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Alphabetical    [«  »]
images 165
imaginable 1
imaginary 124
imagination 293
imaginations 5
imaginative 38
imaginatively 2
Frequency    [«  »]
294 participation
293 51
293 help
293 imagination
293 proportion
293 providence
293 touch
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

imagination

    Part, Question
1 1, 12 | through a vision of the ~imagination. For it is written: "I saw 2 1, 12 | originates from sense; for the ~imagination is moved by sense to act. 3 1, 12 | seen by the sense or the imagination, but only by the intellect.~ 4 1, 12 | seen in a vision of the ~imagination; but the imagination receives 5 1, 12 | the ~imagination; but the imagination receives some form representing 6 1, 12 | first conceived; thus the imagination from the preconceived images ~ 7 1, 12 | formed in ~the senses or imagination, according to some similitude 8 1, 12 | without ~the use of the imagination. But we cannot have an imagination 9 1, 12 | imagination. But we cannot have an imagination of God, Who ~is incorporeal. 10 1, 12 | reason only through the imagination; and the same applies to 11 1, 12 | the images in the human ~imagination are divinely formed, so 12 1, 12 | or divinely formed in the imagination, we have so much the more ~ 13 1, 14 | power of ~thought or of imagination, or of any other manner 14 1, 14 | images received in the ~imagination and sense, yet its power 15 1, 17 | to the senses, but to the imagination.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[17] A[ 16 1, 17 | Falsity is attributed to the imagination, as it represents the likeness ~ 17 1, 30 | than man, for they have no ~imagination, or feeling, or the like. 18 1, 34 | the ~signification or the imagination, as stated in De Anima ii, 19 1, 34 | called; and thirdly, the imagination of the vocal sound is called 20 1, 43 | vision, which belongs to the imagination, and not ~to the body, nor 21 1, 45 | objection proceeds from a false imagination, as if ~there were an infinite 22 1, 45 | plainly ~false. This false imagination comes from creation being 23 1, 50 | apprehended ~by sense and imagination. And because bodies alone 24 1, 50 | bodies alone fall under ~imagination, they supposed that no being 25 1, 51 | that is, according to imagination. But ~this is contrary to 26 1, 51 | is only in the beholder's imagination, and consequently ~is not 27 1, 54 | Therefore the power of the imagination is in the ~demons; and for 28 1, 55 | nature of a form in the imagination, ~which form is without 29 1, 55 | since the angel has no imagination, as was ~said above (Q[54], 30 1, 57 | apprehension of sense and of imagination, which does not ~exist in 31 1, 57 | manner neither does the imagination; ~for it apprehends only 32 1, 57 | than ~do the images in our imagination; because the former are 33 1, 57 | But the ~images in our imagination can be known by an angel 34 1, 57 | are known: because the imagination is a corporeal faculty. 35 1, 57 | s ~sensitive appetite or imagination, he knows what is in the 36 1, 57 | sensitive ~appetite or the imagination, but can make various uses 37 1, 63 | be itself. But herein the imagination plays ~us false; for one 38 1, 75 | able to rise above their imagination, supposed that the ~principle 39 1, 76 | to be ~distinct from the imagination. It seems, therefore, to 40 1, 77 | power, as the action of the ~imagination by the action of the senses. 41 1, 77 | taking with itself sense and ~imagination, reason and intelligence, 42 1, 77 | from ~the body. But the imagination is a power of the sensitive 43 1, 43 | vision, which belongs to the imagination, and not ~to the body, nor 44 1, 46 | objection proceeds from a false imagination, as if ~there were an infinite 45 1, 46 | plainly ~false. This false imagination comes from creation being 46 1, 51 | apprehended ~by sense and imagination. And because bodies alone 47 1, 51 | bodies alone fall under ~imagination, they supposed that no being 48 1, 52 | that is, according to imagination. But ~this is contrary to 49 1, 52 | is only in the beholder's imagination, and consequently ~is not 50 1, 55 | Therefore the power of the imagination is in the ~demons; and for 51 1, 56 | nature of a form in the imagination, ~which form is without 52 1, 56 | since the angel has no imagination, as was ~said above (Q[54], 53 1, 58 | apprehension of sense and of imagination, which does not ~exist in 54 1, 58 | manner neither does the imagination; ~for it apprehends only 55 1, 58 | than ~do the images in our imagination; because the former are 56 1, 58 | But the ~images in our imagination can be known by an angel 57 1, 58 | are known: because the imagination is a corporeal faculty. 58 1, 58 | s ~sensitive appetite or imagination, he knows what is in the 59 1, 58 | sensitive ~appetite or the imagination, but can make various uses 60 1, 64 | be itself. But herein the imagination plays ~us false; for one 61 1, 74 | able to rise above their imagination, supposed that the ~principle 62 1, 75 | to be ~distinct from the imagination. It seems, therefore, to 63 1, 76 | power, as the action of the ~imagination by the action of the senses. 64 1, 76 | taking with itself sense and ~imagination, reason and intelligence, 65 1, 76 | from ~the body. But the imagination is a power of the sensitive 66 1, 77 | Memor. et Remin. i), ~the imagination and the memory are passions 67 1, 77 | subject. Therefore memory and ~imagination should not be assigned as 68 1, 77 | from the action of the ~imagination. Therefore either we must 69 1, 77 | be made distinct from the imagination.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 70 1, 77 | which is an action of the imagination or phantasy; and ~intellectual, 71 1, 77 | and intellect, besides the imagination.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 72 1, 77 | common sense, phantasy, imagination, and the ~estimative and 73 1, 77 | forms, the "phantasy" or "imagination" is appointed; which are 74 1, 77 | the ~same, for phantasy or imagination is as it were a storehouse 75 1, 77 | namely, the common sense, the imagination, and the estimative and ~ 76 1, 77 | another. In this way the imagination and the memory are ~called 77 1, 78 | comes to our aid, then ~imagination, then reason, then the intellect." 78 1, 78 | distinct from the intellect, as imagination is from sense.~Aquin.: SMT 79 1, 78 | opinion rises ~from the imagination: then the mind by judging 80 1, 78 | comes to our aid, then ~imagination, then reason, then intellect, 81 1, 78 | afterwards intelligence." ~But imagination and sense are distinct powers. 82 1, 78 | considers ~man in one way, imagination in another, reason in another, 83 1, 78 | is ~a distinct power from imagination or sense.~Aquin.: SMT FP 84 1, 78 | spirit of your mind" - or the imagination, whence imaginary vision 85 1, 80 | guides, but also by the imagination and sense. ~Whence it is 86 1, 80 | form the phantasms of the imagination.~ 87 1, 83 | these images - namely, the imagination - is "common to us and beasts."~ 88 1, 83 | senses, may be present to the imagination, as ~when we are asleep 89 1, 83 | the opinion of Plato, the ~imagination has an operation which belongs 90 1, 83 | images are impressed on the imagination, ~not by bodies but by the 91 1, 83 | the above opinion, in the imagination there must needs be not 92 1, 83 | that the action of the imagination, is an action of ~the "composite," 93 1, 83 | first impression of the ~imagination is through the agency of 94 1, 83 | 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, the imagination is more dependent on the 95 1, 83 | than the ~intellect on the imagination. But the imagination can 96 1, 83 | the imagination. But the imagination can actually imagine in ~ 97 1, 83 | incorporeal things: for the imagination ~does not transcend time 98 1, 83 | corporeal organ. Now sense, ~imagination and the other powers belonging 99 1, 83 | need for the act of ~the imagination and of the other powers. 100 1, 83 | For when the act of the ~imagination is hindered by a lesion 101 1, 83 | through the senses and ~the imagination. And, therefore, for the 102 1, 83 | individual thing; ~wherefore the imagination does not need any further 103 1, 83 | suspended, but also the ~imagination, so that there are no phantasms; 104 1, 83 | are gifted with a strong imagination. If the ~evaporation be 105 1, 83 | slight, not only does the imagination retain its ~freedom, but 106 1, 83 | according as sense and imagination are ~free, so is the judgment 107 1, 84 | formation, inasmuch as the imagination forms for itself an image 108 1, 84 | action of the senses and the imagination. Now in a material thing ~ 109 1, 85 | figures that are not in the imagination, except in a general ~way 110 1, 85 | influence of ~demons, when the imagination is moved regarding the future 111 1, 85 | heavenly bodies causes the ~imagination to be affected, and so, 112 1, 85 | many ~future events, the imagination receives certain images 113 1, 85 | movements produce in the imagination ~images from which the future 114 1, 85 | have no power above the imagination wherewith ~to regulate it, 115 1, 85 | reason, and therefore their imagination ~follows entirely the influence 116 1, 87 | not fall under sense and imagination, ~cannot first and "per 117 1, 88 | tied, and by a distracted imagination, as explained above ~(Q[ 118 1, 88 | destroys the senses and imagination, as we ~have shown above ( 119 1, 88 | possess organs of sense and imagination ~which are necessary for 120 1, 89 | unable ~to rise above their imagination, supposed that nothing but 121 1, 92 | that is, the faculty of imagination, informed by the ~species; 122 1, 92 | memory, but also from the imagination. For these ~reasons the 123 1, 93 | lower faculty, such as the imagination or the like. Hence we see ~ 124 1, 93 | anything presented to the imagination or sense of the ~first man, 125 1, 110 | Whether he can change man's imagination?~(4) Whether he can change 126 1, 110 | the phantasms. But as the imagination which serves ~the intellect 127 1, 110 | an angel can change man's imagination?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[111] A[ 128 1, 110 | angel cannot change man's imagination. For ~the phantasy, as is 129 1, 110 | since the forms in the imagination are spiritual, they ~are 130 1, 110 | cannot impress forms on the imagination, and so he cannot change 131 1, 110 | be mingled with the human imagination, nor that the imagination ~ 132 1, 110 | imagination, nor that the imagination ~can receive the knowledge 133 1, 110 | angel ~cannot change the imagination.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[111] A[ 134 1, 110 | vision, by changing the imagination.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[111] A[ 135 1, 110 | Therefore an angel can move the imagination. ~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[111] 136 1, 110 | power ~can move the human imagination. This may be explained as 137 1, 110 | The first principle of the imagination is from the sense in ~act. 138 1, 110 | Sometimes, however, the imagination is informed in such a way 139 1, 110 | 2: An angel changes the imagination, not indeed by the ~impression 140 1, 110 | angelic spirit with the human ~imagination is not a mingling of essences, 141 1, 110 | which he produces in the imagination in the way above stated; 142 1, 110 | things only appear in the ~imagination; but neither then is deception 143 1, 113 | demon can work on man's imagination and even on his corporeal 144 1, 113 | Dei xviii, 18): "Man's imagination, which whether thinking 145 1, 113 | understood as though the imagination itself or the images ~formed 146 1, 113 | forms an image in a man's ~imagination, can offer the same picture 147 1, 114 | the moon, disturb ~man's imagination, when they observe that 148 1, 116 | when the soul is of strong ~imagination, it can change corporeal 149 1, 116 | to say, that by a strong imagination the (corporeal) spirits ~ 150 2, 9 | relation to the will, as the imagination in representing ~the appetible 151 2, 9 | sensitive appetite. But the imagination, does ~not remove the sensitive 152 2, 9 | appetite: indeed sometimes our imagination ~affects us no more than 153 2, 9 | Reply OBJ 2: Just as the imagination of a form without estimation 154 2, 13 | by its sense or by its ~imagination, is offered something to 155 2, 15 | things present; for the ~imagination apprehends the similitude 156 2, 17 | apprehended by sense or imagination. But it is not always in ~ 157 2, 17 | apprehend something by sense or imagination. Therefore the ~act of the 158 2, 17 | the apprehension of the imagination, being a particular ~apprehension, 159 2, 17 | an apprehension of the ~imagination of sense. And then such 160 2, 17 | the apprehension of the imagination is ~subject to the ordering 161 2, 17 | far as the ~intellect and imagination represent such things as 162 2, 18 | but from some ~act of the imagination, as when a man strokes his 163 2, 30 | medium of the particular imagination.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[30] A[ 164 2, 32 | as it arouses ~in man an imagination of abundant good existing 165 2, 33 | expansion arising from the ~imagination of the thing desired; but 166 2, 33 | requires the due use of the imagination ~and of the other sensitive 167 2, 33 | it hinders the act of the imagination and of the other sensitive ~ 168 2, 35 | the intellect or of the imagination. Now the interior ~apprehension 169 2, 35 | caused by some evil in the imagination. Since, therefore, life 170 2, 35 | interior apprehension, of the imagination or of the reason.~Aquin.: 171 2, 35 | apprehension of reason and ~imagination is of a higher order than 172 2, 35 | sense may be ~apprehended by imagination and reason, but not conversely. 173 2, 38 | saddens us is present to the ~imagination. But the image of that which 174 2, 42 | fear is caused by ~the "imagination of a future evil which is 175 2, 42 | since fear arises "from ~the imagination of future evil," as the 176 2, 42 | whatever removes the imagination of the future evil, removes 177 2, 42 | passion resulting from the imagination of an imminent evil. In ~ 178 2, 44 | that fear arises from the imagination ~of some threatening evil 179 2, 44 | Wherefore from the very imagination ~that causes fear there 180 2, 44 | an animal is moved by the imagination of death, it experiences 181 2, 44 | suffers a ~disturbance of his imagination, through fear of the fall 182 2, 44 | that is pictured ~to his imagination.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[44] A[ 183 2, 45 | is the presence in the imagination of the hope that the means 184 2, 46 | they are moved by ~their imagination to something like rational 185 2, 46 | there is both reason and imagination, the movement of anger can 186 2, 46 | ways. First, when only his imagination denounces ~the injury: and, 187 2, 50 | facility of memory, thought or ~imagination: wherefore also the Philosopher 188 2, 51 | cogitative power, with memory and imagination. With regard then to ~the 189 2, 52 | things, ~which come under the imagination. Now in corporeal quantities, 190 2, 53 | that are pictured by his imagination. Hence when man ceases to ~ 191 2, 53 | opposition to them, arise in his imagination; so that unless those ~fancies 192 2, 56 | reason: for the powers of ~imagination, of cogitation, and of memory [* 193 2, 60 | is apprehended by sense, ~imagination, or reason, and again, according 194 2, 67 | organs, viz. in the powers of imagination and memory. Now these ~powers 195 2, 74 | other, ~e.g. goodness of the imagination is a disposition to science 196 2, 74 | does the ~reason excel the imagination. Now sometimes man proceeds 197 2, 74 | apprehension of the power of imagination, without any deliberation 198 2, 74 | apprehension of the power of imagination is sudden and ~indeliberate: 199 2, 75 | remote, on the part of the imagination or sensitive appetite.~Aquin.: 200 2, 77 | inordinate apprehension of ~the imagination and judgment of the estimative 201 2, 77 | the apprehension of the ~imagination and the judgment of the 202 2, 77 | do not easily turn their imagination away from ~the object of 203 2, 77 | respect of the apprehension or imagination, or some similar ~mode of 204 2, 80 | darkness is due to the ~imagination and sensitive appetite. 205 2, 80 | seems to be confined to the imagination and sensitive appetite, 206 2, 80 | presenting certain forms to the imagination; and he is able to ~incite 207 2, 80 | representation of forms to the ~imagination is due, sometimes, to local 208 2, 80 | so ~it happens that man's imagination is brought into play.~Aquin.: 209 2, 80 | what is put ~before the imagination, is judged, as being something 210 2, 80 | are represented to the ~imagination: because "all our knowledge 211 2, 80 | the devil can move man's imagination, as stated above (A[2]); 212 2, 80 | altogether, by ~moving the imagination and the sensitive appetite; 213 2, 80 | apprehended by the senses or the imagination ~does not move the will, 214 2, 85 | his youth" [*Vulgate: 'The imagination and ~thought of man's heart 215 2, 102 | and appearing, to the ~imagination, to be the very seat of 216 2, 11 | or some ~illusion of the imagination (which gives rise to error, 217 2, 12 | words suggested ~by his imagination, without heeding to the 218 2, 49 | disposition of their power of imagination, which has ~a facility in 219 2, 58 | Eccles. 1:15), "for the imagination and thought of man's ~heart 220 2, 93 | while awake recur to his imagination while ~asleep. A such like 221 2, 93 | formation of a movement in the ~imagination consistent with that disposition; 222 2, 93 | so far as the sleeper's imagination is ~affected either by the 223 2, 152 | the images ~formed by his imagination as though they were real, 224 2, 152 | superfluities are formed in the imagination. ~Accordingly if this excess 225 2, 152 | more ~easily led in his imagination to consent to acts productive 226 2, 163 | suggestion, at least, man's ~imagination is changed by the devil [* 227 2, 170 | take place in the human imagination through the ~impression 228 2, 170 | their causes, whereby their imagination ~is moved more than man' 229 2, 170 | than man's, because man's imagination, especially in ~waking, 230 2, 171 | senses, secondly to the imagination, ~thirdly to the passive 231 2, 171 | active intellect. Now in the imagination there are the ~forms of 232 2, 171 | judging of things seen ~in imagination by others, as in the case 233 2, 171 | colors were imprinted on the imagination of one ~blind from birth), 234 2, 171 | results from ~pictures in the imagination, by the aid of the prophetic 235 2, 171 | from these pictures in the imagination by means ~of the enlightenment 236 2, 171 | kinds of pictures in the imagination, by simply considering these ~ 237 2, 171 | coordination of pictures in the imagination, and by the ~outward presentation 238 2, 171 | conveyed by images in the ~imagination, abstraction from the senses 239 2, 171 | the things ~thus seen in imagination be taken for objects of 240 2, 171 | outwardly from those he sees in imagination. ~Hence Augustine says ( 241 2, 172 | another by the ~soul's imagination, a third by the eyes of 242 2, 172 | powers, which are sense, imagination, and ~intellect, and then 243 2, 172 | imprinting ~of pictures on the imagination he mentions three, namely " 244 2, 172 | prophecy ~that extends to the imagination is greater than that which 245 2, 172 | things in the vision of the ~imagination.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[174] A[ 246 2, 172 | things presented to the imagination.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[174] A[ 247 2, 174 | prophetic light, and the imagination ~with the imaginary vision, 248 2, 178 | The first belongs to "the ~imagination alone," and consists in 249 2, 178 | The ~second is in "the imagination guided by reason," and consists 250 2, 178 | the reason based on the imagination"; when, to wit, from the ~ 251 2, 178 | things invisible of which the imagination has no cognizance. The fifth 252 2, 178 | senses, nor even of the imagination, as happens in rapture; ~ 253 3, 5 | body, but by visions in the imagination, as is ~plain from Is. 60: 254 3, 5 | real ~body, but only in imagination.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[5] A[1] 255 3, 13 | the stronger the soul's imagination, as ~was said in the FP, 256 3, 13 | strength as regards both the imagination and the other powers. ~Therefore 257 3, 13 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: If the imagination be strong, the body obeys 258 3, 13 | set on high, since the ~imagination was formed to be a principle 259 3, 13 | moved, naturally follow the imagination, and thus by commotion of 260 3, 13 | natural relation to the imagination are not transmuted by ~the 261 3, 13 | are not transmuted by ~the imagination, however strong it is, e.g. 262 3, 15 | apprehended by the reason or the imagination, as was said in ~the FS, 263 3, 15 | fear springing from the imagination of something great"; and 264 3, 30 | bodily vision: just ~as the imagination is a higher power than the 265 3, 30 | eyes, than what is in our imagination. Thus Chrysostom says (Hom. 266 3, 30 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The imagination is indeed a higher power 267 3, 39 | was ~formed in Christ's imagination by the Divine power and 268 3, 72 | of the proximity of the ~imagination, and because the (vital) 269 3, 72 | which is the site ~of the imagination. But a simple priest can 270 3, 76 | the senses, nor under the ~imagination, but solely under the intellect, 271 3, 76 | by the sense nor by the imagination, but only by the ~intellect, 272 Suppl, 32| heart without an act of the ~imagination which is a movement proceeding 273 Suppl, 58| exist ~save only in the imagination of the common people, who 274 Suppl, 58| because, ~owing to a vivid imagination, certain shapes such as 275 Suppl, 58| by the demon ~on a man's imagination, whereby he is deprived 276 Suppl, 70| all with itself, sense and imagination, reason, ~understanding 277 Suppl, 70| irascible powers." ~Now sense, imagination, concupiscible and irascible 278 Suppl, 70| with these" (namely the imagination, and the concupiscible and 279 Suppl, 70| to its merits." But the imagination, the ~concupiscible, and 280 Suppl, 70| separated soul is affected with ~imagination and other like powers, not 281 Suppl, 70| in the body through the imagination and other like ~powers: 282 Suppl, 70| like ~powers: so that the imagination and such like powers are 283 Suppl, 70| sleeper uses the organ of imagination wherein corporeal ~images 284 Suppl, 70| designate that part of the imagination which pertains to the intellective ~ 285 Suppl, 70| may result ~from a false imagination, as Augustine observes ( 286 Suppl, 79| thereof existing in the imagination or ~reason, if the organ 287 Suppl, 79| external things, but by the ~imagination or other higher powers, 288 Suppl, 79| powerful influence of the imagination) have real ~sensations, 289 Suppl, 81| proceeds from an error in ~the imagination; for it is imagined that 290 Suppl, 81| This is an error of the ~imagination, because each part of a 291 Suppl, 94| like images being in his ~imagination. Even Augustine seems to 292 Suppl, 94| unreasonable statement. For the imagination is a power that makes use 293 Suppl, 94| for such visions of the ~imagination to occur in the soul separated


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