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pt 90
ptolemy 4
puberty 27
public 220
publican 9
publicans 4
publication 6
Frequency    [«  »]
221 109
221 prayers
220 government
220 public
220 xiv
219 consist
219 specifically
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

public

    Part, Question
1 1, 60 | danger of death for the public weal of ~the state; and 2 1, 61 | danger of death for the public weal of ~the state; and 3 1, 109 | contracts; good Christians by public justice, bad ~Christians 4 1, 109 | Christians by the signs of public justice." But magicians 5 1, 109 | the whole universe as the public law is in the city. ~Therefore 6 1, 109 | said to work miracles by "public justice": but bad ~Christians 7 1, 109 | Christians by the "signs of public justice," as by invoking 8 1, 116 | takes place and is ~made public," as Augustine says further 9 2, 61 | those who have ~retired from public life on account of failing 10 2, 73 | sin committed against a public personage, ~e.g. a sovereign 11 2, 90 | the whole people or to a public personage who has care of 12 2, 90 | whole people or in some ~public personage, to whom it belongs 13 2, 95 | includes "military law," and "public law," referring to ~priests 14 2, 96 | any reason be bound by the public ~law." Now all spiritual 15 2, 96 | closed, this is ~good for public welfare as a general rule: 16 2, 97 | right of appointing their public officials is rightly ~forfeit 17 2, 97 | of laws belongs to those public men whose ~business it is 18 2, 97 | a private person to the public law to which he is subject. ~ 19 2, 97 | as none can dispense from public human law, except the man ~ 20 2, 105 | stripes, retaliation, public disgrace, exile, death, 21 2, 105 | be beaten before them." ~"Public disgrace" was brought on 22 2, 105 | punishment of stripes or of public disgrace.~Aquin.: SMT FS 23 2, 105 | matters concerning ~the public life of the people, admission 24 2, 105 | was prescribed ~that no public duties should be laid on 25 2, 107 | service rendered by the public ~solemnization of a small 26 2, 1 | before the faith was made ~public, is said secretly at Prime 27 2, 3 | commendable in making a public confession ~of one's faith, 28 2, 3 | and confess his faith in ~public. Hence it is written (Mt. 29 2, 10 | dispute with unbelievers in public?~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[10] A[ 30 2, 10 | dispute with unbelievers in ~public. For the Apostle says (2 31 2, 10 | to ~debate or dispute in public about matters which have 32 2, 10 | to presume to dispute in public about matters of faith.~ 33 2, 10 | ought not to dispute in public about matters of faith. ~ 34 2, 10 | necessary to dispute in ~public about the faith, provided 35 2, 10 | dangerous to dispute in public about the faith, ~in the 36 2, 10 | That law forbade those public disputations about the faith, ~ 37 2, 24 | of which he prefers the public good to the life of the ~ 38 2, 31 | To withstand anyone in public exceeds the mode of fraternal ~ 39 2, 31 | subject, rebuked him in public, on account of the ~imminent 40 2, 31 | admonition should precede public ~denunciation.~Aquin.: SMT 41 2, 31 | admonition should precede ~public denunciation.~Aquin.: SMT 42 2, 31 | secret admonition before public denunciation.~Aquin.: SMT 43 2, 31 | that, With regard to the public denunciation of sins it 44 2, 31 | because sins may be either public or ~secret. In the case 45 2, 31 | secret. In the case of public sins, a remedy is required 46 2, 31 | should be ~denounced in public, according to the saying 47 2, 31 | understood as referring to public sins, as ~Augustine states ( 48 2, 31 | when one man's sin is ~made public others are incited to sin 49 2, 31 | secret admonition to ~precede public denunciation.~Aquin.: SMT 50 2, 31 | judgment of God, just what public sins are to the judgment 51 2, 31 | Judas as though it were ~public, wherefore He could have 52 2, 31 | may say that the sin was public with regard to his brethren, ~ 53 2, 31 | 1/1~Whether before the public denunciation witnesses ought 54 2, 31 | would seem that before the public denunciation witnesses ought ~ 55 2, 31 | witnesses forward before the public denunciation.~Aquin.: SMT 56 2, 31 | brought forward before the public ~denunciation.~Aquin.: SMT 57 2, 31 | He wished the end to be public, ~when such a one would 58 2, 31 | dishonoring him before the public.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[33] A[ 59 2, 38 | sovereign or judge, or (as a public person) through zeal ~for 60 2, 39 | persons, being declared not by public authority, but rather by 61 2, 39 | judge, in virtue of their public authority, ~attack certain 62 2, 39 | but those who resist the public ~authority. Hence it is 63 2, 52 | sacrifices was a kind of public confession of sin, ~whereas 64 2, 52 | should not be confessed in public.~~ 65 2, 55 | individuals; secondly, ~by public agreement, as when the whole 66 2, 56 | individual and the general public stands the ~household community. 67 2, 58 | hold ~when such sins are public, because there would be 68 2, 58 | If however they are not public but ~hidden, and there be 69 2, 58 | law cannot be made save by public authority, ~so neither can 70 2, 58 | be pronounced except by public authority, which ~extends 71 2, 58 | that was ~not approved by public authority, so too it is 72 2, 58 | pronounced by other than the ~public authority.~Aquin.: SMT SS 73 2, 58 | judged by one who has no public authority.~Aquin.: SMT SS 74 2, 58 | usurped, as in the absence of public authority which gives a 75 2, 59 | in a court of law, or by public insult. If it be against 76 2, 60 | they are invested ~with public authority, in order that 77 2, 62 | private individual, or to a public ~person only?~(4) Whether 78 2, 62 | who, without exercising public ~authority, kills an evil-doer, 79 2, 62 | to persons of rank having public ~authority: wherefore they 80 2, 62 | from good men; hence a ~public authority is requisite in 81 2, 62 | lawful, for one who exercises public authority, to ~kill evil-doers. 82 2, 62 | evil-doers. Now he who exercises public authority is sometimes an ~ 83 2, 62 | OBJ 2: One who exercises public authority may lawfully put 84 2, 62 | lawful for one who exercises public ~authority to put himself 85 2, 62 | except by the sentence of the public authority. Again it is unlawful 86 2, 62 | be a soldier, exercise a public office, so that one does 87 2, 62 | s life, except for the ~public authority acting for the 88 2, 62 | except ~for such as have public authority, who while intending 89 2, 62 | self-defense, refer this to the public good, as in the case of 90 2, 63 | by killing him, except by public authority. ~Therefore neither 91 2, 63 | anyone, except perhaps by public ~authority.~Aquin.: SMT 92 2, 63 | restraining sin. Hence just as by public authority a person is lawfully ~ 93 2, 63 | anyone's ~life, except to the public authority to whom is entrusted 94 2, 64 | coercion except through public authority: and, ~consequently, 95 2, 64 | private individual not having public authority takes ~another' 96 2, 64 | As regards princes, the public power is entrusted to them ~ 97 2, 64 | justice, in the ~exercise of public authority, is to act unlawfully 98 2, 64 | them, not by private but by public ~authority.~Aquin.: SMT 99 2, 64 | more universal danger to ~public justice whose wardens they 100 2, 65 | save ~by those who hold public authority: and those who 101 2, 65 | as much as he exercises public ~authority, wherefore his 102 2, 65 | from what he ~knows as a public person. Now the latter knowledge 103 2, 65 | in general through the public laws, whether ~Divine or 104 2, 65 | in matters concerning the public ~authority, he must form 105 2, 65 | knowledge ~attainable in the public judicial procedure.~Aquin.: 106 2, 65 | 2 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: Public disgrace takes the place 107 2, 65 | private individual but as a public ~person. Accordingly on 108 2, 65 | sovereign, to whom the ~entire public authority is entrusted. 109 2, 65 | seem ~detrimental to the public good.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[67] 110 2, 68 | of them would detract in public opinion from the dignity 111 2, 68 | those who are guilty of a public crime and who ~are not allowed 112 2, 69 | judges receive out of the public ~funds a fixed pay for their 113 2, 71 | something known to the ~public. If, therefore, a person' 114 2, 71 | accuse ~him for the good of public justice.~Aquin.: SMT SS 115 2, 75 | measures as are ~established by public authority or custom.~Aquin.: 116 2, 75 | more absurd than for a ~public crier, instructed by the 117 2, 75 | publish beforehand by the public crier ~the defects of the 118 2, 75 | take to trade for some ~public advantage, for instance, 119 2, 78 | taken by authority of a public power, in ~accordance with 120 2, 81 | person praying, so ~too, in public prayers we must judge of 121 2, 86 | seems to be the same as a public vow. Now ~many other vows 122 2, 86 | other vows may be made in public besides that which is pronounced 123 2, 86 | Through being pronounced in public vows may have a certain ~ 124 2, 87 | facts, namely, by making public what was hitherto secret: ~ 125 2, 87 | it would ~be contrary to public justice. The Roman Pontiffs, 126 2, 87 | as Augustine states (Ad ~Public., Ep. xlvii): and accordingly 127 2, 93 | he ~tolerated, being made public, the power of the Healer 128 2, 93 | the truth, especially in public occurrences which depend ~ 129 2, 93 | For ~it is allowable that public crimes should be judged 130 2, 96 | gods, as Augustine says (ad Public. Ep. ~xlvii). Therefore 131 2, 96 | man demands an oath as a public person, in ~accordance with 132 2, 96 | 2: As Augustine says (ad Public. serm. xlvii), "though we 133 2, 96 | as ~Augustine says (ad Public. Ep. xlvii). Hence when 134 2, 97 | shall allow the Jews to hold public offices, ~"he must be excommunicated 135 2, 97 | guilty of sacrilege." Yet public ~offices have nothing to 136 2, 98 | Order, whether his sin be ~public or secret. Nor may he reclaim 137 2, 106 | as it is the concern of public justice, is an ~act of commutative 138 2, 115 | and among human goods the ~public good surpasses the good 139 2, 120 | good, for instance about public officers and the ~like. 140 2, 142 | disgraceful deed avoids the public eye through fear of reproach. ~ 141 2, 175 | fit to be intrusted with public teaching.~Aquin.: SMT SS 142 2, 181 | number have a ~share in public actions. Wherefore the Apostle 143 2, 182 | should be constrained by a public law." ~Now a man is not 144 2, 184 | lighter," rather than to do public penance while remaining 145 2, 185 | not to those who perform public prayers in the church, ~ 146 2, 185 | in the church, ~or give public lectures in the schools. 147 2, 186 | defense of divine worship and ~public safety, or also of the poor 148 2, 187 | satisfaction, even that of ~public penance, according to the 149 2, 187 | of all they withdraw from public business" ~(Dist. liii, 150 2, 187 | forbid) he ~have fallen into public sin." Therefore it would 151 3, 13 | example, they are made ~public against their will." And 152 3, 18 | as to ~wish to hinder the public good for the private good - 153 3, 37 | gregarious, signifies the public prayers of the Church" ~[* 154 3, 40 | appear openly and preach in public. Wherefore (Lk. 4:42,43) 155 3, 40 | to be for ever before the public, ~our Lord withdrew Himself 156 3, 47 | transgressor of the Law, but as a ~public enemy, since He had made 157 3, 55 | manifested to all. For just as a public penalty is due for public 158 3, 55 | public penalty is due for public sin, ~according to 1 Tim. 159 3, 55 | reprove before all," so is a ~public reward due for public merit. 160 3, 55 | a ~public reward due for public merit. But, as Augustine 161 3, 55 | all ~while He suffered in public, it seems that the glory 162 3, 55 | But what belongs to the public weal ought to be ~manifested 163 3, 55 | witness by preaching ~in public: and this is unbecoming 164 3, 55 | R.O. 1 Para. 2/2~But that a public penance is imposed upon 165 3, 55 | penance is imposed upon public sinners, is to be ~understood 166 3, 55 | life. And in like manner ~public merits should be rewarded 167 3, 55 | merits should be rewarded in public, in order that others may 168 3, 59 | consequently, a perfect and public Judgment cannot be made ~ 169 3, 65 | community and to exercise public acts: and ~corresponding 170 3, 67 | not suffered to teach in public, but is ~allowed to instruct 171 3, 70 | law is ordained to ~the public good, as we have stated 172 3, 72 | confess their faith in ~public, even in the face of the 173 3, 72 | Confirmation ~is ordained to the public confession of the Faith 174 3, 72 | Ghost showed themselves in public, whereas before they remained ~ 175 3, 80 | evidence of the fact, as public ~usurers, or public robbers, 176 3, 80 | as public ~usurers, or public robbers, or from being denounced 177 3, 80 | sinner, or warn all openly in public, from ~approaching the Lord' 178 3, 80 | must not be refused even to public sinners, ~especially in 179 3, 80 | government ~to judge of public crimes committed, and that 180 3, 82 | ought not to celebrate in public: he ~can, however, say mass 181 3, 84 | absolutions as are given in public are not ~sacramental, but 182 3, 84 | Now it is worse to sin in public than in private, ~both because 183 3, 84 | private, ~both because a public sinner seems to sin more 184 3, 89 | applying to those who ~do public penance, for these cannot 185 Suppl, 6 | Para. 2/2~Further, in the public court of justice, no one 186 Suppl, 9 | satisfaction ~is sometimes public. Therefore confession should 187 Suppl, 19| that it is a ~corruption of public life when the government 188 Suppl, 20| superior. The first is when a public penance has to be imposed, 189 Suppl, 22| other men, belongs to the public tribunal of external ~judgment. 190 Suppl, 26| and jurisdiction in the public ~tribunal, belong to him 191 Suppl, 26| belong to him alone as the public person, but to others by ~ 192 Suppl, 28| be repeated?~(3) Whether public penance should be imposed 193 Suppl, 28| Now a sin is sometimes ~public, and by its example draws 194 Suppl, 28| medicine should also be public and solemn so as to give ~ 195 Suppl, 28| Some penances should be public and solemn for four ~reasons. 196 Suppl, 28| reasons. First, so that a public sin may have a public remedy; 197 Suppl, 28| a public sin may have a public remedy; secondly, ~because 198 Suppl, 28| him. And if the sin be ~public, the penitent, by fulfilling 199 Suppl, 28| like manner, after doing public penance, a sinner does not 200 Suppl, 28| Every solemn penance is public, but not vice versa. For ~ 201 Suppl, 28| Para. 3/3~On the other hand public but not solemn penance is 202 Suppl, 28| penance is taken to signify a public one: so ~that authorities 203 Suppl, 31| person he can pray ~as a public official, whereas a layman 204 Suppl, 45| whether this be done in public or in private the result 205 Suppl, 47| office for dispensing the public weal: ~"Let a man so account 206 Suppl, 50| marriage, and the "justice ~of public honesty," where we have 207 Suppl, 50| such ~as hypocrisy, the public games, and so forth; thirdly, 208 Suppl, 53| scandal since it may be public, even as ~a solemn vow. 209 Suppl, 53| it is at times somewhat public. Moreover ~the indissolubility 210 Suppl, 55| called ~"the justice of public honesty," which is an impediment 211 Suppl, 55| defined thus: "The justice of public honesty is a relationship 212 Suppl, 55| known as "the justice of ~public honesty": wherefore just 213 Suppl, 55| affinity, namely the justice of public honesty.~Aquin.: SMT XP 214 Suppl, 55| impediment called "justice of public honesty," because at the 215 Suppl, 55| the head of the justice of public honesty rather than ~under 216 Suppl, 55| iii) says: "The justice of public honesty forbids the wives 217 Suppl, 55| account of the justice of ~public honesty rather than affinity. 218 Suppl, 60| private individuals, but to public persons, who are deputed 219 Suppl, 68| him as legitimate in ~a public document or in a document 220 Suppl, 84| when they will be made public, and declared before all ~


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