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inclination 398
inclinations 29
incline 51
inclined 213
inclines 94
inclining 23
include 95
Frequency    [«  »]
214 final
214 intelligence
213 bring
213 inclined
213 presence
213 riches
212 really
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

inclined

    Part, Question
1 1, 19 | action results unless it is inclined to one or ~the other by 2 1, 19 | having free-will, can be ~inclined to either side."~Aquin.: 3 1, 59 | things in their own way are inclined by ~appetite towards good, 4 1, 59 | different ways. Some are inclined to good ~by their natural 5 1, 59 | appetite." ~Others, again, are inclined towards good, but with some 6 1, 59 | This is most perfectly inclined towards ~what is good; not, 7 1, 59 | sensitive knowledge, ~but as inclined towards good in general. 8 1, 59 | body. But a natural body is inclined through its form towards 9 1, 59 | substantial ~form: while it is inclined to something outside by 10 1, 59 | everything to which it is inclined, but only from something ~ 11 1, 60 | good; as it is ~naturally inclined to seek its own good, namely, 12 1, 60 | principally, and more strongly inclined to that other to ~which 13 1, 60 | common; for ~everything is inclined to preserve not merely its 14 1, 61 | idolatry, to which they were inclined, and ~from which Moses especially 15 1, 62 | nature, the will cannot be inclined towards it, unless helped 16 1, 62 | intellectual nature to be ~inclined freely towards the objects 17 1, 62 | angel is of his nature inclined to natural perfection, so 18 1, 62 | perfection, so is he by merit ~inclined to glory. Hence instantly 19 1, 62 | rational. Therefore it is inclined towards ~good and evil.~ 20 1, 62 | things ~to which they are not inclined naturally; but as to the 21 1, 63 | as ~regards their being inclined to this or the other object. 22 1, 63 | these demons are ~not at all inclined, any more than they are 23 1, 63 | anything whose nature is inclined towards some particular 24 1, 63 | anything of its nature be inclined to good in ~general, then 25 1, 63 | own nature it cannot be inclined to evil. Now it is ~manifest 26 1, 63 | every intellectual nature is inclined towards good in ~general, 27 1, 63 | the sensitive nature is inclined towards some ~particular 28 1, 63 | Further, the more a subject is inclined towards anything, so much ~ 29 1, 63 | so much ~the more is he inclined towards God. Therefore so 30 1, 64 | by reason of free-will be inclined to good and ~evil; with 31 1, 60 | things in their own way are inclined by ~appetite towards good, 32 1, 60 | different ways. Some are inclined to good ~by their natural 33 1, 60 | appetite." ~Others, again, are inclined towards good, but with some 34 1, 60 | This is most perfectly inclined towards ~what is good; not, 35 1, 60 | sensitive knowledge, ~but as inclined towards good in general. 36 1, 60 | body. But a natural body is inclined through its form towards 37 1, 60 | substantial ~form: while it is inclined to something outside by 38 1, 60 | everything to which it is inclined, but only from something ~ 39 1, 61 | good; as it is ~naturally inclined to seek its own good, namely, 40 1, 61 | principally, and more strongly inclined to that other to ~which 41 1, 61 | common; for ~everything is inclined to preserve not merely its 42 1, 62 | idolatry, to which they were inclined, and ~from which Moses especially 43 1, 63 | nature, the will cannot be inclined towards it, unless helped 44 1, 63 | intellectual nature to be ~inclined freely towards the objects 45 1, 63 | angel is of his nature inclined to natural perfection, so 46 1, 63 | perfection, so is he by merit ~inclined to glory. Hence instantly 47 1, 63 | rational. Therefore it is inclined towards ~good and evil.~ 48 1, 63 | things ~to which they are not inclined naturally; but as to the 49 1, 64 | as ~regards their being inclined to this or the other object. 50 1, 64 | these demons are ~not at all inclined, any more than they are 51 1, 64 | anything whose nature is inclined towards some particular 52 1, 64 | anything of its nature be inclined to good in ~general, then 53 1, 64 | own nature it cannot be inclined to evil. Now it is ~manifest 54 1, 64 | every intellectual nature is inclined towards good in ~general, 55 1, 64 | the sensitive nature is inclined towards some ~particular 56 1, 64 | Further, the more a subject is inclined towards anything, so much ~ 57 1, 64 | so much ~the more is he inclined towards God. Therefore so 58 1, 65 | by reason of free-will be inclined to good and ~evil; with 59 1, 79 | example, fire, by its form, is inclined to rise, and to ~generate 60 1, 79 | only that to which it is inclined by its ~natural form. And 61 1, 80 | which the soul is simply inclined to seek ~what is suitable, 62 1, 81 | this - that the will is inclined to the thing ~itself as 63 1, 82 | retains the power of ~being inclined to various things. For reason 64 1, 82 | such a disposition a man is inclined to choose or reject ~something. 65 1, 82 | virtue of which a ~man is inclined to one thing rather than 66 1, 82 | free-will: for we are naturally ~inclined to those things of which 67 1, 82 | which we are naturally ~inclined are not subject to free-will, 68 1, 85 | its cause is more or less inclined to produce the effect.~Aquin.: 69 1, 85 | soul is naturally more ~inclined to receive these impressions 70 1, 92 | terrestrial ~animals is not inclined prone to the ground, but 71 1, 104 | OBJ 2: Further, any agent inclined to several effects will 72 1, 104 | will is nothing but to be inclined towards ~the object of the 73 1, 110 | concupiscence or anger the will is inclined to will something. In ~this 74 1, 112 | that the ~affection be inclined to good, which is effected 75 1, 113 | it can ~nevertheless be inclined.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[114] A[ 76 2, 6 | things, the will can be inclined to ~either. But it is not 77 2, 8 | and suitable to ~the thing inclined. Since, therefore, everything, 78 2, 13 | its appetite is naturally ~inclined, it is moved to that alone, 79 2, 32 | burdened by sorrow are most inclined to seek pleasures, as the ~ 80 2, 32 | also young people are ~most inclined to seek pleasures; on account 81 2, 32 | that "the mind is more ~inclined by desire to act intensely 82 2, 33 | sit and rest, the soul is ~inclined to knowledge and prudence"; 83 2, 34 | pleasure; men will be more inclined to pleasure by following 84 2, 42 | since the human will may be inclined to sin by an extrinsic cause; ~ 85 2, 44 | quick to attack, but is more inclined to run away.~Aquin.: SMT 86 2, 46 | generic ~nature that man is inclined to desire those things which 87 2, 47 | that "some are very ~much inclined to be angry when they are 88 2, 48 | sanguine temperaments are more inclined to love; and hence the saying ~ 89 2, 50 | something by which the power is inclined to its object; for ~the 90 2, 50 | those things to which it is inclined sufficiently by the nature 91 2, 50 | the appetitive power be ~inclined to something fixed, to which 92 2, 50 | fixed, to which it is not inclined by the nature of ~the power, 93 2, 50 | very nature of the power inclined to the ~good of the reason. 94 2, 50 | ways, the ~will needs to be inclined, by means of a habit, to 95 2, 51 | be prone to sickness or inclined to health, in accordance 96 2, 51 | 3: Nature is not equally inclined to cause all the various ~ 97 2, 51 | the appetitive power is inclined variously, and ~to many 98 2, 51 | entirely overcome, so as to be inclined ~like nature to the same 99 2, 55 | particular action, ~but are inclined indifferently to many: and 100 2, 57 | does not follow that he is ~inclined to make use of it, but he 101 2, 57 | evident that a craftsman is inclined by justice, which ~rectifies 102 2, 58 | Further moral virtue makes us inclined to do good works. But ~some, 103 2, 73 | those whereby the will is inclined to sin. Among these causes 104 2, 73 | his ~will being strongly inclined to sin, that a man does 105 2, 74 | appetite, is naturally inclined to be moved by the will. 106 2, 74 | due to his desire being inclined to this act. Wherefore ~ 107 2, 75 | the sensitive appetite is inclined to something; which ~inclination 108 2, 75 | because the appetite is inclined, that the ~reason sometimes 109 2, 78 | things to which ~we are inclined by habit, as stated in Ethic. 110 2, 78 | his will ~must needs be inclined of itself to the evil he 111 2, 78 | nature of that power man is inclined, not to evil but to good. 112 2, 78 | nature of the power, it is inclined to the rational ~good, as 113 2, 78 | nature. Hence, if a will be inclined, by its choice, to some 114 2, 78 | of a man who is naturally inclined to certain sins, by ~reason 115 2, 78 | by a habit, the will is inclined from ~within. Hence the 116 2, 79 | right, and in having a will inclined to ~evil. Therefore God 117 2, 82 | a habit whereby power is inclined to an act: thus ~science 118 2, 85 | fact that thing becomes inclined to one of two ~contraries, 119 2, 85 | sinning once, is more ~easily inclined to sin again.~Aquin.: SMT 120 2, 85 | that iron be ~breakable and inclined to rust, results from the 121 2, 90 | all those things that are inclined to something by ~reason 122 2, 94 | everything to which a ~man is inclined according to his nature. 123 2, 94 | nature. Now each thing is inclined ~naturally to an operation 124 2, 94 | its form: ~thus fire is inclined to give heat. Wherefore, 125 2, 94 | everything to which a man is inclined according to his nature. 126 2, 94 | different men are naturally inclined to different things; some 127 2, 94 | things to which a man is inclined naturally: and among these 128 2, 94 | is ~proper to man to be inclined to act according to reason. 129 2, 95 | to which above all man is inclined, and ~especially the young, 130 2, 95 | those young people who are inclined ~to acts of virtue, by their 131 2, 101 | above (Q[95], ~A[1]); some, inclined to good, either from nature 132 2, 101 | idols. As to those who were inclined to ~good, it was again necessary 133 2, 101 | these do not seem to be inclined ~in any of those mentioned 134 2, 102 | animals, so as to be less inclined to be cruel to other men, 135 2, 102 | idolatry to which the Jews were inclined. The other ~precept (Dt. 136 2, 105 | especially were the Jews inclined to cruelty and avarice, 137 2, 105 | they should ~not be less inclined to do so as the year of 138 2, 107 | possessed of virtue, ~are inclined to do virtuous deeds through 139 2, 107 | Accordingly such persons are inclined of themselves to those objects, 140 2, 108 | their disposition is not ~inclined to such things. Hence Our 141 2, 110 | they may of themselves be inclined to ~these movements, and 142 2, 10 | enter. For the latter were inclined to idolatry, so ~that it 143 2, 22 | thing the form whereby it is inclined to the end ~appointed to 144 2, 23 | Further, the free-will is not inclined to sin unless by some ~motive 145 2, 26 | consists in the appetite being ~inclined towards the thing in itself. 146 2, 28 | timorous persons, are ~more inclined to pity: whereas those who 147 2, 28 | suffering any hurt, ~are not so inclined to pity.~Aquin.: SMT SS 148 2, 33 | and in so ~far as he is inclined to undue repose, it is sloth: 149 2, 34 | are in ~great defect are inclined to sorrow, as stated above ( 150 2, 37 | people, because they were inclined to seditions ~and schisms. 151 2, 45 | virtues whereby they are inclined to right ends; and consequently 152 2, 68 | the judge ought to be more inclined to ~acquit than to condemn, 153 2, 75 | thought that all men are inclined ~to wish to buy for a song 154 2, 89 | Confess. x, 33): "I am inclined to approve of ~the usage 155 2, 93 | instinct whereby they are inclined ~by a natural movement, 156 2, 105 | Secondly, he should be inclined ~to turn his ungratefulness 157 2, 115 | Ethic. iv, 1) that ~"he is inclined neither to receive nor to 158 2, 132 | whereby the appetite is inclined ~to make good use of the 159 2, 142 | who are virtuous are more inclined to ~be ashamed.~Aquin.: 160 2, 151 | many, since men are ~more inclined to pleasure. Yet the contrary 161 2, 154 | intemperate man is not inclined to be penitent, for he holds 162 2, 154 | every incontinent man is inclined to repentance." Therefore ~ 163 2, 154 | intemperate man, the ~will is inclined to sin in virtue of its 164 2, 154 | incontinent man, the will ~is inclined to sin through a passion. 165 2, 154 | from the ~appetite being inclined to something, either by 166 2, 155 | theft, whereunto he is ~inclined by immoderate love or desire 167 2, 157 | of soul, ~whereby one is inclined to mitigate punishment. 168 2, 157 | to savagery which is not inclined to mitigate ~punishment.~ 169 2, 159 | bent to the ~ground'], i.e. inclined to the lowest place. This 170 2, 164 | which we are most naturally ~inclined. Hence it is that, since 171 2, 164 | part of the soul, he is inclined to desire knowledge of things; 172 2, 164 | his bodily ~nature, man is inclined to avoid the trouble of 173 2, 166 | disposition that a man is ~inclined to this or that style of 174 2, 167 | so that we are naturally ~inclined to be the recipients of 175 2, 170 | ad 2], and also is more inclined to receive the ~subtle motions 176 2, 172 | denunciation, because God is more inclined ~to remit punishment than 177 2, 173 | stone, which is naturally inclined to be borne downwards, may ~ 178 2, 177 | and to which it is most inclined is that which is most ~becoming 179 2, 177 | and to which it is ~most inclined. Thus the life of plants 180 2, 181 | justice consists in being inclined to evil ~by a habit of sin, 181 2, 181 | evil ~by a habit of sin, or inclined to good by a habit of justice: 182 2, 181 | by his natural reason, is inclined to ~justice, while sin is 183 3, 1 | do, and since He is more inclined to ~be merciful than to 184 3, 14 | of soul, whereby one is inclined to wish to satisfy for another, ~ 185 3, 15 | satisfaction, but rather inclined to what is contrary to ~ 186 3, 36 | God is most especially inclined to mercy; according to ~ 187 3, 36 | feared; for "the populace is inclined to favor too much ~those 188 3, 42 | those men, they were less inclined ~to be prejudiced against 189 Suppl, 11| For a man might be more inclined to sin, if he ~had no fear 190 Suppl, 16| possibly, although they are inclined to good by ~nature.~Aquin.: 191 Suppl, 18| debtors. But God is more inclined to mercy than any temporal ~ 192 Suppl, 41| man is an animal ~more inclined by nature to connubial than 193 Suppl, 41| Therefore he is naturally inclined to connubial union, and ~ 194 Suppl, 41| described as being ~naturally inclined to political society, so 195 Suppl, 55| wealth, ~for they, one is inclined to think, would be willing 196 Suppl, 60| Consequently he is less inclined to ~matricide and more prone 197 Suppl, 62| account of their being easily ~inclined to concupiscence," for neither 198 Suppl, 62| wherefore they are more inclined to ~be led by their concupiscences, 199 Suppl, 64| if he be deemed that ~way inclined. If however, he ask in ignorance, 200 Suppl, 71| God. Therefore God ~is not inclined to mercy by the suffrages 201 Suppl, 71| 5: Further, God is more inclined to pity than to condemn. 202 Suppl, 71| the faithful, who are more inclined to offer special than ~common 203 Suppl, 72| His will is ~more easily inclined to give us a gracious hearing, 204 Suppl, 81| their very form they are inclined to such a ~movement: for 205 Suppl, 81| the less is it ~naturally inclined to retard the movement. 206 Suppl, 81| movement by reason of its being inclined to a ~contrary movement, 207 Suppl, 88| its nature, is ~equally inclined to every situation that 208 Suppl, 88| outside it, it is not equally ~inclined to every situation: but 209 Suppl, 93| like habits that we are inclined to the ~practice of such 210 Suppl, 95| obstinate will can never be inclined except to evil. ~Now men 211 Suppl, 95| is in ~their power to be inclined by their affections to this 212 Appen1, 2| the affections are more inclined to them, and more firmly ~ 213 Appen2, 1| supremely merciful is more inclined to reward ~good than to


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