Table of Contents | Words: Alphabetical - Frequency - Inverse - Length - Statistics | Help | IntraText Library
St. Thomas Aquinas
Summa Theologica

IntraText - Concordances

(Hapax - words occurring once)


1003-bespa | beste-conse | consi-drops | dross-foste | fouln-inexo | inexp-megal | melan-penit | pepuz-refut | regai-socra | sodom-truth | tu-zone

     Part, Question
1 3, 55 | Cf. Migne, P. G., xxii, 1003] says, "Two ~Evangelists, 2 1, 25 | having mercy" [*Collect, 10th Sunday after ~Pentecost]. 3 3, 26 | influence of St. Anselm (1109), the doctrine was maintained ~ 4 2, 169 | Averroes or Ibn Roshd, 1120-1198] says (De Anima iii). ~ 5 3, 26 | was maintained ~by Eadmer (1137). Nicolas of St. Albans ( 6 3, 26 | 1175), Osbert of Clare (1170), ~Robert Grosseteste, Bishop 7 3, 26 | Nicolas of St. Albans (1175), Osbert of Clare (1170), ~ 8 1, 87 | Arabian Philosopher; ob. 1183] taught that by the ~understanding 9 2, 38 | Dominican Breviary, August 11th, ~commemoration of St. Tiburtius.]~ 10 Suppl, 71| the See of Paris, A.D. ~1205-9] said that suffrages for 11 2, 98 | Fourth Lateran Council, A.D. 1215, held by Innocent III], 12 3, Note| was written in the years 1235-1253, while St. Thomas was 13 3, 26 | 1253), William of Ware (1300), who ~was the master of 14 3, 26 | the master of Duns Scotus (1308)]. No doubt he knew something 15 1, 36 | God" (Prose Psalter, A.D. 1325), and "Oure ~wrestlynge 16 Suppl, 93| Dominican ~Breviary, December 13th]; not that she has two aureoles 17 2, 53 | wisest man" [*Cf. Iliad xiv, ~214-217].~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[55] 18 2, 53 | man" [*Cf. Iliad xiv, ~214-217].~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[55] A[ 19 1, 109 | Tim. (Did.) vol. ii, p. ~218] asserted that the forms 20 3, 74 | humorem"; Virgil, Georg. i, 295] indicates fermentation 21 Suppl, 74| Ascension to His last coming 400 years would ~elapse, others 22 2, 1 | the other council, A.D. 451, known as the "Latrocinium" 23 Suppl, 74| years would ~elapse, others 500, others 1,000. The falseness 24 2, 105 | it prescribes that in the 50th year of the jubilee all 25 Suppl, 92| endowment" (De Arte Amandi i, 538): "By ~whatever endowment 26 2, 35 | quoting Virgil (Aeneid, vi, 733): "hence wild ~desires and 27 2, 145 | Theodulf, bishop of Orleans (760-821) and is ~said to be 28 2, 2 | Cf. Baron, Annal., A.D. 780]. If, ~however, some were 29 2, 134 | calls patience brave (Sent. ~811).~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[136] 30 2, 145 | bishop of Orleans (760-821) and is ~said to be found 31 2, 185 | held by Photius in the year 879]: ~"The monastic life is 32 2, 183 | heart: My lord is ~long a-coming," which shows contempt of 33 Suppl, 93| the signs drawn on the 'abacus' the number 30 is ~denoted 34 1, 23 | but it is the cause of abandonment by God. ~It is the cause, 35 2, 185 | of humility, just as they abase themselves in other ways, 36 Suppl, 71| forgiveness, or at least an abatement of their damnation." Now ~ 37 3, 44 | from 3 Kgs. 18:10, where Abdias says to Elias: ~'As the 38 2, 44 | due to contraction ~of the abdomen and testicles, as the Philosopher 39 2, 152 | without seduction ~if a man abduct a widow or one who is not 40 2, 152 | are guilty of rape, or of ~abducting or seducing women, should 41 2, 152 | father's care, ~and then the abductor may lawfully marry her with 42 2, 152 | xxxvi, qu. 2], "We abhor ~abductors whether of widows or of 43 2, 29 | nature, but not so as to abet his sin, for this would 44 2, 33 | Ps. 106:18, ~"Their soul abhorred all manner of meat," and 45 3, 31 | of his ~(Roboam's) son, Abiam. "But the impiety of those 46 2, 5 | and would wish to hold ~abidingly, for man naturally shrinks 47 2, 106 | for the sin of Dathan and Abiron their children ~were swallowed 48 2, 11 | which they had ~already abjured, must be left to the secular 49 1, 12 | as a habit makes a power abler to act. Even so corporeal 50 3, 83 | day, lest from taking the ~ablution-wine he be prevented from celebrating 51 2, 97 | has the force ~of a law, abolishes law, and is the interpreter 52 2, 79 | the Latin "factae sunt in abominationem" admits of the ~translation " 53 2, 102 | day, ~because such were abortive as it were, the flesh being 54 2, 93 | Christ. xxviii): "If thou aboundest in that which it ~behooves 55 2, 175 | man shall abound [Vulg.: 'aboundeth']." Now man's goodness is 56 3, 30 | a deep sleep fell upon Abram, and a great and darksome ~ 57 2, 10 | therefore, does unbelief abrogate the right of ~unbelieving 58 2, 10 | have ~peace, unless his son Absalom had been killed in the war 59 2, 20 | flesh, which give the most ~absorbing pleasure.~Aquin.: SMT SS 60 3, 4 | 3 Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: Absorption does not here imply the 61 1, 3 | David of Dinant, ~who most absurdly taught that God was primary 62 2, 172 | sent to ~consult the god of Accaron (4 Kgs. 1).~Aquin.: SMT 63 Suppl, 81| Hence any retardation or ~acceleration affecting the movement affects 64 3, 46 | v), there are several ~acceptations of the word "necessary." 65 2, 37 | instance, hot water is more ~accessible to the action of cold, and 66 3, 65 | secondly, indirectly [per accidens], i.e. by the removal of ~ 67 2, 41 | two ways, ~directly and accidently. The scandal is accidental 68 2, 159 | he is, as it were, 'humo acclinis'" [*Literally, 'bent to 69 2, 166 | any payment, would sin as ~accomplices of their sin. But this would 70 2, 44 | vital spirits and ~heat are accumulated in the interior parts, man 71 Suppl, 55| tua, De his qui matrim. accus. ~possunt.) which runs as 72 2, 31 | Cap. Qualiter, xiv, De Accusationibus) that "nothing else need 73 2, 66 | Decret. II, qu. viii, can. ~Accusatorum) that "the role of accuser 74 Suppl, 86| 45): "There is one that accuseth ~you, Moses in whom you 75 2, 105 | strengthens friendship and accustoms men to ~give things to one 76 2, 33 | sin. Now such ~is sloth [acedia]: for it is written (Ecclus. 77 2, 33 | wisdom, "and be not grieved ~[acedieris] with her bands." Therefore 78 2, 105 | related (Judith ~14:6) that Achior, the captain of the children 79 2, 109 | his countenance before" Achis, king of Geth (1 Kgs. 21: 80 2, 33 | wants to do nothing; thus acid things are also cold. Hence 81 2, 36 | own ~opinion, rather than acquiesce with the other. Now it is 82 1, 93 | serpent, had she not already acquiesced in the ~love of her own 83 2, 33 | appetitive power, which acquiesces in the ~pleasurable object, 84 2, 171 | ignorant of his scientific acquirements. Therefore he who utters 85 2, 64 | committed [*Dig. XLI, i, De ~acquirend, rerum dominio, 9: Inst. 86 2, 62 | as to find a motive for acquitting the innocent: but if he ~ 87 2, 104 | Thanksgiving [gratiarum actio] in the recipient ~corresponds 88 2, 5 | their natural ~intellectual acumen.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[5] A[2] 89 2, 92 | to which ~they were then addicted, was a sin almost equal 90 3, 88 | somewhat in relation to various adherences, as it were to ~various 91 2, 105 | idolatry, and become an adherent of the Law, it was lawful 92 2, 187 | which they committed while ~adherents of Judaism, and furthermore 93 2, 105 | son of the stranger that adhereth to the Lord ~speak, saying: 94 2, 91 | Augustine ~says (Contra Adimant. Manich. discip. xvii) that " 95 2, 185 | 6, cf. XVI, qu. ~i, can. Adjicimus]: says "Let none dare to 96 2, 187 | afterwards it is added: "We adjudge and by apostolic authority 97 Suppl, 58| three years it would be adjudged to be perpetual. Nevertheless, 98 Suppl, 18| way ~through the priestly administrations, it would be possible for 99 2, 58 | subjects as an executive and administrative virtue. Hence judgment, 100 2, 56 | while it is ~secondarily and administratively in his subjects.~Aquin.: 101 1, 89 | as its ~form, but as its administrator. But if the soul is united 102 2, 32 | pleasant to be loved and admired by others, ~inasmuch as 103 2, 102 | other things; whereas ~he admires and reveres those things 104 2, 187 | monastery, when they ~seek admittance, unless first of all they 105 2, 178 | Confess. x, 40), ~"Thou admittest me to a most unwonted affection 106 2, 185 | to understand ~the useful admonishments of charity"; and again: " 107 2, 63 | that "a father's ~words are admonitory and not coercive." Now blows 108 3, 55 | to see and proclaim the adorable mystery ~of the Resurrection: 109 2, 49 | for instance, something adorns or covers, and something 110 2, 38 | instance and entreaty of Adrian, bishop of Rome. ~Therefore 111 2, 137 | fortitude to cut oneself adrift from all the deadly pleasures 112 2, 174 | sequence: 'Sancti Spiritus adsit nobis gratia' ascribed ~ 113 2, 53 | walking in craftiness, nor adulterating the ~word of God." Therefore 114 3, 29 | Reply OBJ 4: The sentence of adulteresses according to the Law was 115 2, 152 | quotation is ~from Cap. Adulterii xxxii, qu. 7. Cf. Augustine, 116 2, 105 | not molest a ~stranger [advenam]"; and again (Ex. 22:9): " 117 Suppl, 87| of the wicked is not more adverse to ~Christ's humanity than 118 Suppl, 41| Theophrastus proves that it is not ~advisable for a wise man to marry, 119 2, 163 | prudent or cunning man ~in advising something prudently or cunningly. 120 2, 98 | lawyer may sell ~his just advocacy, a physician his advice 121 3, 2 | says (Epist. ad Monach. Aegyptii): "The ~Scripture does not 122 2, 35 | the soul; quoting Virgil (Aeneid, vi, 733): "hence wild ~ 123 2, 93 | hydromancy," if in ~the air "aeromancy," if in fire "pyromancy," 124 2, 74 | Trin. xii, 7). ~[*'Rationes aeternae,' cf. FP, Q[15], AA[2],[ 125 2, 116 | First as in the thought [affectu]. In this way it ~gives 126 Suppl, 55| party contracts with the affines of the other ~party a relation 127 Suppl, 55| Non debent, De consang. et affinit.), "length of time does 128 2, 12 | negatives are proved by affirmatives, according to Poster. i, 129 1, 111 | that way begins to be there afresh. Now all this takes ~place 130 2, 102 | pleasure. The ibis is an African bird with ~a long beak, 131 3, 31 | says that ~it is given by Africanus the historian. For these 132 2, 172 | Acts of the apostles that Agabus and the four maidens, daughters 133 2, 62 | Num. 25), Samuel killed ~Agag king of Amalec (1 Kgs. 15), 134 2, 109 | he that acts the part of Agamemnon is not that man himself 135 3, 89 | Innocent I ~says (Ep. vi ad Agapit.) that "the canons framed 136 2, 1 | to ~an end, as directing [agens] and leading itself to the 137 3, 89 | Jerome in commenting on Agg. i, 6: "You have sowed ~ 138 2, 38 | waged not for ~motives of aggrandizement, or cruelty, but with the 139 1, 20 | binding force, ~since it aggregates another to ourselves, and 140 2, 46 | his anger know it and be aggrieved thereby, as the ~Philosopher 141 Suppl, 47| constant ~man is not to be agitated in the midst of dangers. 142 2, 48 | understanding, while by agitating it troubles the mind."~Aquin.: 143 Suppl, 82| have color by their nature aglow with the resplendence of 144 Suppl, 64| to Jerome [*Serm. de Esu Agni viii] ~quoted in the text ( 145 3, 18 | certain struggle [*Greek, ~{agonia}] in a soul drawn to contrary 146 2, 79 | beneath us, thus a farmer [agricola] is one who ~cultivates 147 2, 129 | written ~(Acts 25:27) that "Agrippa and Berenice . . . with 148 2, 105 | authority of the prophet Ahias the Silonite (3 Kgs. 11: 149 2, 38 | applied to the part ~which ails. But contemplation of truth 150 1, 7 | Creator; for no ~agent acts aimlessly. Hence everything created 151 2, 11 | choosing ~[*From the Greek {airein} [hairein], to cut off], 152 2, 89 | theatrical measures and airs." Therefore God should not 153 1, 13 | all things; or from the ~{aithein}, that is to burn, for our 154 2, 15 | perfects youth" [*oion tois akmaiois he hora}--as youthful vigor ~ 155 2, 140 | to childish faults." [*{Akolasia} which Aristotle ~refers 156 2, 46 | calls some angry persons {akrocholoi} ~[choleric], because they 157 1, 92 | decem ~Chordis (Serm. ix, al, xcvi, De Tempore).~Aquin.: 158 2, 187 | evident that this is a foolish alarm; ~thus might a man fear 159 2, 68 | fear, while it is unduly alarmed, may plunge ~us into the 160 3, 82 | Gregory says in the Register: "Alas, ~into what a great snare 161 3, 26 | Eadmer (1137). Nicolas of St. Albans (1175), Osbert of Clare ( 162 1, 90 | of a heavenly ~body; and Albumazar says that man is not generated 163 2, 75 | gold were to be produced by alchemy, it ~would not be unlawful 164 Suppl, 87| De Anima, ~ascribes it to Alcherus, a Cistercian monk; see 165 2, 60 | calls "truthfulness" [*{aletheia}]. For frankness is more 166 2, 185 | Christ's sake." The Blessed Alexis acted in like manner, for, 167 2, 184 | sense for abstinence from ali evil, as stated above (Q[ 168 2, 187 | Decretals (XVI, qu. i, cap. ~Alia causa). Hence although monastic 169 2, 30 | wins from one who cannot alienate his property, such as minors, 170 2, 105 | possessions could not be alienated for ever, but after a certain 171 1, 12 | things. Hence in dreams and alienations of the bodily senses ~divine 172 2, 152 | another's ~marriage-bed [ad alienum torum]" [*Cf. Append. Gratian, 173 1, 114 | the burning body should alight on this matter and set fire 174 Suppl, 55| such a union (cap. Quoties aliqui; cap. Super eo, De test. 175 2, 1 | should believe Him to be ~"all-knowing" and "provident for all," 176 2, 113 | Who dost show forth Thine all-mightiness most by pardoning and ~having 177 2, 178 | Hugh of St. ~Victor, Alleg. in N.T. iii, 4] are said 178 2, 67 | taken against ~calumnious allegations (Extra, De juramento calumniae, 179 3, 83 | progress in life; then the "Alleluia" is intoned, and ~this denotes 180 Suppl, 84| once did, since this would alleviate their pain considerably. 181 2, 13 | can offer no excuse in alleviation of his ~punishment. Likewise 182 3, 31 | by reason of the ~close alliance of their hearts, although 183 1, 23 | particular good, He does not allot it without election; since 184 2, 61 | distributive justice consists in allotting various ~things to various 185 2, 98 | understood ~of the net fruits, allowance being made for expenses 186 2, 61 | Perhaps ~one should make allowances for those who by reason 187 Suppl, 72| its substance contains no alloy of ~evil, as the Manichees 188 2, 147 | inebriating draught, because it allures the mind by its delight, ~ 189 1, 3 | this was the ~theory of the Almaricians. The third error is that 190 2, 109 | 6:2, "When ~thou dost an alms-deed sound not a trumpet before 191 2, 30 | Reply OBJ 3: The merit of an almsgiver depends on that in which 192 2, 171 | arrangements of the letters of the alphabet convey various ideas ~to 193 3, 28 | be taken for the wife of Alphaeus, whose son was ~James the 194 2, 98 | Presbyter, qu. iii, can. Altare]): "None of the faithful 195 2, 152 | woman who is not his own [ad alteram]," ~according to a gloss [* 196 Suppl, 88| is altered argues some ~alterant that is not altered, which 197 2, 85 | the universe, for which alternate generation and ~corruption 198 1, 10 | the flow of the "now" as alternating in aspect is time. But eternity ~ 199 2, 165 | and ~overcome by curiosity Alypius opened his eyes." But it 200 2, 82 | Mardochai refused to ~adore Aman fearing "lest he should 201 2, 149 | Jerome says [*Ep. cxlvii ad Amand. Cf. Gratian, ~Dist. xliv.], 202 Suppl, 92| word "endowment" (De Arte Amandi i, 538): "By ~whatever endowment 203 3, 31 | i.e. Ochozias, ~Joas, and Amasias, of whom St. Augustine asks 204 3, 31 | was succeeded by his son Amasius: after ~whom reigned his 205 2, 75 | about the wealth a man has amassed together. Thirdly, after 206 2, 85 | the people, than for the amassing of ~temporal goods: and 207 2, 41 | 1~Reply OBJ 5: He who is amazed shrinks at present from 208 2, 41 | judgment ~of that which amazes him, fearing to fall short 209 3, 8 | Christ therefore we are ambassadors, God, ~as it were, exhorting 210 Suppl, 65| accidentally that a person is ambidextrous, because our nature ~is 211 2, 79 | that term does not escape ambiguity when it is a question of 212 2, 129 | Macc. 4:7) that "Jason ~ambitiously sought the high priesthood." 213 Suppl, 88| deterioration was on a par with the amelioration which, it is said, will ~ 214 3, 85 | proper act is ~the purpose of amending what was committed against 215 2, 24 | ought not to deny them the amenities of ~friendship, so long 216 2, 25 | written (Prov. 18:24): ~"A man amiable in society, shall be more 217 2, 105 | and in order to promote an amicable ~feeling towards those out 218 2, 28 | 4), and Tully says (De Amicitia) that ~friends "like and 219 3, 31 | Elizabeth, daughter of Aminadab. It is therefore possible 220 2, 152 | in a useful and becoming amity; ~nor should one man have 221 2, 105 | commanded (Dt. 23:3) that "the Ammonite and ~the Moabite, even after 222 2, 105 | been hostile, such as the Ammonites and Moabites) were ~never 223 2, 23 | Thierry, De Nat. et Dig. Amoris. vi.] ~drew his assertion 224 2, 174 | speech, or it would have amounted to an illusion, since a 225 2, 77 | xiv, 28) that "self-love, ~amounting to contempt of God, builds 226 2, 116 | covetousness" has been amplified to denote all ~immoderate 227 1, 14 | intelligent beings has a ~greater amplitude and extension; therefore 228 2, 170 | reason effects much more amply in man, ~that which the 229 1, 118 | a man's hand or foot is amputated. But the "nutritive humor" 230 2, 64 | part (for instance, if he amputates a limb), or as a person ~ 231 2, 166 | rather than forego, such like amusements. Sometimes, however, it 232 2, 166 | try something novel or ~amusing, provided that joking be 233 3, 80 | communicate daily: hence Pope Anaclete says (Ep. i): "When the ~ 234 Suppl, 56| sacred font is called ~{anadochos} by Dionysius (Eccl. Hier. 235 1, 13 | simple ~univocation. For in analogies the idea is not, as it is 236 2, 14 | being, the process is ~not analytic, but synthetic: because 237 2, 14 | future: which is not an ~analytical process. Therefore the process 238 2, 14 | counsel seems to inquire and analyze."~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[14] A[ 239 3, 29 | Scriptures, too, shows that the ancestry of the men is always traced 240 2, 40 | that it is ~compared to an anchor (Heb. 6:19). But young men 241 1, 92 | Synod [*Super i can. Synod. Ancyr.]) ~that "an image is of 242 2, 116 | called ~illiberality [*{aneleutheria}] by the Philosopher.~Aquin.: 243 Suppl, 80| would he speak of natural [animale] bodies, as being ~changed 244 1, 1 | things, as is said in de Animalibus xi.~Aquin.: SMT FP Q[1] 245 1, 84 | itself - for ~instance, animality or humanity as existing 246 2, 62 | they be moved by private ~animosity.~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[64] A[ 247 2, 2 | see me again" [*Cf. Baron, Annal., A.D. 780]. If, ~however, 248 Suppl, 72| found them ~written in the annals of the Hebrews: and, indeed, 249 2, 155 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 2: The annexation of secondary to principal 250 2, 183 | that name. (Cf. Baronius, Anno ~Christi, 45, num. XLIV)] 251 2, 30 | with those who trouble and annoy us, and to ~pray for all, 252 2, 35 | remedies against certain annoyances; thus a man ~takes pleasure 253 2, 107 | greater ~danger and is more annoying to others, it is more repugnant 254 Suppl, 55| way of accusation for the annulment ~of a marriage contracted 255 Suppl, 71| of all he, " namely the anointer, "shares in the ~anointing 256 3, 71 | for instance, the priest ~anoints the baptized on the top 257 2, 148 | Decretals (Dist. xxxv, can. Ante omnia): ~"Drunkenness, more 258 2, 67 | after the tenth day [*Can. Anteriorum, caus. ii, qu. 6], ~nor 259 2, 186 | fell into the error of the ~Anthropomorphites, who thought that God had 260 2, 102 | branches, as Josephus observes (Antiquit. iii, ~7,8), to signify 261 Suppl, 71| another explanation. For Antissiodorensis [*William ~of Auxerre, Archdeacon 262 2, 156 | in a letter [*Ep. xii ad Anton. Monach.] that "to be angry 263 2, 181 | of Solomon . . . and the ~apartments of his servants, and the 264 2, 44 | in that folly implies ~apathy in the heart and dullness 265 2, 127 | i.e. love of honor, and {aphilotimia}, i.e. ~without love of 266 3, 5 | De Haeres. 49,50), "the Apollinarists ~thought differently from 267 3, 88 | following verse:~"Fratres odit, apostata fit, spernitque, fateri,~ 268 2, 85 | Cap. Cum sint, and Cap. Ad apostolicae, de Decimis, etc.]. The ~ 269 2, 64 | Haeres., haer. 40): "The ~'Apostolici' are those who with extreme 270 2, 11 | xxiv, qu. 3, can. Dixit Apostolus): "By no means should we ~ 271 2, 46 | causes anger; and somewhat appeases anger, in so far as the 272 2, 70 | putteth a fool to silence appeaseth anger." Therefore ~neither 273 1, 13 | v) that this relative ~appellation "Lord" is applied to God 274 3, 39 | Law, but also begin what appertained to the New ~Law. Therefore 275 2, 45 | has, to the purpose of appetition and operation. Hence prudence 276 2, 13 | portions of food ~equally appetizing and at an equal distance, 277 2, 2 | whereas the ~generous man is applauded." Therefore man's happiness 278 2, 28 | compass me about with ~apples; because I languish with 279 2, 96 | laws, ~but through being applications of general laws to particular 280 2, 32 | as it implies a present ~appraising of a future good, causes 281 3, 45 | Law, and of ~blasphemously appropriating to Himself the glory of 282 3, 15 | 34:23), "The Most High approveth not the gifts of the ~wicked." 283 Suppl, 72| to a height which can ~be approximately calculated from the height 284 2, 145 | is the fourth month from April (which they count as the 285 2, 38 | Augustine's works, but Can. Apud. Caus. xxiii, qu. 1]): ~" 286 1, 114 | and a passive soul," as Apuleius says, quoted by ~Augustine ( 287 2, 133 | everything. It is also ~called {apyrokalia}, i.e. lacking good fire, 288 Suppl, 38| Bacili." The rubric has "aquamanili." Some texts of the Summa 289 3, 74 | flour." Others, ~styled Aquarii, under guise of sobriety, 290 Suppl | THEOLOGICA OF ST. THOMAS AQUINAS GATHERED FROM HIS COMMENTARY 291 1, 87 | named ~Avempace [*Ibn-Badja, Arabian Philosopher; ob. 1183] taught 292 1, 78 | works ~translated from the Arabic, the separate substances 293 1, 1 | Paul quotes a saying of Aratus: "As some also of your own 294 3, 46 | buried close by Hebron and Arbe, as we read in the book 295 3, 59 | judge of quarrels and an arbiter of property, since ~He is 296 1, 82 | Although free-will [*Liberum arbitrium - i.e. free ~judgment] in 297 2, 182 | s permission ~resign his arch-deaconry or parish, and accept a 298 2, 105 | devil is shown ~to be the arch-murderer.~Aquin.: SMT FS Q[105] A[ 299 Suppl, 40| of Christ. Furthermore archbishops have the "pallium" in sign 300 2, 154 | principle [*{To beltiston, e arche}, 'the best thing, i.e. 301 2, 66 | may be seen when several arches aim at a fixed target.~Aquin.: 302 2, 74 | the Divine 'idea' as the archetype of the ~creature. Hence 303 2, 31 | their ~prelate: "Say to Archippus: Fulfil thy ministry [*Vulg.: ' 304 2, 45 | the ruler, in whom it is architectonic, as it were. Since then ~ 305 2, 1 | concerning God, exacting ~[arctans] our belief." Now belief 306 1, 20 | and therefore the more ardently desires to be freed ~from 307 2, 68 | heroic" or ~"divine virtue [*{arete heroike kai theia}]," in 308 1, 92 | authority quoted above (Arg. On the contrary).~Aquin.: 309 3, 18 | De Incarnat. ~et Cont. Arianos, written against Apollinarius]: " 310 2, 102 | brought them through the arid land of the wilderness to 311 3, 51 | position - namely, by Joseph of Arimathea, who was "a noble counselor," ~ 312 2, 28 | relates (Polit. ii, 1), "Aristophanes stated that lovers ~would 313 2, 10 | outside its own place. [*The Aristotelian theory was that fire's proper ~ 314 1, 31 | according to ~Boethius (Arithm. i, 23). Therefore in God 315 3, 83 | the (Fourth) Council of Arles: "They who do not keep proper 316 2, 187 | Augustine says (Ep. cxxvii ad Armentar. et Paulin.), "happy is 317 Suppl, 71| person himself, or another, arranges for his ~body to be buried 318 2, 86 | another way, ~namely, the array of the bridegroom and bride 319 Suppl, 75| body by ~death, but will be arrayed in the glory of the resurrection.~ 320 2, 110 | his haughtiness, and his arrogancy, ~and his pride, and the 321 2, 160 | every kind of pride of the arrogant betrays itself; either when 322 2, 97 | anyone contumaciously or arrogantly take away by force an escaped ~ 323 Suppl, 57| perfectly, and this is called "arrogatio," whereby the person ~adopted 324 3, 1 | head of a man" ~[*Horace, Ars. Poet., line 1]. But God 325 2, 185 | related of the Blessed ~Arsenius in the Lives of the Fathers ( 326 Suppl, 20| The fourth is the case of arson. The fifth is when it is ~ 327 3, 78 | is fixed ;. just as the art-form in the builder's mind is 328 2, 44 | account of the tracheal artery being near the heart. The 329 2, 87 | Summo Bono ii, 31): "However artful a man may be in wording 330 2, 1 | the Greek; ~for the Greek {arthron} [*Cf. William of Auxerre, 331 2, 1 | together are ~called the articulations of the limbs. Likewise, 332 2, 1 | which the ~Latin renders "articulus," signifies a fitting together 333 1, 92 | product of an art bears to the artistic species in the mind of ~ 334 2, 166 | affectation, but natural and ~artless movement." Therefore seemingly 335 3, 74 | sacrament. Some, known as the Artotyrytae, as Augustine says (De ~ 336 2, 93 | on the altars of demons, "aruspicy."~Aquin.: SMT SS Q[95] A[ 337 2, 93 | lots, for it is a means of ascertaining ~the divine will when a 338 2, 92 | Trismegistus [*De Natura Deorum, ad Asclep], as Augustine states (De 339 2, 94 | a serpent, like the deaf asp that stoppeth ~her ears, 340 2, 134 | the goods to which we had ~aspired by suffering. Hence Augustine 341 2, 95 | Lex ~Cornelia" concerning assassins, and so on, differentiated 342 2, 76 | severely ~punished if they assaulted anyone; having an eye, not 343 Suppl, 21| receives greater power ~of assaulting the excommunicated person, 344 Suppl, 26| Church; while the ~various assemblies, or parishes of one diocese 345 2, 113 | previously and ~afterwards he assented to the Baptism.~Aquin.: 346 2, 15 | Para. 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: "Assentire" [to assent] is, to speak, " 347 2, 76 | Decretal: 'Cum ~tu sicut asseris'): "Property accruing from 348 Suppl, 86| are said to judge. [*An ~"assessor" is one who "sits by" the 349 Suppl, 86| person is said to judge assessorially ~and by similitude, because 350 Suppl, 8 | in two ways. First, by an assiduous attention to their ~external 351 3, 62 | of good. But there is no assignable kind of being to which ~ 352 1, 92 | three, as though the first assignation ~were in part deficient.~ 353 Suppl, 83| it is that the fire will assimilate the bodies ~of the damned 354 2, 162 | Serm. in Dom. inf. oct. Assum. B. V. M.], ~because her 355 3, 35 | Augustine says (Serm. de ~Assumpt. B. Virg., [*Supposititious]), 356 1, 29 | is ~added, the idea of assumptibility is excluded from person; 357 2, 172 | in the ~early days of the Assyrian kingdom promises were made 358 2, 66 | collusion is like one who rides ~astraddle [varicator], because he 359 1, 32 | congruity of its results, as in astrology the theory of ~eccentrics 360 2, 35 | like manner we ~speak of astronomy and perspective as being 361 1, 113 | reason is taken ~from the astuteness of the devil. As to this, 362 2, 49 | this ~virtue are called {asynetoi}, i.e. "senseless."~Aquin.: 363 2, 140 | certain engagements: thus athletes and soldiers ~have to deny 364 2, 154 | a quick or choleric and atrabilious temper whose ~incontinence 365 2, 4 | above the capability of the ~attainer, so that he cannot have 366 2, 2 | powerful who is surrounded ~by attendants, whom he inspires with fear 367 2, 152 | account of the violence or attenuation of the evaporations. ~Nevertheless 368 Suppl, 55| cap. Super eo, De test. et attest.; ~cap. Literas, De juram. 369 2, 59 | of Aulus Gellius [*Noct. Attic. xix, 1], quoted by Augustine ( 370 2, 167 | ministers of the altar, are attired in more costly apparel than 371 1, 90 | animals. Moreover, such an attitude would quite hinder speech, ~ 372 1, 28 | to another involves the ~attribution likewise of whatever is 373 Suppl, 1 | matters, things are said to be attrite, when they are worn ~away 374 2, 30 | inasmuch as, so to speak, it ~attunes and conforms the appetite 375 2, 87 | Caus. XV, qu. 6, can. Auctoritatem, seqq.: Cap. Si vero, de ~ 376 Suppl, 55| Pope Alexander (cap. Ad audiendem, De spons. et ~matrim.) 377 2, 129 | Praetorium.' ~The Vulgate has 'auditorium,' but the meaning is the 378 2, 93 | which he is wont to divine [augurari]": and he himself afterwards ~ 379 2, 59 | because, in the words ~of Aulus Gellius [*Noct. Attic. xix, 380 2, 93 | avium garritu], just as "auspice" is derived from ~watching 381 3, 74 | wine, for its sweetness [*"Aut dulcis musti Vulcano ~decoquit 382 2, 95 | and then we have the ~"Authoritative legal opinions" [Responsa 383 2, 53 | vintage to the time ~of autumn. Accordingly if a man were 384 2, 7 | Quis, quid, ubi, quibus auxiliis, cur, quomodo, quando - ~ 385 2, 116 | Etym. x), "the covetous [avarus] ~man" is so called because 386 2, 116 | avaritia" is derived from ~"aveo" to desire; but the Greek { 387 2, 106 | the ~sin, makes man's will avers to sin: because the fear 388 2, 111 | irony arises from a man's averseness, ~albeit inordinate, to 389 2, 116 | certain greed for gold [aeris aviditas*], because, ~to wit, it 390 2, 116 | he is "greedy for brass [avidus aeris]," i.e. ~money: wherefore 391 2, 87 | Wherefore Augustine says (Ep. ad Avit.) [*Ep. ad ~Auxilium, ccl.], 392 2, 81 | Augustine in his letter to Avitus [*Ep. ad ~Auxilium ccl.], 393 2, 159 | First by ~acknowledging and avowing his own shortcomings; this 394 Suppl, 88| and travaileth in pain, awaiteth ~the revelation of the glory 395 2, 80 | things as are of a nature to ~awaken our love [*'Dilectio,' the 396 2, 7 | appreciate the prize which God awards to the ~just, while it is 397 2, 18 | contemplating: but their awe, lest it should be of a 398 2, 59 | and when they arise from awesome things, they must needs ~ 399 2, 187 | cure of ~souls, receives an awful warning in the words: 'My 400 2, 149 | destroyed'] all them that go awhoring ~from [Douay: 'are disloyal 401 2, 94 | says (De Hebdom.), certain ~axioms or propositions are universally 402 3, 25 | Regis: translation of Father Aylward, O.P.]~Therefore Christ' 403 Suppl, 93| aureole is the greatest. ~For Aymo, commenting on Apoc. 14: 404 1, 36 | spiritual wicked gostes of the ayre" ~(More, "Comfort against 405 3, 31 | after ~whom reigned his son Azarias, called Ozias; who was succeeded 406 2, 52 | written (Ecclus. 20:7): "A babbler and a fool ~[imprudens] 407 2, 37 | are turned aside into vain babbling," so too, schism is the ~ 408 3, 1 | under the frail ~body of a babe in swathing bands, in comparison 409 3, 36 | different stages of age from babyhood to youth, ~had neither eaten 410 2, 165 | wisdom and teaching of the Babylonians to be sinful, would never 411 2, 145 | is cold when Ceres and Bacchus are not there," that is 412 Suppl, 38| cruet to the acolyte. ~[*"Bacili." The rubric has "aquamanili." 413 2, 72 | 1/1~Reply OBJ 3: He that backbites his brother, seems to detract 414 2, 102 | certain men "had their backs towards the temple of the 415 2, 12 | that, Apostasy denotes a backsliding from God. This may happen ~ 416 3, 44 | on Jn. 18:6, "They went backward and fell to ~the ground," 417 2, 186 | who are ~commonly called Bactroperatae [*i.e. staff and scrip bearers], 418 3, 69 | another by his negligence baffles grace.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[ 419 2, 72 | the carnal sense offers a ~bait," which is the sin of thought; 420 2, 100 | 26:26, "Ten women ~shall bake your bread in one oven," 421 2, 93 | butler and of his chief ~baker (Gn. 40), and Daniel interpreted 422 3, 75 | bread, by the power of fire baking the matter made ~up of flour 423 2, 152 | 9) that Jacob went in to Bala and Zelpha the handmaids 424 Suppl, 13| satisfaction when the punishment balances the ~fault, since "justice 425 2, 38 | Balneum, from the Greek {balaneion}] . . . from the ~fact of 426 2, 102 | yourselves nor make any baldness ~for the dead." Therefore 427 Suppl, 72| alone, man would not be balked in his natural ~desire for 428 2, 38 | the ~bath had its name [*Balneum, from the Greek {balaneion}] . . . 429 2, 171 | likenesses, as happened to Balthasar ~(Dan. 5:5), such a man 430 2, 133 | vice ~is called in Greek {banausia}, so called from the Greek { 431 2, 93 | Standard-bearer, fix the ~banner, we had best stand here': 432 Suppl, 55| according to custom, the banns were published in church, 433 3, 83 | are to be placed in the baptistery, or in the walls, or else 434 3, 66 | He that washeth himself ~[baptizatur] after touching the dead, 435 3, 66 | understood in the word "baptizo" [I baptize], so ~that it 436 3, 84 | Blessed ~art thou Simon Bar-Jona: because flesh and blood 437 2, 56 | grammarian may be guilty of a barbarism or make a solecism: and 438 3, 50 | Tapsensis, De Trin. vi; ~Bardenhewer assigns it to St. Athanasius: 439 2, 98 | that he has acquired by the bargain, but shall forfeit the ~ 440 Suppl, 72| i.e. the elect, "into His barn, but the ~chaff," i.e. the 441 2, 2 | shalt see me again" [*Cf. Baron, Annal., A.D. 780]. If, ~ 442 2, 183 | hermit of that name. (Cf. Baronius, Anno ~Christi, 45, num. 443 2, 55 | speak of a court of law, a barrister at law, etc.], and yet ~ 444 2, 69 | spiritual things are not to be bartered with temporal ~things. But 445 3, 54 | bestowed on the blessed Bartholomew, that "if he wished he could 446 2, 98 | reclaim the money which he basely gave, ~although the other 447 2, 57 | common law; while "{gnome}" bases its judgment on the ~natural 448 Suppl, 45| maid is silent through ~bashfulness when her parents give her 449 1, 5 | of goodness which is the basic ~principle of its perfection.~ 450 2, 105 | common weal. ~For this reason bastards, by reason of their base 451 2, 38 | I had heard that the ~bath had its name [*Balneum, 452 3, 66 | Baptism is the washing or ~bathing.~Aquin.: SMT TP Q[66] A[ 453 2, 116 | deeds," and of ~those who "batten on whoredom, usurers, gamblers, 454 2, 136 | for walls yield to the battering-ram. ~Wherefore a man is not 455 2, 186 | said: "You know what great battles I and my brethren, and the 456 2, 133 | so called from the Greek {baunos}, ~because, like the fire 457 2, 184 | drawing their boats on ~to the beach, not as though they purposed 458 2, 38 | Apostle (Rm. 13:4): "He beareth not the sword in vain: for ~ 459 Suppl, 51| applies to it in all its bearings. Now error is of its very 460 2, 186 | uncouthness of mind; and this is beast-like. The other is ~with a view 461 1, 26 | who are called blesses [beati] by reason of the assimilation ~ 462 1, 105 | the light of glory by ~the Beatifier; all of which comes from 463 2, 173 | Hence this vision did not beatify him simply, so ~as to overflow 464 2, 48 | stings of its own anger beats quick, the body ~trembles, 465 Suppl, 71| of Auxerre, Archdeacon of Beauvais] (Sent. iv, Tract. 14) said 466 Suppl, 72| all the ~plants will be bedewed as it were with blood; on 467 2, 86 | you ~that you sinned with Beelphegor, and the stain of that crime 468 3, 43 | He ~cast out devils "by Beelzebub the prince of devils." Therefore 469 3, 80 | privation ~of everything taken before-hand by way of food or drink: 470 3, 84 | sin, when it is completed, begetteth ~death" (James 1:15). Consequently 471 2, 186 | rich, who in the world were beggars." But ~it is derogatory 472 2, 185 | thy Lord," i.e. Christ, ~"begged, thou amass other people' 473 2, 161 | though He who made them men, begrudged them the godhead . . ." 474 3, 8 | were before him were not beguiled into ~wickedness by him 475 3, 8 | mind ~interiorly, yet he beguiles it to evil by persuasion.~ 476 2, 63 | mockery even in the best behaved people." Now faith cannot 477 Suppl, 86| it is written concerning Behemoth or Leviathan, whereby ~the 478 2, 92 | the statue of his father Bel to be worshiped. Among the ~ 479 2, 185 | withal, lest your speech belie your habit." In both ~these 480 2, 108 | 1:11): "The ~mouth that belieth killeth the soul." Now mortal 481 2, 111 | irony, which consists in belittling oneself, is not ~a sin. 482 2, 179 | attentive" as Sallust observes [*Bell. Catilin., LI].~Aquin.: 483 2, 94 | Julius Caesar relates ~(De Bello Gall. vi).~Aquin.: SMT FS 484 2, 154 | the best principle [*{To beltiston, e arche}, 'the best thing, 485 3, 46 | read in the book of Jesus ~Ben Nave." But Jesus was to 486 3, 19 | its ~operation is to make benches. Hence the operation which 487 Suppl, 62| contains the rule (Can. Quod bene semel, ~Caus. vi, qu. iv): " 488 2, 25 | in ~the recipient of his benefaction, and the recipient some 489 2, 81 | according to Seneca (De Benefic. ii, 1), "nothing ~is bought 490 2, 97 | but with the intention of ~benefiting, the common good.~Aquin.: 491 2, 70 | belongs "benignity," for the benign are those in whom the salutary 492 2, 105 | The priestly office was bequeathed by succession from ~father 493 Suppl, 67| made for the children by bequeathing to them the inheritance 494 2, 84 | among the living, or by will bequeaths to the Church ~something 495 2, 129 | 25:27) that "Agrippa and Berenice . . . with great pomp ~[ 496 3, 70 | mother," a gloss says, that ~Bersabee's other baby boy did not 497 3, 21 | permanent, so the Saviour beseeches, ~that a slightly pressing 498 Suppl, 64| insistent, on account of the besetting danger.~Aquin.: SMT XP Q[ 499 3, 66 | are prize-fighters wont to besmear ~themselves with oil. Or, 500 3, 69 | with which it has been ~bespattered from its birth; but that


1003-bespa | beste-conse | consi-drops | dross-foste | fouln-inexo | inexp-megal | melan-penit | pepuz-refut | regai-socra | sodom-truth | tu-zone

Best viewed with any browser at 800x600 or 768x1024 on Tablet PC
IntraText® (V89) - Some rights reserved by Èulogos SpA - 1996-2007. Content in this page is licensed under a Creative Commons License