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Alphabetical    [«  »]
memoria 5
memorial 13
memories 7
memory 248
men 2649
menaced 1
mend 19
Frequency    [«  »]
248 composed
248 fittingly
248 guilty
248 memory
247 ascribed
247 care
247 d
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

memory

    Part, Question
1 1, 12 | we have seen, we keep in memory. But Paul, seeing ~the essence 2 1, 24 | evil works are recalled to memory." But divine energy belongs ~ 3 1, 24 | it is firmly held in the memory, according to Prov. 3:3: " 4 1, 24 | material ~books to help the memory. Whence, the knowledge of 5 1, 24 | deeds will be ~recalled to memory, is spoken of as the book 6 1, 54 | Augustine says (De Trin. x), "Memory and understanding and ~will 7 1, 54 | have likewise a power of memory.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[54] A[ 8 1, 54 | through the senses. But ~memory can be allowed in the angels, 9 1, 59 | in the soul according to memory, understanding, and ~will. 10 1, 72 | because the fish is ~devoid of memory, as Basil upholds (Hom. 11 1, 77 | De Trin. x, 11), that "memory, understanding, and will 12 1, 77 | Augustine says that the memory, understanding, and the 13 1, 77 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, memory is a power of the sensitive 14 1, 77 | Memor. et Remin. 1). But memory remains in the ~separated 15 1, 77 | Lk. 16:25). Therefore memory remains in the separated 16 1, 77 | Trin. x, 11; xiv, 7) places memory in the mind; not ~as a part 17 1, 55 | Augustine says (De Trin. x), "Memory and understanding and ~will 18 1, 55 | have likewise a power of memory.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[54] A[ 19 1, 55 | through the senses. But ~memory can be allowed in the angels, 20 1, 60 | in the soul according to memory, understanding, and ~will. 21 1, 71 | because the fish is ~devoid of memory, as Basil upholds (Hom. 22 1, 76 | De Trin. x, 11), that "memory, understanding, and will 23 1, 76 | Augustine says that the memory, understanding, and the 24 1, 76 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, memory is a power of the sensitive 25 1, 76 | Memor. et Remin. 1). But memory remains in the ~separated 26 1, 76 | Lk. 16:25). Therefore memory remains in the separated 27 1, 76 | Trin. x, 11; xiv, 7) places memory in the mind; not ~as a part 28 1, 77 | the imagination and the memory are passions of the "first 29 1, 77 | against its subject. Therefore memory and ~imagination should 30 1, 77 | fact that the principle of memory in animals is found in some ~ 31 1, 77 | formality of the past, which memory observes, is to be reckoned ~ 32 1, 77 | power, man has not only memory, as other ~animals have 33 1, 77 | the imagination and the memory are ~called passions of 34 1, 78 | one in all?~(6) Whether memory is in the intellect?~(7) 35 1, 78 | intellect?~(7) Whether the memory be distinct from the intellect?~( 36 1, 78 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether memory is in the intellectual part 37 1, 78 | OBJ 1: It would seem that memory is not in the intellectual 38 1, 78 | to man and beast." ~But memory is common to man and beast, 39 1, 78 | body, ~and commit them to memory." Therefore memory does 40 1, 78 | them to memory." Therefore memory does not belong to the ~ 41 1, 78 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, memory is of the past. But the 42 1, 78 | regard to a fixed time. Memory, therefore, knows a thing 43 1, 78 | of the sense. Therefore memory is not in the intellectual 44 1, 78 | 1~OBJ 3: Further, in the memory are preserved the species 45 1, 78 | the species. Therefore the memory ~is not in the intellectual 46 1, 78 | says (De Trin. x, 11) that "memory, ~understanding, and will 47 1, 78 | is of the nature of the memory to preserve the ~species 48 1, 78 | not be possible to admit ~memory in the intellectual part.~ 49 1, 78 | Thus, therefore, if we take memory only for the power ~of retaining 50 1, 78 | But if in the notion of memory we include its object as 51 1, 78 | something past, ~then the memory is not in the intellectual, 52 1, 78 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Memory, if considered as retentive 53 1, 78 | way, then, the ~notion of memory, in as far as it regards 54 1, 78 | Whether the intellectual memory is a power distinct from 55 1, 78 | seem that the intellectual memory is distinct from the ~intellect. 56 1, 78 | 11) assigns to the soul memory, ~understanding, and will. 57 1, 78 | But it is clear that the memory is a distinct ~power from 58 1, 78 | the intellectual part. But memory in the ~sensitive part is 59 1, 78 | Q[78], A[4]). ~Therefore memory in the intellectual part 60 1, 78 | De Trin. x, 11; xi, 7), memory, ~understanding, and will 61 1, 78 | But this could not be if memory and intellect were the same 62 1, 78 | contrary, From its nature the memory is the treasury or ~storehouse 63 1, 78 | 6], ad 1). Therefore the memory is ~not another power from 64 1, 78 | Wherefore it is clear that memory is not ~a distinct power 65 1, 78 | said (3 Sent. D, 1) that memory, intellect, ~and will are 66 1, 78 | Trin. xiv) that "if we take memory, ~intelligence, and will 67 1, 78 | they seem to pertain to the memory only. And by ~intelligence 68 1, 78 | for three powers; but by memory he understands the soul' 69 1, 78 | Intelligence arises from memory, as act from habit; and 70 1, 83 | or when the act of the memory is hindered, as in the ~ 71 1, 86 | s ~affections are in the memory by certain notions.~ 72 1, 88 | previously known is an act of memory. Therefore ~the separated 73 1, 88 | remembrance, according as memory ~belongs to the sensitive 74 1, 92 | the species kept in the ~memory; secondly, the vision itself, 75 1, 92 | while the species in the memory, though not extrinsic to 76 1, 92 | which ~is preserved in the memory, but also from the imagination. 77 1, 92 | Trinity in the soul to "memory, understanding, and will." 78 1, 92 | proper to the mind, namely, memory, understanding, and will; ~ 79 1, 92 | they are objects of our memory only, which, in ~his opinion, 80 1, 92 | consists in these three things, memory, understanding, ~and will. 81 1, 92 | habitual retention of the memory; ~although even thus the 82 1, 92 | Thus it is clear that ~memory, understanding, and will 83 1, 92 | the soul by reason of the ~memory, understanding, and will 84 1, 92 | sometimes present only in memory even after they begin to 85 1, 92 | image is taken from the memory, the ~understanding and 86 1, 106 | habitually, or in the memory, as Augustine says (De Trin. 87 1, 116 | particular things, the memory or experience of which he 88 2, 2 | that he was ~quoting from memory].~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[2] A[ 89 2, 2 | in hope, or at least in memory. Now a fitting good, if 90 2, 12 | images retained ~in the memory, to the penetrating gaze 91 2, 29 | passage, probably ~from memory, as though it were an assertion: " 92 2, 30 | past, is the object of memory. For these particular conditions 93 2, 32 | pleasure?~(3) Whether hope and memory cause pleasure?~(4) Whether 94 2, 32 | Para. 1/1~Whether hope and memory causes pleasure?~Aquin.: 95 2, 32 | OBJ 1: It would seem that memory and hope do not cause pleasure. 96 2, 32 | ii, ~12). But hope and memory regard what is absent: since 97 2, 32 | regard what is absent: since memory is of the ~past, and hope 98 2, 32 | of the future. Therefore memory and hope do not cause ~pleasure.~ 99 2, 32 | belongs to the pleasure of ~memory, which has only the conjunction 100 2, 32 | 1~Reply OBJ 1: Hope and memory are indeed of things which, 101 2, 32 | and ~also in preference to memory, which is of that which 102 2, 32 | and as existing in the memory: and in both ways sadness 103 2, 33 | secondly, as existing in the memory. Again thirst, ~or desire, 104 2, 33 | but as ~existing in the memory, thus it has of itself a 105 2, 33 | from that disposition, the memory of that ~pleasure does not 106 2, 33 | distaste: for instance, the ~memory of food in respect of a 107 2, 35 | beloved object to one's memory, and makes one feel one' 108 2, 38 | more ~strongly than the memory of the past, and since love 109 2, 40 | past: and therefore since memory is of the past, and hope 110 2, 46 | dwells ~some time in the memory; this belongs to {menis} [ 111 2, 47 | more is it fixed in our memory. Again if a man does not ~ 112 2, 48 | Now it is evident that memory is weakened by ~time; for 113 2, 48 | ago easily slip from our memory. But ~anger is caused by 114 2, 48 | anger is caused by the memory of a wrong done. Consequently 115 2, 48 | cause of love is in the memory alone; wherefore the ~Philosopher 116 2, 50 | whereby man has a facility of memory, thought or ~imagination: 117 2, 50 | conduces much to a good memory": the reason of which is 118 2, 51 | the cogitative power, with memory and imagination. With regard 119 2, 51 | firmly impressed on the memory. And so the Philosopher ~ 120 2, 51 | meditation strengthens memory." Bodily ~habits, however, 121 2, 56 | imagination, of cogitation, and of memory [*Cf. FP, Q[78], A[4]] act 122 2, 56 | Rhetor. ii) says that memory is a part. Therefore also 123 2, 56 | Therefore also in the power of ~memory there can be a virtue: and 124 2, 56 | acquires by use, in his memory and other sensitive powers 125 2, 56 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Memory is not a part of prudence, 126 2, 56 | is of a genus, ~as though memory were a virtue properly so 127 2, 56 | required for prudence is a good memory; so that, in a fashion, ~ 128 2, 57 | parts of prudence; viz. "memory of the past, understanding 129 2, 57 | Para. 1/1 ~Reply OBJ 4: Memory, understanding and foresight, 130 2, 67 | powers of imagination and memory. Now these ~powers cease 131 2, 100 | sanctification of the Sabbath in ~memory of the creation of all things.~ 132 2, 100 | Divine favor, either in memory of past favors, or in ~sign 133 2, 100 | celebration of the Passover in memory of the past favor of the 134 2, 100 | should be retained in the ~memory: for it is written (Prov. 135 2, 100 | fitting that mention of the memory should be ~made in the third 136 2, 100 | celebration of the ~Sabbath in memory of the Divine favor.~Aquin.: 137 2, 100 | the Sabbath was made in memory of a ~past blessing. Wherefore 138 2, 100 | Wherefore special mention of the memory is made therein. ~Or again, 139 2, 102 | were put on the table ~in memory of the twelve tribes. And 140 2, 102 | Sabbath," ~celebrated in memory of the work of the creation 141 2, 102 | month, and was ~observed in memory of the work of the Divine 142 2, 102 | feast of "Trumpets," in memory ~of the delivery of Isaac, 143 2, 102 | feast of "Expiation," in memory of the blessing whereby, 144 2, 102 | them to take a ~red cow in memory of the sin they had committed 145 2, 102 | calf ~for his own sins, in memory of Aaron's sin in fashioning 146 2, 102 | had been sacrificed, in ~memory of the blood of the lamb 147 2, 102 | offered: a ~calf, for sin, in memory of Aaron's sin in fashioning 148 2, 102 | ram, for a holocaust, in memory of the sacrifice of Abraham, 149 2, 102 | was a peace-offering, in memory of the delivery form ~Egypt 150 2, 102 | and a basket of bread, in memory of ~the manna vouchsafed 151 2, 103 | Thomas probably quoting from memory, ~substituted them for 2: 152 2, 103 | and other solemnities, in memory of other Divine favors, 153 2, 106 | Thomas, quoting perhaps from memory, omits the ~"et" (and), 154 2, 113 | they were present to his memory; and this ~movement cooperates 155 2, 15 | preservation is effected by the memory, and, as regards this, the ~ 156 2, 17 | regards the ~mind in which is memory, intellect and will, as 157 2, 17 | therefore it is neither in the memory, nor in the ~intellect, 158 2, 24 | thoughts in the present, the memory of past ~good, and the hope 159 2, 28 | pleasure results from hope and memory of good ~things, so does 160 2, 30 | that he may ~live in the memory of man whose respect he 161 2, 42 | mind" as pointing to the ~memory. And again, according to 162 2, 45 | sense, which is perfected by memory and experience so as to ~ 163 2, 45 | forgetfulness is contrary to memory, it seems that ~prudence 164 2, 45 | prudence results not from memory ~alone, but also from the 165 2, 46 | parts of ~prudence, namely, "memory," "understanding" and "foresight." 166 2, 46 | whole. Now the intellective ~memory or intelligence, reason, 167 2, 46 | addition of a seventh, viz. "memory" mentioned by ~Tully; and { 168 2, 46 | cognitive virtue, namely, "memory," "reasoning," ~"understanding," " 169 2, 46 | of the past, is called "memory," if of the present, whether ~ 170 2, 47 | eight points of inquiry:~(1) Memory;~(2) Understanding or Intelligence;~( 171 2, 47 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether memory is a part of prudence?~Aquin.: 172 2, 47 | OBJ 1: It would seem that memory is not a part of prudence. 173 2, 47 | a part of prudence. For memory, ~as the Philosopher proves ( 174 2, 47 | Ethic. vi, ~5). Therefore memory is not a part of prudence.~ 175 2, 47 | by experience, ~whereas memory is in us from nature. Therefore 176 2, 47 | us from nature. Therefore memory is not a part of ~prudence.~ 177 2, 47 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, memory regards the past, whereas 178 2, 47 | Ethic. ~vi, 2,7. Therefore memory is not a part of prudence.~ 179 2, 47 | Invent. Rhet. ii, 53) places memory among the ~parts of prudence.~ 180 2, 47 | therefore prudence requires the memory of many things. Hence memory ~ 181 2, 47 | memory of many things. Hence memory ~is fittingly accounted 182 2, 47 | requisite for prudence, ~and memory is one of them.~Aquin.: 183 2, 47 | Arte Rhet. iii, 16,24], memory not only arises ~from nature, 184 2, 47 | whereby a man perfects his memory. First, when a ~man wishes 185 2, 47 | objects. For this reason memory is ~assigned to the sensitive 186 2, 47 | wishes to retain in his memory he must carefully consider 187 2, 47 | may pass easily from one memory to another. Hence the ~Philosopher 188 2, 47 | from ~the past; wherefore memory of the past is necessary 189 2, 51 | thoughtlessness"; lack of docility, memory, or reason is referable 190 2, 51 | in orderly fashion are ~"memory" of the past, "intelligence" 191 2, 66 | devised as an aid to the human memory of the ~past. But an accusation 192 2, 66 | are apt to escape one's memory, the judge would be unable 193 2, 68 | the frailty of the human memory, ~a man sometimes thinks 194 2, 79 | and ~'cultivate']: a man's memory or presence: we even speak 195 2, 99 | give homage ~to those whose memory or presence we honor."~Aquin.: 196 2, 104 | shown should be held in memory, as the Philosopher says ( 197 2, 122 | authority thus to ~honor the memory of those holy women [*Cf. 198 2, 152 | apparently quoting from memory, as ~the passage is given 199 2, 156 | remains too long in a man's ~memory, the result being that it 200 2, 173 | to man to utter." Now the memory belongs ~to the sensitive 201 2, 182 | They shall publish the memory ~. . . of Thy sweetness," 202 2, 186 | They shall publish the memory of . . . Thy sweetness," 203 3, 8 | on Job 18:17, "Let ~the memory of him perish from the earth," 204 3, 25 | intercessors. Wherefore in memory of them we ought to ~honor 205 3, 31 | wicked Jezabel, therefore his memory is ~omitted down to the 206 3, 42 | Thomas, probably quoting from memory, combines Mt. 10:27 ~with 207 3, 66 | name of the Trinity, but in memory of Christ's death, and with 208 3, 73 | committed most deeply to memory; since then especially ~ 209 3, 80 | Lk. 22:19): "Do this in memory of ~Me." But by the precept 210 3, 80 | sacrament is celebrated in memory of our Lord's ~Passion, 211 3, 82 | wonderfully performed in ~memory of Christ: but it is not 212 3, 83 | offer ~it up every day in memory of His death?" Secondly 213 3, 83 | with, and honoring the memory," etc. Thirdly, he concludes 214 3, 83 | so it is impressed on the memory. ~Hence, if a man pays attention 215 3, 83 | thing is presented to ~the memory under the formality of the 216 3, 84 | evidently ~quoting from memory, and omits the words in 217 3, 85 | the proper object of the memory, according ~to the Philosopher ( 218 3, 85 | penance is subjected in the ~memory.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[85] A[ 219 3, 85 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: The memory is a power that apprehends 220 3, 85 | Wherefore penance is not in the ~memory, but presupposes it.~Aquin.: 221 Suppl, 2 | so that it ~escapes the memory altogether, and then one 222 Suppl, 2 | that it escapes from the memory in part, and in part remains, 223 Suppl, 2 | particular, and then I search my memory in order to discover it. ~ 224 Suppl, 2 | sin ~has escaped from his memory altogether, then he is excused 225 Suppl, 2 | the sin is recalled to his memory, then he ~is bound to have 226 Suppl, 9 | mortal sin, which escaped his memory ~while confessing, and that 227 Suppl, 67| is apparently quoted from memory.] Therefore hatred is not 228 Suppl, 70| 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, the memory is a power of the sensitive 229 Suppl, 70| Sent. i, D, 3, qu. 4), memory ~has a twofold signification. 230 Suppl, 70| this way the ~act of the memory will not be in the separated 231 Suppl, 70| remembers not." In another way memory is used to ~designate that 232 Suppl, 70| De Trin. xiv, 11). Taking memory in this sense the ~separated 233 Suppl, 71| Moreover, the dead live in the memory of the living: wherefore ~ 234 Suppl, 84| the treasure house ~of the memory. Now after the resurrection 235 Suppl, 84| have escaped ~the sinner's memory, and he will be unable to 236 Suppl, 84| the ~treasure house of his memory. Therefore after rising 237 Suppl, 84| sins which we recall to memory is ~charity. Since then 238 Suppl, 84| if they recall ~them to memory: yet this is impossible, 239 Suppl, 84| recall ~their own sins to memory.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[87] A[ 240 Suppl, 84| demerits will have escaped our ~memory, yet there will be none 241 Suppl, 92| Trinity in respect of ~the memory, understanding, and will. 242 Suppl, 92| something ~corresponding to the memory, since fruition regards 243 Suppl, 92| fruition regards not the memory but ~the will.~Aquin.: SMT 244 Suppl, 92| 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Memory and understanding have but 245 Suppl, 92| understanding is itself an act of memory, or - if understanding denote 246 Suppl, 92| denote a ~power - because memory does not proceed to act 247 Suppl, 92| since it belongs to the memory to retain knowledge. ~Consequently 248 Suppl, 92| knowledge, corresponding to ~memory and understanding: wherefore


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