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Alphabetical    [«  »]
subjection 123
subjective 28
subjectively 1
subjects 256
subjoined 3
subjoins 7
subjugated 1
Frequency    [«  »]
258 hier
258 obey
257 qq
256 subjects
255 attain
255 poor
255 universe
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

subjects

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | treats only of ~one class of subjects." But the creator and the 2 1, 1 | together under one ~class of subjects. Therefore sacred doctrine 3 1, 9 | forasmuch as they cannot be ~subjects of variation; but they are 4 1, 13 | understood as existing in many subjects; and the ~reason is because 5 1, 13 | to be taken formally, and subjects materially." To this ~diversity 6 1, 17 | rightly; just as other passive subjects ~because of their indisposition 7 1, 22 | mediation he provides for his subjects. ~Therefore much less has 8 1, 29 | 29] Out. Para. 4/4~Four subjects of inquiry are comprised 9 1, 36 | property cannot belong to two subjects. Therefore the ~Holy Ghost 10 1, 36 | imply in Him a plurality of subjects.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[36] A[ 11 1, 36 | because acts ~refer to subjects. Yet this does not hold 12 1, 39 | individuals are called "subjects," "supposita," or ~"hypostases." 13 1, 39 | divided among its ~different subjects, it stands of itself for 14 1, 40 | presupposes the distinction of the subjects, when it is an accident; 15 1, 42 | and (De Synod.): "The ~Son subjects Himself by His inborn piety" - 16 1, 50 | so as to be ~found in few subjects.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 17 1, 51 | Some functions of living subjects have something in ~common 18 1, 51 | which is special to living subjects; because, according to ~ 19 1, 52 | Touching this there are ~three subjects of inquiry:~(1) Is the angel 20 1, 60 | preserved likewise in such subjects as have ~intellect. But 21 1, 63 | induced them ~to be his subjects. Therefore it does not appear 22 1, 63 | that all the demons are ~subjects of that highest one; as 23 1, 39 | individuals are called "subjects," "supposita," or ~"hypostases." 24 1, 39 | divided among its ~different subjects, it stands of itself for 25 1, 40 | presupposes the distinction of the subjects, when ~it is an accident; 26 1, 42 | and (De Synod.): "The ~Son subjects Himself by His inborn piety" - 27 1, 51 | so as to be ~found in few subjects.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[50] A[ 28 1, 52 | Some functions of living subjects have something in ~common 29 1, 52 | which is special to living subjects; because, according to ~ 30 1, 53 | Touching this there are ~three subjects of inquiry:~(1) Is the angel 31 1, 61 | preserved likewise in such subjects as have ~intellect. But 32 1, 64 | induced them ~to be his subjects. Therefore it does not appear 33 1, 64 | that all the demons are ~subjects of that highest one; as 34 1, 80 | which a man rules over free ~subjects, who, though subject to 35 1, 86 | intellect ~were in different subjects, as they are distinct powers; 36 1, 89 | concerning which there are four subjects of treatment: (1) the production ~ 37 1, 91 | superior makes use of his subjects ~for their own benefit and 38 1, 102 | Lord belongs dominion over subjects; and the name ~of God is 39 1, 104 | belongs the directing of his subjects to the common weal. ~Wherefore 40 1, 107 | part of the multitude of subjects.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[108] A[ 41 1, 108 | the ~evil deeds of their subjects. But the demons do much 42 2, 20 | cannot be in different subjects. Therefore the goodness 43 2, 29 | and hateful to different subjects. ~Therefore hatred is not 44 2, 56 | accident cannot be in several subjects. Therefore one virtue cannot ~ 45 2, 58 | whereby a man rules over subjects ~that are free, having a 46 2, 61 | principles, or according to the subjects in which they are: and either ~ 47 2, 61 | number if we consider the subjects of ~virtue. For there are 48 2, 61 | virtue. For there are four subjects of the virtue we speak of 49 2, 66 | Consequently fortitude ~which subjects the appetitive movement 50 2, 66 | comes temperance, which subjects the ~appetite to reason 51 2, 68 | actions, can also ~be the subjects of gifts, even as they are 52 2, 74 | these same powers are the subjects of ~good and evil moral 53 2, 82 | of the soul are different subjects of sin, as shown above ~( 54 2, 82 | sin cannot be in different subjects, it seems ~that original 55 2, 83 | Hence ~they are the proper subjects of actual sins, which are 56 2, 91 | he directly inclines ~his subjects to something; sometimes 57 2, 91 | sometimes indeed different subjects to ~different acts; in this 58 2, 92 | not intend the good of his subjects, ~but considers only his 59 2, 92 | in the ruler by whom his subjects ~are governed. Now the virtue 60 2, 92 | effect ~of law is to lead its subjects to their proper virtue: 61 2, 92 | made by a superior to his subjects, and aims at ~being obeyed 62 2, 92 | of a law is to induce its subjects to be ~good, as stated above ( 63 2, 93 | governs the acts of his ~subjects, bears the character of 64 2, 96 | burdens ~are laid on the subjects, according to an equality 65 2, 96 | authority imposes on his ~subjects burdensome laws, conducive, 66 2, 96 | inflicts unjust hurt on ~its subjects. The power that man holds 67 2, 96 | its ~authority: hence the subjects of one city or kingdom are 68 2, 98 | by itself or through its ~subjects. For the devil would not 69 2, 100 | for the benefits which his subjects receive from him: and to 70 2, 102 | to be reverenced by their subjects, to be clothed ~in more 71 2, 104 | people's sovereign to his subjects; a second of the subjects 72 2, 104 | subjects; a second of the subjects among ~themselves; a third, 73 2, 105 | should behave towards their subjects: namely, that they ~should 74 2, 105 | tyrants who preyed on their ~subjects. This is clear from the 75 2, 105 | since ~a tyrant rules is subjects as though they were his 76 2, 105 | take many things from his subjects in order to secure the common 77 2, 108 | superior, to direct his subjects in such matters as regards 78 2, 108 | from Christ, such as all subjects ~receive from their superiors: 79 2, 112 | final glory as regards the subjects' participation.~Aquin.: 80 2, 4 | accident cannot be in many subjects. Therefore all cannot have 81 2, 4 | according as it is ~in various subjects. Now it is evident that 82 2, 4 | according to its various subjects.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[4] A[6] 83 2, 10 | prince's household are his ~subjects. Now some of the faithful 84 2, 10 | endanger the faith, for ~subjects are easily influenced by 85 2, 10 | their ~commands, unless the subjects are of great virtue: moreover 86 2, 10 | to be ~observed by their subjects, in favor of liberty. On 87 2, 12 | apostasy from the faith, subjects are ~absolved from allegiance 88 2, 12 | forfeits his dominion over his subjects, on account of ~apostasy 89 2, 12 | forfeit his dominion over ~his subjects, on account of apostasy 90 2, 12 | bound to obey. Therefore subjects are not ~absolved from their 91 2, 12 | the faith does not release subjects from ~allegiance to their 92 2, 12 | command those of their ~subjects who are believers, they 93 2, 12 | the allegiance of their subjects: for ~this same allegiance 94 2, 12 | apostasy from the faith, ~his subjects are "ipso facto" absolved 95 2, 15 | laws on others than his ~subjects; wherefore the precepts 96 2, 23 | distinction follows distinction of subjects. Consequently a habit may ~ 97 2, 23 | follows a ~distinction of subjects: thus whiteness receives 98 2, 26 | which is to be found in more subjects seems to be ~more in keeping 99 2, 31 | not be corrected by their subjects.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[33] A[ 100 2, 31 | to be reproved by their subjects."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[33] A[ 101 2, 38 | wrongs ~inflicted by its subjects, or to restore what it has 102 2, 40 | so inordinately, that his subjects ~suffer greater harm from 103 2, 40 | discord and sedition among his subjects, ~that he may lord over 104 2, 45 | Whether prudence is in subjects, or only in their rulers?~( 105 2, 45 | 1~Whether prudence is in subjects, or only in their rulers?~ 106 2, 45 | that prudence is not in subjects but only in their ~rulers. 107 2, 45 | other virtues are common to subjects ~and rulers, and the prudence 108 2, 45 | not befitting slaves or subjects.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 109 2, 45 | competency of slaves or subjects but only of ~rulers. Therefore 110 2, 45 | Therefore prudence is not in subjects but only in rulers.~Aquin.: 111 2, 45 | Now it belongs also to subjects to perform these ~individual 112 2, 45 | only in rulers but also in ~subjects.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[47] A[ 113 2, 45 | Ethic. vi, 8), but in the ~subjects, "after the manner of a 114 2, 46 | simply so called, in the subjects.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[48] A[ 115 2, 47 | Ethic. vi, 11), even in subjects, there is place for prudence; 116 2, 48 | king, and execution to his subjects, regnative ~prudence is 117 2, 48 | prudence as regards the ~subjects, should not be reckoned 118 2, 48 | hand, men who are slaves or subjects in any ~sense, are moved 119 2, 48 | wherefore the prudence of subjects, which falls short of ~regnative 120 2, 48 | general aspect, as by his ~subjects who obey: since many obey 121 2, 53 | should be solicitous for his subjects, according to ~Rm. 12:8, " 122 2, 55 | Further, justice, before all, subjects man to God: for Augustine ~ 123 2, 55 | other, and both of ~whom are subjects of the ruler of the state; 124 2, 56 | On the other ~hand, the subjects render to each one what 125 2, 56 | administratively in his subjects.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[58] A[ 126 2, 58 | just; while it is in the ~subjects as an executive and administrative 127 2, 59 | distributive justice is also in the subjects to whom those goods are ~ 128 2, 64 | many things from their ~subjects: and this seems to savor 129 2, 64 | princes exact from their subjects that ~which is due to them 130 2, 65 | can ~judge others than his subjects and this in virtue either 131 2, 66 | inferiors. Since therefore ~subjects should not accuse their 132 2, 66 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Subjects are debarred from accusing 133 2, 66 | accuse, it is lawful for subjects to accuse their superiors ~ 134 2, 74 | creatures are not competent subjects either of ~guilt or of punishment. 135 2, 80 | to certain holy men, and subjects are said to be ~devoted 136 2, 80 | servants. But the devotion of subjects to their temporal masters 137 2, 80 | trusts not in himself, but ~subjects himself to God. This consideration 138 2, 81 | the body, but also human subjects, which indeed is done by ~ 139 2, 81 | prayer, in so far as he subjects himself to Him, and by ~ 140 2, 81 | his mind to God, since he ~subjects it to Him with reverence 141 2, 83 | earthly ~princes: and yet the subjects of the latter pay them much 142 2, 83 | God's sake, or ~when a man subjects his own body to some affliction 143 2, 85 | order this to be done his subjects would be bound to obey. 144 2, 86 | vows something and does it, subjects himself ~to God more than 145 2, 86 | that only does it; for he subjects himself to God not ~only 146 2, 86 | cannot do lawfully sins. But ~subjects do not sin by taking vows, 147 2, 87 | oath made by ~one of his subjects in matters that come under 148 2, 88 | on his subject. Therefore subjects cannot adjure their superiors.~ 149 2, 88 | obligation unless ~they be his subjects, whom he can compel on the 150 2, 98 | duty, or for correcting his subjects, or for omitting to correct ~ 151 2, 98 | procurations," ~when he visits his subjects, not as a price for correcting 152 2, 100 | certain power of ~governing subjects, wherefore it is fitting 153 2, 100 | positions of dignity to govern ~subjects. Now to govern is to move 154 2, 100 | with a ~certain power over subjects: secondly, as regards the 155 2, 100 | even though we be not their subjects.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[102] A[ 156 2, 100 | both obedience, whereby subjects are moved at the ~command 157 2, 102 | all things?~(5) Whether subjects are bound to obey their 158 2, 102 | of its ~object. For while subjects have many obligations towards 159 2, 102 | xxxv), "he who forbids his subjects any ~single good, must needs 160 2, 102 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether subjects are bound to obey their 161 2, 102 | 1/1~OBJ 1: It seems that subjects are bound to obey their 162 2, 102 | Therefore in like manner other ~subjects are bound to obey their 163 2, 102 | stand between God and their subjects, ~according to Dt. 5:5, " 164 2, 102 | stands between God and his subjects, whereas in respect of other 165 2, 102 | of justice requires that subjects obey ~their superiors, else 166 2, 102 | commands what is unjust, his subjects are not ~bound to obey him, 167 2, 103 | precepts and lays them upon his subjects, so ~that they are unable 168 2, 106 | of "merit," as the sinful subjects merit a ~sinful superior, 169 2, 116 | man, like the ~idolater, subjects himself to an external creature, 170 2, 116 | same way. For the idolater subjects himself to an external creature 171 2, 116 | whereas the covetous man subjects himself to an ~external 172 2, 116 | much violence against their subjects. But ~the Philosopher says ( 173 2, 122 | of teaching and guiding ~subjects is more perfect than the 174 2, 145 | soul, ~raises the mind, subjects one's flesh to the spirit, 175 2, 147 | kings, who should rule their subjects with wisdom.~Aquin.: SMT 176 2, 159 | especially since ~the more one subjects oneself to God, the more 177 2, 159 | to the person to whom he subjects ~himself; for the latter 178 2, 160 | cause. For the proud ~man subjects not his intellect to God, 179 2, 168 | important. Now since ~humility subjects man to God, it would seem 180 2, 175 | the church belong not to ~subjects but to the prelates (although 181 2, 175 | prelates (although men who are subjects may do these ~things if 182 2, 180 | are suitable to different subjects. Now the active ~and the 183 2, 180 | are suitable to different subjects; for ~Gregory says (Moral. 184 2, 183 | may lawfully abandon his subjects in a bodily manner?~(6) 185 2, 183 | enters ~the religious state subjects himself to others for the 186 2, 183 | spiritual welfare of the subjects entrusted to his ~care: 187 2, 183 | account of the needs ~of his subjects, suffered patiently to be 188 2, 183 | spiritual welfare of his subjects. Sometimes on ~account of 189 2, 183 | through some defect in his subjects, whom he is unable to ~profit. 190 2, 183 | himself to the care ~of his subjects, when he took upon himself 191 2, 183 | by the correction of ~his subjects, cessation of the scandal, 192 2, 183 | of the salvation of their subjects. Consequently when ~the 193 2, 183 | when ~the salvation of his subjects demands the personal presence 194 2, 183 | if the salvation of his subjects can be sufficiently ~provided 195 2, 183 | personally to the care of his ~subjects, he fulfils his obligation 196 2, 183 | have ~ceased to be their subjects; even as those same religious 197 2, 187 | themselves to the ~care of their subjects, as long as they retain 198 3, 7 | particularly upon divers subjects, according to 1 Cor. 12: 199 3, 8 | not always suggest to his subjects to obey ~his will; but proposes 200 3, 10 | multiplied by different subjects, so, too, a property ~of 201 3, 18 | diverse things, and in diverse subjects, this would not suffice 202 3, 35 | one lord who governs ~many subjects by the same power. But if 203 3, 36 | due to a king from ~his subjects. But the Magi did not belong 204 3, 47 | them by the Romans, whose subjects they were.~~Aquin.: SMT 205 3, 50 | concerning which there are ~six subjects of inquiry:~(1) Whether 206 3, 57 | every ~creature, since He subjects it to Himself.~Aquin.: SMT 207 3, 59 | the power of coercing subjects; hence it is written (Ecclus. 208 3, 59 | judgment except over his own subjects. ~But, according to Heb. 209 3, 59 | answer that, The angels are subjects of Christ's judiciary power, 210 3, 63 | accident ~cannot be in several subjects. Therefore it seems that 211 3, 64 | is required, whereby he subjects himself to the principal 212 3, 77 | wine remained; but ~their subjects had "such" being through 213 Suppl, 8 | the consciences of their subjects by means of ~confession, 214 Suppl, 8 | hear the confession of his subjects. Therefore this cannot be ~ 215 Suppl, 11| confession, whereby ~a man subjects himself to a priest, is 216 Suppl, 16| Therefore they are not ~subjects of penance.~Aquin.: SMT 217 Suppl, 16| Hence the angels cannot be subjects of the virtue of penance.~ 218 Suppl, 17| key ~he is referred to his subjects. Therefore the key is not 219 Suppl, 19| spiritual ~power over their subjects), seem to have the keys. 220 Suppl, 19| like, by withdrawing their ~subjects from them either altogether 221 Suppl, 20| power of the keys on his subjects.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[20] A[ 222 Suppl, 20| the Eucharist ~to their subjects, to which sacrament the 223 Suppl, 22| can loose ~and bind his subjects in the tribunal of Penance. 224 Suppl, 22| priest ~can excommunicate his subjects.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[22] A[ 225 Suppl, 22| jurisdiction indeed over their ~subjects, in the tribunal of conscience, 226 Suppl, 23| can communicate with his subjects: while others hold the ~ 227 Suppl, 23| obligation to them, for just as ~subjects are bound to serve their 228 Suppl, 23| bound to look ~after his subjects. Again certain cases are 229 Suppl, 24| cannot ~excommunicate their subjects. Neither, therefore, can 230 Suppl, 32| conferred on those who are not subjects for ~bodily healing, those 231 Suppl, 32| sacrament, unless they be ~subjects for a bodily healing.~Aquin.: 232 Suppl, 34| seek the salvation of their subjects and not their own ~profit.~ 233 Suppl, 36| were he to place unworthy subjects in his offices.~Aquin.: 234 Suppl, 41| is variously in various ~subjects, as individualized in this 235 Suppl, 44| quality in each of the like subjects, and since, moreover, the ~ 236 Suppl, 44| and since, moreover, the ~subjects of likeness are two in number, 237 Suppl, 44| either of the like or equal subjects. But the relations of ~matrimony, 238 Suppl, 44| relation having a diversity of subjects is signified by the terms ~" 239 Suppl, 44| and adds determinate ~subjects by the words "between lawful 240 Suppl, 50| and those who are unlawful subjects ~of marriage.~Aquin.: SMT 241 Suppl, 50| are said to be unlawful subjects for marriage ~through being 242 Suppl, 50| persons have been unlawful subjects ~of marriage.~Aquin.: SMT 243 Suppl, 50| those ~who are simply lawful subjects and those who are simply 244 Suppl, 52| than that whereby a man subjects himself to ~his wife. But 245 Suppl, 55| ceases when one of the like subjects dies, or when the ~quality 246 Suppl, 55| that is of one of the subjects. The same applies to affinity, 247 Suppl, 55| requires diversity of subjects, as likeness does.~Aquin.: 248 Suppl, 58| altogether unlawful for ~their subjects to marry.~Aquin.: SMT XP 249 Suppl, 64| remedy for the sins of his ~subjects even though they rebel against 250 Suppl, 70| this is: because in certain subjects it is not ~impossible, for 251 Suppl, 77| cannot rise again in two subjects, it will be impossible for ~ 252 Suppl, 80| account of the ~distinction of subjects. Again we can understand 253 Suppl, 80| account of the distinction of subjects, and thus while wholly ~ 254 Suppl, 88| thus they are in no way subjects of ~incorruption. Hence 255 Suppl, 93| Moreover, in different subjects one motive ~is stronger 256 Suppl, 93| 1~OBJ 3: Further, a man subjects himself wholly to God by


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