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Alphabetical    [«  »]
consanguinei 1
consanguinitas 1
consanguinity 177
conscience 203
consciences 2
conscious 35
consciousness 10
Frequency    [«  »]
204 mission
204 serm
204 worthy
203 conscience
203 injustice
203 innocence
203 suffrages
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

conscience

    Part, Question
1 1, 57 | mind of each is seen, his conscience will at the same time be ~ 2 1, 57 | see what is in another's conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[57] A[ 3 1, 64 | which applies to the worm of conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[64] A[ 4 1, 58 | mind of each is seen, his conscience will at the same time be ~ 5 1, 58 | see what is in another's conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[57] A[ 6 1, 65 | which applies to the worm of conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[64] A[ 7 1, 78 | intellectual part?~(13) Whether the conscience is a power of the intellectual 8 1, 78 | Thes. Para. 1/1~Whether conscience be a power?~Aquin.: SMT 9 1, 78 | OBJ 1: It would seem that conscience is a power; for Origen says ~[* 10 1, 78 | Commentary on Rm. 2:15] that "conscience is a correcting and guiding ~ 11 1, 78 | xii, 7,24). Therefore ~conscience is a power.~Aquin.: SMT 12 1, 78 | power of the soul. ~But conscience is a subject of sin; for 13 1, 78 | some that "their ~mind and conscience are defiled" (Titus 1:15). 14 1, 78 | Therefore it seems that ~conscience is a power.~Aquin.: SMT 15 1, 78 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, conscience must of necessity be either 16 1, 78 | Nor is it a habit; for conscience is not one thing but many, 17 1, 78 | of knowledge. Therefore ~conscience is a power.~Aquin.: SMT 18 1, 78 | Para. 1/1~On the contrary, Conscience can be laid aside. But a 19 1, 78 | be ~laid aside. Therefore conscience is not a power.~Aquin.: 20 1, 78 | that, Properly speaking, conscience is not a power, but an act. ~ 21 1, 78 | speaking are attributed to conscience. For conscience, ~according 22 1, 78 | attributed to conscience. For conscience, ~according to the very 23 1, 78 | knowledge to something: for conscience may be resolved into "cum 24 1, 78 | the name it is clear that conscience is an act.~Aquin.: SMT FP 25 1, 78 | which are attributed to ~conscience. For conscience is said 26 1, 78 | attributed to ~conscience. For conscience is said to witness, to bind, 27 1, 78 | not done ~something; "Thy conscience knoweth that thou hast often 28 1, 78 | and according to this, conscience is said to ~witness. In 29 1, 78 | way, so far as through the conscience we judge that ~something 30 1, 78 | done; and in this sense, conscience is ~said to incite or to 31 1, 78 | third way, so far as by conscience we ~judge that something 32 1, 78 | done, and in this sense ~conscience is said to excuse, accuse, 33 1, 78 | Wherefore, properly speaking, conscience denominates an act. But ~ 34 1, 78 | act, sometimes the name conscience is given ~to the first natural 35 1, 78 | Jerome calls ~'synderesis' conscience (Gloss. Ezech. 1:6); Basil [* 36 1, 78 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Conscience is called a spirit, so far 37 1, 78 | the same ~as mind; because conscience is a certain pronouncement 38 1, 78 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The conscience is said to be defiled, not 39 1, 78 | all the habits ~by which conscience is formed, although many, 40 1, 78 | habit is sometimes ~called conscience, as we have said above.~ 41 1, 86 | certainly that it ~is there, and conscience proclaims its existence"; 42 2, 19 | in the FP, Q[79], A[13], conscience is ~nothing else than the 43 2, 19 | erring reason, it is against conscience. But every such will is 44 2, 19 | i.e. all that is ~against conscience - "is sin." Therefore the 45 2, 19 | 1/2~I answer that, Since conscience is a kind of dictate of 46 2, 19 | inquire "whether an erring ~conscience binds." On this matter, 47 2, 19 | they say that if reason or conscience tell us to do ~something 48 2, 19 | hand if a man's reason or conscience tells him that he ~is bound 49 2, 19 | forbidden, then his reason or conscience errs. In like manner ~if 50 2, 19 | manner ~if a man's reason or conscience tell him, that what is indifferent 51 2, 19 | commanded, his reason or conscience errs. They say, therefore, 52 2, 19 | therefore, that ~reason or conscience when erring in matters of 53 2, 19 | say that ~when reason or conscience errs in commanding what 54 2, 19 | variance with ~erring reason or conscience is not evil.~Aquin.: SMT 55 2, 19 | variance with erring reason or conscience, is evil in some way on ~ 56 2, 19 | inquiring ~"whether an erring conscience binds"; so this question 57 2, 19 | inquiring "whether an erring conscience excuses." Now this question ~ 58 2, 19 | Para. 2/2~If then reason or conscience err with an error that is 59 2, 19 | such an error of reason or conscience does not excuse ~the will, 60 2, 19 | by that erring reason or conscience, from being ~evil. But if 61 2, 19 | that error of reason or conscience excuses the will, that abides 62 2, 19 | suppose a man's reason or conscience to ~err through inexcusable 63 2, 85 | would have no remorse of conscience. That it is not reduced 64 2, 87 | himself, viz. remorse of conscience; another, inflicted by man; 65 2, 88 | sense, as to the ~remorse of conscience; although as to the pain 66 2, 94 | iv, 22] says that the ~conscience or "synderesis is the law 67 2, 96 | Whether it binds man in conscience?~(5) Whether all men are 68 2, 96 | human law binds a man in conscience?~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[96] A[ 69 2, 96 | law does not bind man in conscience. For ~an inferior power 70 2, 96 | such as ~is the court of conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[96] A[ 71 2, 96 | Further, the judgment of conscience depends chiefly on the ~ 72 2, 96 | does not bind a man in ~conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[96] A[ 73 2, 96 | laws ~do not bind man in conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[96] A[ 74 2, 96 | is thankworthy, if ~the conscience . . . a man endure sorrows, 75 2, 96 | the power of binding in conscience, from the eternal law ~whence 76 2, 96 | are just and ~binding in conscience, and are legal laws.~Aquin.: 77 2, 96 | such ~laws do not bind in conscience, except perhaps in order 78 2, 96 | guilty according to his conscience.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[96] A[ 79 2, 104 | can'] not, as to the conscience, make him perfect ~that 80 2, 16 | a pure heart, and a good conscience," i.e. ~"from hope," according 81 2, 20 | Wis. 17:10): "A ~troubled conscience always presumes [Douay: ' 82 2, 23 | a pure heart, and a good conscience, and an ~unfeigned faith." 83 2, 23 | pure ~heart, and a good conscience, and an unfeigned faith," 84 2, 24 | account of the gnawings of conscience, according to ~Ps. 49:21: " 85 2, 31 | that we once had it on our conscience, but have it ~no longer: 86 2, 31 | brother's or in his own conscience, on account of his previous 87 2, 31 | amend him as ~regards his conscience, that he keep his good name.~ 88 2, 31 | 4~Since, however, one's conscience should be preferred to a 89 2, 31 | brother and so deliver ~his conscience from sin, even though he 90 2, 41 | When you wound the weak ~conscience of the brethren [*Vulg.: ' 91 2, 41 | brethren and wound their weak conscience'], you sin against Christ." ~ 92 2, 42 | pure heart, and a good conscience, and an unfeigned faith." 93 2, 42 | the possession of a ~good conscience - such are the virtues that 94 2, 42 | earthly things; an evil conscience gives man ~a horror for 95 2, 43 | this, the testimony ~of our conscience." Now one ought not to glory 96 2, 61 | flaw. But as ~regards the conscience of an elector, it is necessary 97 2, 65 | OBJ 4: Further, the word "conscience" denotes application of 98 2, 65 | evidence but against his conscience ~of the truth.~Aquin.: SMT 99 2, 65 | person, a man must form his ~conscience from his own knowledge, 100 2, 65 | authority, he must form his conscience in accordance with the knowledge ~ 101 2, 65 | man, takes the sinner's conscience as his ~accuser, according 102 2, 73 | eyes the glory of a good ~conscience, according to 2 Cor. 1:12, " 103 2, 73 | this, the testimony ~of our conscience." Hence, on the other hand, 104 2, 73 | loses the glory of his ~conscience through being confused and 105 2, 73 | OBJ 3: A secure and calm conscience is a great good, according 106 2, 73 | that ~disturbs another's conscience by confounding him inflicts 107 2, 86 | vow without any remorse of conscience, whenever his ~superior 108 2, 87 | removed in the tribunal of conscience, ~because that man ought 109 2, 87 | God Who witnesses his conscience accepts his oath as understood 110 2, 98 | so one ~ought with a good conscience to receive Orders from him. 111 2, 101 | hearts, the witness of one's conscience suffices. wherefore ~honor, 112 2, 154 | more a man acts against his conscience, ~the more gravely he sins, 113 2, 154 | seem to act against his ~conscience more than the intemperate 114 2, 160 | some ~rejecting a good conscience have made shipwreck concerning 115 2, 166 | gloss adds, "namely, in the conscience." Now the movements of the ~ 116 2, 183 | his own defect, either of conscience (for instance if he be ~ 117 2, 187 | However, in the court of conscience one ~ought to advise him 118 2, 187 | if "he wish to heal his conscience ~he should renounce the 119 3, 22 | cleansed should have no conscience of sin any longer; but in 120 3, 22 | God, shall cleanse our ~conscience from dead works, to serve 121 3, 62 | secret ~hiding-place of the conscience. For subtle and clear as 122 3, 66 | sprinkled from an evil ~conscience, and our bodies washed with 123 3, 66 | unto God, shall cleanse our conscience ~from dead works," etc. 124 3, 68 | the examination of a ~good conscience towards God." But children 125 3, 68 | God." But children have no conscience, either ~good or bad, since 126 3, 68 | the ~child acquires a good conscience in himself, not indeed as 127 3, 78 | shall cleanse our conscience from dead ~works," that 128 3, 80 | neglects to examine his conscience, which is opposed ~to what 129 3, 82 | approach it except with clean conscience." From this it is evident 130 3, 83 | cleanness, to denote purity of conscience, and, ~owing to the manifold 131 3, 86 | is forced by his wicked conscience ~to acknowledge and confess 132 3, 89 | shall cleanse our conscience from dead works." These 133 Suppl, 6 | it is the mark ~of a good conscience to acknowledge a fault where 134 Suppl, 6 | it is the mark of a good conscience to accuse oneself of those ~ 135 Suppl, 6 | tribunal of Penance, is the conscience. Therefore a man ~ought 136 Suppl, 6 | sin which is not on his conscience.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[6] A[4] 137 Suppl, 6 | than ~what he has on his conscience, whether it be good or evil, 138 Suppl, 6 | only of what is on his ~conscience.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[6] A[4] 139 Suppl, 6 | good, but of an ~erroneous conscience, to acknowledge having done 140 Suppl, 6 | also the ~mark of a good conscience that a man should accuse 141 Suppl, 6 | confession thereof tally with his conscience.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[6] A[5] 142 Suppl, 6 | from sin in the tribunal of conscience; but from punishment in 143 Suppl, 7 | which a man has on his conscience: for thus his lips and heart 144 Suppl, 8 | judge. But, in the court of conscience, the judge is none but a ~ 145 Suppl, 8 | he may help his subject's conscience. Consequently ~in the tribunal 146 Suppl, 8 | priest, in the tribunal of conscience, ought, and is bound, to 147 Suppl, 9 | the confession knows the conscience of the person ~confessing. 148 Suppl, 9 | order that the penitent's ~conscience may be made known to the 149 Suppl, 9 | But a man can make his ~conscience known to the priest, through 150 Suppl, 9 | voice. But he could make his conscience ~known to him by writing. 151 Suppl, 9 | he ought to manifest his ~conscience to him by writing to him.~ 152 Suppl, 9 | wherein the hidden affairs of conscience are tried.~Aquin.: SMT XP 153 Suppl, 11| is bound to safeguard his conscience rather than ~the good name 154 Suppl, 11| hiding a sin injures his own ~conscience - for instance, if he be 155 Suppl, 11| wherefore without wronging his conscience he can swear that he knows 156 Suppl, 11| can, ~without wronging his conscience, leave a sin unpunished 157 Suppl, 11| know what is on another's conscience: and it ~would seem that 158 Suppl, 14| he that has a sin on his conscience cannot ~make satisfaction 159 Suppl, 14| mitigated as to the remorse of ~conscience, though not as to the pain 160 Suppl, 14| pain of the remorse of conscience: so that what applies to 161 Suppl, 20| hand, in the tribunal of conscience he can give another the 162 Suppl, 22| that, In the tribunal of conscience the plea is between man 163 Suppl, 22| subjects, in the tribunal of conscience, but not in the judicial ~ 164 Suppl, 29| they need only a clear conscience which is signified by ~oil.~ 165 Suppl, 36| should shine with a good conscience before God, and with a good 166 Suppl, 36| being in mortal sin, which conscience, however, he can lay aside 167 Suppl, 45| him in the tribunal of his conscience so that he ~is not bound 168 Suppl, 45| in the tribunal ~of his conscience nor in the tribunal of the 169 Suppl, 46| reference ~to the tribunal of conscience, and thus in very truth 170 Suppl, 47| the ~marriage is valid in conscience and in God's sight, but 171 Suppl, 55| Yet in the tribunal of the conscience the other brother ~ought 172 Suppl, 55| is not bound to form his conscience on what ~has been done about 173 Suppl, 60| according to the law of conscience, whatever evidence he ~may 174 Suppl, 64| divine service against ~her conscience.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[64] A[ 175 Suppl, 66| being compelled by his own conscience, even before ~she is convicted 176 Suppl, 84| all that is on another's ~conscience?~(3) Whether one will be 177 Suppl, 84| are certain books of the conscience, wherein each one's merits 178 Suppl, 84| leaves its mark upon the conscience according ~to a gloss of 179 Suppl, 84| Origen on Rm. 2:15, "Their conscience bearing witness," ~etc. 180 Suppl, 84| one cannot read in one's conscience all the ~sins one has committed: 181 Suppl, 84| judgment to the witness of the conscience, according to 1 Kgs. 16: 182 Suppl, 84| it is necessary for the conscience to witness ~to everything 183 Suppl, 84| Therefore each one's conscience must needs retain all the 184 Suppl, 84| shall ~judge" each one's conscience will bear witness to him 185 Suppl, 84| works. Wherefore each ~man's conscience will be as a book containing 186 Suppl, 84| speak, signifies each one's ~conscience, which is said to be one 187 Suppl, 84| the first books to the ~conscience, and by the second book 188 Suppl, 84| Reply OBJ 2: Each one's conscience will bear certain marks 189 Suppl, 84| all that is in another's ~conscience?~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[87] A[ 190 Suppl, 84| all ~that is in another's conscience. For the knowledge of those 191 Suppl, 84| is contained in another's conscience. ~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[87] A[ 192 Suppl, 84| contained in a ~person's conscience cannot be known by another 193 Suppl, 84| all that is in another's conscience.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[87] A[ 194 Suppl, 85| accusing or ~defending his conscience, so that all and each will 195 Suppl, 85| according to Rm. 2:15,16, "Their conscience bearing witness to them, 196 Suppl, 86| xxxiv): "Consider how the conscience of the wicked will then 197 Suppl, 87| blood" hath cleansed "our conscience from dead works." And thus ~ 198 Suppl, 94| and this is the remorse of conscience, which is ~called a worm 199 Suppl, 95| damned will have remorse of conscience. But the ~conscience suffers 200 Suppl, 95| of conscience. But the ~conscience suffers remorse for deeds 201 Suppl, 95| Second Objection, since conscience will not have remorse for ~ 202 Appen1, 1| the damned ~is the worm of conscience. Therefore these children 203 Appen1, 1| children will have the worm of ~conscience, and consequently theirs


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