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Alphabetical    [«  »]
licet 6
licit 2
licitly 1
lie 218
lied 5
liers 1
lies 122
Frequency    [«  »]
219 unbelievers
219 white
218 corresponds
218 lie
218 obstacle
218 promise
217 105
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

lie

    Part, Question
1 1, 3 | inasmuch as all things lie under ~His protection.~Aquin.: 2 1, 7 | error, since "there is no lie ~in things abstract," as 3 1, 17 | is called in Scripture a lie, ~"They have laid hold on 4 1, 19 | as a man, that He should lie, ~nor as the son of man, 5 1, 114 | visible fashion, certain seeds lie ~hidden in the corporeal 6 2, 42 | of ~an evil that does not lie in our own power: and consequently 7 2, 48 | the other hand, is said to lie low and to be cunning, because, ~ 8 2, 100 | 28:22,23: "Thou shalt not lie with ~mankind . . . thou 9 2, 102 | lustful man who ~seeks to lie hidden in his deeds of darkness. 10 2, 105 | should agree to tell a lie. Therefore it is unreasonably 11 2, 105 | The woman that shall lie ~under any beast, shall 12 2, 2 | by God Himself Who cannot lie.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[2] A[4] 13 2, 8 | externally), and ~effects lie hidden in their causes, 14 2, 11 | enemies of Christ's cross lie in ~wait for our every deed 15 2, 29 | account of the obligation we lie under towards ~them for 16 2, 31 | saying of Prov. 24:19: "Lie not in wait, nor ~seek after 17 2, 38 | all men, it is wrong to lie to anyone, as Augustine 18 2, 53 | craftiness by which they lie in wait to deceive": and ~ 19 2, 62 | either ~because the wicked lie hidden among the good, or 20 2, 66 | false ~witness hath told a lie against his brother: then 21 2, 67 | sin ~mortally if he tell a lie in court.~Aquin.: SMT SS 22 2, 67 | just as it is an officious lie when one tells a lie in ~ 23 2, 67 | officious lie when one tells a lie in ~order to rescue another 24 2, 67 | death, so is it an officious lie when ~one tells a lie in 25 2, 67 | officious lie when ~one tells a lie in order to free oneself 26 2, 67 | another. Now an officious lie is ~considered not a mortal 27 2, 67 | But that the accused lie by denying himself to be 28 2, 67 | neighbor. ~Therefore such a lie is not a mortal sin.~Aquin.: 29 2, 67 | Therefore it is ~a mortal sin to lie in order to cover one's 30 2, 67 | is not lawful for him to lie.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[69] A[ 31 2, 67 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: To lie, with injury to another 32 2, 67 | is not a purely officious lie, for it has an admixture 33 2, 67 | admixture of ~the pernicious lie: and when a man lies in 34 2, 67 | guile have the force of a lie, ~and so to use them would 35 2, 68 | be concealed and not a lie be told. Now, by hiding 36 2, 68 | truth and he who tells a lie are guilty, the former because 37 2, 68 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 2: Further, a lie that benefits someone and 38 2, 68 | mortal sin. Now sometimes a lie of this kind ~occurs in 39 2, 68 | by reason of which every lie is a sin: on this account, 40 2, 69 | of him that ~hateth thee lie underneath his burden, thou 41 2, 69 | than if his ass were to lie underneath ~its burden. 42 2, 81 | Therefore either ~they lie in saying this, and so are 43 2, 86 | subject to ~him, it does not lie in his power to do as he 44 2, 87 | witness, for neither ~can God lie, nor is anything hidden 45 2, 87 | liar He makes known his lie. ~Hence oaths are of two 46 2, 87 | knows all things and ~cannot lie. Therefore the accompanying 47 2, 91 | xiv), "a most ~pernicious lie is that which is uttered 48 2, 91 | Christian religion." Now it is a lie if one signify outwardly 49 2, 92 | just as it is a wicked lie to affirm the contrary of 50 2, 108 | Contra Mend. xii) that ~"a lie is a false signification 51 2, 108 | one doubt that ~it is a lie to tell a falsehood in order 52 2, 108 | to deceive is a manifest lie." But this is ~opposed to 53 2, 108 | the essential notion of a lie is taken from formal falsehood, ~ 54 2, 108 | also the word "mendacium" [lie] is derived from its being 55 2, 108 | that it is not a ~perfect lie, since what is beside the 56 2, 108 | the specific nature of a lie.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[110] A[ 57 2, 108 | when it is said that "a lie is a ~false signification 58 2, 108 | the effect: for a "jocose" lie is ~told in order to make 59 2, 108 | make fun, an "officious" lie for some useful purpose, ~ 60 2, 108 | purpose, ~and a "mischievous" lie in order to injure someone. 61 2, 108 | doctrine"; the second is "a lie that ~profits no one and 62 2, 108 | destroy all that speak a ~lie," says "that there are three 63 2, 108 | there is another kind of lie ~that is told in fun; but 64 2, 108 | fun; but the third kind of lie is told out of malice." ~ 65 2, 108 | these is called an officious lie, the second a jocose lie, ~ 66 2, 108 | lie, the second a jocose lie, ~the third a mischievous 67 2, 108 | the third a mischievous lie. Therefore lies are divided 68 2, 108 | of two kinds, namely, the lie which goes beyond the truth, 69 2, 108 | belongs to "boasting," and the lie which stops short of the 70 2, 108 | called a ~"mischievous" lie, while the sin of lying 71 2, 108 | and then it is a "jocose" lie, or of ~usefulness, and 72 2, 108 | we have the "officious" lie, whereby it is intended ~ 73 2, 108 | God, and then we have the ~lie "in religious doctrine," 74 2, 108 | it is the second kind of lie, ~which "profits no one, 75 2, 108 | this is the ~third kind of lie, "which profits one, and 76 2, 108 | diminution; and ~this is the lie which is told "out of mere 77 2, 108 | fifth kind is the jocose lie, which is told "with a desire 78 2, 108 | comprised under the officious lie, ~wherein something useful 79 2, 108 | we have the sixth kind of lie, ~which "profits someone 80 2, 108 | Para. 1/1~Whether every lie is a sin?~Aquin.: SMT SS 81 2, 108 | It seems that not every lie is a sin. For it is evident 82 2, 108 | account. Therefore not every lie is a sin.~Aquin.: SMT SS 83 2, 108 | were rewarded by God for a lie, for it is stated that " 84 2, 108 | Ex. 1:21). Therefore a lie is not a sin.~Aquin.: SMT 85 2, 108 | Holofernes. Therefore ~not every lie is a sin.~Aquin.: SMT SS 86 2, 108 | Therefore a man may ~lawfully lie, to save another from committing 87 2, 108 | OBJ 5: Further, it is a lie not to fulfill what one 88 2, 108 | ill." Therefore not every ~lie is a sin.~Aquin.: SMT SS 89 2, 108 | 6: Further, apparently a lie is a sin because thereby 90 2, 108 | that there is any kind of lie that is not a sin deceives 91 2, 108 | others." Yet not every lie is a cause of deception, 92 2, 108 | is ~deceived by a jocose lie; seeing that lies of this 93 2, 108 | Writ. ~Therefore not every lie is a sin.~Aquin.: SMT SS 94 2, 108 | willing to make ~any manner of lie."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[110] 95 2, 108 | asserts (Div. Nom. iv). Now a lie is evil in respect of its 96 2, 108 | praise." Therefore every lie is a sin, ~as also Augustine 97 2, 108 | writings does not constitute a lie. Hence Augustine says (De ~ 98 2, 108 | rewarded, not for their lie, but for ~their fear of 99 2, 108 | latter led them to tell ~a lie. Hence it is expressly stated ( 100 2, 108 | houses." But the subsequent lie was not ~meritorious.~Aquin.: 101 2, 108 | the truth, not to tell a lie, for ~she is called his 102 2, 108 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: A lie is sinful not only because 103 2, 108 | is not lawful to tell a lie in ~order to deliver another 104 2, 108 | Reply OBJ 5: A man does not lie, so long as he has a mind 105 2, 108 | otherwise neither did he ~lie in promising - since he 106 2, 108 | go (2 Cor. 1), did not lie, because obstacles had arisen 107 2, 108 | agent. Accordingly a jocose lie, from the ~very genus of 108 2, 108 | De Mend. v), "it is not a lie to do or ~say a thing figuratively: 109 2, 108 | Para. 1/1~Whether every lie is a mortal sin?~Aquin.: 110 2, 108 | OBJ 1: It seems that every lie is a mortal sin. For it 111 2, 108 | destroy all that speak a lie," and (Wis. 1:11): "The ~ 112 2, 108 | the soul. Therefore every lie is a mortal sin.~Aquin.: 113 2, 108 | witness." Therefore every lie is a mortal sin.~Aquin.: 114 2, 108 | venial sin. Therefore no lie is a venial sin.~Aquin.: 115 2, 108 | mortal sin. ~Now, for a lie the eternal reward was lost, 116 2, 108 | meed on account of the ~lie of which they were guilty." 117 2, 108 | Therefore even an officious lie, such as ~was that of the 118 2, 108 | perfection, not only not to lie at all, but not even to 119 2, 108 | but not even to wish ~to lie." Now it is a mortal sin 120 2, 108 | precept. Therefore every ~lie of the perfect is a mortal 121 2, 108 | consequently so also is a lie ~told by anyone else, otherwise 122 2, 108 | There are two kinds of lie, that are not grievously 123 2, 108 | devoid of sin, when we lie either in joking, or for 124 2, 108 | 12]; Q[35], A[3]). Now a lie may be contrary to charity 125 2, 108 | 110] A[4] Body Para. 2/3~A lie may be in itself contrary 126 2, 108 | hides or corrupts by such a lie; so that ~a lie of this 127 2, 108 | by such a lie; so that ~a lie of this kind is opposed 128 2, 108 | science or to moral conduct, a lie of this description ~inflicts 129 2, 108 | opinion engendered by the lie be about some matter the 130 2, 108 | no consequence, then the lie in question does no harm 131 2, 108 | concern him. Wherefore a lie of this ~kind, considered 132 2, 108 | regards the end in view, a lie may be contrary to charity, 133 2, 108 | charity, neither will the lie, ~considered under this 134 2, 108 | in the case of a jocose ~lie, where some little pleasure 135 2, 108 | intended, or in an officious lie, ~where the good also of 136 2, 108 | intended. Accidentally a lie may ~be contrary to charity 137 2, 108 | refer to the mischievous lie, as a ~gloss explains the 138 2, 108 | destroy all that speak a ~lie."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[110] 139 2, 108 | Q[100], A[5], ad 1), a lie is contrary to a precept 140 2, 108 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 4: The lie of the midwives may be considered 141 2, 108 | with the deformity of their lie, though this was ~inconsistent 142 2, 108 | that they merited ~by that lie to lose the eternal reward 143 2, 108 | that for the perfect every lie is a mortal sin. ~But this 144 2, 108 | an officious ~or jocose lie. Wherefore an officious 145 2, 108 | an officious or a jocose lie is not a mortal sin ~in 146 2, 108 | perfection not only not to lie at all, but not even to 147 2, 108 | but not even to wish to lie": ~although Augustine says 148 2, 108 | or ~teaching, and if they lie in these matters their lie 149 2, 108 | lie in these matters their lie will be a mortal ~sin: but 150 2, 108 | they sin mortally when they lie in other ~matters.~ 151 2, 109 | dissimulation is properly a lie told by the signs of outward ~ 152 2, 109 | matters not whether one lie in word or in any other 153 2, 109 | Wherefore, since every lie is a sin, ~as stated above ( 154 2, 109 | pretend is not ~always a lie: but only when the pretense 155 2, 109 | signification, then it is ~a lie. When, however, our pretense 156 2, 109 | signification, there is ~no lie, but a representation of 157 2, 109 | dissimulation from sin or lie, because he was a wicked 158 2, 109 | evil, both because it is ~a lie, and because it gives scandal; 159 2, 109 | In dissimulation, as in a lie, there are two things: one 160 2, 109 | every dissimulation and lie as a sign.~Aquin.: SMT SS 161 2, 109 | All dissimulation is a lie, as stated above (A[1]). 162 2, 109 | stated above (A[1]). Now ~a lie is directly opposed to truth. 163 2, 109 | not always a mortal sin to lie by deed. Neither ~therefore 164 2, 109 | applies to simulation as to a lie.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[111] A[ 165 2, 110 | Further, boasting is a kind of lie. But it is neither an ~officious 166 2, 110 | officious nor a jocose lie. This is evident from the 167 2, 110 | an officious nor a jocose lie, and ~consequently it must 168 2, 110 | it must be a mischievous lie. Therefore seemingly it 169 2, 110 | First, in itself, as a lie, and thus it is sometimes 170 2, 110 | always involve a mischievous lie, but ~only where it is contrary 171 2, 110 | wherefore it amounts to a jocose lie. Unless perchance he were 172 2, 110 | to involve an officious lie: ~provided it be do without 173 2, 110 | once become ~a mischievous lie.~ 174 2, 111 | sinful: ~which would be a lie of irony.~Aquin.: SMT SS 175 2, 111 | and so he ought not to lie in any way at all in order 176 2, 111 | above (Q[110], AA[2],4), one lie is more ~grievous than another, 177 2, 111 | which it is ~about - thus a lie about a matter of religious 178 2, 111 | sinning; thus a ~mischievous lie is more grievous than an 179 2, 111 | than an officious or jocose lie. Now ~irony and boasting 180 2, 111 | Now ~irony and boasting lie about the same matter, either 181 2, 111 | boasting, according as a ~lie is considered to be grievous 182 2, 116 | witnessing is a special kind of lie, just as theft is a special 183 2, 122 | martyrdom. Yet, since every lie is a sin, as stated ~above ( 184 2, 122 | AA[3],4), avoidance of a lie, to whatever truth it may 185 2, 122 | martyrdom inasmuch as a lie is a sin ~against the Divine 186 2, 136 | claim to praise seems to lie ~rather in overcoming pleasures. 187 2, 152 | virgin not yet espoused, and lie with her, he shall endow 188 2, 152 | espoused, and taking her, lie with her, and the matter 189 2, 165 | written (Prov. 24:15), "Lie not in wait, nor seek ~after 190 2, 170 | that "when he ~speaketh a lie, he speaketh of his own, 191 2, 170 | may gain credit for his lie." ~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[172] 192 2, 181 | this is not the case ~if he lie down, sit, or recline, but 193 3, 29 | strengthened, the motive for a lie is removed. If she ~had 194 3, 29 | wished to ~hide her sin by a lie: being espoused, she had 195 3, 36 | neighboring parts of Judea that lie to the east of the region 196 3, 55 | signification, it is not a lie, but a figure of the truth; 197 3, 76 | significance, it is not a lie, but a ~figure of the truth." 198 3, 80 | this sacrament does not lie in the use of ~the faithful, 199 3, 83 | consecrated, and the faithful lie in it, it ~is lawful to 200 Suppl, 6 | then the ~sinner should not lie by excusing or denying his 201 Suppl, 6 | that he has, he does not lie; wherefore he does not ~ 202 Suppl, 25| Hath God any need of your ~lie, that you should speak deceitfully 203 Suppl, 25| publishing indulgences, does not lie; and so they avail as much 204 Suppl, 33| the like, and those who lie sick of ~them should not 205 Suppl, 37| believers and ~instructed, yet lie under an impediment through 206 Suppl, 47| and thus it makes ~him lie. But a constant man does 207 Suppl, 47| man is not compelled to lie, because at the ~time he 208 Suppl, 65| with a concubine. For a lie is a greater sin than simple 209 Suppl, 65| recoiled from telling a lie, saying (Gn. 38:23): "Surely 210 Suppl, 65| cannot charge us with a lie." But a lie is not always 211 Suppl, 65| charge us with a lie." But a lie is not always a mortal sin. ~ 212 Suppl, 65| Thus, ~too, Juda avoided a lie while he avoided not fornication. 213 Suppl, 65| would have been a pernicious lie, for it would have involved 214 Suppl, 70| said before of those who lie senseless that "they ~have 215 Suppl, 75| are born in original sin lie under the sentence: ~Earth 216 Suppl, 92| seduce a virgin . . . and lie with ~her, he shall endow 217 Suppl, 93| against Him by telling any lie whatever.~Aquin.: SMT XP 218 Appen1, 2| instanced in those who ~lie dangerously ill; nor again


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