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Alphabetical    [«  »]
contiguity 2
contiguous 2
continebatur 1
continence 231
continency 57
continent 56
continentem 1
Frequency    [«  »]
233 immaterial
232 equally
232 sacrifices
231 continence
231 dispensation
231 ordered
230 adultery
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

continence

    Part, Question
1 1, 97 | restlessness of the mind. Therefore continence would not have been ~praiseworthy 2 2, 109 | less than virtue, even as ~continence is, as is clear from the 3 2, 109 | perseverance is to ~sadness as continence is to concupiscence and 4 2, 109 | together with grace, even ~as continence and the other virtues are. 5 2, 33 | sorrowful about the good of continence, and the glutton ~about 6 2, 42 | that can be restrained by continence, man cannot love God with ~ 7 2, 77 | fulfil her vow by ~observing continence. Again a priest is not bound 8 2, 83 | belongs to ~abstinence, by continence belongs to chastity, by 9 2, 86 | granted in a solemn vow of continence?~(12) Whether the authority 10 2, 86 | and cherished ~by godly continence."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[88] A[ 11 2, 136 | perseverance is. As to continence, its claim to praise seems 12 2, 139 | same things, and so are continence and ~incontinence, perseverance, 13 2, 141 | when he asserts them to be "continence, ~mildness, and modesty." 14 2, 141 | mildness, and modesty." For continence is reckoned to be distinct 15 2, 141 | under virtue. ~Therefore continence is not a part of temperance.~ 16 2, 141 | temperance are gravity, continence, humility, simplicity, ~ 17 2, 141 | movement is ~restrained by "continence," the effect of which is 18 2, 141 | Reply OBJ 1: It is true that continence differs from virtue, just 19 2, 150 | viii) that "virginity is ~continence whereby integrity of the 20 2, 150 | De Bono Conjug. xxi): "Continence was equally ~meritorious 21 2, 150 | were preferable to conjugal continence, it ~would seem to follow 22 2, 150 | not greater than conjugal continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[152] A[ 23 2, 150 | to the good of virginal continence or even to that of ~widowhood."~ 24 2, 150 | preferable to conjugal continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[152] A[ 25 2, 150 | Wherefore in him conjugal continence was equally ~meritorious 26 2, 150 | meritorious with the virginal continence of John, as regards the ~ 27 2, 150 | is better than conjugal continence, a ~married person may be 28 2, 151 | from pleasures ~pertains to continence which is a part of temperance, 29 2, 152 | Since a woman, by vowing continence, contracts a spiritual ~ 30 2, 153 | CONTRARY VICES (QQ[155]-170)~OF CONTINENCE (FOUR ARTICLES)~We must 31 2, 153 | parts of temperance: (1) continence; ~(2) clemency; (3) modesty. 32 2, 153 | first head we must consider ~continence and incontinence. With regard 33 2, 153 | incontinence. With regard to continence there are four ~points of 34 2, 153 | of inquiry:~(1) Whether continence is a virtue?~(2) What is 35 2, 153 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether continence is a virtue?~Aquin.: SMT 36 2, 153 | OBJ 1: It would seem that continence is not a virtue. For species 37 2, 153 | of the same division. But continence is ~co-ordinated with virtue, 38 2, 153 | Ethic. vii, 1,9). ~Therefore continence is not a virtue.~Aquin.: 39 2, 153 | from doing it. Therefore ~continence is not a virtue.~Aquin.: 40 2, 153 | modesty," ~etc., says that by continence a man refrains even from 41 2, 153 | that are ~lawful. Therefore continence is not a virtue.~Aquin.: 42 2, 153 | be a virtue. Now ~such is continence, for Andronicus says [*De 43 2, 153 | says [*De Affectibus] that "continence ~is a habit unconquered 44 2, 153 | by pleasure." Therefore continence is a virtue.~Aquin.: SMT 45 2, 153 | I answer that, The word "continence" is taken by various people 46 2, 153 | ways. For some understand continence to denote abstention from 47 2, 153 | thus the Apostle joins continence to chastity (Gal. ~5:23). 48 2, 153 | In this sense perfect continence is virginity in the first 49 2, 153 | Wherefore the same applies to continence ~understood thus, as to 50 2, 153 | Others, however, understand continence as signifying ~that whereby 51 2, 153 | sense the Philosopher takes continence (Ethic. vii, 7), and thus ~ 52 2, 153 | xii, 10,11). ~In this way continence has something of the nature 53 2, 153 | says (Ethic. iv, 9) that ~"continence is not a virtue but a mixture," 54 2, 153 | actions, we may say that continence is a virtue.~Aquin.: SMT 55 2, 153 | The Philosopher includes continence in the same division ~with 56 2, 153 | The gloss quoted takes continence in the first sense, as ~ 57 2, 153 | touch are the matter of continence?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[155] A[ 58 2, 153 | touch are not the ~matter of continence. For Ambrose says (De Offic. 59 2, 153 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, continence takes its name from a man 60 2, 153 | De Ira i, 1]. Therefore continence does not properly ~regard 61 2, 153 | Invent. Rhet. ii, 54): "It is continence ~that restrains cupidity 62 2, 153 | of all evils." Therefore ~continence is not properly about the 63 2, 153 | but also in eating. But continence is wont to be applied only 64 2, 153 | of animals or ~boys. But continence is not about such like things, 65 2, 153 | not the proper ~matter of continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[155] A[ 66 2, 153 | says (Ethic. vii, 4) that "continence ~and incontinence are about 67 2, 153 | Q[141], A[4]). Therefore continence ~and incontinence are also 68 2, 153 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, Continence denotes, by its very name, 69 2, 153 | following his passions. Hence ~continence is properly said in reference 70 2, 153 | to the touch. Therefore ~continence and incontinence refer properly 71 2, 153 | man to be curbed: so, too, continence properly ~speaking regards 72 2, 153 | sense Ambrose speaks of continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[155] A[ 73 2, 153 | speaking we do not speak of continence in relation ~to fear, but 74 2, 153 | Tully either understood continence in a general sense, as ~ 75 2, 153 | as ~including relative continence, or understood cupidity 76 2, 153 | we are wont to speak of continence and incontinence in ~reference 77 2, 153 | 5 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 5: Continence is a good of the human reason: 78 2, 153 | 1~Whether the subject of continence is the concupiscible power?~ 79 2, 153 | seem that the subject of continence is the concupiscible ~power. 80 2, 153 | matter. Now the matter of continence, as stated (A[2]), is ~desires 81 2, 153 | concupiscible ~power. Therefore continence is in the concupiscible 82 2, 153 | disobedience to reason." Therefore continence is ~likewise in the concupiscible.~ 83 2, 153 | and the irascible. Now continence is not in the reason, for 84 2, 153 | is it in the will, since continence is ~about the passions which 85 2, 153 | evil act of that power. But continence does not remove the evil 86 2, 153 | Ethic. vii, 9). Therefore continence is not in the ~concupiscible 87 2, 153 | Wherefore it is ~manifest that continence is not in the concupiscible 88 2, 153 | his reason forbids. Hence continence must needs ~reside in that 89 2, 153 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Continence has for its matter the desires 90 2, 153 | the concupiscible. Hence continence ~may be ascribed to the 91 2, 153 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether continence is better than temperance?~ 92 2, 153 | OBJ 1: It would seem that continence is better than temperance. 93 2, 153 | virtue can be equalled to continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[155] A[ 94 2, 153 | greater the ~virtue. Now continence apparently merits the greater 95 2, 153 | not vehement. Therefore continence is a greater virtue than 96 2, 153 | the ~concupiscible. But continence is in the will, whereas 97 2, 153 | above (A[3]). Therefore continence is a ~greater virtue than 98 2, 153 | De ~Affectibus] reckon continence to be annexed to temperance, 99 2, 153 | As stated above (A[1]), continence has a twofold ~signification. 100 2, 153 | venereal ~pleasures; and if continence be taken in this sense, 101 2, 153 | absolutely. In another way continence may be taken as ~denoting 102 2, 153 | temperance is far greater than ~continence, because the good of a virtue 103 2, 153 | its evil desires. Hence continence is compared to ~temperance, 104 2, 153 | reference to the sense in which continence denotes abstinence from 105 2, 153 | marriage is equalled to the continence of virginity or ~of widowhood, 106 2, 153 | the general sense in which continence denotes ~any abstinence 107 2, 154 | they differ in respect of continence and incontinence, for we 108 2, 154 | for we ascribe ~neither continence nor incontinence to the 109 2, 154 | essential conditions of continence or ~incontinence cease, 110 2, 154 | have said in reference to continence (Q[155], A[2]~). In this 111 2, 154 | said above in ~reference to continence (Q[155], A[2], ad 3). In 112 2, 182 | the ~taking of a vow of continence, which is one of the things 113 2, 183 | safeguard of perfection, such as continence, poverty, and so forth, 114 2, 184 | instance those who observe continence. Therefore it would ~seem 115 2, 184 | dispositively, ~as poverty, continence, abstinence, and the like.~ 116 2, 184 | Para. 1/1~Whether perpetual continence is required for religious 117 2, 184 | would seem that perpetual continence is not required for ~religious 118 2, 184 | appear to have observed ~continence, as evidenced by Peter, 119 2, 184 | would seem that perpetual continence is not requisite ~for religious 120 2, 184 | example. Therefore ~perpetual continence is not requisite for religious 121 2, 184 | does not require perpetual ~continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[186] A[ 122 2, 184 | spirit is ~safeguarded by continence, for it is said (1 Cor. 123 2, 184 | religious perfection requires continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[186] A[ 124 2, 184 | 2/2~Therefore perpetual continence, as well as voluntary poverty, 125 2, 184 | only of poverty but also of continence ~was introduced by Christ 126 2, 184 | been seasonable to observe continence and poverty, would ~have 127 2, 184 | venery by their vow of ~continence. But they are not bound 128 2, 184 | there any comparison with continence whereby acts are excluded ~ 129 2, 184 | perfection that poverty, ~continence, and obedience should come 130 2, 184 | aforesaid, namely poverty, continence, and obedience, ~should 131 2, 184 | that ~one keep poverty, continence, and obedience without. 132 2, 184 | to God to keep ~poverty, continence, and obedience without a 133 2, 184 | AA[3],4,5) that poverty, continence, and ~obedience belong to 134 2, 184 | than the vows of poverty, continence, and ~obedience which refer 135 2, 184 | are removed by the vow of continence; thirdly, the inordinateness 136 2, 184 | cut away ~by the vow of continence; thirdly, as regards the 137 2, 184 | especially by the vow of continence, whereby he renounces the 138 2, 184 | observance of the vow of continence. And such religious ~observances 139 2, 184 | was need for the vows of continence and ~poverty; but for the 140 2, 184 | excellent. Therefore the vow of continence is more excellent than ~ 141 2, 184 | the vows of poverty and continence "are so inseparable from ~ 142 2, 184 | the vow of ~poverty and continence.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[186] A[ 143 2, 184 | which ~he offers God by continence, and than external things, 144 2, 184 | bound by vow to observe continence ~and poverty, yet these 145 2, 184 | things besides the keeping of continence and poverty.~Aquin.: SMT 146 2, 184 | vow, voluntary poverty and continence, he would not ~therefore 147 2, 184 | The words quoted mean that continence is to be preferred, ~not 148 2, 184 | renders 'price.']. Or again continence is taken in a general ~sense 149 2, 184 | aforesaid, namely poverty, ~continence, and obedience, while all 150 2, 184 | acts against the vow of continence, and by ~theft against the 151 2, 186 | oneself to observe the vow of continence, by solitude of place, ~ 152 2, 186 | efficaciously directed to ~continence by means of abstinence in 153 2, 186 | perfection; since the vow of continence ~excels the vow of poverty, 154 2, 186 | it in matters relating to continence, or obedience, and thus 155 2, 187 | man has vowed to observe ~continence, he is bound, even after 156 3, 7 | His head." Temperance and ~continence also regard wicked desires, 157 3, 7 | suffers. Hence, taking ~continence in this sense, as the Philosopher 158 3, 7 | had all virtue, had not continence, since it is not a ~virtue, 159 Suppl, 50| this because he is bound to continence, which happens in two ways, ~ 160 Suppl, 52| marriage. Hence he cannot vow continence without his master's consent.~ 161 Suppl, 53| after taking a simple vow of continence, since ~according to Jerome [* 162 Suppl, 53| contrary to the vow of ~continence, except by reason of carnal 163 Suppl, 53| has taken a simple vow of ~continence can never ask for the debt 164 Suppl, 53| clearly ~against his vow of continence, since he is bound to continence 165 Suppl, 53| continence, since he is bound to continence by vow. ~Therefore neither 166 Suppl, 53| to the effect of keeping continence for God's sake, ~a man still 167 Suppl, 53| taking a simple vow of ~continence, yet since the contract 168 Suppl, 53| position to fulfill ~the vow of continence. But after the marriage 169 Suppl, 53| should atone for not ~keeping continence, by his tears of repentance.~ 170 Suppl, 53| bound to keep his ~vow of continence in those matters wherein 171 Suppl, 53| wife die he is bound to continence altogether. And ~since the 172 Suppl, 53| the purpose of perpetual continence. Wherefore ~he is unable 173 Suppl, 53| no person who has vowed continence can contract marriage. Now ~ 174 Suppl, 53| some orders have a vow of continence connected with them, as 175 Suppl, 53| keep their bodies clean by continence ~[*Cf. Is. 52:11]. But it 176 Suppl, 53| by virtue of ~the vow of continence which is annexed to the 177 Suppl, 53| the parties ~cannot vow continence without the other's consent [* 178 Suppl, 53| sacred order has a vow of continence annexed to it. Therefore 179 Suppl, 53| sacred orders are bound to continence for the time when ~they 180 Suppl, 53| Religious are bound to continence like those who are in ~sacred 181 Suppl, 53| persuade her to observe continence.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[53] A[ 182 Suppl, 53| is bound to vow perpetual continence, but she is ~not bound to 183 Suppl, 55| be under a solemn ~vow of continence or any like impediment, 184 Suppl, 59| cannot receive orders or vow continence without her ~consent.~Aquin.: 185 Suppl, 59| OBJ 4: Further, the vow of continence is more favorable than the ~ 186 Suppl, 59| husband to take a vow of continence without the consent of his ~ 187 Suppl, 59| ought not to take a vow of continence nor enter ~into a second 188 Suppl, 61| wife, he cannot by a vow of continence offer it to ~God without 189 Suppl, 61| belong to ~perfection. Now continence is of those things that 190 Suppl, 61| Therefore a wife is not bound to continence on account of her husband ~ 191 Suppl, 61| consorts take a like vow of continence, neither ~renounces the 192 Suppl, 62| one is bound to perpetual continence. Now in some cases ~the 193 Suppl, 62| one is absolutely bound to continence, he may ~be bound accidentally; 194 Suppl, 62| however, ~take a vow of continence, against her husband's will, 195 Suppl, 62| consent she has taken a vow of continence.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[62] A[ 196 Suppl, 64| other's taking a vow of ~continence whether absolutely or for 197 Suppl, 64| the one can take a vow of continence either absolutely or for 198 Suppl, 64| husband cannot take a vow of ~continence whether absolutely or for 199 Suppl, 64| which is an obstacle to continence, the one cannot vow continence 200 Suppl, 64| continence, the one cannot vow continence without ~the other's consent; 201 Suppl, 64| consent to the other's vow ~of continence, does not sin, because the 202 Suppl, 64| those who observe perpetual continence have ~recourse.~Aquin.: 203 Suppl, 93| is due to the virtue of continence only?~(4) Whether three 204 Suppl, 93| assigned to the three parts of ~continence?~(5) Whether an aureole 205 Suppl, 93| is due to the virtue of continence alone?~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[ 206 Suppl, 93| not due to the virtue of continence ~alone. For a gloss on 1 207 Suppl, 93| to none but the virtue of continence.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[96] A[ 208 Suppl, 93| fortitude than in ~temperance or continence. Therefore fruit does not 209 Suppl, 93| does not correspond to ~continence alone.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[ 210 Suppl, 93| is greater than that of ~continence. Therefore fruit corresponds 211 Suppl, 93| frugality rather than to ~continence.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[96] A[ 212 Suppl, 93| widowhood, and ~conjugal continence, which are parts of continence.~ 213 Suppl, 93| continence, which are parts of continence.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[96] A[ 214 Suppl, 93| Now this is the effect of continence, since it ~is by sexual 215 Suppl, 93| Therefore fruit corresponds to ~continence rather than to another virtue.~ 216 Suppl, 93| seed, is more adapted to continence than to fortitude, because 217 Suppl, 93| the ~passions with which continence is concerned.~Aquin.: SMT 218 Suppl, 93| assigned to the three parts of ~continence?~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[96] A[ 219 Suppl, 93| assigned to the ~three parts of continence: because twelve fruits of 220 Suppl, 93| one is saved who lacks continence, and continence is adequately 221 Suppl, 93| who lacks continence, and continence is adequately divided ~by 222 Suppl, 93| widowhood surpasses conjugal continence, so does ~virginity surpass 223 Suppl, 93| adapted to the degrees of continence.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[96] A[ 224 Suppl, 93| Para. 1/1~I answer that, By continence, to which the fruit corresponds, 225 Suppl, 93| spirituality resulting from continence. Now there is a ~certain 226 Suppl, 93| those who keep conjugal ~continence, the thirtyfold fruit is 227 Suppl, 93| to those who keep the ~continence of widows, the sixtyfold 228 Suppl, 93| those who keep virginal ~continence, the hundredfold fruit: 229 Suppl, 93| the case with ~conjugal continence. The number 100 corresponds 230 Suppl, 93| to the other degrees of continence. If Adam had not sinned, ~ 231 Suppl, 93| perfection over conjugal continence, since in ~that case marriage


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