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tenderness 2
tenders 1
tending 80
tends 227
tenens 1
tenet 2
tenets 1
Frequency    [«  »]
227 98
227 back
227 die
227 tends
226 93
226 affinity
226 conditions
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

tends

    Part, Question
1 1, 5 | as it is in act, acts and tends towards that which ~is in 2 1, 5 | itself towards which it tends, e.g. a place or ~form; 3 1, 5 | means by which something tends towards another, is ~called 4 1, 5 | its own sake the appetite tends, is called the virtuous; 5 1, 16 | towards which the appetite ~tends, so the true denotes that 6 1, 16 | towards which the intellect tends. Now ~there is this difference 7 1, 16 | according as the desirer tends towards ~the thing desired. 8 1, 19 | when it has it not, it tends towards it; and when it 9 1, 19 | sight to ~color, since it tends to it by its own nature. 10 1, 20 | 3: An act of love always tends towards two things; to the 11 1, 28 | affects a thing related and tends ~from that thing to something 12 1, 31 | refers to the subject, it tends to exclude ~another Person 13 1, 41 | as man's will naturally tends to happiness; and likewise 14 1, 47 | certain limit, but of itself tends to infinity, ~and the infinite 15 1, 59 | a kind of inclination it tends, in a ~manner, to what is 16 1, 60 | Consequently the will ~tends naturally to its last end; 17 1, 60 | movement. But every movement tends ~towards something else. 18 1, 60 | whither natural movement tends in the natural order of 19 1, 63 | every creature naturally ~tends. If, therefore, the angel 20 1, 63 | has a ~particular nature, tends naturally towards some good; 21 1, 73 | other ~hand, the desire that tends to an object outside itself, 22 1, 41 | as man's will naturally tends to happiness; and likewise 23 1, 48 | certain limit, but of itself tends to infinity, ~and the infinite 24 1, 60 | a kind of inclination it tends, in a ~manner, to what is 25 1, 61 | Consequently the will ~tends naturally to its last end; 26 1, 61 | movement. But every movement tends ~towards something else. 27 1, 61 | whither natural movement tends in the natural order of 28 1, 64 | every creature naturally ~tends. If, therefore, the angel 29 1, 64 | has a ~particular nature, tends naturally towards some good; 30 1, 72 | other ~hand, the desire that tends to an object outside itself, 31 1, 79 | intellectual appetite, though it tends to individual things which 32 1, 79 | exist outside the soul, yet tends to them as standing under ~ 33 1, 81 | will." Therefore the will tends of necessity to ~the good 34 1, 91 | active force in the male seed tends to the ~production of a 35 1, 98 | is well ordered when it tends to acts which are befitting 36 1, 102 | represented; for each thing tends to a participation ~thereof, 37 1, 102 | own operation and effort tends to good only, "for no ~one 38 1, 104 | called the mover; or ~else tends to a form, as heating tends 39 1, 104 | tends to a form, as heating tends to the form of heat. Now 40 1, 113 | the ~Divine ordinance this tends to the glory of the elect.~ 41 1, 113 | something, when its action ~tends directly thereunto. And 42 2, 1 | be observed that a thing tends to an end, by its ~action 43 2, 1 | to the end, as an ~arrow tends to a determinate end through 44 2, 1 | needs be one: since nature tends to one ~thing only. But 45 2, 1 | Therefore that to which the will tends, as to its last end, ~is 46 2, 1 | action is nature, which tends to one thing, as stated 47 2, 3 | end, to which man's will tends ~naturally. But man's will 48 2, 4 | loves a thing, and that tends towards it while not ~possessed, 49 2, 4 | intellect. For the will tends to the final act of the 50 2, 5 | of operation, whereby it tends thereto. But the angel, 51 2, 5 | principle of the movement that tends towards Happiness.~Aquin.: 52 2, 5 | naturally and of necessity tends thereto, as stated above. 53 2, 6 | That to which the will tends by sinning, although in ~ 54 2, 8 | as the natural appetite tends to good existing in a ~thing; 55 2, 8 | animal or voluntary appetite tends to a good which is ~apprehended. 56 2, 8 | same natural movement which tends ~through the middle space 57 2, 10 | general, to which the will tends naturally, as does ~each 58 2, 10 | point of view, the will tends to it of ~necessity, if 59 2, 12 | movement of the thing moved tends ~to anything, is due to 60 2, 12 | will does not ordain, but tends to something according ~ 61 2, 13 | act: in so far as the will tends to its object, according ~ 62 2, 13 | that act whereby the will tends to ~something proposed to 63 2, 13 | the action whereby a man tends ~to the attainment of a 64 2, 13 | just as sometimes the will tends to something which is apprehended 65 2, 15 | means. Now the appetite tends to the last end ~naturally: 66 2, 16 | to another; but the will ~tends to that which is referred 67 2, 16 | Now every imperfect thing tends to perfection. And therefore 68 2, 16 | in respect of which it tends to the realization of the 69 2, 17 | acts, and from one thing tends to another.~Aquin.: SMT 70 2, 19 | whereas the sensitive appetite tends only ~to the particular 71 2, 19 | it as an evil, the will tends to it ~as to something evil. 72 2, 19 | something evil, the will tends to it as to something evil: 73 2, 19 | variance with the reason, tends to ~that which reason judges 74 2, 19 | accord with reason, it ~tends to what reason judges to 75 2, 19 | which the act of the will tends: and that, "indirectly" ~ 76 2, 19 | thing to which the will tends be called evil, it suffices, ~ 77 2, 19 | and thus the will that ~tends to that object considered 78 2, 19 | above (AA[3],5), ~the will tends to its object, according 79 2, 19 | the good to which the will tends. This is evident in the 80 2, 19 | willed; because the will ~tends more to the end, than to 81 2, 20 | will, in so far as the will tends towards it. ~Aquin.: SMT 82 2, 20 | more intensely ~the will tends to good or evil, the better 83 2, 21 | therefore, ~a human action tends to the end, according to 84 2, 23 | passion in respect of good, tends to it, as love, ~desire 85 2, 23 | passion in respect of evil, ~tends from it, as hatred, avoidance 86 2, 24 | Reply OBJ 3: A passion that tends to evil, and precedes the 87 2, 24 | object to which a passion tends, ~is, of itself, in harmony 88 2, 25 | first in the thing that ~tends to the end. Now it is evident 89 2, 25 | is evident that whatever tends to an end, has, ~in the 90 2, 25 | to that end, for nothing ~tends to a disproportionate end; 91 2, 25 | attractive, so that ~hope tends to good directly; whereas 92 2, 26 | with the thing to which it tends, and may be called "natural 93 2, 27 | is evil, in so far as it tends ~to that which is not simply 94 2, 28 | the more intensely a power tends to ~anything, the more vigorously 95 2, 30 | latter ~also, in its own way, tends to the spiritual good, following 96 2, 30 | Concupiscence is caused by love, and tends to pleasure, ~both of which 97 2, 30 | requires; and ~nature ever tends to something finite and 98 2, 31 | execution ceases, by which the tends ~to the end; yet the movement 99 2, 31 | because natural movement tends to a natural ~end. Therefore 100 2, 34 | with the appetite, which ~tends sometimes to that which 101 2, 35 | For movement from within tends to what is suitable more ~ 102 2, 35 | is from within: since it tends ~from the soul to the object. 103 2, 40 | arduous good, to which hope tends likewise.~Aquin.: SMT FS 104 2, 40 | attainable; and ~thus hope tends thereto, for it denotes 105 2, 40 | being expanded that one tends ~to that which is arduous; 106 2, 42 | namely, the ~good to which it tends, and the thing through which 107 2, 42 | evil: consequently whatever tends ~to increase evil, conduces 108 2, 47 | with whom we are angry, tends to increase our ~anger, 109 2, 48 | even the natural ~appetite, tends with greater force to repel 110 2, 48 | follows that the appetite tends with great ~force to repel 111 2, 48 | sweetness and gentleness; for it tends to the good that one loves: 112 2, 59 | reason, since the appetite tends to conformity with ~reason. 113 2, 62 | rectitude of the will which tends naturally to good as ~defined 114 2, 62 | of a thing is moved and tends ~towards its connatural 115 2, 64 | There will be excess, if one tends to this maximum ~"when" 116 2, 66 | universal, ~while the appetite tends to things themselves, whose 117 2, 74 | to the fact that the will tends to that upon ~which the 118 2, 77 | itself," as when the will ~tends towards it directly; or " 119 2, 77 | its cause," when the will tends towards ~that cause and 120 2, 77 | directly, if ~the will tends towards it; indirectly, 121 2, 78 | its suitableness, the will tends, as to ~something good, 122 2, 78 | good, because everything tends, of its own accord, to that ~ 123 2, 78 | through passion, whose purpose tends to a good end, although 124 2, 82 | like that of nature which ~tends to one thing. Now original 125 2, 82 | each power ~of the soul tends to its own proper movement, 126 2, 85 | nature as on its root, and tends ~to the good of virtue, 127 2, 85 | text. 37, since ~this power tends to the being and preservation 128 2, 88 | which the angry movement tends, is a ~sin generically venial, 129 2, 113 | free-will - one, whereby it tends to God's justice; the other ~ 130 2, 114 | called just, because it tends to justice; and not that 131 2, 12 | fourthly, ~in his will, which tends to evil. The result is that " 132 2, 16 | Reply OBJ 4: Magnanimity tends to something arduous in 133 2, 16 | 3: Further, by hope man tends to God. But this belongs 134 2, 17 | reason: and thus too, hope tends to its end with ~certainty, 135 2, 19 | to which the ~appetite tends naturally, and which it 136 2, 20 | there is presumption if he tends to a good as though it were 137 2, 20 | in the fact that a man tends to some ~good as though 138 2, 23 | a movement. Therefore it tends ~to an end and term. Therefore 139 2, 24 | specifically the ~same act that tends to an aspect of the object, 140 2, 24 | of the object, and that tends to the ~object under that 141 2, 24 | since their whole soul ~tends to one thing.~Aquin.: SMT 142 2, 25 | that the ~love of charity tends to God as to the principle 143 2, 25 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Charity tends towards the last end considered 144 2, 25 | from the term to which it tends, while the intensity of 145 2, 26 | good, in so far as another tends towards his good by ~an 146 2, 26 | act of the will. But it ~tends to good only, and this is 147 2, 26 | belonging to him, and so tends towards him. On ~the other 148 2, 26 | even in this state of life, tends to God first, and ~flows 149 2, 26 | creatures, ~but, through them, tends to something else, love 150 2, 26 | begins from creatures, tends to God, and love begins 151 2, 26 | movement of the Divine love tends: hence a reward is promised 152 2, 28 | thus the sensitive appetite tends sometimes to that which 153 2, 28 | the same ~appetitive power tends to diverse objects of appetite, 154 2, 29 | and so a parent's love tends to ~conferring benefits, 155 2, 29 | while the children's love tends to honor their ~parents. 156 2, 41 | disposes him ~to mortal sin, it tends to the loss of salvation.~ 157 2, 45 | reason. But moral ~virtue tends to the mean after the manner 158 2, 49 | while demonstration which ~tends to judgment, proceeds from 159 2, 50 | form to which the movement tends, then the action of the 160 2, 54 | precept, ~because justice tends to render that which is 161 2, 55 | intention of the virtue tends as to its proper ~object, 162 2, 55 | can. Nevertheless justice tends to make man repay God as 163 2, 64 | sin. Now to sin secretly tends to diminish a ~sin, just 164 2, 73 | always a mortal sin when it ~tends to the injury of God: else 165 2, 75 | which ~knows no limit and tends to infinity. Hence trading, 166 2, 81 | union with God. Now prayer tends to God through being ~moved 167 2, 81 | to wit, the will ~of God tends chiefly to this - that we 168 2, 94 | end that the magic art ~tends.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[96] A[ 169 2, 102 | in agreeable matters, he tends ~towards it at once by his 170 2, 102 | because there one's own will tends to ~nothing beside the precept. 171 2, 106 | and virtuous so far as it tends to ~the prevention of evil. 172 2, 115 | answer that, Every virtue tends towards a good; wherefore 173 2, 115 | greater ~virtue is that which tends towards the greater good. 174 2, 115 | greater good. Now liberality tends ~towards a good in two ways: 175 2, 115 | and of its very nature it tends ~to set in order one's own 176 2, 116 | which an inordinate appetite tends. Hence where there is a 177 2, 121 | object of daring and fear, tends by ~its very nature to check 178 2, 121 | desire, by its ~very nature, tends to a pleasurable good, to 179 2, 127 | be magnanimous because he tends to ~great things. But the 180 2, 127 | passion, namely hope, which tends to a difficult ~good. Wherefore 181 2, 127 | and that a magnanimous man tends to such ~things as are deserving 182 2, 127 | extremes," in so far as he tends ~to what is greatest, "but 183 2, 127 | follows the ~mean," because he tends to the greatest things according 184 2, 127 | in so far, to wit, as he tends to what is worthy ~of great 185 2, 127 | 2: Since the magnanimous tends to great things, it follows ~ 186 2, 127 | things, it follows ~that he tends chiefly to things that involve 187 2, 128 | quantity of that to which it ~tends, but in proportion to our 188 2, 128 | regards that to which he tends, does not ~exceed the magnanimous, 189 2, 128 | to which a man sometimes tends in excess of his ~ability, 190 2, 130 | his estimation, ~and he tends thereto in excess of his 191 2, 131 | just as the magnanimous man tends ~to great things out of 192 2, 132 | Further, seemingly that which tends to a thing is the same as ~ 193 2, 132 | point ~that as fortitude tends to something arduous and 194 2, 132 | thing to which fortitude tends derives its difficulty from 195 2, 132 | thing to which magnificence ~tends, derives its difficulty 196 2, 132 | of its matter: since it tends ~to something difficult 197 2, 132 | expenditure, even as fortitude ~tends to something difficult in 198 2, 134 | magnanimity regards hope, which tends to good, ~rather than daring, 199 2, 139 | things, when, to wit, a man tends to that which is proportionate ~ 200 2, 141 | is that of anger, which tends towards revenge, and ~this 201 2, 143 | rational appetite. which tends to that which is in accordance ~ 202 2, 152 | an inordinateness that ~tends to injure the life of the 203 2, 154 | reason, since the angry man tends to avenge the injury done ~ 204 2, 154 | movement of the bile which tends to anger. Hence one who ~ 205 2, 156 | appetible object to ~which anger tends, and that is revenge. Wherefore 206 2, 156 | sin of concupiscence that tends ~to a good. In this respect 207 2, 160 | magnanimity, inasmuch as ~it tends to great things inordinately. 208 2, 160 | follows that ~his appetite tends to his own excellence in 209 2, 161 | concupiscence of ~the flesh tends against the order of reason. 210 2, 165 | or wrong. First, when one tends by his study to the ~knowledge 211 2, 171 | prophetic vision the mind tends to the ~acceptance of things 212 2, 173 | concurs in that to which it tends in accordance with its ~ 213 2, 173 | to which his inclination tends. This difference ~arises 214 2, 173 | as when a man's ~appetite tends to something outside him, 215 2, 173 | s intellective appetite tends wholly to ~divine things, 216 2, 173 | another way, when a man tends wholly to things pertaining 217 2, 182 | faculty always actually tends to God as much ~as it possibly 218 2, 184 | already perfect, but ~that he tends to perfection. Hence Origen 219 3, 11 | all; provided it actually tends to ~everything in fitting 220 Suppl, 19| be cheated, because ~all tends to His own glory, even the 221 Suppl, 25| whenever the cause assigned tends to the good of the ~Church 222 Suppl, 59| the end, the marriage that tends ~to the first perfection 223 Suppl, 59| comparison with that ~which tends to the second perfection. 224 Suppl, 72| For the power of water tends to unite rather than to 225 Suppl, 72| Of its own nature fire tends only upwards; but in so 226 Suppl, 88| the term to ~which a thing tends. Hence since this movement 227 Suppl, 90| operation whereby the soul tends to ~God: since the more


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