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Alphabetical    [«  »]
coveter 1
coveting 21
covetous 42
covetousness 281
covets 4
cow 12
coward 3
Frequency    [«  »]
282 enter
282 interior
282 six
281 covetousness
281 humility
281 praise
281 stands
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

covetousness

    Part, Question
1 2, 19 | instance, to vainglory ~or covetousness, by willing to obey God 2 2, 25 | Augustine puts desire or covetousness in place of hope, in ~so 3 2, 30 | says (QQ. 83, qu. 33) that "covetousness is ~the love of transitory 4 2, 30 | essential ~predication: for covetousness is not essentially love, 5 2, 30 | that Augustine is taking covetousness in a wide ~sense, for any 6 2, 30 | hope is sometimes called covetousness. For a ~small good or evil 7 2, 59 | disturbances: viz. instead ~of covetousness, "desire"; instead of mirth, " 8 2, 72 | Apostle (Eph. 5:3) reckons covetousness with the carnal sins.~Aquin.: 9 2, 72 | against his body. While covetousness, which is reckoned among 10 2, 72 | bodily, and in this respect ~covetousness is numbered with the carnal 11 2, 73 | soul." Now theft belongs to covetousness, which is ~a spiritual sin; 12 2, 73 | brought under the head ~of covetousness, as a gloss observes on 13 2, 75 | preparing ~its matter: thus covetousness prepares the matter for 14 2, 77 | Apostle (1 Tim. 6:10), "covetousness [*Douay: ~'The desire of 15 2, 77 | life is ~not included in covetousness. Therefore it should not 16 2, 77 | the eyes, so as to denote covetousness, according to the ~explanation 17 2, 77 | of life" is included in covetousness according as ~the latter 18 2, 77 | for any kind of good. How ~covetousness, as a special vice, which 19 2, 84 | of inquiry:~(1) Whether covetousness is the root of all sins?~( 20 2, 84 | vices, besides ~pride and covetousness?~(4) How many capital vices 21 2, 84 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is the root of all sins?~ 22 2, 84 | OBJ 1: It would seem that covetousness is not the root of all sins. 23 2, 84 | the root of all sins. For ~covetousness, which is immoderate desire 24 2, 84 | all virtues. ~Therefore covetousness is not the root of all sins.~ 25 2, 84 | desire for which is called covetousness, are not ~desired except 26 2, 84 | Ethic. i, 5. ~Therefore covetousness is not the root of all sins, 27 2, 84 | which is another name for ~covetousness, arises from other sins; 28 2, 84 | that, According to some, covetousness may be understood in ~different 29 2, 84 | say that in this sense ~covetousness is the root of all sins, 30 2, 84 | Apostle when he states that covetousness is the root of all sins. 31 2, 84 | of the devil . . . ~for covetousness is the root of all evils." 32 2, 84 | that he ~is speaking of covetousness as denoting the inordinate 33 2, 84 | Accordingly, we must say that covetousness, as denoting a special sin, 34 2, 84 | necessity. So when we say that covetousness is the ~root of all evils, 35 2, 84 | as the root of sin. Now covetousness is the root of every ~sin, 36 2, 84 | and that it differs from covetousness, because covetousness ~regards 37 2, 84 | from covetousness, because covetousness ~regards sin as turning 38 2, 84 | fostered, for which reason covetousness is called the ~"root"; whereas 39 2, 84 | from this ~point of view, covetousness is said to be the "root" 40 2, 84 | like a mouth. If therefore covetousness is called the ~"root of 41 2, 84 | character ~of primary origin, as covetousness which is called the "root," 42 2, 84 | vainglory, envy, anger, sloth, covetousness, gluttony, lust. For ~sins 43 2, 84 | OBJ 4: Further, just as covetousness or avarice is the root of 44 2, 84 | viz. riches, to which "covetousness" is referred. ~These same 45 2, 84 | implies satiety, which "covetousness" seeks in ~riches that give 46 2, 84 | Moral. xxxi, ~27). But covetousness is said to be the root from 47 2, 99 | lxxxiii, qu. 36), that ~"covetousness is the bane of charity." 48 2, 99 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Covetousness whereby man places his end 49 2, 100 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: All covetousness has one common ratio: and 50 2, 100 | of the commandment about covetousness as though it were ~one. 51 2, 100 | various special kinds of covetousness, ~therefore Augustine distinguishes 52 2, 100 | prohibitions against ~coveting: for covetousness differs specifically in 53 2, 108 | thought that movements ~of covetousness were lawful on account of 54 2, 108 | justice, not to ~encourage covetousness. Wherefore Our Lord teaches 55 2, 11 | to the vice ~of pride or covetousness: for Augustine says (De 56 2, 11 | it arises ~from pride or covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[11] A[ 57 2, 11 | it arises from ~pride or covetousness, as stated in the second 58 2, 18 | anyone were to describe ~covetousness as love of work because 59 2, 18 | because men work on account of covetousness, ~this description would 60 2, 18 | seeks is wealth, wherefore ~covetousness is rightly described as 61 2, 19 | uncleanness and [Vulg.: 'unto'] ~covetousness." Therefore despair is not 62 2, 31 | not ~seem to result from covetousness, but to be counselled by 63 2, 31 | to do so, through fear or covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[33] A[ 64 2, 31 | sin, when through fear or ~covetousness, a man is loth to correct 65 2, 31 | so doing, through fear or covetousness, ~because in his own mind 66 2, 51 | which is a daughter of covetousness, ~according to Gregory ( 67 2, 53 | fraud from pertaining to covetousness or illiberality.~Aquin.: 68 2, 53 | Whether these vices arise from covetousness?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[55] A[ 69 2, 53 | vices do not arise from covetousness. As ~stated above (Q[43], 70 2, 53 | pride rather ~than from covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[55] A[ 71 2, 53 | former of which ~pertains to covetousness, and the latter to anger. 72 2, 53 | vices arise not only from covetousness, but also from anger.~Aquin.: 73 2, 53 | fraud is a ~daughter of covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[55] A[ 74 2, 53 | the chief of which is ~covetousness. Therefore the aforesaid 75 2, 53 | vices arise chiefly from ~covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[55] A[ 76 2, 53 | pride, but rather from ~covetousness, which seeks its own profit 77 2, 56 | virtue ~which is opposed to covetousness."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[58] A[ 78 2, 97 | we taken ~an occasion of covetousness." But it seems to involve 79 2, 97 | involve an occasion of ~covetousness that a pecuniary punishment 80 2, 97 | to involve an occasion of covetousness. But when it is exacted ~ 81 2, 109 | the hypocrite, if through ~covetousness he take by violence," says: " 82 2, 109 | XVIII.] Therefore since covetousness or vainglory is not directly 83 2, 110 | to ~belong to the sin of covetousness, which is opposed to justice 84 2, 115 | opposite vices, namely, ~covetousness and prodigality.~Aquin.: 85 2, 116 | IN THE FIRST PLACE, OF ~COVETOUSNESS (EIGHT ARTICLES)~We must 86 2, 116 | to liberality: and (1) ~covetousness; (2) prodigality.~Aquin.: 87 2, 116 | of inquiry:~(1) Whether covetousness is a sin?~(2) Whether it 88 2, 116 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is a sin?~Aquin.: SMT SS 89 2, 116 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that covetousness is not aa sin. For covetousness ~[ 90 2, 116 | covetousness is not aa sin. For covetousness ~[avaritia] denotes a certain 91 2, 116 | comprised. [*The Latin for covetousness "avaritia" is derived from ~" 92 2, 116 | his substance). Therefore covetousness is not a sin.~Aquin.: SMT 93 2, 116 | above (FS, Q[72], A[4]). But covetousness is not, ~properly speaking, 94 2, 116 | what is his own. Therefore covetousness is not a sin. ~Aquin.: SMT 95 2, 116 | naturally are not sins. Now ~covetousness comes naturally to old age 96 2, 116 | Ethic. iv, 1). Therefore covetousness is ~not a sin.~Aquin.: SMT 97 2, 116 | your manners be without ~covetousness, contented with such things 98 2, 116 | This is what is meant by covetousness, which is ~defined as "immoderate 99 2, 116 | therefore evident that ~covetousness is a sin.~Aquin.: SMT SS 100 2, 116 | the nature of the end. But covetousness ~exceeds this rule, and 101 2, 116 | 2 Para. 1/2~Reply OBJ 2: Covetousness may signify immoderation 102 2, 116 | immoderately. In this way by covetousness a ~man sins against himself, 103 2, 116 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is a special sin?~Aquin.: 104 2, 116 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that covetousness is not a special sin. For 105 2, 116 | says (De Lib. Arb. iii): "Covetousness, which in Greek is called ~{ 106 2, 116 | A[6], OBJ[3]). Therefore covetousness is a general sin.~Aquin.: 107 2, 116 | money: wherefore in Greek covetousness is called {philargyria}, 108 2, 116 | A[2], ad 2). Therefore covetousness is a desire for any ~external 109 2, 116 | especially the concupiscence of ~covetousness: hence it is written (Ex. 110 2, 116 | Therefore the concupiscence of covetousness is all ~evil, and so covetousness 111 2, 116 | covetousness is all ~evil, and so covetousness is a general sin.~Aquin.: 112 2, 116 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Covetousness is numbered together with 113 2, 116 | iniquity, ~malice, fornication, covetousness" [Douay: 'avarice'], etc.~ 114 2, 116 | useful to man. Consequently covetousness is a special ~sin, forasmuch 115 2, 116 | the name of money, whence covetousness [avaritia] is ~denominated.~ 116 2, 116 | consequently the term "covetousness" has been amplified to denote 117 2, 116 | homily (xvi in Ev.) that "covetousness is a desire not only for 118 2, 116 | sought after." In this way covetousness is not a special sin: and 119 2, 116 | sense Augustine speaks of covetousness in the passage quoted in 120 2, 116 | is ~not properly called covetousness, in so far as it is a special 121 2, 116 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is opposed to liberality?~ 122 2, 116 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that covetousness is not opposed to liberality. 123 2, 116 | other special, to which covetousness is ~opposed: and the Philosopher 124 2, 116 | Ethic. v, 2). Therefore ~covetousness is not opposed to liberality.~ 125 2, 116 | OBJ 2: Further, the sin of covetousness consists in a man's exceeding ~ 126 2, 116 | appointed by ~justice. Therefore covetousness is directly opposed to justice 127 2, 116 | Ethic. i, 7; iv, 1). But ~covetousness has no contrary and opposite 128 2, 116 | Ethic. v, 1,2). Therefore covetousness is not opposed to ~liberality.~ 129 2, 116 | desire of riches. Therefore covetousness is opposed to liberality.~ 130 2, 116 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, Covetousness denotes immoderation with 131 2, 116 | justice, and in this ~sense covetousness is mentioned (Ezech. 22: 132 2, 116 | run ~after gains through covetousness." Secondly, it denotes immoderation 133 2, 116 | unwilling to steal. In this way covetousness is opposed to liberality, ~ 134 2, 116 | 3, A[6]). In this sense covetousness is spoken of (2 Cor. 9:5): ~" 135 2, 116 | so as a blessing, not as covetousness," where a gloss observes: ~" 136 2, 116 | Philosopher are speaking of covetousness ~in the first sense: covetousness 137 2, 116 | covetousness ~in the first sense: covetousness in the second sense is called ~ 138 2, 116 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Covetousness as opposed to justice has 139 2, 116 | sin ~but a punishment. But covetousness as opposed to liberality 140 2, 116 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is always a mortal sin?~ 141 2, 116 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that covetousness is always a mortal sin. 142 2, 116 | worthy of death on account of covetousness. For the Apostle after saying ( 143 2, 116 | iniquity . . . fornication, covetousness [Douay: ~'avarice']," etc. 144 2, 116 | worthy of ~death." Therefore covetousness is a mortal sin.~Aquin.: 145 2, 116 | Further, the least degree of covetousness is to hold to one's own ~ 146 2, 116 | Much more therefore is all ~covetousness a mortal sin.~Aquin.: SMT 147 2, 116 | on the soul." Therefore ~covetousness, which is lust for money, 148 2, 116 | which pertains to the sin of covetousness. Now he ~that builds wood, 149 2, 116 | as by fire." Therefore ~covetousness is some times a venial sin.~ 150 2, 116 | As stated above (A[3]) covetousness is twofold. In one ~way 151 2, 116 | genus. For in this sense covetousness consists in the unjust taking ~ 152 2, 116 | may occur in this kind of covetousness by reason of imperfection 153 2, 116 | Para. 2/2~In another way covetousness may be take as opposed to 154 2, 116 | of God and his neighbor, covetousness will then be a mortal sin. 155 2, 116 | God or his neighbor, then covetousness is a ~venial sin.~Aquin.: 156 2, 116 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Covetousness is numbered together with 157 2, 116 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is the greatest of sins?~ 158 2, 116 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that covetousness is the greatest of sins. 159 2, 116 | But this pertains to covetousness. Therefore covetousness 160 2, 116 | covetousness. Therefore covetousness is the most ~grievous of 161 2, 116 | more grievous ~it is. Now covetousness is most opposed to charity: 162 2, 116 | of charity." Therefore ~covetousness is the greatest of sins.~ 163 2, 116 | it is irremissible. But covetousness is an incurable ~sin: hence 164 2, 116 | men illiberal." Therefore covetousness is ~the most grievous of 165 2, 116 | Apostle says (Eph. 5:5) that covetousness is "a ~serving of idols." 166 2, 116 | grievous sins. ~Therefore covetousness is also.~Aquin.: SMT SS 167 2, 116 | 30. But theft pertains to covetousness. Therefore covetousness ~ 168 2, 116 | covetousness. Therefore covetousness ~is not the most grievous 169 2, 116 | this seems to belong to covetousness. Secondly, ~the degrees 170 2, 116 | point of view the sin of covetousness, whereby the human ~appetite 171 2, 116 | Hence we must assert that covetousness is not ~simply the most 172 2, 116 | These authorities speak of covetousness on the part of the ~good 173 2, 116 | special acceptation for covetousness: because ~greed for any 174 2, 116 | is incurable in one way, ~covetousness in another. For the sin 175 2, 116 | sin. on the other hand, covetousness is incurable on the part 176 2, 116 | the more one gives way to covetousness. Hence incurability ~of 177 2, 116 | 4 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: Covetousness is compared to idolatry 178 2, 116 | it does not follow that covetousness is as grievous a sin as ~ 179 2, 116 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is a spiritual sin?~Aquin.: 180 2, 116 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that covetousness is not a spiritual sin. 181 2, 116 | goods. But the matter of covetousness is ~bodily goods, namely, 182 2, 116 | external riches. Therefore covetousness is not a ~spiritual sin.~ 183 2, 116 | with sin of the flesh. Now ~covetousness is seemingly a sin of the 184 2, 116 | carnal nature, fall into covetousness. Therefore ~covetousness 185 2, 116 | covetousness. Therefore ~covetousness is not a spiritual sin.~ 186 2, 116 | against his own body." Now ~covetousness disturbs man even in his 187 2, 116 | troubled in body. Therefore covetousness seems ~not to be a spiritual 188 2, 116 | Gregory (Moral. xxxi) numbers covetousness among ~spiritual vices.~ 189 2, 116 | pleasure of the flesh. Such is covetousness: for the covetous man takes ~ 190 2, 116 | possessor of riches. ~Therefore covetousness is a spiritual sin.~Aquin.: 191 2, 116 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Covetousness with regard to a bodily 192 2, 116 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether covetousness is a capital vice?~Aquin.: 193 2, 116 | 1 ~OBJ 1: It seems that covetousness is not a capital vice. For ~ 194 2, 116 | not a capital vice. For ~covetousness is opposed to liberality 195 2, 116 | capital vice. Therefore covetousness also should not be reckoned 196 2, 116 | But this does not apply to covetousness: since riches ~have the 197 2, 116 | in Ethic. i, 5. Therefore covetousness is not a capital ~vice.~ 198 2, 116 | says (Moral. xv), that "covetousness arises ~sometimes from pride, 199 2, 116 | the mind ~to give way to covetousness. And there are others who, 200 2, 116 | s property." ~Therefore covetousness arises from other vices 201 2, 116 | Gregory (Moral. xxxi) reckons covetousness among the ~capital vices.~ 202 2, 116 | things obey money." Therefore covetousness, ~which is desire for money, 203 2, 116 | good of the reason, yet ~covetousness is a principal vice, because 204 2, 116 | to mercy are daughters of covetousness?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 205 2, 116 | seems that the daughters of covetousness are not as commonly ~stated, 206 2, 116 | insensibility to mercy." For covetousness is opposed to ~liberality, 207 2, 116 | have no connection with ~covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 208 2, 116 | as different daughters of covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 209 2, 116 | enumerates nine daughters of ~covetousness; which are "lying, fraud, 210 2, 116 | of ~vices as belonging to covetousness which he calls illiberality, 211 2, 116 | be reckoned a daughter of covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 212 2, 116 | Moral. xxxi) assigns to covetousness the ~daughters mentioned 213 2, 116 | answer that, The daughters of covetousness are the vices which arise ~ 214 2, 116 | desire of an end. Now since ~covetousness is excessive love of possessing 215 2, 116 | retaining, and in this ~respect covetousness gives rise to "insensibility 216 2, 116 | second place it belongs to covetousness ~to exceed in receiving, 217 2, 116 | receiving, and in this respect covetousness may be ~considered in two 218 2, 116 | betrayed Christ through ~covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[118] A[ 219 2, 116 | daughters of illiberality or covetousness. For a man may be said to 220 2, 117 | prodigality is opposite to covetousness?~(2) Whether prodigality 221 2, 117 | it is a graver sin that covetousness?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 222 2, 117 | prodigality is opposite to covetousness?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 223 2, 117 | prodigality is not opposite to covetousness. For ~opposites cannot be 224 2, 117 | prodigality is not opposite to ~covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 225 2, 117 | relate to one same thing. But covetousness, as ~opposed to liberality, 226 2, 117 | prodigality is not opposite to ~covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 227 2, 117 | insensibility rather than to covetousness and liberality.~Aquin.: 228 2, 117 | we give ~here the name of covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 229 2, 117 | excess and deficiency. Now covetousness and prodigality ~differ 230 2, 117 | retaining and acquiring, while covetousness, ~on the contrary, denotes 231 2, 117 | prodigality is opposed to ~covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 232 2, 117 | are ~subordinate, so, too, covetousness and prodigality regard principally ~ 233 2, 117 | unduly, and ~this pertains to covetousness; or it may be due to inordinateness 234 2, 117 | Apostle says (1 ~Tim. 6:10): "Covetousness [Douay: 'desire of money'] 235 2, 117 | between ~prodigality and covetousness is one of excess and deficiency; 236 2, 117 | referring, not ~to actual covetousness, but to a kind of habitual 237 2, 117 | but to a kind of habitual covetousness, which is ~the concupiscence 238 2, 117 | is speaking of a general covetousness ~with regard to any kind 239 2, 117 | prodigality arises from covetousness; since the prodigal seeks 240 2, 117 | rich," etc. In this sense covetousness is ~said to be "the root 241 2, 117 | evils always arise from ~covetousness, but because there is no 242 2, 117 | at some time ~arise from covetousness. Wherefore prodigality sometimes 243 2, 117 | prodigality sometimes is born of ~covetousness, as when a man is prodigal 244 2, 117 | a more grievous sin than covetousness?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 245 2, 117 | more grievous sin than ~covetousness. For by covetousness a man 246 2, 117 | than ~covetousness. For by covetousness a man injures his neighbor 247 2, 117 | a more grievous sin than covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 248 2, 117 | sinful. Now the disorder of covetousness is ~sometimes accompanied 249 2, 117 | a more grievous sin than covetousness. ~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] 250 2, 117 | opposed to prudence than covetousness is: for it is written (Prov. ~ 251 2, 117 | more grievous sin than ~covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[119] A[ 252 2, 117 | less grievous sin ~than covetousness, and this for three reasons. 253 2, 117 | reasons. First, because ~covetousness differs more from the opposite 254 2, 117 | excess, and with regard to covetousness that ~it retains them to 255 2, 121 | unyielding ~to lusts, avoiding covetousness as a deformity that weakens 256 2, 130 | things, ~which pertains to covetousness; or in the testimony of 257 2, 133 | money." But this belongs to covetousness or illiberality. ~Therefore 258 2, 146 | one capital vice, namely covetousness. Therefore, seemingly, there 259 2, 152 | and all uncleanness, or ~covetousness, let it not so much as be 260 2, 152 | if it is ~wicked, through covetousness, to go beyond one's earthly 261 2, 164 | Douay: 'are given to'] covetousness." Now ~covetousness is not 262 2, 164 | to'] covetousness." Now ~covetousness is not properly about knowledge, 263 2, 164 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Covetousness craves the acquisition of 264 2, 164 | to things pertaining to covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[166] A[ 265 2, 183 | unlawful, and pertains to ~covetousness or ambition. Wherefore our 266 2, 185 | thereby incur the mark of ~covetousness or of anything else unbecoming. 267 2, 185 | who beg ~from motives of covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[187] A[ 268 2, 185 | begging from motives of ~covetousness, as appears from the words 269 2, 185 | considered as the result of ~covetousness or negligence, and thus 270 3, 41 | counseled two sins - namely, covetousness ~and idolatry. Therefore 271 3, 41 | gluttony, vainglory, and covetousness. ~Therefore the temptation 272 3, 41 | place to the temptation to covetousness on the ~mountain, and the 273 Suppl, 14| his lust and perseveres in covetousness. Therefore we ~can make 274 Suppl, 15| rather than of the flesh, as covetousness. Hence such like ~sins are 275 Suppl, 59| Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, covetousness is idolatry according to 276 Suppl, 59| be put away on account of covetousness, as also on account of other ~ 277 Suppl, 59| other ~sins graver than covetousness.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[59] A[ 278 Suppl, 59| Para. 1/1 ~Reply OBJ 4: Covetousness is said to be idolatry on 279 Suppl, 59| corrupts the intellect whereas covetousness ~corrupts the affections.~ 280 Suppl, 65| spiritual sins. Now pride and ~covetousness, which are spiritual sins, 281 Suppl, 71| sinned, however, venially by ~covetousness: and consequently they were


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