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Alphabetical    [«  »]
speculative 315
speculatively 3
speculo 1
speech 200
speeches 17
speechless 4
speed 11
Frequency    [«  »]
200 94
200 cap
200 peter
200 speech
200 theological
199 duty
199 fathers
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

speech

    Part, Question
1 1, 1 | Writ by the manner ~of its speech transcends every science, 2 1, 16 | in the intellect, and in ~speech. Now according as it is 3 1, 16 | but according as it is in speech, it is called enunciable 4 1, 36 | by the use of scriptural speech accommodated to Him. The ~ 5 1, 36 | a fallacy of "figure of speech" as the argument concludes 6 1, 51 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, speech is the function of a living 7 1, 51 | other operations; just as speech, which is the function of 8 1, 51 | there is a semblance of speech, in so far as they ~fashion 9 1, 54 | it is a common usage of speech, when he ~understands something 10 1, 57 | only ~when expressed by speech, but even when conceived 11 1, 58 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, speech is a sign of the intellect. 12 1, 58 | affirmative and negative forms of ~speech, shows that they know both 13 1, 63 | choose and consent, and vocal speech in order to ~exhort; both 14 1, 63 | in the ~last instant of speech, another who catches his 15 1, 63 | away, then, the time for speech and deliberation which is ~ 16 1, 63 | affection by intelligible speech, it was possible for the 17 1, 67 | senses, extended in common speech to all knowledge obtained 18 1, 52 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 4: Further, speech is the function of a living 19 1, 52 | other operations; just as speech, which is the function of 20 1, 52 | there is a semblance of speech, in so far as they ~fashion 21 1, 55 | it is a common usage of speech, when he ~understands something 22 1, 58 | only ~when expressed by speech, but even when conceived 23 1, 59 | Para. 1/1~OBJ 3: Further, speech is a sign of the intellect. 24 1, 59 | affirmative and negative forms of ~speech, shows that they know both 25 1, 64 | choose and consent, and vocal speech in order to ~exhort; both 26 1, 64 | in the ~last instant of speech, another who catches his 27 1, 64 | away, then, the time for speech and deliberation which is ~ 28 1, 64 | affection by intelligible speech, it was possible for the 29 1, 68 | senses, extended in common speech to all knowledge obtained 30 1, 78 | that is, orderly internal speech; from which, they say, ~ 31 1, 78 | which, they say, ~comes speech expressed by the tongue." 32 1, 78 | the ordering of "interior speech," from which proceeds "external ~ 33 1, 78 | which proceeds "external ~speech." For every difference of 34 1, 90 | attitude would quite hinder speech, ~which is reason's proper 35 1, 93 | received the faculty of speech from God." But this was 36 1, 105 | of the enlightenment and speech ~of the angels; and of their 37 1, 106 | 107] Out. Para. 1/1 - THE SPEECH OF THE ANGELS (FIVE ARTICLES)~ 38 1, 106 | ARTICLES)~We next consider the speech of the angels. Here there 39 1, 106 | 4) Whether the angelic speech is subject to local distance?~( 40 1, 106 | distance?~(5) Whether all the speech of one angel to another 41 1, 106 | hidden from another. But speech manifests ~to another what 42 1, 106 | Para. 1/1 ~OBJ 2: Further, speech is twofold; interior, whereby 43 1, 106 | to another. But exterior speech ~takes place by some sensible 44 1, 106 | the properties of ~bodily speech, should be lifted to the 45 1, 106 | unknown methods of ~interior speech."~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[107] 46 1, 106 | 1~Reply OBJ 2: External speech, made by the voice, is a 47 1, 106 | angel; ~but only interior speech belongs to him, and this 48 1, 106 | includes not only the ~interior speech by mental concept, but also 49 1, 106 | a gloss remarks that the speech of the angels is an ~enlightenment 50 1, 106 | the same way every angelic speech is an enlightening. ~Therefore 51 1, 106 | enlightening is an ~angelic speech; but on the other hand, 52 1, 106 | the other hand, not every speech is an ~enlightening; because, 53 1, 106 | primary truth, is both speech and enlightenment; for example, 54 1, 106 | enlightenment, but is only a speech; for ~instance, when one 55 1, 106 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Every speech of God to the angels is 56 1, 106 | does not speak to God. For speech ~makes known something to 57 1, 106 | the patient, and in ~human speech the teacher is ordered to 58 1, 106 | the agent, and in human speech the disciple to the master; 59 1, 106 | 1 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 1: Speech is not always for the purpose 60 1, 106 | distance influences the angelic speech?~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[107] A[ 61 1, 106 | distance affects the angelic speech. For ~as Damascene says ( 62 1, 106 | works where he is." ~But speech is an angelic operation. 63 1, 106 | it seems that an angel's speech is limited by the ~bounds 64 1, 106 | Therefore in the angelic speech local distance has some 65 1, 106 | local distance impede the speech of one angel to another.~ 66 1, 106 | answer that, The angelic speech consists in an intellectual 67 1, 106 | whatever. ~Hence in the angelic speech local distance is no impediment.~ 68 1, 106 | Reply OBJ 1: The angelic speech, as above explained (A[1], 69 1, 106 | this is to perceive his speech.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[107] A[ 70 1, 106 | another. But in the angelic speech local distance ~has no effect, 71 1, 106 | enlightenment is a kind of speech. But the enlightenment ~ 72 1, 106 | the others." Therefore the speech of one angel to another ~ 73 1, 106 | an angel can perceive the speech of one angel to another; ~ 74 1, 106 | enlightenments are common to all. But speech may be of ~something ordered 75 1, 108 | manifestation of the truth is ~speech, as when one angel manifests 76 1, 108 | concept to another by way of ~speech.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[109] A[ 77 1, 116 | But men can by means of speech make known to ~angels the 78 2, 12 | the purpose of taste and ~speech" (De Anima ii, 8). Therefore, 79 2, 22 | and yet ordinary human speech is wont to ascribe to them 80 2, 31 | such are movement, repose, speech ~and such like. On the other 81 2, 35 | is sorrow ~depriving of speech; anxiety is the sorrow that 82 2, 35 | said to deprive one of ~speech is because of all the external 83 2, 44 | contrary they lose their speech. Therefore fear does not 84 2, 44 | wherefore fear hinders speech which ensues from the emission 85 2, 44 | tremble especially in their speech, on ~account of the tracheal 86 2, 46 | anger with ~perfection of speech," corresponding to the three 87 2, 46 | we ~have "perfection of speech"]. Therefore Damascene's 88 2, 48 | taciturnity is opposed to speech. But increase in anger conduces 89 2, 48 | increase in anger conduces to ~speech; as is evident from the 90 2, 48 | above all it conduces to ~speech. Therefore it does not cause 91 2, 48 | the tongue from unbridled ~speech. Wherefore Gregory says ( 92 2, 48 | altogether ~deprived of speech; and taciturnity is the 93 2, 57 | syllogism or of a fitting speech, or the work ~of counting 94 2, 60 | his regard, by becoming ~speech and deeds: and this belongs 95 2, 71 | the exterior actions of speech or operation. Again, a human ~ 96 2, 94 | for ~he makes a becoming speech by the habit of grammar. 97 2, 96 | things are not subject ~to speech, but speech to things." 98 2, 96 | subject ~to speech, but speech to things." Therefore we 99 2, 97 | may be made manifest by ~speech, so may they be made known 100 2, 97 | is evident that by ~human speech, law can be both changed 101 2, 102 | only by touch, but ~also by speech or looks, as Rabbi Moses 102 2, 110 | to the common manner of speech, grace is ~usually taken 103 2, 114 | life; and not merely their ~speech but even their life was 104 2, 1 | articles are parts of speech which are affixed to words 105 2, 10 | Even as a ~thoughtless speech gives rise to error, so 106 2, 12 | betrays itself outwardly in speech ~it is blasphemy is opposed 107 2, 33 | curiosity"; if it ~affect the speech it is called "loquacity"; 108 2, 36 | signifies ~contrariety of speech. For this reason when a 109 2, 36 | various ~contrary things in a speech, this is called "contentio," 110 2, 36 | consists in developing a speech from contrary things," for ~ 111 2, 36 | 2/3~Now contrariety of speech may be looked at in two 112 2, 36 | contention is a sharp ~speech suitable for proof and refutation" - 113 2, 36 | respect of the ~acrimony of speech, it is not always a mortal 114 2, 36 | inordinate in mind or in ~speech.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[38] A[ 115 2, 53 | is ascribed ~chiefly to speech. Yet guile may happen also 116 2, 69 | cause he ~defends, and also speech and hearing, that he may 117 2, 72 | name from the sound of his speech, for he speaks disparagingly 118 2, 74 | blasphemy [Douay: 'railing ~speech']," where blasphemy stands 119 2, 78 | do good, and is of gentle speech": and Andronicus too says 120 2, 81 | pray is to speak." Now ~speech belongs to the intellect. 121 2, 81 | originally ~signified a speech, being derived in the first 122 2, 81 | with tears rather than with speech."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[83] A[ 123 2, 87 | Mt. 5:37): ~"But let your speech be: Yea, yea: No, no. And 124 2, 87 | but for a condition of speech.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[89] A[ 125 2, 93 | Christ ~put a stop to his speech, lest together with the 126 2, 107 | man, both in life and in ~speech, shows himself to be such 127 2, 108 | the truth both in one's speech and in one's life. But ~ 128 2, 108 | which exceeds the truth in speech, and "irony," which falls ~ 129 2, 108 | made use of ~this mode of speech being moved by the spirit 130 2, 109 | And he cites figures of ~speech as an example, where a thing 131 2, 109 | shows himself in life and speech to be what he is, as ~stated 132 2, 120 | that are ~comprised under speech, such as detractions, insults, 133 2, 122 | fighting erect, undaunted in speech, with souls unmoved, and ~ 134 2, 123 | Antonomasia is the figure of ~speech whereby we substitute the 135 2, 130 | others. Thirdly, as regards "speech," and then we have "contention," ~ 136 2, 139 | It is customary in human speech to employ a common term ~ 137 2, 139 | Antonomasia is the figure of ~speech whereby we substitute the 138 2, 144 | kingdom of God is not in speech but in power [virtute]." ~ 139 2, 146 | carried away by immoderate ~speech, that rich man who is stated 140 2, 146 | not only to bridle ~the speech, but also to restrain outward 141 2, 151 | pertaining in the main to speech; wherein there is a fourfold ~ 142 2, 151 | pleasure, he directs his ~speech thereto, and so gives utterance 143 2, 156 | anger ~in his manner of speech, as stated above (A[5], 144 2, 156 | disorderly and confused speech. The other disorder is when 145 2, 159 | one be not immoderate in ~speech, which refers to the second. 146 2, 160 | pride of will, pride of speech, end pride of deed." Bernard ~[* 147 2, 160 | which a man is proud ~of speech. The third degree of humility 148 2, 163 | irrational animal. Now wisdom, speech, ~and punishment are not 149 2, 166 | exclude fun from human ~speech, but from the sacred doctrine; 150 2, 166 | only is lacking in playful speech, but is also ~burdensome 151 2, 169 | pertain to knowledge, ~some to speech, and some to operation. 152 2, 169 | men unto edification." Now speech is not knowledge itself, ~ 153 2, 169 | consists secondarily in speech, in so far as the prophets ~ 154 2, 170 | vision, or even by ~audible speech; and in this way this prophecy 155 2, 171 | his disciple by signs of speech, but he cannot ~enlighten 156 2, 174 | Para. 1/1 - PERTAINING TO SPEECH (QQ[176]-177)~OF THE GRACE 157 2, 174 | gratuitous graces that pertain to speech, and ~(1) the grace of tongues; ( 158 2, 174 | those who understood ~their speech, or it would have amounted 159 2, 174 | utterance of various ~signs of speech. All this is done in the 160 2, 174 | explain any obscurities of speech arising either from a difficulty 161 2, 174 | or from the ~figures of speech employed, according to Dan. 162 2, 175 | kingdom of God is not in speech, but in ~power." Therefore 163 2, 175 | profit, except by means of speech. ~And since the Holy Ghost 164 2, 175 | members of the Church with ~speech; to the effect that a man 165 2, 175 | will know, not the speech of them ~that are puffed 166 2, 175 | said (1 ~Cor. 2:4): "My speech and my preaching was not 167 2, 175 | Para. 1/1~I answer that, Speech may be employed in two ways: 168 2, 176 | inward movement, or his speech, or some outward action, 169 2, 179 | teaching is ~conveyed by speech, and speech is the audible 170 2, 179 | conveyed by speech, and speech is the audible sign of the 171 2, 179 | teaching is on the part of the speech heard, and ~thus the object 172 2, 185 | a gloss on 1 Cor. 2:4, "Speech is addressed ~privately, 173 2, 185 | inflated withal, lest your speech belie your habit." In both ~ 174 3, 3 | the fallacy of figure of speech or of accident; even as 175 3, 6 | our word is united to our speech by means of ~"breathing" [ 176 3, 6 | Our word is united to our speech, by means of breathing ~[ 177 3, 6 | proceeds, from which the speech is ~formed. And similarly 178 3, 8 | Reply OBJ 2: In metaphorical speech we must not expect a likeness 179 3, 8 | Eph. 4:29: "Let no evil speech proceed from ~your mouth; 180 3, 8 | suddenly he turned his speech to Anti-christ the ~head 181 3, 42 | He says this because His speech is darkness to ~the carnal-minded, 182 3, 44 | says, "He restrained his speech, although ~he was confessing 183 3, 51 | in the customary usage of speech of the Scriptures, whereby 184 3, 58 | after the same manner ~of speech the Apostle adds that "He 185 3, 60 | corresponding to the ~usual forms of speech. And so, although the sensible 186 3, 67 | not be a proper form of ~speech to say: "We wrote this book," 187 3, 72 | communicates with others by speech, but balm, by its ~odor. 188 3, 78 | My blood" is a ~figure of speech, which can be understood 189 3, 78 | immediately following the speech: ~because the sense is: " 190 3, 78 | the signification of this speech is complete directly those ~ 191 3, 78 | it ~would not be a true speech. Moreover, this opinion 192 3, 78 | constitute the truth of one speech, but the words of the different 193 3, 82 | his fingers, or the use of speech; and sometimes on account 194 Suppl, 21| the judgment of railing speech, ~but said: The Lord command 195 Suppl, 36| great care to be examples of speech and conduct to those over ~ 196 Suppl, 44| stands the common use of speech.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[44] A[ 197 Suppl, 85| the ~Gospel describes as speech (Mt. 25:84-46), nevertheless 198 Suppl, 85| take place ~suddenly. But speech which is measured by time 199 Suppl, 86| Q[106]],: or by way of speech as the ~lower angels speak 200 Suppl, 89| as life ~is perceived in speech. For although our intellect


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