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Alphabetical    [«  »]
accidentally 329
accidentals 7
accidently 1
accidents 277
acclinis 1
accommodated 9
accompanied 75
Frequency    [«  »]
279 remission
278 87
278 generated
277 accidents
277 bestowed
277 ex
277 scandal
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

accidents

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | not as parts or species or accidents ~but as in some way related 2 1, 3 | all the individualizing accidents, is not included in the 3 1, 3 | Whether in God there are any accidents?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[3] A[6] 4 1, 3 | It seems that there are accidents in God. For substance cannot 5 1, 3 | and the like, which are ~accidents in us, are attributes of 6 1, 3 | Therefore in God there are ~accidents.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[3] A[6] 7 1, 3 | there are ~many "genera" of accidents. If, therefore, the primal 8 1, 3 | subject is compared to its accidents as ~potentiality to actuality; 9 1, 3 | sense made actual by ~its accidents. But there can be no potentiality 10 1, 3 | can He have ~any essential accidents (as the capability of laughing 11 1, 3 | accident of man), because such accidents are caused by the constituent ~ 12 1, 3 | not follow that there are accidents in God as ~there are in 13 1, 3 | substance is prior to its accidents, the principles ~of accidents 14 1, 3 | accidents, the principles ~of accidents are reducible to the principles 15 1, 6 | secondly, in ~respect of any accidents being added as necessary 16 1, 6 | existence; in Whom there are no accidents; ~since whatever belongs 17 1, 7 | form. Since therefore ~the accidents follow upon the substantial 18 1, 7 | necessary that ~determinate accidents should follow upon a determinate 19 1, 7 | determinate form; and among ~these accidents is quantity. So every natural 20 1, 8 | matter how; and thus the accidents of a place ~are in place; 21 1, 11 | in subject may have many accidents; or because it is undivided 22 1, 11 | whole; and what are many in ~accidents, are one in subject; and 23 1, 15 | genera, singulars, and accidents. But there are not ideas 24 1, 15 | same is the case with those accidents that inseparably ~accompany 25 1, 15 | with their ~subject. But accidents which supervene to the subject, 26 1, 15 | form of the house all the ~accidents that originally accompany 27 1, 17 | naturally deals with external ~accidents, therefore those external 28 1, 17 | therefore those external accidents, which resemble things ~ 29 1, 18 | proper objects are ~external accidents. Hence from external appearances 30 1, 25 | existence as regards the accidents, although not as ~regards 31 1, 28 | each of ~the nine genera of accidents there are two points for 32 1, 29 | by itself; ~whereas the accidents are individualized by the 33 1, 29 | and dry body: for proper accidents are the effects of substantial 34 1, 29 | thing. As it underlies the accidents, it is called ~"hypostasis," 35 1, 29 | things in relation to the accidents, which are outside ~the 36 1, 29 | signifies what is the subject of accidents, which do not exist in God. ~ 37 1, 29 | nor is He the ~subject of accidents, so as to be called a substance. 38 1, 29 | since He does not underlie accidents; but it applies to ~Him 39 1, 39 | signified by the name. But as accidents have their existence in 40 1, 44 | except as regards certain accidents, for instance, in relation 41 1, 45 | own being. But ~forms and accidents and the like are called 42 1, 45 | a being." Therefore, as accidents and forms and the ~like 43 1, 46 | various corruptions and accidents, were subject to an ~infinite 44 1, 57 | but only ~their outward accidents. In like manner neither 45 1, 66 | consequent forms would ~be merely accidents, implying not generation, 46 1, 67 | quality. But qualities are accidents, and as such should have, 47 1, 75 | do not ~subsist, such as accidents and material forms, acquire 48 1, 76 | dispositions to a form are accidents. ~Therefore we must presuppose 49 1, 76 | Therefore we must presuppose accidents to be in matter before the ~ 50 1, 76 | genus" follow its own proper accidents. Therefore ~as matter is 51 1, 76 | corporeal, and so on; so those accidents which belong to ~existence 52 1, 76 | Dimensions of quantity are accidents consequent to the ~corporeity 53 1, 77 | powers of the soul are not accidents; and so it would seem ~that 54 1, 77 | are ~not in the soul as accidents in a subject, this must 55 1, 77 | us, are known by their accidents; nothing prevents us from 56 1, 77 | sometimes ~substituting accidents for substantial differences.~ 57 1, 77 | the cause of its proper accidents; whence also it is ~included 58 1, 77 | The emanation of proper accidents from their subject is ~not 59 1, 77 | and nutritive parts. Now accidents cannot remain after ~the 60 1, 39 | signified by the name. But as accidents have their existence in 61 1, 45 | except as regards certain accidents, for instance, in relation 62 1, 46 | own being. But ~forms and accidents and the like are called 63 1, 46 | a being." Therefore, as accidents and forms and the ~like 64 1, 47 | various corruptions and accidents, were subject to an ~infinite 65 1, 58 | but only ~their outward accidents. In like manner neither 66 1, 67 | consequent forms would ~be merely accidents, implying not generation, 67 1, 68 | quality. But qualities are accidents, and as such should have, 68 1, 74 | do not ~subsist, such as accidents and material forms, acquire 69 1, 75 | dispositions to a form are accidents. ~Therefore we must presuppose 70 1, 75 | Therefore we must presuppose accidents to be in matter before the ~ 71 1, 75 | genus" follow its own proper accidents. Therefore ~as matter is 72 1, 75 | corporeal, and so on; so those accidents which belong to ~existence 73 1, 75 | Dimensions of quantity are accidents consequent to the ~corporeity 74 1, 76 | powers of the soul are not accidents; and so it would seem ~that 75 1, 76 | are ~not in the soul as accidents in a subject, this must 76 1, 76 | us, are known by their accidents; nothing prevents us from 77 1, 76 | sometimes ~substituting accidents for substantial differences.~ 78 1, 76 | the cause of its proper accidents; whence also it is ~included 79 1, 76 | The emanation of proper accidents from their subject is ~not 80 1, 76 | and nutritive parts. Now accidents cannot remain after ~the 81 1, 77 | there are many kinds of accidents. Therefore, as powers are 82 1, 77 | the number of the kinds of accidents. ~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[78] A[ 83 1, 78 | demonstrates their proper accidents. ~On the other hand, it 84 1, 84 | effect, and substance through accidents. ~Wherefore the universal 85 1, 84 | understands the properties, accidents, and the various ~relations 86 1, 99 | innocence. But ~individual accidents do not necessarily exist 87 1, 100 | respect, but only in those accidents which were ~natural or conferred 88 1, 103 | OBJ 3: Further, forms and accidents have no matter as part of ~ 89 1, 103 | 1~Reply OBJ 3: Forms and accidents are not complete beings, 90 1, 114 | separate; while he referred accidents ~to the material principles 91 1, 114 | diversified ~save according to accidents of that kind, the principles 92 1, 114 | it is clear that those accidents are merely ~material dispositions 93 2, 7 | the circumstances ~are not accidents of human acts.~Aquin.: SMT 94 2, 7 | human acts themselves ~are accidents. Therefore the circumstances 95 2, 7 | the circumstances are not accidents of acts.~Aquin.: SMT FS 96 2, 7 | called its individuating accidents. But the Philosopher (Ethic. 97 2, 7 | circumstances are ~individual accidents of human acts.~Aquin.: SMT 98 2, 7 | should be called their ~accidents.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[7] A[1] 99 2, 7 | circumstances are said to be the accidents of ~human acts.~Aquin.: 100 2, 7 | First, in so far as two accidents ~are both related to the 101 2, 7 | Socrates. Secondly, when ~such accidents are related to one another; 102 2, 7 | Further, circumstances are the accidents of acts. But one thing ~ 103 2, 7 | subject to an infinity of accidents; hence the Philosopher says ~( 104 2, 7 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Accidents which are altogether accidental 105 2, 7 | infinity. But such like ~accidents are not what we call circumstances; 106 2, 7 | being related to it. ~Proper accidents, however, come under the 107 2, 18 | since circumstances are ~accidents of actions, it seems that 108 2, 18 | derives much from ~supervening accidents, as man does from shape, 109 2, 18 | and ~if any one of these accidents be out of due proportion, 110 2, 18 | it by reason of certain accidents: and such are its due circumstances. ~ 111 2, 18 | they are in an action as accidents thereof. ~Thus, too, accidents 112 2, 18 | accidents thereof. ~Thus, too, accidents in natural substances are 113 2, 18 | subject; for some ~are proper accidents; and of these every art 114 2, 18 | respect, as it were, of its accidents. Fourthly, it has ~goodness 115 2, 18 | circumstances, which are its accidents, as it were; just as ~something 116 2, 18 | reason of his individual accidents, which ~does not belong 117 2, 18 | Further, circumstances are as accidents in relation to the moral ~ 118 2, 19 | circumstances, which are accidents, as ~it were, of the act.~ 119 2, 31 | senses stop at the outward ~accidents of a thing, whereas the 120 2, 35 | Metaph. viii, ~2; and in accidents the subject takes the place 121 2, 46 | specific differences from accidents. But these three ~are diversified 122 2, 50 | accident. But ~since among accidents themselves there is a certain 123 2, 50 | angels) after the manner of ~accidents, as in us: as though one 124 2, 50 | of material ~habits and accidents.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[50] A[ 125 2, 52 | stated above (A[1]), certain accidents are of ~themselves susceptible 126 2, 53 | the nose." But if we take accidents in the concrete, the ~relation 127 2, 53 | and ~decrease in certain accidents: wherefore to be more or 128 2, 54 | there cannot be diversity of accidents; for the subject is the 129 2, 54 | subject is the cause of ~its accidents; and it does not appear 130 2, 55 | however, observe that, as accidents and ~non-subsistent forms 131 2, 81 | also transmitted, since accidents do not pass from one ~subject 132 2, 81 | be strong, even certain accidents of ~the individual pertaining 133 2, 83 | a subject to its proper accidents, which follow ~their subject 134 2, 85 | remains the same when its accidents ~are changed. But nature 135 2, 1 | directed to such and such ~accidents of bread, but to the fact 136 2, 4 | says (In Categ. Arist. i), "accidents cannot ~be altered." Now 137 2, 8 | speak. Thus, under the ~accidents lies hidden the nature of 138 2, 127 | there accrue certain fixed accidents by way of bodily ~movements. 139 2, 146 | circumstances, being the accidents of an act, do not differentiate ~ 140 2, 178 | forwards; if it be about ~accidents that surround a thing near 141 3, 2 | notion of the species, viz. accidents and individuating principles, 142 3, 2 | numerically can underlie different accidents. But it does not ~happen 143 3, 7 | quantity is due, even as other accidents are determined. Hence ~the 144 3, 74 | sacrament; fourthly, the accidents of bread and wine which 145 3, 74 | some unlikeness as to the accidents, owing either to the matter, ~ 146 3, 74 | taste, color, and other accidents are changed; hence ~the 147 3, 74 | leavened or unleavened are mere accidents of bread, ~which do not 148 3, 74 | regarding the variation of the ~accidents, as to whether it be salt 149 3, 75 | Christ?~(4) Whether the accidents remain after the change?~( 150 3, 75 | substance is known by its accidents.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[75] A[ 151 3, 75 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether the accidents of the bread and wine remain 152 3, 75 | OBJ 1: It seems that the accidents of the bread and wine do 153 3, 75 | sacrament, it seems that ~its accidents cannot remain.~Aquin.: SMT 154 3, 75 | we judge of substance by accidents. It seems, then, that human ~ 155 3, 75 | deceived, if, while the accidents remain, the substance of ~ 156 3, 75 | this ~sacrament for the accidents of bread to remain subject 157 3, 75 | change. If therefore the accidents of the bread remain ~after 158 3, 75 | effected, it seems that the accidents are the ~subject of the 159 3, 75 | Metaph. iii). Therefore the accidents of the bread and ~wine ought 160 3, 75 | evident to sense that all the accidents of the ~bread and wine remain 161 3, 75 | this sacrament; for the accidents ~which are discerned by 162 3, 75 | ad 1); nevertheless the accidents which remain have some ~ 163 3, 75 | been said (A[5]) that the ~accidents remain after the consecration. 164 3, 75 | consecration not only ~do the accidents of the bread remain, but 165 3, 75 | this sacrament: because the accidents ~of the bread remain in 166 3, 75 | follow it by reason of the ~accidents, such as to affect the senses, 167 3, 75 | consecration on account of the ~accidents which remain. But some other 168 3, 75 | bestowed ~miraculously upon the accidents themselves, as will be said 169 3, 75 | this sacrament the same accidents remain.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 170 3, 75 | remains the same, namely, the accidents of the bread, as stated 171 3, 75 | this ~difficulty that the accidents remain while the substance 172 3, 76 | wine into ~His blood, the accidents of both remain. From which 173 3, 76 | dimensive quantity and its other accidents, hence it ~comes that by 174 3, 76 | s body and all its other accidents are in this sacrament.~Aquin.: 175 3, 76 | quantity, and with all its accidents. But to ~be in a place is 176 3, 76 | among ~the nine kinds of accidents. Therefore Christ's body 177 3, 76 | stated above (A[4]), the accidents of Christ's body are ~in 178 3, 76 | concomitance. And therefore those accidents of ~Christ's body which 179 3, 76 | the medium, through its accidents. Now the accidents of ~Christ' 180 3, 76 | through its accidents. Now the accidents of ~Christ's body are in 181 3, 76 | substance; so that ~the accidents of Christ's body have no 182 3, 76 | sacrament, not through its own accidents, but ~through the sacramental 183 3, 76 | change wrought in the other ~accidents, such as shape, color, and 184 3, 76 | foundation of the other accidents, as we shall see later on ( 185 3, 76 | is wrought in the other accidents, as stated ~above.~ 186 3, 77 | Out. Para. 1/1 - OF THE ACCIDENTS WHICH REMAIN IN THIS SACRAMENT ( 187 3, 77 | We must now consider the accidents which remain in this sacrament; 188 3, 77 | inquiry:~(1) Whether the accidents which remain are without 189 3, 77 | the subject of the other accidents?~(3) Whether such accidents 190 3, 77 | accidents?~(3) Whether such accidents can affect an extrinsic 191 3, 77 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether the accidents remain in this sacrament 192 3, 77 | OBJ 1: It seems that the accidents do not remain in this sacrament ~ 193 3, 77 | sacrament of truth. But for accidents to be without a ~subject 194 3, 77 | to savor of deceit, since accidents are naturally ~the signs 195 3, 77 | the subject. Therefore the accidents are not ~without a subject 196 3, 77 | even by ~miracle, that the accidents exist without a subject 197 3, 77 | subject. If therefore ~the accidents remain in this sacrament 198 3, 77 | 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, the accidents after the consecration of 199 3, 77 | at the same time these ~accidents are perceptible to the senses. 200 3, 77 | in this sacrament the ~accidents do not remain without a 201 3, 77 | is ~manifest that these accidents are not subjected in the 202 3, 77 | way be affected by such accidents; nor is it possible for 203 3, 77 | is not susceptive of such accidents. Secondly, because these ~ 204 3, 77 | Secondly, because these ~accidents are not where the atmosphere 205 3, 77 | species. Thirdly, because accidents do ~not pass from subject 206 3, 77 | not deprived of its own accidents, it would have at the one 207 3, 77 | at the one time its ~own accidents and others foreign to it. 208 3, 77 | Therefore it follows that the accidents continue in this sacrament ~ 209 3, 77 | the order of grace, the accidents exist in this ~sacrament 210 3, 77 | virtue of ~their essence that accidents are not in a subject, but 211 3, 77 | they do not cease to be ~accidents, because neither is the 212 3, 77 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: These accidents acquired individual being 213 3, 77 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: These accidents had no being of their own 214 3, 77 | of their own nor other ~accidents, so long as the substance 215 3, 77 | after the consecration the accidents which remain ~have being; 216 3, 77 | the subject of the other accidents?~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[77] A[ 217 3, 77 | the subject of the other accidents. For accident is ~not the 218 3, 77 | the subject of the other ~accidents.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[77] A[ 219 3, 77 | so also ~are the other accidents. If, then, the dimensive 220 3, 77 | for like reason the other accidents remain individuated ~according 221 3, 77 | Further, among the other accidents that remain, of the bread 222 3, 77 | can be the subject of the ~accidents which remain in this sacrament.~ 223 3, 77 | Since, then, ~the remaining accidents in this sacrament are sensible, 224 3, 77 | quantity is the subject of the accidents ~which remain in this sacrament.~ 225 3, 77 | necessary to say that the other accidents which ~remain in this sacrament 226 3, 77 | color and affected by other accidents is perceived by the ~senses; 227 3, 77 | consequence is ~that all other accidents are related to their subject 228 3, 77 | subject is withdrawn, the accidents remain according to the 229 3, 77 | before, it follows that all accidents remain founded upon ~dimensive 230 3, 77 | of individuation of ~the accidents, it is necessary for what 231 3, 77 | as the subject of ~some accidents to be somehow the principle 232 3, 77 | the subject of the other ~accidents, rather than the other way 233 3, 77 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: The other accidents, even as they were in the 234 3, 77 | the subject of the other ~accidents remaining in this sacrament, 235 3, 77 | dimensions; ~just as all other accidents likewise follow from the 236 3, 77 | And consequently, as the accidents are preserved by Divine ~ 237 3, 77 | sacramental species are accidents. ~Therefore they cannot 238 3, 77 | Consequently, as the being of those accidents ~could be corrupted while 239 3, 77 | Body Para. 2/4~But such accidents could have been previously 240 3, 77 | one. And in ~this way such accidents can be corrupted manifestly 241 3, 77 | alteration regarding the accidents.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[77] A[ 242 3, 77 | change on the part of the accidents as would not have sufficed 243 3, 77 | sacramental species ~are accidents, it seems that no substance 244 3, 77 | be without their proper ~accidents, which is impossible. Unless 245 3, 77 | sacramental species are indeed accidents, yet they ~have the act 246 3, 77 | sacramental species are ~accidents, whereas man is not made 247 3, 77 | whereas man is not made of accidents, because accident is not ~ 248 3, 77 | subject, just as the other accidents. And as the ~sacramental 249 3, 77 | species, because ~those accidents are without a subject, as 250 3, 77 | sacramental species, which are ~accidents; nor from the liquid and 251 3, 77 | as the diversity of the ~accidents shows: for instance, if 252 3, 77 | writes thus: "The very ~accidents appear to affect the wine 253 3, 77 | result is, then, that the ~accidents change the subject, just 254 3, 77 | just as subject changes accidents; for ~nature yields to miracle, 255 3, 77 | action; because the remaining accidents ~of the wine retain the 256 3, 77 | blood, but, mixed with the ~accidents of the previous wine, it 257 3, 78 | substance, but only as to the accidents whereby it ~comes under 258 3, 78 | relative to the sensible accidents which ~continue; but the 259 3, 78 | Christ's body nor even its ~accidents. Therefore this expression, " 260 3, 78 | this" does not indicate the accidents, but the ~substance underlying 261 3, 78 | substance underlying the accidents, which at first was bread, 262 3, 78 | although not informed by those ~accidents, is yet contained under 263 3, 81 | above (Q[76], A[4]), the accidents of Christ's ~body are in 264 3, 81 | this sacrament, whatever accidents ~really exist in it.~Aquin.: 265 Suppl, 2 | another body, that all ~the accidents contrary to the thing generated, 266 Suppl, 2 | generated, and which were the ~accidents of the thing corrupted, 267 Suppl, 54| matter and that all forms are accidents: ~which is false.~Aquin.: 268 Suppl, 70| they are of the genus of accidents. Hence the comparison fails.~ 269 Suppl, 78| as well as all the other accidents ought to agree. Therefore 270 Suppl, 79| qualities are the proper accidents of the ~elements, being 271 Suppl, 80| Trin. i): "Difference of accidents ~makes distinction in number. 272 Suppl, 80| in ~species, but in their accidents. If we were to remove absolutely 273 Suppl, 80| matter, form, and natural accidents, all of ~which pertain to 274 Suppl, 80| matter, or form, or natural ~accidents, namely heat, cold, and 275 Suppl, 80| requires ~this difference of accidents. Now subtlety does not deprive 276 Suppl, 80| quantity differs from all other accidents ~in that it has a special 277 Suppl, 80| common to it and all other ~accidents, arising namely from the


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