, 87 | A dispensation from an oath does not imply a permission 143 2, 87 | do anything against the oath: for this is impossible, 144 2, 87 | since the keeping ~of an oath comes under a Divine precept, 145 2, 87 | what hitherto came under an oath no ~longer comes under it, 146 2, 87 | being due matter for an oath, just as we ~have said with 147 2, 87 | matter of a ~declaratory oath, which is about something 148 2, 87 | but the act itself of the oath: ~so that such a dispensation 149 2, 87 | the matter of a promissory oath is something ~future, which 150 2, 87 | consequently undue matter for an oath. ~Therefore a promissory 151 2, 87 | Therefore a promissory oath admits of dispensation, 152 2, 87 | regards the matter of an oath, and is not contrary to 153 2, 87 | promise something under oath to another in two ~ways. 154 2, 87 | man promise ~another under oath that he will enter religion, 155 2, 87 | matter of a promissory ~oath is manifestly opposed to 156 2, 87 | a religion: and such an ~oath requires no dispensation. 157 2, 87 | bound not ~to keep such an oath, while in the latter it 158 2, 87 | keep or ~not to keep the oath, as stated above (A[7], 159 2, 87 | Sometimes what is ~promised on oath is doubtfully right or wrong, 160 2, 87 | which is promised under oath is ~manifestly lawful and 161 2, 87 | lawful and beneficial. An oath of this kind seemingly admits ~ 162 2, 87 | to any man to cancel an oath made by ~one of his subjects 163 2, 87 | may annul his daughter's oath, and a husband his ~wife' 164 2, 87 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether an oath is voided by a condition 165 2, 87 | 1: It would seem that an oath is not voided by a condition 166 2, 87 | condition of person ~or time. An oath, according to the Apostle ( 167 2, 87 | Therefore it would seem that an oath is not ~voided by a condition 168 2, 87 | instead of being put ~on his oath": and (22, qu. v, can. Nullus): " 169 2, 87 | are to be considered in an oath. One is on the ~part of 170 2, 87 | respect we should ~hold an oath in the greatest reverence. 171 2, 87 | as to be able to take a oath ~with due reverence. Perjurers 172 2, 87 | debarred from taking an oath, ~because it is presumed 173 2, 87 | they will not treat an ~oath with the reverence due to 174 2, 87 | assertion is confirmed by oath. For a man's assertion needs 175 2, 87 | becoming that they should take oath on days of solemnity, ~since 176 2, 87 | the more ~binding is the oath, considered in itself, as 177 2, 87 | swearing for instance, an oath by the Gospels might be 178 2, 87 | deliberation and solemnity, and an oath by God frivolously and ~ 179 2, 87 | Reply OBJ 4: The angel's oath is adduced not on account 180 2, 88 | the superior imposes an ~oath on his subject. Therefore 181 2, 88 | who utters a promissory oath, swearing by his ~reverence 182 2, 88 | compel on the strength of the oath they ~have taken.~Aquin.: 183 2, 88 | he would bind ~himself by oath, such an adjuration is unlawful, 184 2, 88 | he would bind ~himself by oath: for thus did the high-priest 185 2, 88 | employ ~terms resembling an oath in order to provoke another 186 2, 93 | above with regard to an oath (Q[89], ~A[4], ad 2). Wherefore 187 2, 96 | it is a sin to enjoin an oath on a perjurer?~Aquin.: SMT 188 2, 96 | the statement confirmed on oath ~be false?~Aquin.: SMT SS 189 2, 96 | statement confirmed on oath be false. As stated above ( 190 2, 96 | above (Q[89], A[3]), an ~oath should be accompanied by 191 2, 96 | the conclusion. Now in an oath a man's statement is confirmed 192 2, 96 | statement which is ~confirmed on oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[98] A[ 193 2, 96 | a falsehood confirmed by oath" ~[*Hugh of St. Victor, 194 2, 96 | their end. Now the end of an oath is the confirmation of a ~ 195 2, 96 | directly annuls the end of ~an oath: and for this reason, that 196 2, 96 | though it is a perverse oath when a man swears to the ~ 197 2, 96 | kind of ~perversity in an oath, that deprives the oath 198 2, 96 | oath, that deprives the oath of its end, by swearing ~ 199 2, 96 | what he has confirmed on oath is seemingly a perjurer. 200 2, 96 | 4: Further, a promissory oath extends to future, just 201 2, 96 | just as a ~declaratory oath extends to past and present 202 2, 96 | Now the obligation ~of an oath may be removed by some future 203 2, 96 | scene who did not take the oath; or a canon may swear to 204 2, 96 | seemingly he that breaks an oath does not sin.~Aquin.: SMT 205 2, 96 | if he fails to keep his oath, he ~is not guilty of perjury 206 2, 96 | was not a fit matter of an oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[98] A[ 207 2, 96 | could not be ~a matter of an oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[98] A[ 208 2, 96 | Para. 1/2~Reply OBJ 4: An oath is a personal act, and so 209 2, 96 | he is not bound, as by oath, to fulfil whatever the ~ 210 2, 96 | college" is not bound by his oath to keep any that may be ~ 211 2, 96 | the question whether ~an oath is binding on those who 212 2, 96 | the obligations of their oath. Henceforth, that ~discretion 213 2, 96 | expressly not to keep their oath: but if they should ~not 214 2, 96 | were to ~employ such an oath in fun or by a slip of the 215 2, 96 | mortal sin to ~break an oath that has been taken solemnly 216 2, 96 | the case of a declaratory oath violated by perjury [*Cap. 217 2, 96 | not ~deprive a promissory oath of its binding force, as 218 2, 96 | he who fails to fulfil an oath which he took ~under coercion 219 2, 96 | an obligation ~even of an oath, especially if the latter 220 2, 96 | coerced into ~taking the oath through such fear as may 221 2, 96 | falsely in a declaratory oath be not ~infamous in the 222 2, 96 | who breaks ~a promissory oath taken solemnly is that he 223 2, 96 | sworn to substantiate his oath, which is not the case in 224 2, 96 | the case in a ~declaratory oath.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[98] A[ 225 2, 96 | Whether he sins who demands an oath of a perjurer?~Aquin.: SMT 226 2, 96 | seem that he who demands an oath of a perjurer commits a ~ 227 2, 96 | useless for him to demand ~an oath: and if he believes him 228 2, 96 | seemingly should one enjoin an oath ~on another person.~Aquin.: 229 2, 96 | Further, to receive an oath from a person is less than 230 2, 96 | less than to impose ~an oath on him. Now it would seem 231 2, 96 | seem unlawful to receive an oath from a ~person, especially 232 2, 96 | seem lawful to impose an ~oath on one who swears falsely.~ 233 2, 96 | not lawful to demand an oath of such a man.~Aquin.: SMT 234 2, 96 | to take advantage of an oath of ~one who has sworn by 235 2, 96 | it is lawful to demand an oath from one who swears ~falsely.~ 236 2, 96 | a person who demands an oath from another, a ~distinction 237 2, 96 | For either he demands the oath on ~his own account and 238 2, 96 | him. If a man demands an oath on his own ~account as a 239 2, 96 | other hand, a man demands an oath as a public person, in ~ 240 2, 96 | fault, if he demands an oath of a ~person, whether he 241 2, 96 | is not he that exacts the oath but the person at whose ~ 242 2, 96 | case of one who demands an oath ~on his own account. Yet 243 2, 96 | such a case he exacts an oath in order that he ~may be 244 2, 96 | Hence he that ~accepts an oath does not sin, except perchance 245 2, 96 | is lawful to accept the oath of one who is ready to swear 246 2, 96 | the true ~God, because an oath of this kind lacks the good 247 2, 96 | man ~makes use of in the oath of one who swears truly 248 2, 96 | falsely by ~the true God his oath seems to lack any good that 249 2, 116 | confirm his statement by oath; if he has recourse to ~ 250 2, 120 | man's word by ~way of an oath, because men are wont to 251 2, 120 | vanity on the part of the ~oath itself, but only on the 252 2, 187 | order, binding himself by an oath [*Referring to the last 253 2, 187 | a vow is like that of an oath. But ~children under the 254 2, 187 | ought not to be bound by oath (Decret. ~XXII, qu. v, cap. 255 2, 187 | bind ~themselves by vow or oath to do something, they are 256 2, 187 | who is bound by vow or oath to enter a lesser order, 257 2, 187 | one who is bound by vow or oath to enter a ~greater order, 258 3, 22 | infirmity; but the word of the oath, which was since the Law, 259 3, 60 | 1/1 ~OBJ 3: Further, an oath is sometimes called a sacrament: 260 3, 60 | take ~a sacrament," i.e. an oath. But an oath is not a kind 261 3, 60 | sacrament," i.e. an oath. But an oath is not a kind of sign, therefore ~ 262 3, 60 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Even an oath has a certain relation to 263 Suppl, 24| after binding ~himself by oath to submit to the command 264 Suppl, 24| of giving one's word by ~oath, as in the case of absolution 265 Suppl, 24| between men are decided by ~oath.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[24] A[ 266 Suppl, 43| a mere ~promise, but an oath is added, as also certain 267 Suppl, 43| by the addition of ~an oath. If, however, this promise 268 Suppl, 43| the parties be bound by oath, for then ~he ought to be 269 Suppl, 43| the broken promise - or oath if the ~promise was confirmed 270 Suppl, 43| promise was confirmed by oath - and he or she can contract 271 Suppl, 45| the consent ~confirmed by oath or by carnal intercourse; 272 Suppl, 46| THE CONSENT TO WHICH AN OATH OR CARNAL INTERCOURSE IS 273 Suppl, 46| the consent to which an oath or carnal intercourse ~is 274 Suppl, 46| inquiry:~(1) Whether an oath added to the consent that 275 Suppl, 46| Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether an oath added to the consent that 276 Suppl, 46| It would seem that if an oath be added to a consent that 277 Suppl, 46| But the fulfilling of an ~oath is of Divine law according 278 Suppl, 46| the obligation to keep an oath previously taken. If, therefore, ~ 279 Suppl, 46| confirming that consent with an oath, a man binds himself to 280 Suppl, 46| bound to keep his former oath. But this would not be the 281 Suppl, 46| be the case ~unless that oath made the marriage complete. 282 Suppl, 46| marriage complete. Therefore an oath affixed to ~a consent expressed 283 Suppl, 46| than human truth. Now an oath ~confirms a thing with the 284 Suppl, 46| future confirmed by an oath.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[46] A[ 285 Suppl, 46| Apostle (Heb. 6:16), "An oath for ~confirmation is the 286 Suppl, 46| rate one must stand by an oath rather than by a mere ~affirmation. 287 Suppl, 46| the future confirmed by oath, it would seem ~that in 288 Suppl, 46| But the addition of an oath must have some effect. ~ 289 Suppl, 46| Now the addition of an oath ~does not make words of 290 Suppl, 46| marriage. But after the oath there is yet another consent 291 Suppl, 46| Para. 1/1~I answer that, An oath is employed in confirmation 292 Suppl, 46| done yet, even though an oath ~be added to the promise, 293 Suppl, 46| The fulfilling of a lawful oath is of Divine law, but not ~ 294 Suppl, 46| fulfilling of an unlawful oath. Wherefore if a subsequent 295 Suppl, 46| subsequent obligation ~makes that oath unlawful, whereas it was 296 Suppl, 46| he who does not ~keep the oath he took previously does 297 Suppl, 46| woman, makes the ~previous oath unlawful which was lawful 298 Suppl, 46| Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: The oath has some effect, not by 299 Suppl, 47| promise, especially with an oath, for one ~whom he cannot 300 Suppl, 47| confirm their promise by oath. ~Therefore they can compel 301 Suppl, 53| force to a simple vow ~as an oath does. Now a simple vow, 302 Suppl, 53| simple vow, even though an oath be added thereto, ~does 303 Suppl, 53| Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: An oath is more binding than a vow 304 Suppl, 53| which is ~promised; while an oath does not do this actually. 305 Suppl, 55| evidence is not taken 'on oath of calumny,' since it is


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